Tribune Almanach - Index of

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Tribune Almanach - Index of

CONTENTS.

Astronomical Departmkst ; pages.

Eclipses for 1S68 (none visible in the U. S.) 1

Aspects and Movements of the Planets 1

Transit of Mcrcur}'--Occulta;ions 1

Conjunction of Planets—Characters explained ; Cycles and

Church Days 2

Tide Table for 110 Places; Jewish and Mahometan Calen-

dars 3

Sixty-one Largest Stars— .Mornini,' and Evening Stars. . 4

IIow Surveyors may know the Variation of the Needle 4

Monthly Calendars—Showing Kisinp;, S-'ettin^', Ch.'.n~c3 of Sun

and Moon—Moon South, Planets on Meridian, &c 5 to 13

Political Department;

f°°THE TRIBUNE

Synopsis of Acts, Public llcsolulioris and Proclamations of

the Second Session of XXXIXlh Congress 19 to 29

Progress of Reconstruction in 1S07 29 to 83

The Reconstruction Acts 80

Progress of Impartial Suffrage

.'

33

The Vote on Impeachment 34.

United States Government, Ministers, &c 39

Senators and Representatives in the XLlh Congress 40 to 43

Election Returns for 186T in all tlie States and Territories,

with especially full statements of Registration and Voting

in the Southern States, all compared with former elec-

tions 43 to TO

States of the Union—Area, Population, Cai)itals Governors

Terms, Meeting of Legislature, and day of State Election, Tl

Foreign Countries—Area, Population, Rulers, Titles, Date of

Accession, Nature of Government, &c 12

Alexander J Schem, Compiler.

ANT) rOLITICAL REGISTER

FOR

1868.

ASSOCIATIOlTn

YORK, j-"^


GENERAL INDEX.

Astroiioinical, &7 Kentucky , 16

STATES OF THE INIOX Compensation to Civil offi- Louisiana 62

Area ; AVhite Population in cers 27 .Maine 13

]S50; White, Colored, In- David's Island, Purchase Maryland 48

dian, and Total Population Authorized 27 Massachusetts .59

in 1S60; Increase and Per- Disabled Volunteers, Asylum Michigan 55

centage of Increase of

I for -^ Min n esota 56

Ponulation from 1850 to JFie^dVcyrnsW.', TbHukit'o::]; Missis.sippi 63

isbd; Capitals; Governors, 'Kentucky Militia •>7 .Missouri 61

Salaries and Term of j

J H"" m edals to Soldiers 26 •Montana 69

Office: Time of Meeting of Kational Banking Associa- Nebraska 68

Legislatures; Time of State tion. 27 Nevada 67

Elections ^IjOcean Maiis'from San Fran- New Hampshire . , 43

ACTS OF CONGKESS. clsco to Portland, Oregon. .27 New Jersey 48

Albany a Port of Entry 26 Paris Exposition 26 New Mexico 69

Amnesty and Pardon lOiPayments to certain Officers New Y'ork 49-54

Appeals, Time defined 261 Prohibited 27 North Carolina 66

Army Appropriations 25, Pensions of Widows of Rev- Ohio 45

Army , Brev ets in 1 25 olutionary Soldiers 27 Oregon ftS

Bankruptcy Law 25, Post-office Site in New York. 27 Pennsylvania 14

Causes, Removal of from iPost-offlce and Sub-Treasury Rhode Island. . , 44

State Courts 26] Site iu Boston 27 South Carolina 64

( emeteries. National 21 Public Documents, Exchange Tennessee 59

Clerks of Honse, duties 1 of. . .21 of 27 Texas 61

Colored Volunteers lOiRelief for Southern People, a U tah 65

Coniponnd Interest Notes. . .26 Vessel sent 27 Virginia CtS

Convicts, Sentences miti- 'Ship Canal across Isthmus of Vermont , 44

gated 22' Darien 27 Washington 70

Copyrights 21 Scott, Gen., Equestrian W est Virginia 57

Cotton Tax 25 1 Statue of 27 Wisconsin 53

Court nf claims 21 rEocxAiiATioNS. Wyoming 6(5

Currency and Public becuri- lAmnosty Universal 2S orB NEW FUBOHASeS.

ties ....19 Civil Courts, Supremacy of. .28 .Aliaska 65

Drafted Men 22| Japan, Neutrality as to Civil St. Thomas 05

I'lducation, Department of. ..24' War in 27 vote for pkeside.vt.

Franchise in Dist. Columbia. I'.l Nebraska, Admission of 28 Popular Vole for President,

by Slates, in 186-1, 1860 and

1856 70

of 26 Tonnage on Hawaiian Ves- FOKEIGV COINTRIF.S.

Goneral of tile Army cannot i sels 2& The states of America and

be Removed 25' keooxstki ctjo.v i.v 1S67. liurope Names and Titles

Habeas corpus In Writs of iConstitutional Amendment, of Rulers and their Acces-

Error 20^ Vote on in all the Stales ...29 sion. Form of Government. 72

Franchise in Territories 19 Senate, Extra Session called.28

Freedman's Bureau, Funds Tonnage on French Vessels.. 27


TRIBUNE .4LMMC FOR 1868.

The Astronomical Calculations have been made expressly for this Almanac, by SAMUEL UAUT

WRIGHT, M. D., A. M., Penn Yan, N. Y.

Eclipses for tlie Year 1868.

There Tvill be only two Eclipses this year, both of the Sun, and neither of them visible In the

United States.

I. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun, February 23. Visible in South America, Africa, and

Southern Europe.

II. A Total Eclipse of the Sun, August IS. A'isible in Eastern Africa, Southern Asia, and in

Australia.

A Tkassit of Mkrcurt over the Sun's disc, will occur November 6. Invisible in the United

States.

Tlie Planets.

Uerccky ( r ) will be at the most favorable stations for visibility, February 17, June 13, and

October 9, being then Evening Star, and appearing in the vrcst just after sunset; also April 7

August 5, and November 34, being then Morning Star, and appearing ia the east just before


sunrise.

Venus (?) will be in the constellation Capricornus until January 20, then in Aquarius until

February 15, being directly south of the Urn January 23. It passes the equinoctial February 15,

rising exactly on the east point of the horizon, and setting squarely in the west. It will be in

Pisces from this time to March 12, then in Aries until April C. On the 4th of April it will be 2°

south of the brightest star in the Pleiades. April 14 it will be S' north of Aldebaran, and on the

25th it -irill be 2° 22' south of 3 Tauri. It passes the solstitial colure May 4, and will be farthest

north May 6. May 7 it reaches its greatest eastern elongation from the Sun, 45° 01'. On the 2Gth

it will be 7° south of Castor, and on the 30th it will be A" south of Pollux. June 9 it will be

brightest; after which it approaches the Sun, and daily loses its splendor. June 23 it becomes

stationary, having been moving direct, or eastward, since its last superior conjunction, but now it

begins to retrograde, and is situated a little southwest of the ncbulm in Cancer. It passes Pollux

again July 18, 12° 2S' to south of it ; but this will not be visible, as Venus will be in inferior con-

junction with the Sun on the IGth, and itself invisible. It now moves off from the Sun westward

apparently, and increases in beauty as a morning star. On the 7th of August it becomes station-

ary again, and begins to pass the stars eastward, and reaches its greatest splendor again on the

21st. On the 25th of September it reach«s its greatest western elongation, 4G' 9'. October 6 it will

be 1° soutl of Regulus. November 7 it crosses the Equator southward; November 21 4° north

of Spica; December 10. enters Libra's Square; and on the loth is near the middle of it- Decem-

ber 29, C° 12' north of Antares.

JIars ( 5 ) will come to the meridian during the daylight for the first nine months of the j'ear.

It has no opposition this year, and will not be an object of much interest until near the close of

the year. November 27 it will be 2° north of Kegulus in the handle of the Sickle. It will be near

the Sickle during November and December.

Jupn-ER (y) has been traveling northward since May 8, 1865, and on the first day of May it

crosses the Equator, and rises exactly in the east at 3h. 32m. mom. It will be southeast of the

Urn in the first part of the year, but directly east of it May 1. October 1 it will be brightest and

in opposition to the Sun, rising at sunset and setting at sunrise. On the 8th of April it will be

very close to Mars.

Satcrn ( ^ ) will be in opposition May 23, and brightest, rising as the Sun sets, and setting as

the Sun rises. It will be in the region 10° or 12° north of Antares all of the year.

OccpLTATioNS.—The Moon wiU occult or eclipse the bright star a Tauri, or Aldebaran, January

7, at Ih. 17m. mom., at Washington, the star reappearing at 2h. 30m. The same star will also be

occulted again November 29, at 5h. 54m. eve., at Wasliiagton, and reappear at 6h. 51m. eve.

These occultations are interesting to witness


THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 186&


THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868.

New aud Valuable Tide Table for 110 Places.

To fini the time of hifrh-water at any of the places named in the following table, add time

indicated in the first column of figures to the time of "Moou South," found in the calendar

pages. If the result, is more than 12 hours from noou, the time will be the next day in ihe

morning, acd ii more (ban 12 hours from midnight, the time will bo in the atternoon of the

same day. The tide thus found is the first after tiio Moon's culaiinatioa. The second tide

occurs 12 hours and 23 minutes later than the first.

Noe'east Coast.

Hanni well's Point

Portland

Portsmouth

Newburyport

Rockport

Salem

l?oston Light

Boston

Ph-mouth

AVellfieet ...!

Provencetown . .

. I

Monomoy

Nantucket

Hyannis

Edgartown

Holmes' Hole

Tarpaulin Cove ..i

Wood's Hole (N.)

Wood's Hole (S.).

Menemsl'a Light, i

Quick's Hole (N.)i

Quick's Hole (S.).

Cuttyhnuk

Kettle Cove

Bird Island Light


New Bedford

Newport ;

Point Judith

Blocl: Island

Monlauk Point...

*

Sandy Hoo'.i

New York

HUDSOX KlVEB. '

Dobli's Ferry

Tarrvtown

Verpl a n ck 's Point

West Point

Ponghkeepsie

Tivoli

Stnyvesant


THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 186a

-a?

A Table of Sixty-one ISrlsht Stars.

To ascertain when any Star or constellation found in tlie following Table will be on the upper

meridian, odtJ the numbers opposite in the left-hand column of fif.iires to the time of *' t>ider«a.l

Noon" found in the calendar pa},'es. For the rislng of a t^tar, ««J


1st Month.] JAlVXJAIS^y, ISOS. [31 Days.

I*liases of the 310011.

|


2d Month.] FEBKiTJA-RY, ISGJ^. [29 Days.

JPliases of the M.oon. |


3d Month.] IM^kKCH, 1S6J55. [31 Days.

riTLases of the Mioon.

MOON. BOSTON. I

1st Quar.

Full . . .

.

3d Quar.

]S'ew . . .

1st Quar.

N. YORK. 'WASH'TONi

5 m. 11 53 ev.|ll 41 ev.

3 38 ev. 3 26 ev 3 14 ev.

10 45 ev. 10 33 ev, 10 21 ev.!

2 15 m. 2 3 m 1 51 m.

I

"Z 41 m. I T 29 m T 17 m.

Jupiter

South.


4th Montli.]


5th Month.]


6tli Month.] JXJIVE, ISOS. [30 Days, j


7tli Month.] JUJL,-Y, ISOS. [31 Days.

riiases of tlie ]>Xoon.

MOON.


Sth Month.] A.XJOXJSX, ises. [31 Days.


9'tii Month.] J^Er»TE3J[BEIi, ISG*^. [80 Days.

Ptiases of tlxe 3Ioon.

YORK. WASH'TON

Full 1,11 13 ev. 11 lev. 10 49 ev.

Sd Quar.) 91

New |l6

5 20 ev.

8 35 m.

5 8 ev.

8 23 m.

4 56 ev.

8 11 m.

1st Quar. ,23 10 38 m. 10 26 m. 10 14 m.

D.

1


10th Month.] OCTOBEK,, lSe». [31 Days.

I*lia.ses of


^th Month.] NOVEIMEBER, l??«e@. [30 Days.

I»liases of tlie ^loon.

MOON.

SdQuar.j 1

K^ew .... 14

j

1st Quar. 22

Full ....129

BOSTON.

9 3 m. j

6 11 m. I

2 2 in. I

8 16 ev.'

N.


12tli Month.] I>ECE3I:BER, 1SG8. [31 Days.


I Some

CU^S thia question Is

C^ often asked us,

we with pleasure give

a little history of her.

twenty years

ago, a lady in New

York City observed

that her hair was

rapidly losing its

natural color, and

getting quite gray,

and, disliking the

idea of becoming

gray, and equally

averse to using any

dye (knowing them

to be injurious), con-

cluded that she would

try and invent some-

thing that would re-

store her hair to its

original life color

and, by dint of study

and perseverance in

experimenting, she

succeeded in finding

that the articles that

she had compounded

woiUd not only re-

store the hair to its

original color, but

also render it pliable,

and give it the nat-

oral moistness that a

;

Tt'^'-a^tCrow^MV.^^""'^^'

IS THE

IRRESTO^g

»)ftlTE

healthy head of hair

should have. This

was even more than

she had hoped for,

and, without the

slightest Intention at

first of making a busi-

ness of it, she was

actually forced to

commence making It

for sale, by the num-

ber of persons of hor

acquaintance and

others, whom her ac-

quaintances had In-

formed of the re-

markable change in

her hair, calling at

her residence to pro-

cure the article ; and

she now probably

does one of the larg-

est cash businesses

in the City of New

York. Owing to the

large demand from

foreign countries, she

has been obliged to

establish a depot for

the exclusive sale of

her Hair Preparations

In London, at

266

High Holborn

Principal Manufactory and Sales Office,

198 & 200 GREENWICH ST., NEW YORK.


niversal Exposition, ^aris,

The First Gra:

1867.

TRIUMPHANT,

KATTSO B2ES AWAIIDED

for American Grand, Square, and rpri^ht Plan"": tb;:i Medal bcln;? nistincth- cla?sified _;?;•."/ in

order of Merit, nrer all other American exhibitors, and over more than 400 Pianos entered by

nearly all the celebrated manufacturers of Europe. In proof of which the foUovring

OFFICI.4L, CEKTIFICATE

of the President and Members of the International Jury on Musical Instruments (Class X) is

eabjoined

Paris, July 20, 1867.

I certify that the First Golb Medal for American Pianos lias b»en unanimously awarded to

Messrs. Stelnwav by the Jurv of the International Exposition.

Rrst on the list "in Class X.

MiXKET, President of International Jury.

^,

;

* Ge'jrges Kastker, "i

AMB.noiSK Thomas,

Ed. Hanslice,

F. A. Gevaert,

J. ScmEDMAl-ER,

STEimW^AY sor

Members

of the

International Jury.

This unanimous fieclsion of the International Class Jurj-, eTvdomed by the Supreme Group

Jnr}-, and ajfirmed by the Imperial Commission, being f7ie jinal verdict of the only tribunal

determining the rank of the awardi at the Exposition, places Taa Stkiswat Piaso3 at Tua hkab

OF AIX OTHTiKS.

Tlie " Societc des Beaux Arts,"

(Society of Fine Arts, of Pari', known throughout Europe as one of the highest authorities on

Music and A.rt Matters) unani'inously awarded their only annual Testimonial Medal for 186T to

Steinwat & Sons, for the highest degree of perfection, most valuable inventions, and as exhibiting

the greatest progress in the art of Piano-making above all other e.xhibitors, at the Universal Exposition

at Paris.

were also awarded a FinST PRIZE MEDAL at the great International Exhibition, London, 1862,

for powerful, clear, brilliant, and sj-mpathetic tone, with excellence of workmanship as shown in

Grand and Square PIANOS, in competi'ion with 269 Pianos from all parts of tlie world.

STEINWAY & SON'S, in addition to the above, have taken thirty-five First Premiums, Gold

and Silver Medals, at the principal Fairs held in this country from the year 1S55 to ls62 inclusive,

since which time they have not entered their Pianofortes at any Local Fair in the United States.

Every Piano is warranted for Fire Years.

WAREROOMS, FIRST FLOOR OF STEINWAY HALL,

Nos. 109 and 111 East Fourteenth Street,

NETV YOBK.

(Bstween 4tli Avenne and Irving Place,)




THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868. 19

ACTS OF CONGRESS.

SYNOPSIS OP THE PRINCIPAL ACTS PASSED AT THE SECOND SESSION OF THE

TUIUTY-NINTII CONGRESS.

Chap. VT.— 77i« Elective Fravchise in the

District of Columbia.—Regulates the elective

franchise in the District of Columbia. Sec. 1.

Confers the elective franchise on male citizens

of the United States, 21 years and upward, without

distinction on account of race or color, who

shall have resided in the District one year next

preceding any election therein, excepting paupers,

persons under guardianship, those con- :

victed of any infamous crime or offense, and

those who may have voluntarily given aid and

comfort to the Rebels in the late Rebellion. ;

t-EC. 2. Provides that any person whose duty it

shall be to receive votes at any election within ;

the District of Columbia, who shall reject the

vote of any person entitled to vote under this

act, shall be liable to an action of tort by the

person injured, and on indictment and conviction,

to a fine not exceeding $5,000, or to imprisonment

not exceeding one year in the jail of

the Diftrict, or both. Skc. 3. Provides that any

one willfully disturbing an elector in the exercise

of such franchise shall be guilty of a misdemeanor,

and on conviction, shall be liable to a

fine not exceeding $1,000, or an imprisonment

not exceeding thirty days in the jail of

the District, or both. Sec. 4. Makes it the duty

of criminal courts in the District to give this

act In special charge to the grand jury at the

common circuit of each term of the coUrt. Slc.

5 and 6. The voting lists are to be prepared by

the mayors and aldermen of the cities of ^yaEhington

and Georgetown on and before the first

day of March in each year, and are to be posted In

public places ton days before the annual election.

The remaining four sections give other prescriptions

as to the manner in which the election shall

be held. [The President of the United States

having returned the bill to the Senate with his

objections thereto, the bill was passed over the

veto by a two-thirds vote of the Senate and the

the times for the regular meetings of Congress.

I'rovides that in addition to the present regular

times of meeting of Congress, there phall be a

meeting of the XLth Congress of the United

States, and of each succeeding Congress thereafter,

at 12 o'clock, meridian, on the 4th day of

March, the day on which the term begins for

which the Congress is elected, except that when

the 4th of Jlarch occui-s on Sunday, then the

meeting shall take place at the same hour on

the next succeeding day. No person who was a

member of the previous Congi-ess shall receive

any compensation ;i8 mileage for going to, or

returning from, the additional session provided

for by this act. [Jan. 22, 18G7.]

Cinp. XV —Electire Franchise in the Territories.—Provides

that from and after the passage

of this act, there shall be no denial of the

elective franchise in any of the Territories of

the United Slates, now, or hereafter to be organized,

to any citizen thereof, on account of race,

color, or previous conditi(>n of servitude, and

all acts or pai-ts of acts, either of Congress or

the Legislative Assemblies of said Territories,

inconsistent with tjae provisions of this act are

declared null and void. [This act was received

by the President on Jan. 14, and not being

returned within ten days, became a law on Jan.

24, 1S8T.]

Chap. XXVI.


Pnlilie Securities and Cur-

rencif.—Provides penalties for certain crimes in

relation to the public securities and currency,

and for other puriioses. Sec. 1 provides that if

any person shall buy, sell, etc., any false, forged,

counterfeited or altered obligation or security of

the United States, or circulating note of any

banking association organized or acting under

the laws of the United States, with the intent

that the same shall be passed, altered, published

or used as true tnd genuine, such person

shall be deemed guilty of felony, and on convic-

House of Representatives, Jan. 7 and 8, 1867.] tion thereof shall be imprisoned not more than

Cn.\p. VII. Servians or' Colored Volunteers. ten years, or fined not exceeding $5,000, or both,

—Suspends the payment of moneys from the at the discretion of the court. Sec. 2 provides

Treasury as compensation to persons claiming that it shall not be lawful to make, or to use, any

the service or libor of colored volunteers or business or professional card, notice, placard,

drafted men, and for other purposes. [Jan. 14, circular, hand-bill, or advertisement, in the like-

1867.]

ness or similitude of any obligation or security

Chap. TTII.—Arane-fty and Pardon.—Re- of the United States, or of any banking associapeals

the authority of the President to proclaim tion organized or acting under the laws thereof;

amnesty and pardon conferred upon him by sec- and any person offending against the provisions

tion 13 of "An act to suppress insurrection, etc., of this section shall be subject to a penalty of

approved July IT, 1SG2. [This act was presented $100, to be recovered by an action of debt, one-

to the President on Jan. 9, and not being rehalf to the use of the informer. Sec. 8 imposes

turned bv him within ten days, became a law a penalty of $100, one-half to the use of the

on Jan. 19, 1S6T.]

informer, upon the printing of any business

Ch.vp. IX. Penitentiaries in the Terri- card or notice on any United States security.

tories.—Sets aside net proceeds from Internal Sec. 4, 5, 6, 7, punish with imprisonment not

Revenue of the Territories of Nebraska, Wash- more than ten years, or with a fine not exceedington,

Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Arizona, and ing five thousand dollars, or both, any person

Dakota, for three years (ending June 80, 1S68), making impressions upon any material by any

for the erection of penitentiary buildings. [Jan. tool used in printing, or in making other tools to

52,1867.]

be used in printing any security to be issued by

Chap. X Meeting* of Congreee.— Fixes or for the United States ; for any persop having



20 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868.

In possession, without authority and with intent

to defraud, any inipression of any tool used or

Intended for printing any security to be issued

by or for the United States ; for any person secretin?,

carrj"ing away, erson taking,

Ac.,' without authority, any material prepared

and intended to be used in making such stamps

or cun-ency, or printed, in whole or in part, and

intended for circulation and use as such ciu-rency

; for any person Uiking, without authority,

from any place of deposit, ;iny paper prepared or

intended for use to procure the payment of money

from, or allowance of ciiums against, the

United States, whether such has or has net been

used, or such claim has or has not been allowed ;

for any person using or attempting to use any

such paper [Feb. 5, 1SG7.]

Chap. XXVII. 1/ahea.i Corpus and Certain

Judicial Proceed'ivgs.—Amends "An Act to

amend an act entitled 'An Act relating to habeas

corpus, and regulating judicial proceedings in

certain cases,' " approved May 11, 1SC6. AVhen

in any suit begun in a State court and removed

to the circuit court of the United Stales, the defendant

is in actual custody under the State process,

the ckrk of the circuit court shall issue a

habeas corpus cum causa. The marshal shall take

the body and file duplicate copy with the clerk

of the State coiirt. Attachments, bail, &c., shall

continue in full force. [Feb. 5, ISCT.]

Chap. XXVUI.—Judicial Proceeding/!, Habeas

Corp)'% Wrda of En-or.—Amends "An

Act to establish the judicial courts of the United

States," aoproved Sept. 2-t, 17^9. Sec. 1. Provides

that the Courts of the United Slates, in addition

to the authority already conferred bylaw,

shall have power to grant writs of habeas corpus

In all cases where any person may be restrained

of liberty in violation of the Constitution, or of

any treaty or law of the United States, and directs

in what manner the writ shall be applied

for and return made thereof. If any person

to whom such writ of habeas corpus may be directed

shall refuse to obey the same, or shall

neglect or refuse to mate return, or shall make

a false return thereto, in addition to the remedies

already given by law, he shall be deemed and

taken to be guilty of a misdemeanor, and shall

on conviction before any Court of competent

jurisdiction, be punished by fine not exceeding

$1,000, and by imprisonment not exceeding one

year, or by either, according to the nature and

aggravation of the case. From the final decision

of any Judge, Justice, or Court inferior to the

Circuit Court, an appeal may be taken to the

Circuit Court of the United States for the district

in which said cause is heard, and from the

judgment of said Circuit Court to the Supreme

Court of the United States, and on such terms

and under such regulations and orders, as well

for the cus'^ody and appearance of the person

alleged to be restrained of his liberty, as for

sending up to the appellate tribunal a transcript

of the petition, writ of habeas corpus, return

thereto, and other proceedings, as may be prescribed

by the Supreme Court, or in default of

such, as the Judge hearing such cause may prescribe;

and pending such proceedings or appeal.


and until final judgment be rendered ,

therein, and

after final judgment of discharge in the same,

j

any proceeding against such person la any State

\

\ Court, or by or under the authority of any State,

for any matter or thing so heard and ;

determined

' by virtue of such writ of habeas corpus, shall be

deemed null and void. Sec. 2. Determines for

what causes AVrits of Error from the Supreme

Court of Ihe United States may be issued, how

the citation shall be signed, and what eCfect the

writ shall have. [Feb. 5, 1SC7.]

CiiAP. XXXU. Pcnisions.—I'rovides for pay-

ment of jieasions. The President of the United

States shall be authorized to establish agencies for

the payment of pensions granted by the United

States, and to appoint all pension agents, who

shall hold their oliices for the term of four years,

and who shall give bond for such amount and in

such form as the Secretary of the Interior may

approve. The number of pension agencies in

any State or Territory shall, in no case, be increased

hereafter so as to exceed three, and

no such agency shall be established in addition

to those now existing, in any State or Territory

in which the whole amount of pensions paid,

during the fiscal year next preceding, shall not

have exceeded the sum of $500,000. The term

of ofiice of all pension agents appointed since

July 1, 1?G6, shall expire at the end of 80 days

from the passage of this act ; and the commissions

of all other pension agents now in office

shall continue for four years from the passage of

this act, unless such agents are sooner removed.

[Feb. 5, 1S67.]

Chap. XX.XIT.—Srnitlisonian In-ffitvi'on.—

Authorizes the Secretary of the Treasury to

receive into the Treasury, on the same terms

as the original bequest, the residuary legacy

of James Smithson. now in United States bonds,

namely: twenty-six thousand two hundred

and ten dollars and sixty -three cents, together

with such other sums as the regents may from

time to time see fit to deposit, not exceeding,

with the original bequest, the sum of one million

dollars, and provides that the increase which has

accrued, or which may hereafter accrue, from

said residuary legacy, shall be applied by the

Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution

in the same manner as the interest on the original

bequest, in accordance with the provisions of

the act of Aucrust 10, 1646, establishing said Institution.

[Feb. 8, 1SC7.J

Chap. XXXVI.

Acimtsxion of the State of

XebrafJca.—.Vdmits the State of Nebraska into

the Union. Sec. 1. Ratifies the Constitution and

State Government which the people of Nebraska

have formed for themselves, and admits the State

into the Union. Sec. 2. Declares tlie State of Nebraska

entitled to all tlie rights, privileges, grants,

and immunities, and subject to all the conditions

and restricticns cf the enabling act, approved

April 19, liOt Sec. 3. Provides that this act

shall not take effect except on the condition that

there be within the State cf Nebraska no denial

of the elective franchise, or of any other right, i

to any person, by reason of race or color, except- i

ing Indians not taxed, and upon the further 1

condition that the Legislature cf said State shall I

by a solemn public act, declare 'he assent of the I

State to the said condition ; upon receipt of an

authentic copy whereof the President shall issue

a proclamation announcing the fact, whereupon



the said condition shall be held as part of the

org-anic law of the State, and thereupon without

further proceedings of Congress the admission

of said State shall be considered complete.

[Passed over the President's veto, Tcb. 9, IbO".]

Chap. XLII.—Smugglinij. — Supplements an

act to prevent smuggling, and for other purposes,

approved July 1, 1SG6. Declares that said act

shall be so construed as not to aCect any right of

prosecution which may have accrued under acts

of Congi-ess prior to said act, and all suits or

prosecutions as have been or shall be commenced

under such prior a;t3 for acts committed previous

to July, 1SG6, shall be tried and disposed

eral acts respecting copyrights. Provides that

every proprietor of a book, pamphlet, map,

chart, musical composition, print, engraving, or

photograph, for which a co[)jTight shall have

been secured, who shall fail to deliver a printed

copy of every such book, Ac, within one month

after publication thereof shall, fcr every such

default, be subject to a penalty of $25, to be collected

by the librarian of Congress in the United

States in any District or Circuit Court of the

United States within the jurisdiction of which

the delinquent may reside. Such matter may be

transmitted free of postage if the words " copyright

matter" be plainly written on the outside,

and postmasters shall cive receipt for the same

if requested. [Feb. 1S,'1SC7.]

Chap. XLV.—Alhghenij Arsenal.—Authorizes

the purchase of certain lots of ground adjoining

the Allegheny Arsenal, at Pittsburgh, Pa.

[Feb. IS, 1 SOT.]

Chap. XLVI.—League Island. — Authorizes

the Secretary of the Navy to accept League

Island, in the Delaware River, for naval purposes,

and to dispense with and dispose of the

site of the existing vard at Philadelphia. [Feb.

18, 1S67.]

Chap. LTI.— Cleric cf Tlowie, of Bepresentatives.—Kegulates

the duties of the Clerk of the

House of PLepresentatives in preparing for the organization

of the House, and for other purposes.

Provides that before the first meeting of the

next Congress, and of every subsequent Congress,

the Clerk of tlie next preceding House of

Representatives shall make a roll of the Representatives

elect, and place thereon the names of

all persons claiming seats as Representatives

elect from States which were represented in the

next preceding Congress, and of such persons

only, and whose credentials show that they were !

regularly elected in accordance with the laws of I

'

their States respectively, cr the laws of the Unit-

ed States. In case of a vacancy in the office of I

Clerk of the House of Representatives, or of ab-

|

sence or inability to discharge his duties relative I

to the preparation of the roll or organization- of i

the House, said duties shall devolve on the Ser-

|

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S68. SI

geant-at-arms of the next preceding House of

Representatives ; and in case of vacancies in

both of the aforementioned oflices, or the absence

[

or inability of both the Clerk and Sergeant-at-

Arms to act, then the said duties shall be performed

by the Doorkeeper of the next preceding

House of PLepresentatives. [This act was presented

to the President on Feb. 9, and not being

returned within ten days, became a law on

Feb. 19, ISt!'.]

Chap. LVII.—Court of ClaijiW!. — Declares

the sense of an act of Julj' 4, 1864, entitled "An

Act to restrict the jurisdiction cf the court of

I

[

'

[

I

claims, and to provide for the payment of cerof,

and judgment or decree executed, as if said tain demands for quartermasters' stores, and

act had not been passed. Authorizes the Secre- subsistence supplies furnislied to the army of the

tary of the Treasury to make such regulations as United States." Provides that chapter 240 of the

shall enable vessels engaged in the

I

coasting actsof theX.XXVIIIth Congress shall not be contrade

between ports and places upon Lake Mich- stnied toauthorizethesettlementof any claimfor

igan exclusively, and laden with American pro- supplies taken or damage doi;e by the military auductions

and free merchandise only, to unload thorities or troops of the United States, where such

their cargoes without previously obtaining a per- claim originated during the war fcr the suppresmit

to unload. Amends sectiou 25 of said act by sion of the Southern Rebellion in a State, or part of

I

inserting the word "March" in the place of a State,declared in insurrection by the proclama-

"July." [Feb. IS, 1SG7.]

i tion

CuAP. XLIIL Copyrighlit.—Amends the sev-

of the President of the United States, dated

July 1 , 1862, or in a State which by an ordinance

of secession attempted to withdraw from the Unit^

ed States Government. Nothing herein contained

shall repeal or modify the ellect of any act or

joint resolution, extending the provisions of the

said act of July 4, 1&G4, to the lojal citizens of

the State of Tennessee, or of the State of West

Virginia, or any county therein. [This act was

presented to the President on Feb. 9, was not returned

within ten davs, and therefore became a

law on Feb. 19, 1SC7.]

Cn.i.p. LIX.— Congressional Printer.—Provides

for the election of a Congressional printer.

ITie Senate shall elect a practical printer to manage

the Government Printing 03':ce. He shall

be deemed an officer of the Senate and designated

Congressional Printer, and shall in all respects

be governed by the laws in force in relation to

t!ie Superintendent of Public Printing, and the

execution of the printing and binding. Sec. 8.

Abolishes the oflice of the Superintendent of

Public Printing and establishes the salary of the

ConErressional Printer at $4,000 a year. [Feb.

22, ISGT.]

Chap. LXL—27'afi(mal Cemeteries.—An act

to establish and to protect National Cemeteries.

Provides that the National Cemeteries for the

burial of deceased soldiers and sailors shall be

Inclosed with a good stone or iron fence, and each

grave marked with a headstone. At the principal

entrance of each a porter's lodge shall be

erected, and a Superintendent appointed by the

Secretary of War from enlisted men of the army

disabled in sei-vice, who shall have the pay and

allowances of an ordnance sergeant, and shall

reside therein to guard the cemetery. The Secretary

of War shall detail an officer annually to

inspect all of said cemeteries, and report their

condition. Sec. .3. Provides for the punishment

of any person who shall do injury to any monument,

&c., or trees, shrubs, Ac. "Secs. 4. 5, and

6. Provide for the purchase of lands needed for

t!ie purposes of tnis act. Sec. 7. Appropriates

{'750,000 for carrying into effect the provisions of

this act. [Feb. 22, 1SG7.]

Chap. LXII.—Soldiers' and Sailors' Or'

phan Home.—Amends an act entitled " An act


— —

22 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC TOE 1868.

to incorporate the National Soldiers' and Sailors'

Orphan Home," approved July a5, IbCB. Parents

and guardians may withdraw children, and

minora over sixteen shall be discharged on their

written request. [Feb. 22, 1 SOT.]

CuAP. L\X\ni.—Smiii!y/i)iy.—Amentia the

21st section of an act entitled "An act further to

prevent snui'^^Ung and for other purposes," approved

July 18, ibOG, by providing that said section

shall not api)ly to any case where the said

towing in whole or in partis witluu or upon foreign

waters, and that any foreign railroad company

or corporation, whose road enters the

United States by means of a ferry or tug boat,

may own such boat, and it shall be subject to no

other or diliereut restrictions or regulations in

such employment, than if owned by a citizen of

pUots licensed by the insiiectors of steam vessels

vessels of other countries and public vessels of

the United States only excepted. [Feb. 25, 1SC7.]

Chap. C.—Militafy A cadem i/.—Makes _ appropriations

for the support of the Military

Academy for tlie fiscal year ending June SO,

l&OS, and for other purposes. Sec. 4. Declai-es

that no part of the moneys appropriated by this

or any other act shall be applied to the pay or

subsistence of any cadet from any State declared

to be in rebellion against the Government of the

United States, appointed alter the first day of

January, 18G7, until such State shall have been

restored to its original relations to the Union.

[Feb. 28, 1S07.]

Chap. CII.—Draftd Men.—Makes provision

for the relief of certain drafted men. The Secretary

of War is authorized to refund to each

person drafted who paid commutation, and was

alro required to enter the service or furnish a

substitute, the sura of $300. Sec. 2. Authorizes

the Secretary of War to refund from the commutation

money the amount (.not exceeding $300 in

;

— —

any one case) paid by any person draft«d during }

the late war who furnished a substitute or paid

commutation money wherever it shall appear

that under the decisions and rules of the War

Department governing at the time, the said person

was entitled to discharge from the obligation

to render personal service under the draft, for

which he paid money or furnished a substitute, !

and to refund in like manner, in all cases wherein

it shall 1

appear that a person so having paid

commutation money or furnished a substitute, i

was not legally liable to draft :

Pi-ovide


Chap. CLIIL — Government of the JRebel

Statu,—An Act to provide efficient government

for the insurrectionary States.

Wherefis, No legal State governments or adequate

protection for liTe or property now exist in

the Rebel States of Virginia, North Carolina,

South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi,

Louisiana, Florida, Texas, and Arkansas; o.id

uhere/">, it is necessary that peace and good

order should be enforced in said States until loyal

and republican State governments can be legally

established ; therefoi'e

Be it enacted, ic. That said Rebel States

Bhall be divided into military districts and made

subject to the military authority of the United

States, as hereinafter mentioned ; and for that

purpose Virjrinia shall constitute the First District,

North Carolina and South Carolina the Second

District, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida the

Third District, Mi'^si^sippi and Arkansas the

Fourth District, and Louisiana and Texas the

Fifth District.

Sec. 2. That it shall be the duty of the President

to assign to the command of each of said

districts an officer of the army not below the

rank of Brigadier-General, and to detail a sufficient

military force to enable such officer to

perform his duties and enforce his authority

within the district to which he is assigned.

( EC. 3. That it shall be the duty of each officer

assigned as aforesaid to protect all persons in

their rights of person and property, to suppress

Insurrection, disorder, and violence, and to punish

or cause to be punished all disturbers of the

public peace and criminals ; and to this end be

may allow local civil tribunals to take jurisdiction

of and try offenders, or, when in his judgment

it may be necessary for the trial of offenders,

he shail have power to orpranize military

committees or tribunals for that purpose ; and all

interference under color of State authority with

t)ie exercise of military authority under tuis act

shall be null and void.

Sec. 4. That all persons put under military arrest

by virtue of this act shall be tried without

unnecessary delayj and no cruel or unusual punishment

shall be inflicted, and no sentence of

any military commission or triliucal hereby authorized

affecting the life or liberty of any person

shall be executed until it is approved by the

officer in command of the district ; and the laws

and regulations for the government of the army

shall not be affected by this act, except in so far

as they may conflict with its provisions. Pro-

-vided, That no sentence of death under this act

shall be carried into execution without the approval

of the President.

Sec. 5. AVhen the people of any one of said

Rebel States shall have formed a constitution

and government in conformity with the Constitution

of the United States in all respects, framed

by a ctmvention of delegates elected by the male

citizens of said State 21 years old and upward,

of whatever race, color, or previous condition,

who have been resident in said State for one

year previous to the day of such election, except

such as may be disfranchised for participation

in the Rebellion or for felony at common

law, and when such constitution shall provide

that the elective franchise shall be enjoyed by

all such persons as have the qualifications herein

stated for electors of delegates, and when such

. A%mnu«»l- ' w^uii ill mm-mmf

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868. 28

constitution shall be ratified by a majority of the

persons voting on the question of ratification

who are quaUlled as electors for delegates, and

when such constitution shall have been submitted

to Congress for examination and approval, and

Congress shall have approved the same, and

when said State by a vote of its Legislature

elected under said constitution shall have adopted

the amendment to the Constitution of tie

United States proposed by the XXXIXth Congi'ess,

and known as Article 14, and when said

article shall have become part of the Constitution

of the United States, said State shall be declared

entitled to representation in Cougre^, and Senators

and Representatives shall be admitted therefrom

on their taking the oath prescribed by law,

and then and thereafter the preceding sections of

this act shall be inoperative in said State. Pror

ded, That no person excluded from the privilege

of holding office by said proposed amendment

to the Constituti


24

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18«a

with the e^'ldence and reasons for his action in

the case, and the nanae of the person so designated

to porfcrmtlie duties of such office. If the

Senate concurs, the President may remove the

officer and appoint a successor. If the Senate does

not concur, the suspended officer resumes his

office, and receives again the official salary and

emoluments. The President, in case he shall

become satisfied that the suspension by him of a

civil officer was made on insufficient grounds,

Bhall be authorized, at anytime before reporting

the suspension to the Senate, to revoke the suspension

and reinstate the ofiicer in the performance

of the duties of his office. Sec. 8. The

President shall have power to fill all vacancies

which may happen during the recess of the

Senate, by reason of death or resignation, by

granting commissions which shall expire at the

end of their next session. And if no appointment,

by and with the advice and consent of the

Senate, shall be made to such office so vacant or

temporarily fiiled during the next session of the

Senate, the office shall remain in abeyance,

without any salary, fees, or emoluments attached

thereto, imtil it shall be tilled by appointment

thereto, by and with the advice and consent of

the Senate; and during such time all the powers

and duties belonging to the office shall be exercised

b.y such other officer as may by law exercise

such powers and duties in case of a vacancy

in such office. Sec. 4. No term of office, the duration

cf which is limited by law, shall be extended

by this act. Sec. 5. Persons accepting or exercising

office contrary to this act, are declared to be

guilty of a high "misdemeanor, and, upon trial

and con\'iction thereof, shall be punished by a

fine not exceeding $10,000, or by imprisonment

not exceeding 5 years, cr both. Sec. 6. Every

removal, appointment, or employment, made,

had, or exercised, contrary to the provisions of

this act, and the making, signing, sealing, countersigning,

or issuing of any commission or letter

of authority fcr cr in respect to any such

appointment or employment, are declared to be

high misdemeanors, and, upon trial and conviction

thereof, persons guilty thereof shall be

punished by a fine not exceeding ^10,000, or by

imprisonment not exceeding 5 years, or both :

Provided, That the President shall have power

to make out and deliver, after the adjournment

of the Senate, commissions for all officers whose

appointment shall have been advised and consented

to by the Senate. Sec. 7. It shall be

the duty of the Secretary of the Senate, at the

close cf each session, to deliver to the Secretary

of the Treasury, and to each of his assistants,

and to each of the auditors, and to each of the

comptrollers in the treasury, and to the treasurer,

and to the register of the treasury, a full and

complete list, duly certified, of all the persons

who shall have been nominated to and rejected

by the Senate during such session, and a like

list of all the offices to wliich nominations shall

have been made and not confirmed and filled at

such session. Sec. 8. The President shall notify

the Secretary of the Treasury when he has made

an appointment to office without the consent of

the Senate; and it shall be the duty of the Secretary

of the Treasury thereupon to communicate

such notice to all the proper accounting and disbursing

officers of his department. Sec. 9. Xo

money shall be paid or received from the treas-

ury, or paid or received from or retained out of

any public moneys or funds of the United States,

to or by or for the benefit of any person appointed

to or authorized to act in or holding or

exercising th.e duties or functions of any office

contrary to the provisions of this act; nor shall

airy claim, account, or other instrument providing

for or relating to such payment, receipt, or

retention, be presented, passed, allowed, approved,

certified, or paid by any officer of the

United States, or by any person exercising the

functions or performing the duties of any office

or place of trust under the United States, for or

in respect to such office, or the exercising or

performing the fimctions or duties thereof; and

persons who shall violate any of the provisions

of this section shall Ije deemed guilty of a high

misdemeanor, and, upon trial and conviction

thereof, shall be punished therefor by a fine not

exceeding $10,000, or by iniprisonment not exceeding

10 years, or both. [The bill was passed

over the President's veto on JIarch 2, 1S87J

Chap. CLV.—Proclamations of the President

Declared Valuf.—Declares valid and conclusive

all acts, proclamations, and orders of

the President of the United States, or acts done

by his authority or approval after the4th March,

1661, and bef.ire the 1st July, 1866, respecting

martial law, military trials by courts-martial or

military commissions, or the arrest, imprisonment

and trial of persons charged with participation

in the late rebellion against the United

States, or as aiders or abettors thereof, or as

guilty of any disloyal practice in aid thereof, or

of any violation of the laws or usages of war, or

of affording aid and comfortto rebels against the

authority of the United States, and all proceedings

and acta done or had by courts-martial or

military commissions, or aiTests and imprisonments

made in the premises by any person by

the authoritv of the orders or proclamations of

the President. [March 2, 1S6T.]

Chap. CLVI.—Allotment of Judges of the

Supreme Court.—The chief justice and associate

justices of the Supreme Court of the United

States shall be allotted among the circuits by

order of the court. New allotments, if necessary,

shall be made by the court ; or, if they become

necessary at any other time than during the

term, by the chief justice. A marshal of the

Supreme Court of the United States may be

appointed by the court with a salary of $3,000 per

annum. The marshal, with the approval of the

chief justice, may appoint assistant marshals

and messengers. [March 2, 1&67.]

Chap. CIj\1II.— Depajiment of E




sued contrary to the requirements of this section

shall be null and void ; and any officer who shall

issue orders or instructions contrary to the provisions

of this section shall be deemed guilty of

a misdemeanor in office ; and any officer of the

army who shall transmit, conve.v, or obey any

orders or instructions so issued contrary to the

provisions of this section, knowing that such o:^

ders were so issued, shall be liable to Imprisonment

for not less than 2 nor more than 'IQ years,

upon conviction thereof in any court of competent

iurisdiction. Sec. 5. It shall be the duty of

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 186a S5

chief clerk with a salary of $2,000, one clerk

with a salary of $1,800, and one clerk with a

salary of $1,600. The commissioner thall make

the officers of the army and navy, and of the

Freedmen's Bureau, to prohibit and prevent

whipping or maiming of the person, as a punish-

an annual report to Con^rei^s, and his first report ment for any crime, misdemeanor or offence, by

shall present a statement of the land grants by any pretended civil or military authority in any

Congress to promote education, their management,

the amount of funds arising therefrom,

State latel.v in rebellion until the civil government

of such State shall have been restored, and

and the annual proceeds of the same, [ilarch

2, ISCT.]

CuiP. CLIX. I!i(iht/< of Volunteers.—In

computing the service of any army officer, the

shall have been recognized by the Congress of

the United States. Sec. 6. All militia forces now

organized or in service in either of the States of

Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Geor-

time of all actual sen-ice shall be taken into

account. This provision shall apply to all

gia, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi,

and Te.xas, shall bo forthwith disbanded, ana

appointments under the act 1S66, ch. 2!)9. All the further organization, arming, or calling into

rules as to pay, rank, duties, &c., shall apply

alike to officers and soldiers of the regular army

service of the said militia forces, or any part

thereof, is prohibited under any circumstances

and of the volunteer service. State militia

shall not be affected by this act. Emoluments

of commissioned officers of army shall not be

increased by act 18fi4, ch. 145. The first section

of act 1S65, ch. 79, shall not be retroactive.

[March 2, 1S6T.]

Cn.4P. CLXII. ffoward Univernitt/.—Incorporates

the Howard University in the District of

Columbia. Its net annual Income shall not

exceed $50,000 over and above and exclusive of

the receipts for the education and support of

whatever, until tlie same shall be authorized by

Congress. [The President, in a message of March

2, protested against Sec. 2 of this act, which, he

says,

the students of the University. [March 2, 1SC7.]

Chap. CLXIT — JfatioiKil Theolorjical lactiUite.

— Amends an act of May 10th, 1866.

Changes the name of the " National Theological

Institute" to that of the "National Theological

Institute and University. The coi-poration may

hold real estate to the amount of $250,000, and

shall ha\e the riglit to confer degrees, and all

other rights of universities. [.March 2, 1867.]

Cn\p. CLXIX. TnteriKil Bevenue.—.\n act

to amend existing laws relating to internal revenue,

and for other purposes. AU acts relative

to the internal revenue laws now required to be

done in May and June, shay be done hereafter

in March and April. The tax on cotton shall,

after Sept. 1, 1867, be 2^ cents per pound.

[March 2, 1S67.]

Ch.vp. CLX.X.—Ai-my Approp7uationfi—Irre

movahiliti/ of the General of the Aimy.—

Sec. 1. Makes appropriations for the support of

the army for the year ending June SO, ISCS. Sec.

2. The head-quarters of the General of the army

shall be at Washington, and all orders and instructions

relating to military operations issued

by the President or Secretary of War shall be issued

through the General of the anny, and, in

case of his inability, through the next in rank.

The General of the army shall not be removed,

suspended, or relieved from command, or assigned

to duty elsewhere than at said headquarters,

except at his own request, without the

previous approval of the Senate ; and any orders

or instructions relating to military operations is-

" in certain cases virtually deprives the

President of his constitutional functions as Commander-in-Chief

of the Army," and against Sec.

6, " which denies to ten States of the Union their

constitutional riglit to protect themselves, in any

emergency, by their own militia." But notwithstanding

his protest against these two sections

he signed the act, lest, "bj' witliholding his

signature, the necessary appropriation be defeated."

[March 2, 1867.1

Chap. CL.XXIV.—Aar?/.—The Admiral shall

be the ranking officer of Navy. Section 6 provides

that disabled persons, who have served as

enlisted persons in the navy or marine corps for

twenty years, shall receive from the na\ al pension

fund half cf their rating when discharged.

Disabled persons so servuig for not less than

ten years, may apply for aid from the surplus

income of the naval pension fund. [.March 2,

1867.]

CuAP. CLXXV. Brereis in the Armj/.—Bre-


vet rank may be conferred on officers in the army

for gallant conduct in the volunteer service,

prior to their appointment in the army. [Jlarch

2, 1867.]

CuAP. ClJXXW.—Bankf^iptcy Act.—kn Act

to establish a uniform System of Bankruptcy

throughout the United States. — The district

courts of the United States are constituted courts

cf bankruptcy under this act, in all matters under,

or growing out of whicli, they have original

jurisdiction. They are always open for business

under this act, and the powers of the judge in

vacation, and when sitting in chambers, are the

same as when sitting in court and in term time.

They may be held in any part of the district.

The circuit com'ts have also a general supervision

of all cases under this act, and ma.v be appealed

to from the district courts, with which

they have also concurrent jurisdiction in all cases

wherein the assignee in bankruptcy is a party ;

but no claim can be maintained by or against an

assignee touching the bankrupt's property after

the lapse of two years. One or more registers

shall be appointed in each congressional district,

whose duty it is to act in the place of the judge

in all merely administrative and uncontested

cases. Bankrujitcy may be either voluntary or

involuntary. The debtor may assume voluntary

bankruptcy if his aebts exceed three hundred

dollars, by filing a petition, setting forth his

debts, an inventory of all his possessions, and

a declaratisn of willingness to give them up


as THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868.

to his creditors. A warrant then issues from the

court appointing a time and place for a meeting

of the creditors. At this meeting an assignee or

assignees are chosen, subject to the approval of

the court, to whom is delivered all the property

of the banlirupt, except that specifically exempted.

The assignee possesses all the powers

for recovering debts due the debtor, which the

latter would othcrwi?e have possessed. The

court may examine the bankrupt, or the wife of

the bankrupt, ou oatli, or any person who m.ay

be alile to give evidence on any matter pertaining

to the bankrupt's affairs, and may compel

their attendance. All claims against the bankrupt

must be duly verified in writing and on

oatii. Those which are approved are registered

by the assignee, and all creditors, whose claims

are allowed, are entitled to share In the bankrupt's

estate, pro /(itu, no priority of claim being

allowed except for the wages of certain servants.

At the expiration of each tliree months

after the adjudication of bankruptcy, the approved

creditors may receive dividends on their

claims ; and after all claims have been decided

upon, and the assignee's accounts have been approved

by the court, all expenses cf the proceedings

are paid from the portion of the estate

remaining in the hands of the assignee, and the

residue divided finally among the creditors.

After six months from the adjudication of bankruptcy,

the bankrupt may receive a discharge

from all previous debts honestly contracted by

and due from him, provided there has been no

fraud on his part in the proceedings. Any conveyance

or transfer of property made by the

debtor to a preferred creditor, in view cf insolvency,

within four months before the filing of a

petition in bankruptcy, is void ; and the creditor

who, knowing the facts, receives such conveyance,

forfeits all sliare in the bankrupt's estate,

and also double the value of the money or property

so obtained, which is recoverable by the

assignee for the benefit of the estate. A partnership

or firm may be made bankrupt by the

filing of a petition by any member, when not

only the joint property but the separate estates

of each member of the firm is taken by the assignee.

Separate accounts are kept by the assignee,

who pays the private debts of each member

from his own e=tate, and the balance ia added

to the joint stock for the benefit of the creditors

cf tlie firm, if the property of the firm shall not

have been sufficient to liquidate the claims

against it. A certificate of discharge is given

or refused to each partner according to the

merits of his individual case. "Where partners

reside in different districts, jurisdiction is in

that district where the petition is first filed. Involuntary

bankruptcy may be forced upon any

debtor who has committed certain acts of actual

or constructive fraud, by which he is deemed to

have committed an act of bankruptcy, on the

petition of any one of his creditors whose debt

amounts to $2&3. If the debtor so demand, the

question of fact as to the alleged act of bankruptcy

may be tried by a jury ; and if the allegations

in the question be maintained, or if the

debtor allow the matter to go by default, a warrant

of bankruptcy issues, and the estate of the

banln'upt is settled in a manner similar to that

In a case of voluntary bankruptcy. Fines and

imprisonment are decreed against either bank-



rupts or officers who are gxiilty of fraud or offences

tinder this act. [March 2, ISGT.]

Cwp. CLXXVII. Public iMvda.—Tovrn authorities

may enter public lands occupied as

town sites, at minimum price, in trust for the

several use and benefit cf the occupants thereof.

[March 2, 1S6T.]

Chap. CLXXVIII.—/'or^ of Albany.—^l&Vta

Albany a port of delivery. [March 2, 1867.]

Chap. CLXXX.—j7n]n-if:onn>ent for Debt.—

State laws for discharge from imprisonment for

debt shall apply to process from courts of the

United States. [March 2, 1S8".]

CuAP. CLXXXII. Mail Steamship Service

u-ith the Ufncaiian Jsland.i.—Autliorizes the

postmaster-general to establish ocean mail steam

service b.-.'tween the United States and the

Hawaiian lilands by contract with the lowest

bidder who is a citizen of the United States. The

contract shall go into effect on or before Jan.

1, 18CS. [March 2, 1S67.]

CuAP. CLXXXV. Appealu and Wrif.t of

Error.—Appeals cr writs of error brought from

districts in which the sessions of the courts have

been interrupted, stall be valid, though the time

for bringing the same may have previously expired

; and new appeals or writs of en-rr may

be brought within one year from the passage of

this act. [March 2, 1&67.J

Chap. CLXXXVI.—P«6/ic FimOin Cwtl-ot^y

of i'reedmeri's Bureau. — The commissioner

of the bureau of refugees, freedmcn, and abandoned

lands, is constituted the custodian of retained

bounty fund, and appointed tn;stee for

the benefit of colored soldiers and their lawful

representatives. [March 2, 1867.]

Chap. CluXXXKu.—Peonage Aboli.'^hert.—

The holding of any person to service or labor

under the system of service cr labor known as

peonage, is declared unlawful and abolished in

New Mexico, or in any other Territory or State

of the Union. All acts, etc., establishing it are

declared void, and the civil and military officers

sliall have the duty to enforce this act. [March

2, 1S67.]

Chap. CXCIII.— Crimen.— "Rohhery and larceny

of personal property belonging to the United

States shall be punished by fine not exceeding

$5,000, or by imarisonment at hard labor

not less than 1 nor more than 10 years, or by

both. [March 2, 1&67,]

Chap. CXCIV.— Compound Tnterett Kotes.

—Temporary loan certificates may be issued to

redeem compound interest notes. [March 2,

1867.]

Chap. CXCVI.—Uemoval of Caseinfrom State

Courts.— &\i\{s in State courts may be removed

to circuit court of the United States, when, from

local influence, there is reason to believe that

justice cannot be had in State court. [March 2,

1867.]

Chap. CXCVII.— TPoo?.—Provides increased

revenue from imported wool. [March 2, 1SG7.]

PUBLIC RESOLUTIONS.

No. 3. Paris Eirposition.—Instructs the

commissioner of agriculture to collect and prepare

specimens of the cereal productions of the

United States for exhibition at the Paris Exposition.

[January 11, ^£67.]

No. i Medals to Soldiers.—The adjutantgeneral

of West Virginia may distribute through





the mails, free of postage, to the honorably discharged

soldiers of 'West Virginia, and to the

relatives and friends of those who were killed or

died of wounds or disease while in service, certain

medals furnished bv the legislature of that

State. [January 14, 1867.]

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868. 87

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No. 5. Post Office and U. S. Ccnirt in Xeic

York—Appoints a commission to purchase for

the sum of $500,000 the lower part of City

nail Park, as site for a building for the postofEce

and United States courts in New York.

No. 49.

Excess of duty paid by anv national bank shall

be refunded. [March 2, 1867.] i

No. 51. Ship Canal throuffh the Isthmus of

Darien.—Directs the Secretary of State to oh-

[Jan. 22, 1R67.]

No. 7. Xatwnal Aifylum for Disabled Volunteers.—The

Secretary of War may transfer to

the National Asylum for Disaliled Volunteer

Soldiers any of the propert.v of the United States

Etill remaining at Point Lookout, Md. [Jan.

tain from the United States of Colombia author-

ity for the United States to make sun'ey of the

Isthmus of Darien fur a sliip canal. [March 2,

1807.]

No. 52. Thanking the Chambers of Bratdl.

—Acknowledges resolutions of sorrow for death

29, 1867.]

No. 11. Internal Jietemte. — Alcohol and

burning fluid made from certain materials

on which taxes have been paid shall be exempt

from tax. The annual tax of ^0 on distillers

of burning fluid, ic, is repealed, [Feb.

5, 1SG7.]

No. V>.—Kentucky Jllilitia.—Directs the Secretary

of Wai- to cause the claims of the Kentucky

forces under the command of James S.

Fish to be investigated and paid. [Feb. 8. 1867.]

No. 14. Alcohol in, Bond.—Alcohol may be

of Preirident Lincoln adopted by the Chambers

of BraziL [Miu-ch 2, 1S«7.]

No. 53. Pout-Office and Sub- Treasury of

Bostrn.—Appoints a commission to select site

for Post-Oflice and Sub-Treasury in Boston,

[March 2, 1867.]

No. 55. Exchange of Public Document'.—

withdrawn from bond by curators of scientifio

institutions without payment of internal tax.

[Feb. IS, 1SC7.]

No. 15. Ocean Mail Service.—The Postmaster-General

is authorized to employ ocean mail

service between San Francisco, Cal., and Portland,

Oregon, three times per month, the cost

not to exceed $25,000 per annum. [Feb. IS,

1887.]

No. 16. Pensions.—The pensions of widows

of revolutionary soldiei-s shall, from Sept. 30,

1865, be paid at the same rate as the deceased

soldiers would be entitled if living. [I'tb. is,

1867.]

No. 17. — David''s Inland. — Authorizes the

Secretary of War to purchase David's Island, in

Long Island Sound, at the sum of $38,500. [Feb.

of Brevet Lieutenant-General Winfield Soott.

[March 2, 1867.]

No. 46. t'ai/ment Prohibited to Certain

18, 1867.]

No. 23. Svppliesfor the People ofthe Southtrn

States.—Authorizes the Secretarj"- of the

Navy to assign a public vessel to transport sup-

PROCLAMATIONS.

Dec. 28, 1866 Tonnage Potties on French

Vessels.—Proclaims that on and after Jan. 1,

1S67, so long as vessels of the United States shall

be admitted to French ports on the same terms

as vessels belonging to citizens of France, French

plies to the suffering people of the Southern

i

States. [Feb. 22, 1867.]

No. 26. Ship Canal across the Idhmua of

Darien.—Authorizes the Secretary of the Navy

to furnish aid and facilities to citizens of the

United States engaged in the survey if a route

for a ship canal across the Istlmius of Carien.

vessels entering ports of the United States will

be subject to no higher rates of duty oa tonnage

than are levied upon vessels of the United

States.

Jan. 12, 1867. Enforcing Neutrality in the

Civil War of Japan.—Calls a public attention

to and sanctions and confirms a notificaticn by

[Feb. 25, 1867.]

No. 80. Additional Compensation to Cir.il

Officers.—Twenty per cent, additional pay shall

the minister resident of the United States in Japan

forbidding American merchant vessels fi-om

stopping or anchoring at any port or roadstead in

be allowed to certain persons in the civil service

at Washington, D. C. This resolution shall not

apply to those whose salary exceeds §3,500 a

that country except the three opened ports, viz :

Kanagawa (Yokohama), Nagasaki, and Hakodate,

unless in distress or forced by stress of

year. [Feb. 28, 1867.]

No. 81. — Agricultural Colleges. — Extends

weather, as provided by treaty, and giving notice

that masters of vessels cor.:mitting a breach of

the provisions of the acts in regard to agricultural

colleges (1862, ch. 130, and 1S66, ch. 2'M)

the regulation "would thereby render themselves

liable to prosecution and punishment, and also

to the State of Tennessee. [Feb. 28, 1S67.] to forfeiture of the protection of the United

No. 45. Equestrian Statue to Lientenant-

Oeneral Winfield Scott.—Authorizes the Secretary

of War to contract, at a price not exceeding

States, if the vipit to such non-opened port or

roadstead should either Involve a breach of

treaty or be construed as an act in aid of the in-

$20,000, for an equestrian statue, in bronze, surrection or rebellion in Japan.





Per.-ions.—Prohibits payment by any government

otficer to any person not known to have I

been opposed to the rebellion. [March 2, 1867.] 1

Kational Barikinr/ Associations.—

j

50 copies of all documents printed by order of

Congress, and 50 copies additional of all documents

printi'd in excess of the usual number, together

with £0 copies of each publication issued

by any department or bureau of the government,

s-hall be exchanged, through the agency of the

Smithsonian Institution, for works published in

fi reign countries, said works to be deposited in

the library of Congress. [March 2, 1867.]

No. 57.— Thanks to Cyrus W. Field.—Presents

the thanks of Congress to Cjtus W Field,

fiT his foresight, courage, and determination in

e.^ta)jU.sliing telegraphic communication by means

of the Atlautic cable, traversing mid-ocean and

connecting the Old World with the New ; and

requests the President to cause a gold medal to

be struck, with soitable emblems, devices, and !

ir.. i-iijitioii, uu i'j prebcuted to ilr. Field. [Marcii



Jan. 29, 186".— Tonnage Ihtties on ITaicaiian

Vessels.—Proclaims that acts Imposing

discriminating duties of tonnage and impost

wltliln tlie United States shall be suspended as

respects vessels of the Hawaiian Islands, and

their cargoes, from Pecemlier 10, 1866, so

lonj; as the reciprocal exemption of the vessels

of the United States, and the produce, manufactures,

and merchandise imported in them into

the dominions of the Hawaiian Islands, shall bo

contini'.ed on the part of the government of the

King of the Hawaiian Islands.

March 1 . Isti'.-Admixsion of Xehr-a ska. -Vroclaims

that the fundamental conditions impose d

by Concrress on the State of Nebraska to entitle


I call upon all good and well disposed citizens

of the United States to remember that upon the

said Constitution and laws, and upon the judgments,

decrees, and process of the Courts

made in accordance with the same, depend

the protection of the lives, liberty, property,

and happiness of the pe^jple. And I exhort

them everywhere to testify their devotion

to their country, their pride in its prosperity and

greatness, and their determination to uphold its

free institutions, by a hearty co-operation in the

efforts of the Government to sustain the authority

of the law, to maintain the supremacy of the

Federal Constitution, and to preserve unimpaired

the integrity of the national Union.

that State to admission to the Union have been In testimony wLereof, I have caused the seal

I ratified and accepted, and that the admission of of the United States to be afTi.xed to these presthe

State Into the Union is now complete.

ents, and sign the same with my hand.

March 30, 1867. Extraordinary Session of Done at the city of Washington, the third day

the Senate.^^on\-ints an extraordinary session of September, in the year one thousand eight

of the Senate for Apiil 1, 1S6T.

hundred and sixty-seven.

September 8, 1867.— The mipremacy of Ciril

ANDREW JOHNSON.

Courts to he enforced.—After referring to the By the President : WiLLLiM H. Sewaiuj, Sec-

dut.v of the President as chief executive officer retary of State.

of the Government of the United States, to the Sept. 8, 1867. Amne-fty Proclaimed. —

supremacy of the Constitution by which the The proclamation at first refers to the declaration

judges in every State are bound, to the jurisdic- by both Houses of Congress, in July, 1&61, that

tion of the Supreme Court and the inferior courts " the war then existing was not w aged on the

which Congress mayfromtimeto time ordain and part of the Government in any spirit of oppres-

establish, to the duty of all civil and military sion, nor for any purpose of conquest or subjuofficers

to support and defend the Constitution gation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interagainst

all enemies, foreign and domestic, to the fering with the rights or establislied institutions

|

of the States, but to defend and maintain the

duty of all officers of the army and navy to 1

:

:

obey the orders of the President, the General, or supremacy of the Constitution, and to preserve

other superior officers set over tliem, to the right tlie Union with all the dignitj", equality, and

of the Executive to secure the faithful execution rights of the several States unimpaired, and that

of the laws of the United States by the employ- as soon as these objects should be accomplished

ment of the land and naval forces, in case it the war ought to cease;" to the proclamations

shall become Impracticable to enforce them by by the President, on Dec. 8, 1S6;3, and ilarch 26,

the ordinary course of judicial proceeding 1864, "offering amnesty and pardon to all per-

the proclamation continues as follows

sons who had directly or indireciiy participated

^yhereas. Impediments and obstructions seri- in the then existing rebellion, except as in those

ous in their character have recently been inter- proclamations was specified and reserved ; " to

posed in the States of North Carolina and South the proclamation of J!?.y 29, 1865, granting " \

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to

Carolina, hindering and preventing for a time all persons who had directly or indirectl3' para

proper enforcement there of the laws of the ticipated in the then existing rebellion, except

United States, and of the judgments and de- as therein excepted, amnesty and pardon, with

crees of a lawful court thereof, in disregard of restoration of all the rights of property except

the command of the President of the United as to slaves, and except in certain cases where

States; and legal proceedings had been instituted, but upon

Whereas, Reasonable and well-founded ap- condition, that such persons should take and

prehensions exist that such ill-advised and un- subscribe an oath therein prescribed, which oath

lawful proceedings may be again attempted should be registered for permanent preservathere

or elsewhere: tion, but excepting and excluding from the ben-

Soic therefore. I, Andrew Johnson, President efits of this proclamation fourteen extensive

of the United States, do hereby w am all persons classes of persons therein specially described ;" to

against obstructing or hindering in any manner the proclamation of April 5, 1SC6, declaring that

whatsoever the faithful execution of the Consti- " the insurrection was at an end and was thencetufion

and the law ; and I do solemnly enjoin forth to be so regarded." The President then

and command all oflicers of the Government, goes on to state, that "there now exists no

;

civil and military, to render due submission and organized armed resistance of misguided citizens,

obedience to said laws, and to the judgments i or others, to the authority of the United States

and decrees of the Courts of the United States, in the States of Georgia, South Carolinn, \irand

to give aU the aid in their power necessary ginia. North Carclina, Tennessee, Alabama,

to the prompt enforcement and execution of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Florida and

said laws, decrees, judgments, and process, and Texas, and the laws can be sustained and

I do hereby enjoin upon the cfBcers of the army enforced therein by the proper civil authority,

State or Federal, and the people of said States

and navy to assist and sustain the Courts and i

' other civil authorities of tlie United States in a ore ire/l ami htijally d /.-.po-yed . u7id hare con-

I cesses

laithful administration of the laws thereof, and fanned, or if permitted to do so viU con-

'

in the judgments, decrees, mandates and pro- fonn. to t?ie condition of chairs growing out

of the Courts of the United States. And ; of the amendment to the Constitution of the


United States prohibiting; slavery witliin the

lioiits and jurisdiction of the United States;"

that "there no longer exists any reasonable

ground to apprehend within the States which

were involved in the late rebellion any renewal

thereof, or any iinlaicful renixtdnce by the

people of said States to the Constitution and

laws of the United States ;

" that •' lartje stand-

ing armies, military occupation, martial law,

military tribimals and the suspension of the

privilege of the writ of habeas corpus, and the

right of trial by jury, are, in time of peace,

dangerous to public liberty, incompatible nith

the individual rights of the citizen, contrary to

the genius and spirit of our free institutions,

and exhaustive of the national resources, and

ought not, therefore, to be sanctioned or allowed

except in cases of actual necessity, for repelling

invasion, or suppressing insurrection or rebellion;"

that " a reUiUatory or riiidU'tive policy

aitendedhy minece-s/^ary disquaUjications,

pains, penalties, confiscations, and dUfrancfd-sements,

novc, rt* always, could only tend

to hinder reconciliation among the people, and

national restoration, while it must seriously embarrass,

obstruct and repress popular energies

and national industry and enterprise." For

these reasons the President deems it to be

" essential to the public welfare, and to the more

perfect restoration of constitutional law and

order," that the proclamation of May 29, 1S65,

should be modilied, and that "the/«W and

heneficcnt pardon conceded thereby should be

opened and further extended to a large number

of persons who, by its aforesaid exceptions,

have been hitherto excluded from Executive

clemency." Accordingly, the President declares

that tlio "full pardon described in the proclamation

of May 29, 1S65, " shall henceforth be opened and

extended to all persons who directly or indirectly

participated in the late Rebellion, with the restoration

of all privileges, immunities, and rights

of property, except as to property with regard to

slaves, and except in cases of legal proceedings

under the laws of the United States ; but upon

this condition, nevertheless, that every such per-

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868. 29

son who shall seek to avail himself of this proclamation

shall take and subscribe the following

oath, and shall cause the same to be registered

for permanent preservation, in the same mr.nner

and with the same effect as with the oath

prescribed in the said proclamation of the 29th

day of May, 1SG5, namely:

" I do solemnly swear (or affirm) in presence of

Almighty God, that I will henceforth faithfully

support, protect, and defend th« Constitution of

the United States, and the Union of the States

thereunder; and that I will in like manner abide

by and faithfully support all laws and proclamations

which have been made during the late Rebellion

with reference to the emancipation of

slaves. So help me God."

The following persons, and no others, are excluded

from the benefits of this proclamation,

and of proclamation of May 29, 1SG5, namely:

"i^4>'.s


80 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868.

North Carolina Dec. 13 Dec. 13, 1SC6.

Arkansas, Dec. 15 Dec. 17, "

South Carolina. Dec. 20, "

Virginia. Jan. 9 Jan. 9, 18G7.

Mississippi Jan. 80 Jan. 25, "

Louisiana Feb. 5 Feb. 6, "

2. Further Action of Congress on the

Ameiidmtnt.—By Sec. 5 of the Keconstruction

Act of Congress of March 2, ISG" (see p. %y) the

admission of senators and representatives from

the reconstructed rebel ttates is made dependent

upon the previous ratification of the Constitutional

Amendment by Legislatures of the rebel

States elected in accordance with the provisions

of the Reconstruction Act.

n.—THE RECONSTRUCTION ACTS OF

CONGRESS.

1,


Tteconfitruction Act of the XXXIXtU

Conijref>s.'f 2i rch 2, 1M7.—We have given this

act on p. 23. The bill pi.ssed the House, on Feb.

20, 1SG7, by the following vote—j-eas 123 (all

Republicans"), nays 46 (all Democrats, e.xcept

Hawkins of Tenu.. James R. Ilubbell of Ohio,

and Kuykendall of 111.). The Senate passed

the bill on the same day—yeas S5 (all Re-

?ublicans except Johnson of Maryland), nays

(all Democrats). The bill was vetoed on

JIarch 2. Both Houses of Congress re-passed

it on the same day, the Hou.-e by a vote

of 138 (all Republicans), nays 51 (all Democrats,

except Hale of N. Y., Hawkins of Tenn.,

Kuvkendall of 111., StillweU of Ind., and Latham

of \V. Va.), the Senate by a vote of yeas 8S (all

Rep. except Johnson of Md.), nays 10 (all Democrats).

2.

Supplemental reconstruction Act of

XLih Congrexs, of March 23, 1SC7.—A reconstruction

bill, supplementary to the above

act of March 2, passed both Houses of Congress on

March 19. It was vetoed on March 23. On the

same day the House repassed it by a vote of yeas

114 (all Republicans), nays 25 (all Democrats),

and the Senate by a vote of yeas 40 (all Republicans

except Johnson of Md.), and nays 7 (all

Democrats).

The following are the main provisions of this

act:

Before Sept. 1, 1867, the commanding general

in each district, defined by an act entitled " An

act to provide for the more elBcient government

of the rebel States," passed March 2, 1807, shall

cause a registration to be made of the male citizens

of th"e United States, 21 years of age and

upwards, resident in each county or parish in

the State or States included in his district, which

registration shall include only those persons who

are qualified to vote for delegates by the act

aforesaid, and who shall have taken and sub-

scribed the following oath or affirmation : " I,

, do solemnly swear (or aflirm), in the

presence of Almighty God, that I am a citizen

of the State of ; that I have resided in

said State for months next preceding this

day, and now reside in the county of , or

the parish of , in said State (as the case

may be) ; that I am twenty-one years old ; that

I have not been disfranchised for participation

in any rebellion or civil war against the United

States, nor for felony committed against the laws

of any State or of the United States ; that I have

Dever be«n a member of aiiy State legislature,

nor held any executive or judicial office In any

State and afterwards engaged in insurrection or

rebellion against the United ."rtates, or given aid

or comfort to the enemies thereof; that I have

never taken an oath as a member of Congress of

the United States, or as an ofijccr of the United

States, or as a member of any .^tate legislature,

or as an e.xecuiive or judicial officer of any

State, to support the Con; titution of the United

States, and afterwards engacred in insurrection

or rebellion against tlie United States or given

aid or comfort to the enemies tliereof; that I

will faithfully support the Constitution and obey

the laws of the Lnited States, and will, to the

best of my ability, encourage others so to do, so

help me God;" whiciioath or affirmation maybe

administered by any registering officer. Sec. 2.

After the completion of the registration hereby

provided for in any State, at such time and places

therein as the commanding general shall appoint

and direct, of which at least 30 days' pu)>

lie notice shall be given, an election shall be

held of delegates to a convention for the purpose

of establishing a constitution and civil government

for such State loyal to the Union, said convention

in each State, except Virginia, to consist

of the same number of members as the most

numerous branch of the State legislature of such

State in the vear 18C0, to be apportioned among

the several districts, counties, or parishes of

such State by the commanding general, giving

to each representation in the ratio of voters registered

as af jresaid, as nearly as may be. The

convention in Virginia shall consist of the same

number of members as represented the territory

now constituting Virginia in the most numerous

branch of the legislature of said State in the

year 1860, to be apportioned as aforesaid. Sec.

3. At said election the registered voters of each

State shall vote for or against a convention to

form a constitution therefor under this act. The

person appointed to superintend said election,

and to make return of the votes given thereat,

as herein provided, shall count and make return

of the votes given for and against a convention ;

and the commanding general to whom the same

shall have been returned shall ascertain and declare

the total vote in each State for and against

a convention. If a majority of the votes given

on that question shall be for a convention, then

such convention shall be held as hereinafter

provided; but if a majority of said votes shall

be against a convention, then no such convention

shall be held vinder this act : Provided,

that such convention shail not be lield imless a

majority of all such registered voters shall have

voted on the question of holding such convention.

Sec. 4. The commanding general of each

district shall appoint as many boards of registration

as may be necessary, consisting of 3 loyal

officers or persons, to make and complete the

registration, superintend the election, and make

return to him of the votes, lists of voters, and

of the persons elected as delegates by a plurality

oMhe votes cast at said election ; and upon receiving

said returns he shall open the same,

ascertain the persons elected as delegates according

to the returns of the officers who conducted

said election, and make proclamation

thereof; and if a majority of the rotes given on

that queetion shall be for a convention, the commanding

general, within 60 daya from the date



THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S6S.

of wilful and corrupt perjury.

8. Supplementary Reconstruction Act of

XLih Cmigress, of July 19, 1S67.—A reconstruction

bill, supplementary to the two preceding

acts, passed both Houses of Congress, on

July 18. It was vetoed by the President on July

19, but on the same day re-passed by both

Houses over the veto. The vote in the Senate

stood—yeas 30 (all Repub.), nays 6 (all Democ.)

in the House—yeas 100 (all Rep.), nays 22 (all

Dem.). The bill is as follows

:

;

of election, shall notify the delegates to assemble

in convention, at a time and place to be

mentioned in the notification, and said convention,

when organized, shall procL-ed to frame a

constitution and civil government according to

the provisions of this act and the act to which

it is supplementary ; and when the same shall

have been so framed, said constitution shall be

submitted by the convention for ratification to

the persons registered under the provisions of

this act at an election to be conducted by the

ofDcers or persons appointed or to be appointed

by the commanding general, as hereinbefore

provided, and to be held after the expiration of

30 days from the date of notice thereof, to be

given by said convention ; and t!ie returns

thereof shall be made to the commanding general

of the district. Sec. 5. Thr.t if, according

to said returns, the constitution shall be ratified

by a majority of the votes of the registered electors

qualified as herein spcciCed, cast at said

election (at least one-half of all the registered

voters voting upon the question of such ratification),

the president of tl;c convention shall transmit

a copy of the same, duly certified, to the

President of the United States, who shall forthwith

transmit the same to Congress, if then in

session, and if not in session, then Immediately

upon its next assembling; and if it shall, moreover,

appear to Congress, that tlie election was

one at which all the registered and qualified electors

in the State had an opportunity to vote

freely and without restraint, fear, or the influence

of fraud, and if the Congress shall be satisfied

that such constitution meets the approval of

a majority of all the qualified electors in the

State, and if the said constitution shall be declared

by Congress to be in conformity with the

provisions of the act to which this is supplementarj',

and the other provisions of said act shall

have been complied with, and the said constitution

sliall be approved by Congress, the State

shall be declared entitled to representation, and

Senators and Representatives shall be admitted

therefrom as therein provided. Sec. 6. All elections

in the States mentioned in the said "Act

to provide for the more efficient government of

the rebel States," shall, during the operation of

said act, be by ballot; and all officers making

the said registration of voters and conducting

said elections shall, before entering upon the discharge

of their duties, take and subscribe the

oath prescribed by the act approved July 2, 1S62,

entitled " An act to prescribe an oath of ofiice :"

j

been the true intent and meaning of the act of

the 2d day of March, 18tJ7, entitled "An act to

provide for the more eflicient government of the

reljel States," and the act supplementary thereto

passed the 23d of March, 1867, tliat the governments

then existing in the rebel States of Virginia,

North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia,

Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana, Florida, Texas,

and Arkansas, were not legal State governments,

and that thereafter said governments, if continued,

were to be continued subject In all

respects to the military commanders of the respective

districts, and to the paramount authority

of Congress.

Sec. 2. That the commander of any district

named in said act shall have power, subject to

the disapproval of the general of the army of the

United States, and to have eCect until disapproved,

whenever, in the opinion of such commander,

the proper administration of said act

shall require it, to suspend or remove from office,

or from the performance of official duties,

and the exercise of official powers, any officer or

person holding or exercising, or professing to

hold or exercise, anj' civil or military office or

duty in such district, under any power, election,

appointment, or authority derived from, or

granted by, or claimed under, any so called

.State, or the government thereof, or any municipal

or other division thereof, and upon such suspension

or removal such commander, subject to

the approval of the general as aforesaid, shall

have power to provide from time to time for the

performance of t!ie said duties of such officer or

person so suspended or removed, by the detail of

some competent oflicer or soldier of the army, or

by the appointment of some other person to

perform the same, end to fill vacancies occasioned

by death, resignation, or otherwise.

Sec. 8. That the general of the army of the

United States shall be invested with all the powers

of suspension, removal, appointment, and

detaching granted in the preceding section to

district commanders.

Provided, That if any person shall knowingly

and falsely take and subscribe any oath in this

act prescribed, such person so offending and

being thereof duly convicted, shall be suliject to

the pains, penalties, and disabilities which by

law are provided for the punishment of the crime

Sec. 4. That the acts of the ofiicers of the army,

already done in removing in Sitid districts

persons exercising the functions of civil officers,

and appointing others in their stead, are hereby

confirmed provided that any ; persons heretofore

or hereafter appointed by any district commander

to exercise the functions of any civil

office may be removed either by the military officer

in command of the district or by the "general

of the army, and it shall be the duty of such

commander to remove from office, as aforesaid,

all persons who are disloyal to the government

of the United States, or who use their official influence

in any manner to hinder, delay, prevent

or obstruct the due and proper administration of

this act and the acts to which it is supplementary.

Sec. 5. That the boards of registration provided

for in the act entitled "An act supplementary

to an act entitled "An act to provide for the more

efficient government of the rebel States,' passed

March 2, 1867, and to facilitate restoration."

passed March 23, 18G7, shall have power, and it

shall be their duty, before allowing the registration

of any person, to ascertain, upon such facts

or information as they can obtain, whether such

person is entitled to be registered under said act,

Section 1. That his hereby declared to have and the oath required by said act shall not be


j

82 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868.

conclusive on such question; anri no person

shall be registered unless such board shall decide

that be is entitled thereto; and such board

shall also have jiower to examine under oath, to

be administered bj- any member of such board,

any one touching the qualification of any person

claiming registration ; but in every case of refusal

!iy tlie board to register an applicant, and

in every case of striking his name from the list,

as hereinafter provided, the board shall make a

note or memorandum, which shall be returned

with the registration list to the commanding

general of tlie district, setting forth the ground

of such refusal or such striking from the list;

provided that no person shall be disqualified as a

member of any board of registration by reason

of race or color.

Sec. 6. That the true intent and meaning of

the oath presented in said supj^lementarv act is

(among other things) that no person who has

been a member of the Legislature of any State,

or who has held any executive or judicial office

in any State, whether he has taken an oath to

support the Constitution of the United States or

not, and whether he was holding such office at

the commencement of the rebellion or had held

it before, and who has afterwards encaged in insun-ection

or rebellion against the United States

or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof, is

entitled to be registered or to vote; and the

words "executive or judicial" office in any

State, in said oath mentioned, shall be construed

to include all civil offices created by law for the

administration of any general law of a State or

for the administration of justice.

Sec. 7. That the time for completing the original

registration provided for in any act may, in

the discretion of the commander of anv district,

be extended to the 1st day of October, 1S67 ; and

the board of registration shall have power' and

It shall be their duty, commencing fourteen days

prior to any election under said act, and upon

reasonable public notice of the time and place

thereof, to revise for a period of five days the

registration lists, and upon being satisfied that

any person not entitled thereto has been registered,

to strike the name of such person from

the list, and such person shall not be allowed to

vote. And such board shall also, during the

same period, add to each registry the names of

all persons who at that time possess the qualifications

re'quired by said act, who have not been

already registered, and no person shall at any

time be entitled to be registered or to vote by

reason of any executive pardon or amnesty, for

any act or thing which, without such pardon or

amnesty, would disqualify him from registration

or voting.

Sec. 8. That all members of said boards of

registration, and all persons hereafter elected or

appointed to office in said military districts under

any so-called State or municipal authority,

or by detail or appointment of the district commander,

shall be required to take and subscribe

to the oath of office prescribed by law for the officers

of the United States.

Sec. 9. That no district commander or member

of the board of registration, or any officer or

appointee acting under them, shall be bound in

his action by any opinion of any civil officer of

the United States.

Sec. 10. That section four of said last-named

.

;

;

act shall ))e construed to authorize the commanduig

general named therein, whenever he shall

it needful, to remove any member of a

board of registration, and to appoint another in

his stead, and to fill any vacancy in such board.

11. That all the provisions of this act

and of the acts to which this is supplementarv'

shall be construed liberally, to the end that a'll

the intents thereof may be fully . and perfectly

i- j

earned out.

I

I deem

;

j

I Sec.

III.—PROORESS OF I.MP.\UTI.\LSUFFnAnE

At the beginning of _

the year lbU6, the legisla-

tion in the several States of the Federal Union

concerning the i

right of suffrage, was as follows :

Only five I States—:\Iaine, Vermont, Xew Hampshire,

Massachusetts, ;

Rhode Island—made no

legal distinction among , their citizens on the

ground of color. In New 1 York, colored citizens

to be voters must be owners I

of a freehold worth

55-50. In Ohio, which limits the elective franchise

to " every I

white male citizen " of the United

States, the courts have held that everv person

of one-half white blood is a " white malecit-

izen '

I within the Constitution, and that the burden

of proof is with the challenging party, to

show that the person is more than half black

All the other States denied the right of suffrage

to the negro. Indians had a right of voting in

the New England States, in Michigan, Wiscon- I

sm, California, and Minnesota. Chinamen were

expressly excluded in California, Oregon and

Nevada. Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin Minnesota,

Oregon, Kansas, and Illinois, adniitted as

voters those not yet citizens. A vote to extend

the right of suffrage to negroes, was taken In

1^65. in Connecticut (Oct. 2), Colorado (Sept )

Wisconsin (Nov. 7), and Minnesota (\ov' 7)

All these four States declared against negro suffrage.*

On Dec. IS. 1S65, a resolution offered bv Mr

Thornton (Dem., 111.), "that anv extension of

the elective franchise to persons in the States

either by act of the President or of Congress'

would be an assumption of power which nothing

in the Constitution of the United States would

warrant, and that to avoid everv danger of conflict,

the settlement of this que'stion should be

referred to the several States," was laid on the

table by a vote of—yeas 111, nays 46.

On May 21, 1S66, a resolution offered (Feb 26

ISCC) by Mr. Defrees (Rep.. Ind.), "that it is the i

opinion of this House that Congress has no constitutional

right to fix the qualification of electors

in the several States " was referred to the '

Committee on the Judiciary—yeas S6, nays 80 i

On Dec. 18, 1866, a bill conferring the elective

franchise in the District of Columbia upon every

male person without any distinction on account i

of color or race, passed the Senate by a vote of

yeas 82, nays 13; on the following day the bill

P^f^^i" *^^ "°"^e-yeas 12S, nays 46. "On Jan.

7, 18fa7, the bill was vetoed. The Senate on the

same day, passed the bill over the veto—yeas 29

nays 10 ; the House passed it on Jan 8—veaa

118, nays 88.

On Jan. 15, 1867, the House passed a bill for

the admission of Nebraska into the Union, upon

•A full accost of the lawj in the wreral SUIm on

'


the fundamental condition that there shall be,

within the State of Nebraska, no denial of the

elective franchise or of any other right, to any

person by reason of race or color, except Indians

not taxed, and upon the further fundamental

condition that the Legislature of Nebraska shall

declare the assent of the State to the foregoing

condition, and shall transmit a copy of the act

to the President. The bill was vetoed by the

President on Jan. 30. The Senate passed it over

the veto on Feb. 8—yeas 30, nays i) ; the House

on Feb. 9—yeas 120, nays 44.

On Jan. 29, a bill similar to the preceding for

the admission of Colorado was vetoed, and no

vote was subsequently taken upon it.

On Jan. 10, a bill regulating the elective franchise

on the same basis in all Territories was

adopted.

On Feb. 6, 1867, the lower branch of the Tennessee

Legislature passed a bill striking the word

" white " from the franchise law of the State

yeas 38, nays '2i\ On Feb 18, the Senate concurred—yeas

14, nays 7. On March 21, the supreme

court of the State unanimously sustained

the constitutionality of the franchise law. In

August, the negroes, for the first time, exercised

:


THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 186S.

the franchise, at the election fcr Governor, at

which the Republican candidate received a majority

of more than 50,000 votes.

On April 6, a joint resolution was passed by

the Legislature of Ohio to propose an amendment

to the State constitution, striking the word

" white " from the franchise law of the State. A

popular vote on this amendment was taken at

the October election, when it was rejected by a

majority of ,5*1,629.

In November, 1867, a special vote was taken

in Minnesota and Kansas on proposed amendments

to the State constitutions, extending the

elective franchise to persons irrespective of

color. In both States the amendments were rejected,

by 1,248 majority in Minnesota, and

9,071 majority in Kansas. In Kansas a special

vote was taken at the same time on an amendment

extending the elective franchise to women.

It was also rejected by 10,658 majority.

In Wisconsin, in 1.S4S, an amendment to the

State constitution giving colored persons the

right of suffrage was submitted to the people,

and received a majority. The Supreme Court, in

1886, decided that that vote was sufficient. Negroes

are entitled to vote in that State.

THE IMPEACHMENT QUESTION.

favor of impeachment, and reported thus

Eenolved, That the Committee on the Judiciary

be discharged from the further consideration

of the proposed impeachment of the President

of the United States, and that the subject

be laid upon the table.

Messrs. Marshall and Eldridge (Democrats)

;

i

1

l

On the 7tli of January, 1867, Mr. James M.

Ashley (Rep.) Member of Congress from Ohio,

rising to a question of privilege, submitted the

foUowing, which was agreed to

" I do impeach Andrew Johnson, Vice-President

and acting President of the United States,

were of course opposed to the whole proceeding.

The reports we'e received and laid over for a

few days. On the 6th of December the House

took up the report. There was no real debate,

the opponents of impeachment using up the ses-

of high crimes and misdemeanors. I charge him

with a usurpation of power and violation of law,

in that he has corruptly used the appointing

sion in motions to adjourn, for call of the House,

&c. The next day the report came up, and after

a little more fillibustering, the House reached the

power ; in that he has corruptly used the par- main business, and the resolution "that Andrew

doning power ; in that he h;is corruptly used the Johnson, President of the United States, be im-

veto power ; in that he has corruptly disposed of peached of high crimes and misdemeanors," was

the public property of the United States ; in that lost—yeas, 56 ; nays, 109 ; absent or not voting,

he has corruptly interfered in elections, and 22. Thus closed the impeachment movement.

committed acts, and conspired with others to AVe give the following analysis of the vote.

commit acts which, in contemplation of the Con- The figures before the names indicate the Disstitution,

are high crimes and misdemeanors." trict from which the Member comes, (Democrats

Mr. Ashley appended a resolution directing in Italic.)

the Judiciary Committee to make a thorough investigation

in the matter, and the House, on the THOSE WHO VOTED FOR IMPEACHMENT.

same day, adopted the resolution by 107 yeas to

MAINE—1.

39 nays. The Committee began to take testimony 1—John Lynch.

on the 6th of February, and continued at inter-

NEW HAMPSHIRE—2.

vals for several months. On the 25th of No- 1—Jacob H. Ela, 2—Aaron F. Stevens.

vember, they sent in an enormous mass of testi-

MASSACHUSETTS—2.

mony, (printed in 1163 pages,) and submitted 7—George S. Boutwell, 5—Benjamin F. Butler.

therewith their report, or rather three reports.

KBW YORK—3.

Messrs. Boutwell, Williams, Thomas, Lawrence 22—John C. Churchill, 27—Hamilton Ward.

and Churchill agreed in favor of impeachment, 25—William H. Kelsej'.

and submitted this resolution :

Re.wlved, That Andrew Johnson, President

of the United States, be

crimes and misdemeanors.

impeached of high

Messrs. Wilson and Woodbridge wei'e not in

PENNSYLVANIA—9.

7—.John JL Broomall, 2—Charles O'Neill,

21—John Covode, 9—Thaddeus Stevens,

4—William D. Kelley, 23—Thomas Williams,

13—Ulysses Mercer, IS—Stephen F. Wilson,

3—Leonard Myers.

MARYLAND— 1.

4—Francis Thomas.

OHIO—,'5.

10—James M. Ashley, 4—William Lawrence,

6—Reader W. Clarke, 3—Robert 0. Schenck,

17—Ephraim R. Eckley.




INDIANA—6.

6—John Coburn, 8—Godlove S. Orth,

3—Morton C. Hunter, 11—John P. C. Shanks,

5—George W. Julian, 10—William Williams.

MICHIGAN—1.

5—Kowla» E. Trowbridge.

ILLINOIS—6.

7—li'y P. H. Bromwell, 4—Abner 0. Harding,

8—Shelby M. CuUom, 1—Norman B. Judd,

2—Jno. F. Farnsworth, At large—Jno. A. Logan.

WISCONSIN—8.

3—.imasa Cobb,

'2.—Benj. F. Hopkins,

1—Halbert E. Paine.

MINNESOTA—1.

2—Ignatius Donnelly.

IOWA—2.

2—Hiram Price, 4—WilliamLoughridge.

MISSOURI— 7.

9—Geo. W. Anderson, 2—Car'n A. Newcomb,

4—Joseph J. Gravely, 1—William A. Pile,

7—Benjamin F. Loan, G—Robert T. Van Horn

5—Joseph W McClurg.

TENNESSEE— 6.

6—Samuel -M. Arnell, S—David A. Nunn,

2—Horace Maynard, 3—William B. Stokes,

4—James Mullins,



5—John Trimble.

CALIFORNIA— 1.

2—William Higby.

KANSAS—1.

1—Sidney Clarke.

Total voting in the alBrmative, 57— all Republicans.

THOSE VOTING AGAINST IMPEACHJIENT.

>UINE 1.

2—Sidney Perham, 4—.John A. Peters,

3—James G. Blaine, 5—Frederick A. Pike.

NEW HAMPSHIRE—1.

3—Jacob Benton.

VERMONT—.3.

2—Luke P. Poland, 1—Fred.E.Woodbridge,

S—Worthington C. Smith.




1

— —


— —


(

DELAWARB—1.

John A. Nicholson.

MARTLA.ST)—t.

2 Stevenson Archer, 3— 'harles E.Phelpf,

1 Hiram JfcOullough. 5 Frederick Stone.

WE.ST VIRGINIA—2.

1—Chester D. Hubbard, S—Daniel Polsley,

OHIO—13.

10—John A. Bingham, .5— William Mnngen,

9—Ralph P. Buckland, 1.5—Tobias H. Plants,

2—Samuel F. Cary, 18— lUifus P. Spalding,

1— Benj'n Eggleston, 12 PhU. Van Trump,

19—James A. Garfield, 14—Martin Welker,

S—Corn, W Hamilton, 11—John T. AViUon,

13 George W. Morgan.

INDIANA—i.

4 Wm. S. ITolman, 1— Wm. E. Xiblack,

2 Michael 0. Kerr, 7— Il'y D. Washburn.

MICHIGAN—t.

1—Fernan. C. Beaman, 4—Thomas W. Ferry,

(J—John F. Driggs, 2—Charles Upson.

KENTUCKY—fi.

S George J>r. Adams, 5 Axa P. Grover,

7 James R. Beck, 6 Thomas L. Jones,

3 Jacobs. Godaday, 4 J. Proctor Knott.

ILLINOIS—7.

1:2-Jehu Baker, W-SamH S. Marshall,

\Q—Albert G. Burr, 9— Levels W.Ross,

6—Burton C. Cook, 3—ElihuB.Washbm-ne,

b—Ebon C. Ingersoll.

WISCONSIN—3.

4 Chas. A. Eldridge, ti—Cad. C. Washburne,

5—Philetus Sawyer.

lowa—1.

3—William B. Allison, 6— Asahel W. Hubbard,

5—Grenville M. Dodge, 1—James F. Wilson.

MISSOURI—1.

8—John F. Benjamin.

TENNESSEE—1.

7—Isaac R. Hawkins.

CALIFORNU—2.

MASSACHCSETT.?—7.

1 Sanme B. A-vtell, 8 James A. Johnson.

2—Oakes Ames, 1—Thomas D. Eliot,

NEVADA—1.

8—John D. Baldwin, 4—Samuel Hooper, I—Delos R. Ashley.

6—Nathaniel P. Banks, 9—Wm. B. Washburn, Total voting in the negative, 108, of whom 67

10—Henry L. Dawes.

were Republicans, and 41 were Democrats.

RHODE ISLAND—1.

ABSENT OR NOT VOTING.

2—Nathan F. Dixon.

Illinois— 13—Green B. Raum.

CONNECTICUT 1.

Indiana—9—Schuyler Colfax.

4 Wm. H. Barnum^ 1 Rich. D. Hubbard., Kentucky—3 John Y. Broien ; 1 Law-

2 Jidms Botchkiss, 3—H'yH. Starkweather. rence S. Trimble: 9 John t). Yoiimg.

NEW YORK— 20.

(These three are not yet in the House.)

21—Alex'r H. Bailey, 2r)—Wm. S. Lincoln, Massachusetts—-3—Ginery Twitchell.

8 James Brooki)., 18—James M. Marvin. Michigan—3—Austin Blair.

7 John W. Chanler, 2.3—Dennis McCarthy, Minnesota—1—William Windom.

IC—Orange Ferris, ^4—John r. X. Pniyn, Missouri—8 James R. McConnick.

19—William C. Fields, 10—AVm. H. Robertson, Nebraska—1—John Taffe.

15—John A. Griswold, 8— Wni. E. Robinson. New Jersey—1—William Moore.

17—Calvin T. Hulburd, ^—Thmnm E.Rimcart, New York—2 Demas Barnes ; 13—Thomas

3(J J J/. Humphrey, 1 Stephen Taber, Cornell; 4 John Fox; 5 John Morrissey ;

12—John H. Ketcham, 31—Henry Van Aernam, 24—Theodore M. Pomeroy ; 28—Lewis Selye

20—Addison H. Laflin, II—Chas. H. Van Wyck. 29—Burt Van Horn ; 9 Fernando Wood.

NEW JERSEY—4.

Ohio—7—Samuel Shellabaiger.

1— Charles Haighf, 4—John Hill,

Oregon—1— Rufus Mallory.

5—George A. Halsey, 3 Ohnrle-iSitgreaves. Pennsylvania—10—Henry L. Cake ; 20—Dar-

PENNSYLVANIA—11.

win A. Finney; 17—Daniel J. Morrill; 19

6 Ben'fn M. Bayer, 22—James K. Moorhead,

8 J. Lawrence Getz, 1 SnmHJ. Randall,

l.T A. J. Glossbretiner, 5—Caleb N. Taylor,

16—William H. Koontz,ll— />. M. VanAuken,

%i—Geo. V. Lawrence, 12 G. W. Woodward,

14—George F. Miller.


— ;

Glenni W. Scofield.

Rhode Island—1—Thomas A. Jenckes.

Tennessee— 1— Robert B. Butler.

West Virginia— 2—Bethuel M. Kitchen.

Total absent or not voting, 22 ; of whom 18

are Republicans and 4 are Democrats.


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as See Page 90.


, Chili

1 China

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868.

UNITED STATES 'GOVERNMENT.

December 15th, 1867.

THE EXECUTIVE.

ANDREW JOHNSON, of Tennessee, President of the United States Salary $25,00C

BENJAMIN F. WADE, of Ohio, President pro tempore oj' the Senate " 8,000

TOE CABINET.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, of New York. Secretary of State Salary $8,000

HUGH Mcculloch, of Indiana, Secretary of the' Treastinj

" 8,000

ULYSSES S. GRANT, of Illinois. Secretary of War (ad interim)

" S,OUO

GIDEON WELLES, of Connecticut. Secretary of the Nary " 8,000

••

ORVILLE H. BROWSING, of Hlinols, Secretary of the Interior

8,000

HENTJY STANBERY, of Ohio, JZrorH^y-Gf/i^mi

"

,

8,000

ALEXANDER W. R^VNDALL. of Wisconsin. Postmaster. General

" 8,000

TSE JUDICIARY.

SUPP.EME COXntT OF TUE UXITED STATES.

SALMON P. CHASE, of Ohio, Chief Justice ,..,. .., Salary $0,500

Salary of Associate Justices, $i>,000.

David Da'\'is, of Illinois, Associate Justice.

Noah H. Swaykk, of Ohio, " "

Samuwl F. Miller, of Iowa. " "

Stephejv J. Field, of Cal . " "

Court meets first Monday in December, at Washington.

Nathax Cliffokd, of Maine, Associate Justice.

Samuel Nelsox, of N. r.,

Robert C. Grieb, of Penu.,

Jamks M. Wayxs. of Ga.,

MIIVISTERS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES.

EN-yOYS EXTRAORDIXAUY AXD 2nSISTERS PLEXIPOTEN^TJARY.

Country. Capital. Ministers. Salarv. When app'd.

"

Austria

Vienna .,.. ..$12,000.... 1867

Brazil Rio Janeiro .James Watson Webb, N. Y. . . . , . . . . 12,000. . . . 1861

Santiago Judson KJlijatrick,N J 10,000.. 1865

!

France

Great Britain

Italv

Mexico

Pern

Prussia

Russia

Spain

Pekin

Paris

London

Florence

Mexico

Lima

Berlin

St. Petersburg

Madrid

.Anson BurImgame,Ma8s 12,000 ...1861

,..John.\. Dix.N. Y 17,500... 18G6

Charles Francis Adams, Mass 17,500 1861

George P. Marsh, Vt 12.000... 1861

Edward Lee Plumb (Charge d'Affalres)12,000....18C7

A. P Hovey.Ind ..,..,. 10,000. ,..1865

George Bancroft Jilass , 12,000... 1867

Caesius M. Clay,Ky . 12.GC0....1863

JohuP. Hale.N.H , 12,000.... 1865

MINISTERS RESIDSyT.

Argentine Republic

Belgimu

Bolivia

Costa Rica

Denmark

Ecuador

Guatemala

Hawaiian Islands

Buenos Ayres

Brussels

La Paz

San Jose

Copenhagen

Quito

Guatemala

Honolulu

Alexander Asboth, Mo

.Henry S. Sant'ord, Conn

Albert G. Lawrence, R.I

George H. Yeaman,Ky

Fitz Heurv Warren. Iowa

Edward M . McCook, Ohio .'

7,500 1866

7,500. ,..1801

7,500. .1N33

7,500. . . 18G6

7,500... 1865

7,500.. ..18(56

7,500 1865

7,500 1866

Honduras Comavagua R. H Rousseau, Ky 7,500 1866

Jiipan Yedo RobcrtB. Van Valkenburgh. N. Y 7,500.. .1866

Netherlands Hague Hugh Ewlng, Kansas .... 7,500... 1866

U. S. of Colombia Bogota Peter J. Sullivan. Ohio ,.. 7,500... 1867

Nicaragua Nicaragua .\ndrew B. Dickinson, NY 7,500 1863

Paraguay Asuncion Charles A. Washburne,Cal 7,500.... 1861

Portugal Lisbon James E. Harvey, Pa 7,500... .1861

Sweden and Norway.... Stockholm Joseph J. Bartlett.N.Y 7,500 ...1867

Switzerland Berne George Harrington, D.C 7,500. ...1865

Turkey Constantinople Edward Joy Morris. Pa.,..,...., . 7,500.... 1861

Venezuela Caraccas .Thomas A. Stilwell, Ind 7,500. . . .1867

MINISTERS RESIDENT AND CONSULS GENERAL.

Haytl Port-au-Prince....-, 7,500. .. .1865

Liberia Monrovia John Seys, Tenn 4,000... .1866


THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 18GS.

XLth CONGRESS.

First Session began March i, 18(57, Immodlately on the expiration of the XXXIXth Cougrebs.

The fcocond Session besan on the first JIoujay of December, 1807.

SE!VATE.

BEXJAMIX F. AVADE, of Ohio, President.

JoHJt W. FoiiXEY, of Penuaylvuiiia, Secretary,

Of those In the Senate on the 1st of December, 18C7, there were Kepublicans (in Soman), 42;

Democrats (in 7«at7c«) (.Thomas not sworn inj, 11. Whole number of Senators, Dec. 2, iStiT,

53. Whole number, in a full senate, including Suutbern States, 70. The figures before the

name ludicate ibe year iu which i.ou liie 3d ilarch; tho term of the Senator eiplres.

OALIFORXIA.

Term Ex. Seuator. Home Poet Office.

1869 John Conness Sacramento

1873 Cornelius Cole Santa Cruz.

COXNKOTICUT.

1869 James Di.ron Hartford

. . . .

1873 Orris S. I'crry iNorwalk.

DELAWAKK.

1871 WiUard Saulnuuri/ Georgetown.

1873 Jamca A. JJajard WilmingiOL

ILLINOIS.

1871 Richard Yates .Tacksonvillo.

1873 Lymau TrumDuil CUicai^o.

IKDIASTA.

1869 Tliomafi A. Ji"«f//'/rA-.v.. .Indianapolis.

1873 Oliver i>. .Uorton Icdiauapolib.

IOWA.

1871 James W. Grimes Burlington.

1873 James Harlan Mount iMea.sant.

K-UfSAS.

1871 Edmund G. Rosa Lawrence.

1873 Samuel C. Pomeroy Atchison.

BLKSTirCEY.

1871 James Guthrie Louisville.

1873 (garret iJaois Paris.

MAIXJC.

1869 Lot M. Morrill Augusta.

1871 Wm. Pitt Fcssenden Portland.

MASSAOHrSKTTS

1869 Charles Sumner Boston. •

1871 Henry Wilson XaticU.

MARYLAND.

1869 Eevprdy Johnxoii Baltimore.

1873 Philip i'rancJis Thomas. Baltimore.

XICHIGAX.

1889 Zacharlah Chandler... .Detroit.

1871 Jacob M. Howard Detroit.

MINNESOTA.

1869 Alexander Ramsey St. Paul.

1871 Daiuclh. yurtoii Winona.

MI8S0UKI.

1869 John B.Henderson Louisiana.

1873 Charles D. Drake St. Louib.

NEBKA8KA.

John M. Thayer Omaha.

Thomas W. Tipton Brownsville.

NEVADA.

1869 Wm. M. Stewart Nevada City.

1873 James AV. Xyo Carson Cltv

NEW HAMPSHIKE.

1871 Aaron H . Cragin Lebanoti

1873 James W. PatBcrson Hanover.

NEW .TEP.8ET.

18G9 Frederick T. Frelinghnysen. Newark.

1871 Alexander G. Cattell Camden.

NEW TOBK.

1869 EdwlnD. Morgan New York Cltv.

1873 Eoscoe Conkllng Utlca.

.

OHIO.

Term Ex. .Senator. Home Poit Ofllce.

1869 Benjamin F. Wade Jefferson.

lt;73 Jobn Sherman Alansllcld

OBEQON.

1871 Geor;;e H. Williams .... Portland.

1873 Henry W. Corbett Portland.

PKNNSTLVANIA.

1869 CharleD R, IhickaUw ...Bloomsburgh.

lo'i'6 Simon Cameron Harriabur^h.

ItnODE ISLANT>

1869 William Sprague Providence.

1871 Henry ii. .d.uthony Providence.

TENNESSEE.

1869 David T. Patterxon. ....Gxcua-^me.

1371 Joseph S. Fowler Xashville.

VEKMONT.

1869 (ieorge F.Edmunds Burlington.

1873 Jubtiu S. Morrill. Stratford.

WEST VTRniNlA.

1869 Peter G. Van Winkle... Parkersburgh.

1371 VVaitmanT. Willey Morjjautown.

WISCONSIN.

1867 Timothy O. Howe Green Bay.

I'JtiU Jaiiwa ic. I)oolittle fiaciue.

XOT TET AI>MITTED.

ALABAMA.

1867 George S. UouMoii Huntsville.

1871 Zewin E. Pamoiis Talladega.

AKKASrSAS.

1867 E. Baxter Batesville.

1871 William D. Snow Pino Bluff.

OOLORADO.

.TeromeB. Chaffee Central City,

John Evans Denver.

FLOKIDA.

1807 William Marvin Key West.

1871 WUkeraoii Call Tallahassee.

GEOKGIA.

1867 Serschel V. John>


UOUSX: OF REPRESENTATIVES.

SCHUYLER COI.FAX, of South Bend, Indiana, Speaker.

Edward McPhebson of Gettysburg, Penu., Clerk.

[Republicans in Roman, 143 ; Democrats in Italic-'^, 49 ; whole number admitted, Dec. 15,

1867, lS)o. Whole number of members wiien all the States are tuUy represented, 243. Those

marked with a blar C) were members of the last preceding (XXXIXlhj Congress, t Seats

contested. One vacancy_8th Ohio.

OALIFOBSIA.

Samuel B. Axttll San Francisco.

•William Higby Calaveras.

. . .

James A . doh nson Dowuie viUe

CONNECTiOCT.

1 Richard D. Huouara Hartford.

2 Julius Houhkinti .iiiddletown.

8 Henry H. Starkweather. Xorwicb.

4 t William B. iiuriLuiii Lakeville.

DELAWABE.

1 *John A . yichotsou Dover

IXLLNOIS.

1 NormanB. Judd Chicago.

2 *John F. Farnsworth St. Charles.

3 *Elihu C. W:i8hburae Galena.

4 *Abner C. Harding Muumouth.

5 *£bon C. XugersoU Peoria.

6 *BurtouC. LOOK Ottawa.

7 *Heury P. fl. Bromwell . .Charleston.

8 'Shelby M. Culloui Springfield.

9 *Leici^i rr. Rati Lewiston

10 Albert G. Burr Winchester.

il *Samuels. Marshall McLeansboro'.

Vi *Jehu Baker Belleville.

13 Green B. Kanm Harrisburg. •

At large—John A. Logan .. .Carbondale.

INDIANA.

1 "William E. Nihlavk Vincennes.

.

. 4

I 5

'Francis Thomas Frankville.

Frederick Stone Port Tobacco.

'

MASSACHUSETTS.

1 'Thomas D. Eliot New Bedford.

2 'Oakes Ames North Kaston.

I

3 Giuery Twicheli Brookline.

I

; 4 *Samuel Hooper Boston.

5 Benjamin F. Butler Gloucester.

I 6 *Nalhauiel P. Banks Wallham.

7 *George S. Bouiwell Groton.

I

' 8 *John D. Baldwin Worcester.

9 'William B. Washburn... Greenfield.

[

10 *HeuryL. Dawes Pittstield.

; 1

i 4

MICHIGAN.

1 *Fernando C. Beaman Adrian.

2 *Charles Upson Coldwater.

3 Austin Blair Jackson.

*Thomas W. Ferry Grand Haven,

5 'Rowland E.Trowbridge. Birmingham.

6 *Juhn F. Driggs East Sagiaav*'.

MINNESOTA.

'William Windom Winona.

2 'Ignatiua Donnelly Hastings

MISSOUBI.

I

! 1 tWilliam A. Pile St. Louis.

2 * Michael C. Kerr

8 Morton C. Hunter

4 Wiiiium S.HnlDnoi

C *George W..Julian

6 John tobnrn

7 *Henry D. Washburn

8 *GodloveS. OnU

9 *Schuyler Colfax

10 William Williams

11 JohnP. C. Shanks

Now Albany.

Bloomini^tou.

Aurora.

Centreville.

Indianapolis.

Clinton.

Lafayette.

South Bend

Warsaw.

Jay Court House.

2 Carman A. Newcomb ...Tunnel.

• 3 James li. Mc Corm,ck

4 Joseph J. Gravelly Stockton.

'.Joseph W. iMcClurg Linn Creek.

(i

IOWA.

1 *Jame8F WiUon

2 *Hiram Price

3 'Willjam B.Allison

4 William Loughrldge

Fairfield.

Davenport.

Dubuque.

Oskaloosa.

5 Granville M.'Dod-'e

6 *Asahel \V. Hubbard

Council Bluffs.

Sioux City.

KANSAS.

1 *Sldney Clarke Lawrence.

KBNTUCKY.

1 'Laurence S. Trimble

2 iJohn i'ouni/ Brown

S Jacob S. Goladaj/

4 J. ProcUyr Kiioti

5 Asa P. Grocer ..,

6 Thomas L- Jones

7 JameJi B. Beck

8 Georije Jf. Adams

9 John D. Young

MAINS.

Paducah.

Henderson.

Allensville.

Lebanon.

Owenton.

Newport.

Lexington.

Barbourville

OwingsvlUe.

1 'John Lyncli

2 "Sidney Perham

3 *Jame8G. Blaine

4 John A. Peters

5 «rrederick A. Pike

Portland.

Paris.

Augusta.

Bangor.

Calais.

MAKTLAND.

1 *Hiram MeCvUough Elkton.

2 Stevenson Archer Belair

S * Charles E. Phelps Baltimore.

^ Robert T. Van Horn Kansas City.

r 'Benjamin F. Loan St. Joseph.

8 'John F. Benjamin Shelby ville.

9 'tGeorge W. Anderson.. .Louisiana.

NEVADA.

1 'Deles R. Ashley Virginia City.

NEW HAMPSHIEE.

1 Jacob H. Ela Rochester.

2 Aaron F. Stevens Nashua.

3 Jacob Benton Lancaster.

NEW JSESBT.

1 William Moore May's Landing.

2 Charles Uaight Freehold.

3 Charles SUgreaves Philipsbnrg.

4 John Hill Boontou.

5 Geoi-ge A. Halsey Newark.

NEW TOKK.

'Stephen Taher R08lv_.

Demas Barnes Broo"klyn

William E. Robinson "

4 John Fox New York.

5 John Morrissey ,"

6 Thomas E. Stewart ^ ••

H ''John W. Chanter "

8 James Brooks "

9 Ferna7ido Wood "

10 William H. Robertson. ..Bedford

11 Charles H. Van VVyck...Middletown.

12 'John H. Ketcham Dover.

13 Thomas Cornell Rondout

14 John Y.L.Pruvn Albany.

15 "John A.Griswold Troy.

16 Orange Ferris Glenn's Falls.

17 'Calvin T. Hnlburd Brasher Falls.

18 'James M. Marvin Saratoga Springs.

A

.


40 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S68.


Interesting to Housekeepers.

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JAMES PYLE, Manufacturer,

350, 352, 354 & 356 Washington St., cor. Franklin,

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41


43 SPECIMEN OF

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The Go±ani Manufacturing Co.'s

,


.

THE TRIBUNE ALJIANAC FOR 1S6S. 43

ELECTION RETUKNS

BY STATES, COUNTIES, AND CONGRESSIONAL DISTIUCTS.

[The names of Counties and Towns which In 1867 gave a Democratic majority, are in Italics.'i

i

vote for President, 65,92; Lincoln's majority

Gov'noe.'GT. Oov.'6G. Pres.'M.

Counties, Etp.Dem. Iieij.Dt:)n. Vn.Dein.

Chambt)riaiu.Pill&'

Pills. Linc.McCl

Andro8coggin3424 1829.. ia ltfl4.. -^m.'. 193G

Aroostooii ...1607 1038.. 1931 150S . 1059 679

Cumberland.. 7009 57;i4.. SfiSO 5774.. 77S ft{65

Franklin 2270 1647.. 2626 14.53.. 224.S 17S)0

Haucock 2649 1989. 3334 ISS).. 3143 •87

Piscataquis... 1490 10W..1812 949.. 1.58H 916

Sagadahoc ...1877 1181.. 2523 844.. 2671 1120

Somersel .S815 3015.. 4362 2674..363;i 2632

Waldo UTi 8018.. 4069 2367.. S9;« 2724

Washington. .2940 2561.. 343:H 24,51.. 8099 2927

York 6240 6252.. 6809 5880.. 6305 5578

Total 57649 46035. .69626 41939. .61803 44211

Percent 55. bU 44.4U ..6;J.'.'3 S7 17.. 5b.au ^.1.10

9,115.

CONGRESS, 1867.

Districts. Hep. I)em. Aaron F. Stevens

1. Eia. Marcy. over Edward W. Har-

Belknap ....\


44 THK TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S6S.

RHODK ISLAND,

Gov'nor.'Gi. Gov.'66.

Counties. liep.Dem. liep.Vem.

Bur:

Bristol 403

Kent. 751

Newport 870

Providence ..1084

Washington.. 12&1

ide.Pi.

210..

833..

274..

1946..

415..

Burn. Pis

382 175.

628 209.

1332 232.

4595 1873.

1260 322.

Prks '64.

U/i.Uein.

t.Linc.McCl.

780 449

1365 815

1773 844

8152 5369

1622 993

Total 7372 3178.. 8197 2816.. 13692 8470

Percent ..73.34 26. Is. .61. 79. .Sh. 21

In 1S67, whole vote for Governor, 10,550; Ambrose

E. Burnside over Lyman Pierce, 4,194.

In 1866, total vote for Governor (inclading 165

Bcatterlus;), 11,178; Burnside over Pierce, 5,381.

James

In 1865, whole vote for Governor, 10,814 ;

Y. Smith's majority, 9,308. In ISW, whole vote

for President, 22,162 : Lincoln's majority, 5,222.

In l.'!60, whole vote for President, 19,951; Llncolu's

majority , 4,537.

CONGRESS, 1867.

Eastern Difitrict.—1houia.a A. Jenckes, P^ep.,

4,311 ; scattering, 101.

Western i>is'ip22S.. 1754 2.337.. 1666 2135

ColumWi.. 1696 3453.. 1965 aiSS.. 1914 3467

Crawford.. 5400 4018.. 6714 4969.. 6141 4526

Cumber I'd. &151 4-331.. 4030 4507.. .3604 4354

Dauphin... 5247

Delaware.. 3207

B/k 286

Erie 5504

I'nvette .... Sim

Forest 289

Franklin .. 3773

3847.. 5691

2143.. 8647

751.. 376

3128.. T»7

3859.. 3.569

319.. 100

3962.. 4299

4301. . 5-1+1

2262.. 3664

916.. ."48

3957.. 6911

4359.. :a21

76.. 85

4106.. :i8fi2

4220

2145

835

3722

4126

62

3921

Fulto/i .... 709

areene .... lUi'i

Huntlngdon3009

Indiana..,. 3608

1019.. 775

2753.. 1699

2-w'58.. 3248

1867.. 4458

1055.. 694

.3230.. 1.583

2239.. 83->l

2109.. 4:?20

906

:!074

2^177

2197

Jefferson .. 1S06

Juniata.... 1368

Lancaster .12799

Lawrence . 283:S

Lebanon... S625

Lehigh 3514

1851.. 2015

1665.. 1516

7475.. 14592

1281.. 8560

2501.. 4194

5141.. 4159

1912.. 1820

1814.. 1437

8592.. 14469

1110.. &103

2696.. 8780

5731.. 3908

1877

1753

8448

1S89

27i«

.5920

iiiZf-rne... 7985 10404.. 8733

Lyco7ning . 3601 4357. . 3871

McKean... 705 545.. 877

Mercer .... 8935 S414.. 4116

Mijiin 1565 1769.. 1725

Monroe.... 543 2359.. 705

12:M7..7645

4448. . S401

714.. 767

3757.. 4220

1S35..1643

2699.. 6S5

10045

4207

652

3569

1718

2698

Monigom'j/ GdS6 7683.. 7286 8ai2..6872 7943

Montour . wm l:'.83.. 1130 ISiL.llSO 1496

Aortham'n .'5027 5979.. 3859 6370.. 3726 6944

^'orthum'd 3023 3169.. 3361 3829.. 2915 3C08

Perry 2427 2292.. 25>^1 2495.. 2406 2446

niladelph.i9'»7 52015.. ^05 4S.817.. 55797 44032

Pike 235 9U1.. 360 1084.. 260 1180

Potter 11.34 '181.. 1346 6-i0..l;S90 (180

Schuylkill.. T2o6 8:«0.. 8T93 10514.. 78.51 9540

Snyder 1630 1199.. 1792 1326.. 1679 1368

Somerset.. 2756 1511.. 3062 1759.. 2788 1719

Sulliran... 421 683.. 436 761.. 869 660

Snsqneha'a 3947 2690.. 4429 29S1..4203 2959

Tioga 4090 1425.. 4791 1628.. 4673 1584

TTnlon 1675 1200.. 1991 1287. . 1945 1352

Venango... 3040 2610.. 4409 3492.. 3849 3341

Warren.... 2131 1459.. 2687 15r2.. 2.541 1505

Washingt'n 4618 4513.. 4977 4712.. 4951 4579

Waune 2320 25,86.. 2:«7 283:5.. 2274 3989

Weslinorel'd42n 515.. 5046 6113.. 4650 5977

Wyoming.. 1357 1474.. 1408 1499.. 1337 1402

York 1848 7671.. 5896 8780.. 5568 8500

Total... 266824 267746. 307274 290096.296:391 276316

Percent 49.91 50.U9. . .il .44 4S. 56. .61.75 iS.iS

In 1867, total vote for Judge of Supreme

Court, 53'1,570 ; Geo. Sharswood over Henry

W. Williams, 922. In 1866, whole vote for Governor,

597,370; John W. Gearv over Heister

CI ymer. 17,178. In 1865, whole vote for Auditor-

General (including 123 which were thrown

oaf), 454,2^3; J. F. Ilartranft over W. W. H.

Davi8,22,660. In 1864, whole vote for President,

572,707 ;

Lincoln's majority, 20,075.

CONGRESS, 1867.

In the Twelfth District, lately represented

by Charles Denison, Dem., the vote to fill the

vacancy caused by his death was as follows

Counties. Bep. Dem.

Ketcnara.Woodward.

Luzerne 8274 10155

Susquehanna 3804 2468

Tptal 12078 1262S

CSbo. W . "Woodward ov. Wm.W. Ketcbam, 515.

:


JjEGISLATUrb, 1868. SenateJlovse.Joint Bal.

Republicans 19 54 73

DemocraU 14 46 60

.

.

Hayes.Thurman.

Seneca 2789 3584,.

Shelbfj 1350 2393.. 1483 2071..

Stark 4669 4821 . . 4809 40.52 .

Eep. maj 5 13 Summit.... 3942 2274.. 8T19 1676.. 4192 1823

Trumbull.. 4525 2189.. 4623 1785.. 5089 1907

OHIO.

r?/^«rawas2746 :i483. 2997 3205.. 3020 3129

Gov'nok,'67.Seo.State,'66.Pki:8.'64. Union 2128 1537.. 2206 1270.. 2128 1255

Coimtiea. Rep.Beni .Hep .Deia. Un. l)em. Van Wert.. 1408 1408..148'J 1296.. 1294 1201

Hayes.Thurman. Smith.LeFev. Line McClel. rmto-n 1803 1634.. 1376 1363. 1119 1323

Adams 1*3 2300.. 2064 2012.. 2088 1932 Warren.... 3688 1905.. 3943 1'742.. 3851 1595

Allen 1T37 2e:M..1853 2257.. 1865 2241 Washington3r22 3718.. 3796 3169. 4028 3056

Ashland ...nf>i 24i;4..2175 2208.. 2156 2281 Wat/ne 3313 3704.. 3843 3402. 3181 3113

Asbtabula. 5061 1377.. 5004 936.. 6054 1039 Williams .. 2599 1801.. 2283 1680. 2197 1425

Athena 2598 1701.. 2647 1210.. 3024 1318 Wood 2420 1800.. 2783 1838., 2586 1493

Auglaize... 925 271S.. 1039 2'336.. llfrl 2374 Wyandotte 1609 2183.. 1731 1925.. 1740 1874

Belmont ... ^n 3971.. 8535 8560. . 3422 3498

Broicn 2407 8266.. 2822 3102.. 2699 2933 Total.. 243605 240622.256302 213006.265154 205568

Butler 2800

Percent

4886.

60.30

. 3021 4726. . 3219 4310

4a 70.. M. 54 45.46. . 6tt. 31 43.09

Carroll .... 16^4 1289.. 1751 1177.. 1794 1223

In 1867, whole vote for Governor, 484,227;

Champaign 2G23 2159. . 2760 6.. 2753

Rutherford

1755

B. Hayes over Allen G. Thurman,

Clarke 8290 2113.. 35C9 I960.. 3709 1641

2,983. lu 1866, total vote lor Secretary of State,

Clermont. . 3246 3737. . :i466 3613. . 3803 S318

469,908; Wm. H. Smith over BenJ. LeFever,

Clinton .... 2634 1628.. 2844 1499..

42,696.

2758 1397

In 1865, total vote for Governor, 417,720 :

Columbiana 4237 2919.. 4298 2387.. 4547 2501 Jacob Bolson Cox over J. W. Morean, 29,936;

Coshocton . 2102 2619.. 2098 24T2.. 2125 244' Cox's ma.lority over all, 29,.t46. In 1864, wnole

Crauiford. 1864 3497.. 1997 3179.. 1954 3112 vote for President, 470,722. Lincoln's majority,

Cuyahoga . 9673 7436. . 8631 5697. . 9987 5856

59,586; whole vote for Secretary, 419,649;

Darke 2661 3246.. 2881 2915.. 2598 2704

Smith's (Union) majority, 54,751. In 1860,

Defiance... 1009 1855.. 10?2 1666.. 116;^ 1594 whole vote for President, 442,441 ; Lincoln's

Delaware.. 2727 2:311.. 2827 1951.. 2827

majority, 20,779.

Erie 2480 1987.. 2988 1797.. 3033

CONSTITTITIGNAL AlTENDMEI^T, 1867.

Fairfield... 2056 3940.. 2139 3445.. ^484

The Ohio Legislature of ls67. resolved to

Fayette ... 17;« 154;3.. 1817 1318.. i860 1243 submit to a popular vote a constitutional

J^ ranklin . . AGm 7255.. 46.')2 6490.. 49*20 5756 amendment to strike out the word " white " in

Fulton 1902 1146.. 2066 1057.. 1965 970 the franchise law, and to disfranchise disloyal-

Gallia 2001 1902.. 2477 1370. . 2820 1174 ists. The vote was as follows

Geauga.... 2654 630.. 2512 403.. 2986 491 Counties. Yes. Xo., Counties. ».t, No.

Greene 3015 1857.. 39C; 1588.. 3886 1556 Adams 174 2437lLogan 2318 1943

Guernsey.. 2549 2052.. 2711 1913.. 26&1 1980 Allen 1364 2717iLnrain 3857 1944

Hamilton.. 19961 18437. .22118 18341.. 227U0 16598 Ashland 1979 2577 Lucas 3220 3074

zr,,^^^^..i. 0170 OKna ooco o-^^jft ffancock... 2172 2509.. 2272 2380.. oi^? 21' ')Qnn 2300 Ashtabula.. 4787 \2%f>\Mudison 1240 1710

Hardin .... 1770 1770.. 1749 1445.. 1613 1157 Athens 2278 1904 Mahoning... 2733 2642

Harrison .. 2112 1660.. 2122 1521.. 2178 1563 Auglaize 760 2839 Marion 1160 2046

Menry 955 1.544.. lOOfi 1402.. 924 1271 Belmont 3018 4212 Medina 2486 1745

/fiffWand.. 2881 2885.. 3050 2655.. 3105 2582 Brown 2171 8886 * Meigs 2:368 2425

Mocking... m^ 2129.. 1115 1819.. l;jS4 1887 Butler 2505 5060 Mercer 588 2355

Holmes 957 2988.. 942 2755.. 1068

Carroll 1485 1380 Miami 3004 2984

Huron 3683 2273.. 4010 2052.. 4441 2090 * Champaign 2288 2375 Monroe 9136 3535

Jackson ... 1857 1821.. 1929 1669.., 1955 1317 Clarke 2869 2392 Montgo-mery4


. .

.

oZ?^''} ^P*^ °^ Amendment, 472,327; maloritv

?S.?-'.f' Amendment on vote actuWcast

o«3o3- not voting on Amendment,

stltutlonal

12,^"u- «m-

majority against it. '

50,029

"""•,"«''* «"»•"

itl«f,^«l'l r Republican majorrnnir^o?

,''^v'*'--At a special election for

Congressln the Second District, to till vacancv

'•'-l«ig?»ti"n

rJT'^i^'J

of Uovernor

Richard Haye^

fimlth, Kep., received 9.431

barane votes-'

F (ary, Ind. Rtp., 10,S'j6TrharleJ

'^'"^ Carrover Smith, 'J59!

?ve"aH W

Democrats "ig tx'.'.'.'.'.'..'.::^

Dem.maj "7 "7

KENTUCKY.

Gov'koe,'67.ClekkAp.'6C.Pres.'G1.

BarneB.Helm.Kink'd.Hob'n.DuvLini VI


Grayson. 153 569 257

Haiu-ock . 53 543

Henderson 61 1083

Hopkins.. 216 959

McLean . . 44 51'.J

Muhlenb'go^ 633

Ohio 392 7G9

1


THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868. 47

Suiith.Brow.Ritter

Rankin.Jonps. Scat. 1,175 GollaUay over Curd, 5,444 ; over both,

Kenton... 974 1700 23 4,594.

Fendleton 478 920 — Legislature, 1867. Senate.House.Joint Bal.

Trimble.. 10 648 — Kepablicans 7 lo 17

Vemocrata 28 85 !ll3

79 1 Total... S839 9J&S 36 Third Party 3 5 8

.W Th08. L. Jones over

135 Wm. S. Kankin, 5,557,

— over all, 5,621. i

Total . . .2816 892J 1155

Hvp.D.ZdP.

John Young Brown, VII. Brown. Bttk.Han'n.

over BurwellC. latter,, 5o'/r6o« . 91 1046

7,767 ; over Kitter and Bo i/le 104 687

Sam. E. Smitli. 4,H.il. C/arke . . .162 763

Htp.Dem.i Fayette...^ 1257

III. Blakcv. Biio.\ Franklin. \m S4S

Allen 82 i\\ JeMnnmineli-i 614

Barren 56 104l|i


COXGKESS. 1807.

Districts. Rep.Dem.i Higbv.CoflVoth.

1

rLelm.Aitel.'San Joaquln.1731 1550

Frenno 54 321 TuoCitmne . .1116 1308

Inyo 102 104

Kern 172 3811 Total 16053 14786

Lou Angeles. 742 984' "Wm.Higbyover Jas.

Mariposa ... 651 799 W. Coffroth. 1,207.

Merced ...... 56 2531 111. Hartaon. Johnson.

Monterey ... 433 m^ Butte. 1080 1102

S.Bernar(iino24S 418 Viilnm. 25S 527

San Diego. . . 89 173 Di'/Sorlf.... 155 175

S. Fr'in ciKco . 71 50 10219 Humboldt... 698 371

S.Lui.tObixpoiZ'i 180 Klamath.... 145 213

San Mateo... 4.35 860 Lake 234 503

San Barbara. 311 305 Lassen 181 102

Santa Gtora 1896 2000 Marin 544 315

Santa Cruz.. 921 672 Mendocino .. 555 874

Stanislaus .. 225 447[N'apa 736 707

Tulare 2.52 618 Plumas 8;i4 698

Shasta 612 4fl8

Total....

18793 Sierra 1115 667

S. B. Axtel over T. Si.-


. , .

. .

1VE1V TORJft.

Sec. State,'67. Cokt'n,'67. Goveenob, '66. Sec.State.'SSJ^bs't.'M. Pee8't,'60.

;

'

Counties, Jiep. Dem. for Member s. Jiep. Bern. Cn. Dem. Un.Dem.

AIcKflan.N elsnn. Kep. Dem. Fenton. Hoffman. Barlow. Slocum, Line. McClel.

AXbany IftlSo 12292 . 7171 ST05, .. 115*4 11320.. 9762 9919.. 10206 12934.

1 Allegany 5640 2736 . 2420

.. 6:530 2621.. 4626 1911.. 6240 2501.

i Broome 4731 3589 . 1513 16. . . 5173 3375. 3965 2367.. 5003 3139.

Cattaraugus 4826 o563 . 1818 767.

I .. 5728 3118.. 8975 2495.. 5300 3575.

Cayuaa 6776 4393 . 2030 185. .. 7723 ; 4075.. 6120 3498. 7534 4408.

Chautauqua 7614 4053, 3390 15()8. 8750 S514. 6015 2797 8700 3992.

! Cheiimny 3168 8511

148. 3467 3382.. 2787 2928. 3292 3109.

Chenango .''125 4057 2929 1757 55T1 .3980. 4581 3162. 55.52 4033.

Clinton 3443 31S8 . 1216 849. S6&9 3589. 2741 2551.. 8471 3546.

Columbia 4846 5016 . 2200 2356. 5155 4883. 4427 4582.. 4876 5-2-40.

Cortland S477 2095 . 1597 984. SS72 2030.. 3115 1 1592.. 3983 2063.

! Delaware 4887 4226 . 3107 1827. 5:«8 S96S.. 4338 2979. 5297 42-19.

Dutchess 6827 6700 . 3859 2224. . 7281 6081.. 6068 5340. 7201 i 664a.

£yie 11774 13530, 4274 6353. . 125:58 13122.. 11547 19951.. 13061 13370.

' Essex 2S92 1971 1103 735. S089 1903 2466 1537.. 3224 2104.

• 1-ranklin 2758 2060. 954 51. 2858 1953. 2151 1219. 2839 1837.

rnlton&lXamilton3018

I

3003.. 1526 1425. ;283 2069. 2785 2519. 2972 2887.

Genesee 3531 2543.. . 1190 98. 3918 2495. 8291 2210.. 4030 2772.

i

; Greene 2820 3706.. . 1300 2230. 3210 3.532., 2568 8036. 8087 3897.

Herkimer 4698 3949. . 2623 1888. 5182 3831., 4241 3183. 5087 4207.

Itep.Dem,

Line. Others.

S8S5 11145

6443 2530

4554 2876

5955 3409

7922 3954

8481 3673

2949 2478

56S5 S686

3961 3270

5108 4722

3893 17)2

5001 3212

6763 C071

12430 10885

345-1 1793

3103 2402

Sill 2897

4464 2456

3137 3534

5302 8362

Jefl'erson (

Kings I

Lewis I

Livingston j

Madison

Monroe

Montgomery„ A^eic York

Niagara

Oneida

Onondaga

Ontario

Orange

Orleans

Oswego

Otsego

Putnam

Queens

Benisselaer

Michmond

Eockland

St. Lawrence

Saratoga I

Schenectady

Schoharie

Schuyler

Seneca

Steuben

Suffolk

SHllivan

Tioga

Tompldns

Ulater

Warren

"Washington

Wayne

Wefitch ejtter

Wyoming

Yates

Soldiers' vote

7296

17767

2882

4076

5362

9023

3306_

26098

4147

11158

10268

4780

6592

3219

7726

5740

11S2

2841

8892

1212

1212

9657

5175

2223

2634

2282

2419

6830

3316

2761

.3652

3935

6131

2473

5493

51.52

6328

3.546

2631

5506. . S510

£2391. . 8932

2781. 1182

3149. . 1927

3713 2265

8236.. 3713

3812.. 1721

85764. .17.507

4339.. 1»42

10553.. 7131

8^56 4576

3845. . 2230

6891. . 2912

2216. . 985

5442. . K351

5763. . 3104

1599. 640

.•^098. 1362

9:575. 4560

2415. 699

2081. 539

3593. 2844

4956. 3228

2182. 1442

4311. 1731

1883. 864

3128. 1105

5989. 2299

3313. 1596

S355. 925

2979. 1761

2926., 1941

7398., 1836

2261., 1102

3507., 2253

3913. 2042

9253. 2922

2314.. 1481

1632..

2235. 8147

13881. 19634

874. 3182

1014 4.-.55

422. 5923

2190 10006

1808, 3619

31121, 33462

32. . 4ri6

5154. . 12431

2842 11566

905. 5371

578. 7107

— 8585

1505. &568

2687. 6335

920. 1:529

1617 3611

3750.. 9580

SM5.. 1508

825. 1559

45. .; 10648

lWi9.. 6078

1476. 2469

2641.. 3092

343.. •2576

49.. 2767

195. 8021

1428. 40S3

231. 2987

1056.. 3939

922 4-136

2766!! 6769

852.. 2522

1077.. 5972

123.. 6021

3685. 7519

4105

368.. 2878

5314., 6815

29106., 18993

2670. 2399

8118. S706

8519.. 4586

8227.. 8154

3615., 3219

80677., 28740

3989., S986

iim..

9815

36r2.. 4291

6497.. 5803

2106. 2981

5480.. 6745

5797. 5093

1430.. 1046

4.574 2928

7504. 7823

2479. 1371

1973.. 1099

3146.. 7369

4191.. 5135

1998. 2424

4642. 2846

18S4.. 2161

3114.. 2434

5507. C030

3573. 3273

3521.. 2459

2779.. 3131

2952. 3621

7150.. 5346

1944.. 2023

3035. 4867

4026. 4873

8293. 5315

2298. 3403

1476. 2322

801

4428. 8592

20:Ji2.. 20838

1870. 3078

2813. 4580

2872.. 6182

6738.. 10203

3270.. 3519

53128.. S6681

3732. 4839

12048

7310. 10996

3057., 5409

5120. 6784

1961.. 3753

4395. 8793

4802.. 6151

1114.. UI3

ST21..

7368. 9159

1732.. 156-4

1609. 1445

2229. 1C864

3842. 5909

1951.. 2263

3765.. 2870

1547.. 2576

2744.. 2680

4262. 8099

2489. 4305

2759.. 2960

2086. 3780

243?.. 4518

5336.. 0900

1821.. 2399

2552.. 6221

3436.. 6122

6076. 7607

1724.. 4123

1313. 3036

435.

5842. 8?96

25726. 1.5883

2911., 3257

35.53. 5178

3748. 6289

0107. 10808

3908. 3528

73709., S3290

4287.. 4992

10916., 12508

8718., 11243

3989. 5764

6633. 5898

2458. 3859

6238.. 9076

6047. 6543

1618.. 1243

3749

9377. 8464

2874.. 1408

2287. 1410

4048. 11324

4715 5900

2309.. 2154

4801.. 3279

1893. 2551

3267. 3025

5813,. 82.50

-1027. 3756

3.548. 2944

3018. 3760

2996. 4348

7766. C775

2169. 2719

8642. 6173

1392. 66G8

9.335. 6771

2568.

1693. . 3014

5581

20583

2274

3261

3216

7391

3253

62293

3741

9011

7222

3634

con

2246

5414

5061

1325

4392

8421

2370

2309

4007

4552

IBM

4213

1708

2990

5023

3519

3170

2743

3026

6252

1970

3482

3938

8081

2390

1466

Total 325099 373029 134721 133226. .366315 352.5-26. .301055 273198. .308735 361986. .362646 312510

Percent 46.67 63.43 5-2.79 47.-21.. 60.96 49.04.. 6'2.43 47.57.. 60.47 49.63.. 63.72 46.28

Vote foe otheb State Offioeks, 1867.

Offlces. Rep. Dem. Dem. Mai.

Controller Thomas Hillhouse 325,653. William F. Allen 572,517 46,859

Treaiurer Theodore B. Gates 325,201. AVhceler H. Bristol ... 372,769 47,568

Attorney- General Joshua M. Van Cott 325,328. Marshall B.Champlain. 372,648 47,320

State Engineer Archibald C. Powell 324,775. Van Rens. Richmond. .364,702 39,933

Canal Commi-ssiotierJohn M. Hammond 322,509. John D. Fay 372,786 50,277

Prvion Inspector Gilbert De La Matyr 325,018. Solomon Scheu 372,828 47,810

Judge of Appeals Charles Mason .324,477. Martin Grover 364,849. . . 40,372

Vote for Delegates at Large to State Convention, April -23, 1867 ; highest Republican, 154,721

highest Democrat, 133,-226j Kep. maj. 21,495. In 1866, vote for Governor, 718,841 ; Reuben E

Fenton (Rep.) over John T. Hoffman (Dem.), 13,789. In 1865, vote for Secretary of State, 574,253:

.

.

. , .

.

.

. .

.

, .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. ,

;


60 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868,

STATE SENATORS—1S67.

Districts.

I.

Queenn

Hep . Hem.

Simonson.Edwards.

2813 5039

Jiiclimond 1278 2357

/iiijrolk 8209 3830

Total TiflO 1122r3

Lewis A. Edwards over Jere-

miah biOiODSon, 3,836.

XI.

Goodrich.Pierce.

jBroofcZj/n—Wards,

1,2,3,4,5,7,11,13,

15,19,2li 9712 18690

James E. Pierce over'W'm.

A Goodrich, 3,978.

III.

Willey.Murphy.

Mroo!d>/n—^aTds,

6, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, 16,

17, 18; FiatOuah,

FlatlandK, Grcweaend.

New LoUh,

Meio Utrecht 7967 17914

Henry C. Muiphy over Geo.

P. "Willey, 9,947.

Eep.Tam.I.Dem..

rV. Leggat. Tweed. Ktrrijjnu.

Jf.y.Citu. I.. 103 1740 S02

U.. 71 198 56

III.. 131 371 2131

IV.


Total . . . .4731 3589 Harmony . . . .679 114

CATTARAUGUS CO.iKiantone 72 36

Aliegany 184 236 Mi n a MS.* 80

Ashford 183 140 Poland 269 48

CarroUton 63 86| Pomftet 487 374

.

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOE 186S.

K. Y. l»y TO'WA'S.l Towns. McKean.NeUon.

ALBANY CO. IColdspring 96 101

1867. Rep.DeniAConewaiigo 178 103

Wards. McKean.NeUoD. Dayton 143 77

AlbanvCity.l. 431 1353 East Otto 153 79

2.403 704 EUicottville ...144 175

3.474 545 Farmersville ..152 57

4. 439 351 Franklinville..l54 182

5. 185 198 Freedom IflC. 61

6. 373

7. 311

•' 8. 73:i

9. 9:«

" 10 1261

Tot. City.5>JH

Berne 345

Bethlehem ... 5.")(!

Towns. McKean.NelBon. I Towns. McKean.Nelson

Portland 225 163l Ghent 810 249

Ripley 207 165tGreenport 164 148

Sheridan 15 1361 Hillsdale 233 295

Sherman 347 62iHudsou, 1 153 197

Stockton 239

2 171 273

Vilenova ....189

3 217 197

We8tfleUl....429

" 4 236 255

320 Great Valley ... 162 138 Total.... 7614 453 Tot.Clty....776 922

841 Hinsdale 127 CHEMUNG CO. KinderhMok....410 4.S9

964 Humphrey 93 Ashland 124 Livingston 229 198

851 Ischua 82 Baldwin 105 129 New Lebanon. .170 21?

985 Leon 189 Big Flats 164 219 'Stockport 135 171

Little Valley... 138 Catlin 145 149 Siuyvesant 18? 254

7117 Lyndon 123 Chpmung 242 Taghkame 129 208

3:i') Machias 155 Erin 100

52; Mansfleld 154 Elmira 108

Total 4816 5016

Coeymans 23S 466 Napoli .166 ElmiraCity, 1.302 CORTLANK CO.

Gnilderland.. 48(> J74 New AH3ion....l87 130

2.165 Cineinnatus 150 140

Knox 276 122 Glean 252 261 " 3.278 Cortlandvllle..827 430

New Scotland. 4:55 333 Otto 159 74 " . 4.23S Cuyler 209 58

Rensserrv-ille.25it 443 Perry8buigh...l95 16

5.203 Freetown 126 63

AVatei-vliet .. .2029 23S7 Persia .119 171

6.186 Hartord 163 50

TVesterlo 314 298 Poitville 215 118

Homer 625 240

Randolph .

Tot.City.l2b-3 1364 Lapeer 92 73

Total . ...4938 3175 Salamanca . .180 Horseheads ..SOtJ 311 Marathon 210 154

ALLEGANY CO. . JSouth Valley 49 SoQthport 178 318 Preble 134 15:5

Alma 4; 81 Yorkshire .192 Veteran 317 2;il;Scott 213 5-1

Angelica 261 104

VauEtten....ll? 197| Solon 67 126

Alffed, 273 32 Total .... .4826 3563

Taylor 160 83

Allen 165 10| CAYCGA CO.

Total . . . ..S168 2511 Truxton 158 179

Amity 27S 157, Auburn 1 471 323 CHENANGO CO. Virgil 2o6 166

Almond 206

...304 162 Aftou 259 Willett 109 121

Andover 233

3 321 186 Bainbridge...282

Belfast 204

4 318 336 Columbus 240

Total 3477 2095

Birdsall 63

Coventry 198 DELAWARE CO.

Bolivar 142

Tot.City.1414 1007 German 94 Andes 344 218

Burns 148 94'Aur(iliuB ZH 286 Greene 419 Bovina 172 63

ClarkBville...l3o 25iBrutU8 . 327 189 Guilford 32.3 258 Colchester 339 251

Caneadea 200 174 Cato 308 147 Liiicklaen 169 451 Davenport 191 297

Centre ville ..165 34 Conquest 191 196 .McDonough . 157 107IDelhi 404 260

Cuba 291 214 Fleming 171 85 New Berlin ..317 275JFranklin 496 268

Friendship.. .257 1.57i Genoa 369 138 Norwich 550 527(Hamden 316 73

Granger 183 20:Ira 264 170 N.Norwich ..138 86;Hancock 275 294

Genesee 183 28 Ledyard 273 105 Otsellc 230 120Harper8fiekl...l55 138

Grove 88 94 Locke 173 60 Oxford 285 361!Kortright 16? 2S;7

Hume 322 94 Meiitz ^8 255 Pharsalia .... 96 179 Masonville 194 189

Independen'e215 71 Montezuma .. 99 158 Pitcher 173 131 Meredith 210 113

New Hudson. 184 55, Mora via 272 161 Ply mouth.... 193 Middletown....259 453

Rushford 280 75 Niles 220 201 Preston 93 Roxbury 183 326

Solo 208 174 Owasco 139 98 Sherburne ...411 Sidney 190 282

Ward 81 47 Scipio 233 119 Smith ville ...129 Stamford 185 187

"WestAlmond 108 54 Semproniu8..177 86 Smyrna 263 Tompkins 395 353

Wellsville ...314 217 Sennett 212 1'24

Walton 413 237

Willing., 163 65 Springport...240 211 Totsl.....5125

Wirt ...249 71 Sterling 321 189 CLINTON CO. Total 4887 4236

Summer Hill. 182 58 Altoiia 148 DUTCHESS CO.

Total ....5610 273(),Throop 143 114 Ausable 216 240 Amenia 292 225

BROOME CO. Venice 294 97 Beekmantown.274 170 Beekmau 188 95

Barker 189 166 Victory 262 1.39 Black Brook ...151 267 Clinton 254 206

Binghamton

Charaplain 295 338 Dover 265 259

City . 992 914 Total ....6776 4393 Chazy 353 158 East FishkiU... 199 3;;6

" Town. 171 1361 CHAUTAUQUA CO. Clinton 39 202 Fishkill 599 641

Chenango ....223 1031 Arkwright ...113 71 Dannemora ....141 37 Hyde Park 229 800

ColesvlUe . . . .4,55 306 Bustl 280 109 Ellenburgh ....220 293 La Grange 235 216

Conklln ......124 122 Carroll 250 43 Mooers 387 216 Milan 203 159

Fenton 170 llGCharlotte ...159 230 Peru 297 205 Northeast 217 194

Kirkwood ...135 154 Chautauqua. .381 240 Plattsburgh ...474 560 Pawling 273 140

Lisle 388 143, Cherry Creekl76 87

" -"-

Saranac 279 235|Pine Plains "-

. . . .166 133 —

Maine ., 815 129;ciymBr 258 33 Schuyler Falls. 171 166;PleaaantValley204 22-1

Nanti coke ...130 74!Dunkirk 397 573

PoughkeepBie..297 324

Sanford 279 SS:i\ Ellery 303 83 Total &145 3188 " CUy. 1-233 404

Triangle 280 169 Ellicott 873 336 COLUMBIA CO.

2.275

Union 316 258:Ellignton . . . .293 55 Ancram 163 223 " 3.284 196

Vestal 205 2S6 French Creekl30 55 Austerlitz 162 125 " 4.289 227

Windsor 360 232 Gerry 195 36 Canaan 274 133

5.259 191

Hanover 465 400 Chatham 500 448

6.221 146

Claverack 381 402

Clermont 45 154 Total City. 1561 1527

Copake 216 201 Redhook 246 493

1

Gallatin 223 103 Rhinebeck . . 391 870

Germantown ..140 133|Stanford 279 213

51


THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 156S.

Towns. McKean.Nelaon. Towns. McKean.XelsoD. i Towns. McKean.Nelron., Towns. WcKean. Nelson.

Union Valo 228 104 Malone 61G 407 Clayton 304 362 West Sparta ...132 m

AVasUlngtou ...S14 806 Moira 164 167 EUisburgh 729 899iVork 301 100

WestvlUe 124 119 Heudersou 247 152i

Total CS27 C700

Houudsneld....296 2251 Total 4076 3149

KKIE CO.

Total 2756 2060 Leroy 400 276i MAUlsON CO.

Alden HI 209 FULTON CO. Lorraine 146 il6 Brooktield 478 307

Amherbt 212 404 Bleecker oO 158 Lyme 258 231 Lazenovia 547 882

Aurora 291 194 Broadalbiii 280 249 Orleans 277 247 Du iiuyter 285 89

Boston 114 212 Caroga 36 104 Pamela 280 228 Eaton 516 311

Brant

108 Ephrutali 194 254 Philadelphia... 157 187 tenner 169 128

Bultalo, 1 372 1051 Johnstown 1849 821 Rodman 261 93, Georgetown ...255 92

•' •> 7S2 73: .'iSS Mayficld 301 223 Rutland 271 ISSHamilton 564 287

3 517 tJ25 Northampton.. 179 2?2 Theresa 253 219 Lebanon 250 114

4 620 679 Oppenheim 197 254 AVatertown ....791 744 Lenox 935 874

5 769 lull Perth 130 91 Wilna 431 318 Madison 323 184

6 566 933 Stratford lOO 127 Worth 68 83, Nelson 213 183

7 66S

jSmithdeld 190 58

8 SG9

Total 2796 2553 Total 729C 5506 Stockbrldge . . .238 160

9 653 GENliSEE CO.

KlNGri CO. jSulllvan 399 574

10 711 Alabama 238 79 Brooklyn 1... 414 G31

11 373 Alexander 228 124

2... 262 12001 Total 5362 8743

12 273 Bergen 22;^ 174

8... 897 752i MONROE CO.

13 136 Byron 228 103

4... 836 lllO'Brlghtou 235 266

Bethany 216 125 " 5... 521 2490Claik8On 154 166

Tot.City..6754 8126 batavia 533 613 " 6... 911 2514 Chili 2;S 176

Colden 119 187 Darien 203 185

7. ..1104 1352!Uates 146 299

Collins 317 131 Elba 256 185 " 8... 661 1406 Greece 24-1 366

Concord 356 251 Le Koy 480 371

9... 1165 27


Wards. McKean. Nelson. Towds. McKean Nelson. I

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 186S. 58

!

I

I

I

|

!

I

1 !

[

I

!

1

i

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

9..

10

11

12

IS

14

15

16

17

18

19.

21

22

2748

8C5

1125

I5S6

874

827

1490

2177

2020

1932

.1753

20S7

2045

4237 Geddes 353

S153 La Fayette 270

6229 Lysander W7

3076 Aianllns 670

3212 Marcellus 296

3M9!ODOndaga 611

2335 Otisco 156

3834Pompey 453

8487;balina 284

5320lSkaneatele3....429

5064 Stafford 210

4795

.863

5240

3 198

Towns. JicKean.Nelson.i Towns. McKean Nelson.

2S9 USVV£GO CO. lLanslngburgl)..670 520

205 Albion 22S 192 Nassau 395 268

381 Ambuy 140 139 N. Gieenbush..227 S20

5.i9 Boylston 123 5G Petersburgli ...216 185

172 Cphstautia 278 240 Pittstown 48'» 294

469 Granby 357 218 Pocbteuklll ....181 256

188 Hannibal 396 189 Sandlake 298 ?80

302 Uastings 877 221ISchagticoke ...3-« 808

223 Mexico 586 207 schodack 369 567

S80 New Haven. ...314 63 Stepbentown ..286 IW

125 Orwell 105 &1 Troy CUy,1....8S8 476

" 2.... 581 364

503 Oswego City, 1.263 309 " 3.... 320 152

308

2.266 311

4.... 470 278

4 539 445

8.482 878

5.... 394 219

Total 2609S 85764

5 409 444

4.454 322

6.... 215 891

NIAGARA CO.

6 507 390

7.... 873 511

Cambria 234 151

7 508 505 Total City. 1465 1380

8.... 285 778

Hartland a52 264

8 S49 240 Parish 246 138

9....ia3 699

Lewiston 230 240

Palermo 315 99 " 10.... 457 464

Lockport 2S1 232 Total City .3205 £267 Rcdfleld 93

City, 1.295 sai TuUy 223 130 Richland 466 297 Total City .3616 4832

" 2.155 269 Van Buren 396 314 ScUroeppel 349 SIS

" 3.395 299

Sandy (.;reek...336 188 Total 8892 9875

" 4.166 183 Total 102C8 S450 Scriba 299 220 RICHMOND CO.

ONTARIO CO. Yolney 676 499 Castle ton 411 686

Total City. 1011 lOSSlBristol 222 104 West Monroe.. 103 95 MiSdletown ...245 661

Newfane 307 315icnnadice 122 45 Williamsluwn..l03 ISllNortUfleld 201 416

Niagara 258 551'Oanandaigna...709 624

ISoutlilield 130 869

Pendleton 137 1591e. Bloonillcld..25( 181 Total 7726 5442 Westfleld 224 281

Porter 211 163lFarmii!gton....231 „ 81 OTSEGO CO.

Eoyalton 412 482lGorham'''""""22i 236 Burlingtoa 191 172 Total 12112413

I

Somerset 261 101 Honewel'l" 189 163 tutteruuts 334 170 ROCKLAND CO.

Wheatland HI 351 Manchester ;;:. 319 371 W'erry Valley .204 286 Clarkstown ....188 487

Wilson £42 227uaples 305 165 gecalur 102 110 HaverBtraw....224 382

.

iPhelns 501 5')8 Edmeston 228 1831 Oraugelown ...428 571

Total 4147 4339 Pi Richmond Ph'mniiVi 2an 220 Sr, 80 Exeter 247 109lRamapo Ramapo . 274 410

ONEIDA CO Seneca 786 806 Hartwick 250 283iStony Point. 118 281

Annsville 248 Soutb Bristol.. 128 101 Lanrens 276 227

Augusta 281 Victor 265 262

Ava 127 W. Bloomlicld.229 92

Boonville 542

Bridgewater..l56

Total 4770 CS-15

Camden 481

Deerfield 244 ORANGE CO.

i

fCT- [U jfe'!L°eTe#.':f°."^ii \i

li?fc::::::5?6 422iCornwall. 31.. 464

fey 1? ?i?ig^ee^ar^::::::il «?

Mars^ali::::::273 IralSoshen 288 4|

NewHartford507

||!§--7o'ifc.: ^ li

faTgerfleidT.iu SHI Montgomery... 425 340

Steuben 210 86|Mt. Hope 181 201

Trenton 548 202l^Je%,burgh ...ol5 3,0

Utica,l 109 209 .. ^"^'VqoI 2.397 37 ot7

" ^" -"

2 229 388 .. -^

" 8.374 214

3 435 3;39| „

" 4.331 218

4 462 296

"

I JS ?i5l Total City.1379 1166

u 5 ?S ;^?2:iTew Windsor.. 172 286

'

::ft _:Wallklll 931 711

Tnt ritv 9i


Tnwns. McKean. Nelson.' Towns. McKe«n. Nelson.

Halftnoon 352 282 Dansville 132 228

Malta 158 132Erwln 180 201

Milton 498 473 Fremont 123 121

Moreau 238 195 Greenwood ... .140 112

>.'orthumherrdlS4 168 H.irtsville 100 69

Providence 1.t6 134 Horr.bv 105 107

fiaratoga 370 417 Hoineflsville . .452 529

Saratoga Sp'g8.T84 696 Howard : 253 172

Stillwater 297 241 Jasper 250 106

Waterford 315 425 Lindley 123 67

Villton 186 106 Prattsbur^h . . .238 ."*!

Pnltnev.. 179 147

Total 5475 4956 Rathbdne 128 121

PfHENECTADY CO. Thurston 151 91

Dnanesbnrg . . ..S88 2S4 Troupsburgh ..243 159

Glenville 31S 350 Tnscarora 202 SO

Xiskayuna 101 llSiUrbana 223 214

Princetown ISl 77,"Wavland 157 281

Rotterdam 322 234 Wavne 103 85

6chenecta*y,1.116 176 TTest rnion....l07 121

2.171 185 Wheeler 114 171

3.180 256|WoodhnU 278 127

" 4.285 309

5.211 186 Total 6S.Wo989

Towns. McKean. Nelson.

Hurley 303 177

Kingston 1186 1037

Lloyd 243 304

Marbletown ...;i,52 325

Marlborough ..276 226

XewPaltz 2:;2 212

Total 6131 731

WARREX CO.

Bolton 173 105

Caldwell 95 l.iS

Chester 278

Hague 64

>i''KeaD. Nelson.

Xorth Salem. ..213 80

Ossining 512 577

Pelhaui. 37 110

Poundridg.

Oranse 212-

252 TIOGA CO. Butler 282 131 Sep.TomD.Mozl).

Reading 214 119 Barton 493 442 Galen 540 376 Wds. Dfirl. Hoffm. \Vi,.m1.

lyrone 264 207 Berkshire 157 94 Huron 220 159 1.. 58

Candor 483 479 Lvons 426 518 2..

Total '>^82 1883 Xewark Valley 384 138 Maceaon 285 214 3..

SENECA CO. >Cichol8 263 152 Marion 308 r« 4..

Covert 222 288 Owego 1165 95C Ontario :^08 114 5..

Lodi 2S5 2:i! EichTord 181 118 Palmyra 420 389, 6..

Ovid 263 245 Spencer 244 194 Rose 2.53 151)7..

Romulus 152 211 Tioga 282 406 Savannah 230 1.5i; 8..

Variek 159 205

Sodus 495 407 9..

Fayette 277 463: Total .3652 2979 Walworth 255 120 10.

Waterloo 307 478 TOMPKESS CO. Willi.'i.mson....301 167 11..

Seneca Falls... 520 711 Caroline 336 190 Wolcott 298 320 12.

I

Junius 139 146 Dnnoy 279 158

Tvre 145 147 Drvden 705 335 Total 5152 8873 14;:

Enfield 229 205 WESTCHESTER CO. 15.,

Total 2419 3128 Groton 507 218 I Bedford 414 320 16.,

STEUBEN CO. Ithaca 838 834 Cortlandt 781 «« 17.,

Addison 170 205 Lansing 337 331 East Chester. .:«9 509 IS.,

I

Avoca 215 174 Newfield 313 352 Greenbnrgh ...439 83119.,

i

Bath 677 570 Ulysses 391 303 Harrison 59 109 20.. 1426

Bradford 108 135

Lewisboro 2.37 96 21.,

1

Cameron 171 93 Total 3935 2926 Mamaroiieck .. 58 119 22.

I

Camphill 195 109 ULSTER CO. Morri^ania 496 1268

,

Canisteo 245 174 Denning 81 114 Mt. Pleasant. ..23-1 515Totl81S:S

Caton 208 60 Esopus 376 340 : Newcastle 238 169 John T. Hofltaac ov.

Cohocton 293 2;j5 Gardiner 145 253 1 Xew Rochelle..l66 3is Fern. Wood,40;i54; ov.

Corning .502 618 Hardenburgh. . 45 67

Castle... 108 224 AVm. A. Darling, 44^98.


low

Judge, '67.Sec.

Counties. Jiep.Dem.

Adair

Adams

A'i.Craie.W:

237 m.

310 135..

Alamakee . . . .\21Z

Appanoose ...13J5

Audubon 7B

Benton 1510

ISll..

1164..

92..

702..

Blackliaw!£...1405-

Buone 1082

Bremer 9y9

Buchanan.... 1395

Bueua Vista.. 6

Butler 513

Calhoun 83

ei2..

376..

^183..

825..

2..

307..

51..

Carroll 113 46..

Cass 305 160..

Cedar 1337 1033..

Cerro Gordo . 344. 52..

Cherokee 40 14..

Chickasaw ... 758 331..

Clarke 740 326..

Clay 61 6.

.

.

.

.

Clavton 2553 1769..

Clinton 2133 1662..

Crawford .... 13.1 119..

Dallas 820 446..

Davis l;;26 1221..

De


.

.

.

in ISi.. total vote for Justice of supreme

Court, 13G.6S4 ; Benj. F. Graves overysanlord

M. Green, 24,fJ3!. lu 1866, whole votc'for Governor,

lW,l,-.4; Crapo over -Williams, 29,0.T8.

[The vote m Houghton County, which was not

returned to the becretary of State's office in

time lor the official canvass, is offlciallv reported:

Crapo, SGS; Williams, 937.1 In 1805

agsregate vote for the leading Republicau

and the leading Democratic candidate for Regent

of Uuiversity, 71,;00 ; E.-C. Walker over

E. Wells, 38,9es. la isdl, whole vote foJ Governor,

105,049: HenrvH. Crapo over William

H^^ entoft, 17,003. T\1iole vote for FresidenT,

.

.

Qrnves.Groen.Crapo. WiU.Linc.McClel.

fapeer 1547 USl.. isjl „„,

Mttrehall.Flandrau.Mar ni.Ricc.Unr.McCl.

I^CS.. 1464 1247

Leelauuw

Fillmore 1801

342

1212.. 1131

21.. 709..

24:5 1612

51.. 2;a 146

1081

Leuawee

Freeborn 887

44ao

SM.. 659

193.1..

119..

5K59 053

3,59a.. 4780

201

3632

LmngsioH....im

Goodhue 194U 854.

1841..

763

1968

419..

2004..

1S60

1004 1983

Mackinac

Uennepin 266-3

.... 43

2024.. 1120

81..

836..

39 91

1711

SO 185

Macomb

Houston 1099

. . .I&IO

920.. 691

1755. . 2401

6(9..

2185!

796

2041 2177 It-anti

Manistee 153

. . 223

31.. 71

271 59

1.. 145 70

Mauitou

Jackson iti

...

e — 37

-•• — -• U loo Kaiiabec

Marquette.

10 9"

a

524..

Mason

134 7.. 143

Mecostd . .

69.. 274 109. 143 97

Menominee

29.. 116 21.. 58

Midland . .

59.. 253 121.. 208 ICl

Monroe ..1750 2310.. 2164 2085.. 1659 2331

Montcalm 937 .„. 487.. 9U 511.. 5'.)5 443

Muskegon 677 420.. 803 386. 654 350

I^ewaygo .. 513 158.. frlS 229 406 242

Oakland . . .3420 S289. . 4257 S839.. 3709 3816

Oceana .... - 052 268.. 600 203. 336 1 r7

Outonagou 242 1.. 226 380. 232 454

Ottawa .1489 1479.. 1606 1395 1313 1530

Saginaw . . .2141 1455.. 2339 1749. 1731 1900

Sanilac 773 276.. 923 2S8. 753 318

Sliia-vvassee...lG19 1348.. 1907 1.151., 1412 1283

St. Clair 20 189' 2566 2105 : 1808 2063

St. Joseph !!".!2500 15.50 2SC8 1752., 26S1 1796

Tuscola 1018 37.. 1073 355 7SS 401

Van Burou...2288 1236.. 2507 1363 1983 1400

Was/Ue?MW...WS6 3352.. 3914 8688 3032 3836

Wayne 4453 4844.. 5054 6290' 5946 7670

Washinsiton . . — —

Soldiers' Vote —

-..9402 2959

„ Total 80S19 55863 95746 67703 Ollil 74004

1221

635

10..

24

Kandiyohi 60 10.

Le. tieuer 619 1051. 422 729!! 493 812

Lincoln*.... S2

2.1 1..

Manoiiiiii ..

33.. 1 21..

Martin

74.. 133 23.. 190 17

McLeod

261.. 214 207. 202 142

Meeker

220.. 103 92.. 115 84

MilleLac...

49.. 43 22.. 51 20

Jlori'taun...

132.. 39 63.. 83 50

Mower

321.. 411 120.. 214

Monongalia . 174 44..

Nicollet

. 639 500.. 4'ra

505 420

Olmstead. . .1910 1217. 795 292! 1349

) 829

Pine

. 28 U 2. 17 4

Pope

. 188 19".

liam.fey .1321 2064.. 1001 1600.. 1200 1421

Redwood... . 71 ll.«. 63 4.. — —

Renville

. 9-1 20.. 23 14.. - _

Rice

.1424 12S3.. 8S8 528.. 1273 667

Scott

. 404 1359. 252 734.. , 396 1045

Sherburne.. . 157 131.. 85

108 78

Sibley

. 303 079.. 228 S92.. 263 559

Stearns

. 794 1336. 853 812.. 427 916

Steele

. 99J 579.. 521 118.. 636 209

St. Louis ... . 28 IS.. SO 5.. 89 3

Tod

. 103 17..

.' 2;5

l„"i'iVv;-v-'i'-^^.'"'-f--**»'5 •"'' 31

^5.89 44.11 \\ abashaw . .4045 3938.

432.' 1302 633

Waseca

. 0S7 575.. 851 %i2.. 418 284

Washington. , 674 002.. 5C0 383.. 781 502

Watonv, an . , 120 35 32 II.. 88 5

Winona 179:, 1910 1169 735.. 13&0 1032

Wright 778 622, 433 227.. 528 336

. , .

-,Total :ms70 29343.. 17335 LSSIU. .2-1971 17353

^'^''^e'" '~i l-i ii.bt..ii.m 44.60.. 40.07 40.9a

In 1867, whole vote for Governor, 64,413 •

\\ m. K. iiarshall over Chas. E. Fiaudrau 5 327

J^?^l~=;.I',"^coln over McClellan, 16,917.

vote,

23423'*^

153,537; Lincoln Jyer

In

all,

Legislatuee, 1S67. Senate. Hotme.Joint Bal.

Bepublicans 2T 70 iok

Ueniocrats g 31. ! . . ! ! oi

Rep. maj 24 Is... U

The new Constitution will be submitted to

» ° In 1800, whole vote for Consress, 41,758; mal'

for iui Wiudom, tvmuom, 5,910j .-j.y-iu; for lor Donnellv, 4,208- 4,208: Rep Ren

maj. lu the whole State, 10,208. In 1805 whole

vote for Governor, 31,160; Wm. R Jlarshall

over H. M. Rice, 3,476. In 1864, whole vote on

Congress, -12,142; Rep. maj. 7,530.

CONSTITUTIOSAi AmeJTDSLENT, 1867,

Counties. Yes. No. Ye^,

Anoka

3o.

283 202 Mille Lac ... 60 60

Blue Earth.. 1248 1168 ilorrixon ... 31 141

Brown 434 181 Monongalia. 142 47

Benton 53 107 --. Nicollet

X"^,'^/'^

^^^ people 551

on the 503

lirst J\Ioudav of Carver 401

April, ibCS

1140

; at the same

Olmstead ...1757

time 1162

there wilf be Chisago 375 115

separate votes

Pine i!(

upon the 1

following prooosi- IJoiige 820

tions:. Whether SOSjPope

there 158

shall be 28

Snnual or Dakota 1115

biennial

1616

sessions of Redwood ...

the 03 13

Legislature- also Douglas 339

whetner 71

the Legislature

Renville .... 82

shall or 25

shall not pro- Faribault... 721

niDit the sale

371|Rice

of ardent mo

spirits as

1265

a beverage. Fillmore 1373 1301 ! liamsey 1034 2210

Freeborn ... 694 301 '.ScoK 23-i M08

Goodhue ....1685 9521 Sibley ly-j

MINNESOTA.

697

i/ouston* 901 963 1 Steele 903 620

Gov'nor,'67.Gov.'65.Pre9.'64. Hennepin ...2-185 19S0 St. Louis....

Counties.

as

Rep.Dem.Un.Dem.Un.Dem Isanti 122 M U

Sherburne* . 117 120

Marahall.Flandrau.Mars'U.Rice.LmcilcCl Jackson 110 S'Stearns

Anoka 662

309 213

1381

200 114. 285 Kanabec —

Benton

—\To(l* so

82 91

74

29 00.. 52 Kandiyohi.. 57

Blue Earth...

Hi Waseca' 54-f

1498 1079'

597..

Le Sei/cr .... 516 1010.

Brown

Watonwan.. i;2

382 53

2.56.

61..

Lincoln 31

'2

Carter

Winona Uiy

. 668 1031..

1933

355 510..

Martin 306 901

Cass

Waba-sfiaic*.lGiO 1978

Mower 577 4131

Chisago.

Washington* 621

413 lOOi! 232 47.. ST! Jfanojnin ... 1

Crow Wing... — —

^jWright* 494 639

21 10. . ^ McLeod 363

Dakota 1241 1314;" 8o4 ICso. . 1170 1173 Meeker 346 259'

Dodge Total

&45

27461 28759

488. 437 166.. 760 325

Faribault « Coanties whi»h

919

gavs a

301..

Republican

501 majority for

138.. 642 160

GOTeroor

and a majority against the Amendijient.

.

.

.

;


m 1867, total vote on «te^^lon of snffra^e,

5l^^r-o??^itn^r^aK-.^^;

against uegro suftragt, 4,01^

^^.^^ J ^„,_

J.EGI81.ATUUE, IbOa. '="^''.-"^••"33

. JS

Bepublicana

^.L

...

y^

23

JjemocraU

23

Bep.ma] ; J^

IN ©11AN A. ^^ ,„

SEC STATE,'66. GOV.'6i.PBE8.'60.

Coumie... m^rj^aJJua^.Van.^

,Tru.ler.-Janson.Morton .lcI)o

\

I

KUBh 2130

Hcolt 149

Shelby 21S8

I Spencer....

^^ ^^^^

2SJ..

BlucKford.^-l 607.. .vt>i 509. 27iJ

Boone •''!^° fix-*- o?3 c-'j am 7G3

'se'J 8i3.. SOI

i-'Oir» 4:j5

10-2...

^g 1551.: 1590 11G5

Ca8ron....l»-0 180;. "x?,

2GC3.. 1874 1891

187 2003'. : 1874 1891

Ctari- .18^0 2344 «-«,.. 174.. 207^.. 13CJ 2-103

1&43.. 1293 1514 839 1414

1990

I

Starke 294

1

I bteaben ...isyj ,A„a

St. JosepU.2.0.1 lJv»

,S(/H!r llM.

Union ^8J3

Vand'b'gli.29iy

Vermillion. ir."

Ylgo SlHu

Wabash ...290T

Warren n

Warrick .. .15i^

Wamngl'ulUl

Wavne ....4Bi.(J

wti-is loei

White......1191

WUitlty— ii"7

T0tal..ii^l .1520^^ 13^.139040

Cilnton-...:i70b:

170G 1473 l.lj.. 14g 1^04

CYaicford^^U ^h^-- Jsl i^-- 931 1411

Dmrl^orn..i^l

Decatur...2.|9

DeKalb....l830

Delaware.. 2. 07

/>«?'C»


.

Boreman,

Pleasants.. .- 272

Pocahontas 152

I'reston ..1100

Putuaru .."

.. 314

.Smith.Ratifi

258. 261

28.. 183

'n.Rej

222

33

Kaleigh ...".'

4S2. . 1612

264.. 5W

274 244. • 338

.. ]f6

109

5o. 171

Rdxaoiph 30.

.. .. 207 2yo. 145

Kitchie

137. • 177

.. 58C

50

i>17.. 620

lioane 216. •

...

(''3

.. S60 210..

217

S59

.".'

Taylor

191. .

.. 796

275

619..

31

719

Tiiti-ef 495. 785 . .. 48 1S8..

S49

41

.'

Tyler

141.

. Pl.i

.56

'laS..

36

556

rbshnr

485.

.. 716

709

243.. 693

Wayne

£07.

. SU

819

Ift3.. 247

.'

Webster

«.,

20..

liVteei

102..

. 356 708..

Vwrt

354 735.

. oOO 184.. S12

Vvood

223.

.li'C9

2j2

818..

209

1375

"Wyoming 924.

... . 101

1496 591

81..

40.

6,644. ^«4:" Total vot?. vote Ma/iM MaVS' f^^^^i^'?J^- 18^^^? H.'Smith; ^^i^^l

^atlacation, 7,217. rxHe vSiV 'nf^-^Z^H^

^°^

was set ^''^•

aside'DythVcon:Uy

viscrs on Board m?l^«

account of disrpn-nrH S°' bnper-

S3,5S0; Lincoln's majonty?!?:!!""^ President,

jf- Hubbard 10001 Johnson, ^'^^h

Dtinocnm ,

.

f"

60

j: Jf 14

^,^P-«i- 18 28 Te

material chan-'p li> th»T,^ •?• ^nerewas no

the LegislatMi. The Kenubl

^P?""^«

c^.nf

'n

email gaiiis. ^''^"epubl)cansclc:imsome

^ dams. . . . 409? 47^0 ^^•; 1117 So ^7^1- "*^ • 3J55

Clinton 'i^ "y-- 1??^ }^-- ^38 911

Coles..:: 2^ iq6s"'"in i--" ,^ lO'-'"^

Cook.. 15595 S"i5^«? l^-- ^'^^ wnndv....l536 816 1461

mmiUon.. 602 1133

Hancock.. W>

3287 L23l'" "^5

Henderson ili '^^-

^enry J^

Siso 117o' gssx

iroqnoiB...m9 9.55'

" 1777

^acl-.o,t...i2S8

14 a ;S3

Jo I)aviessJ2449 1418

Johnson... 25n

lira R31 Iain

Kane 3040 irr.o iX^

Kankakee .m ^wo''

Kendall... 2U3

1536 m.iii

te .^14 1317:: 424I

fivingston2223 ion"

I-ogan....

1746

2241 153 ; 1727

V/'con 2352 1745 1827

v"Z"^'"-2T62 2972 2274

i^^ad}Sun...3574 S44i tilt

^larion....m6 1^5 -fm

Marshall... 16M m lUl

Vinson 1311 liHs' i?22

Massac 961 .503' 9S

McDono'gh2C65 24^ : McHem-y..2697 2U5

682 2951

McLean ...4743 25fifi jnn?

Mercer.... 2020 1291 1^

J/o,»-oe 674 148S 560

Jfo„tffom'^l-,i,0

2133 1274

Jfo,ff„,i ...2486 2578 220-)

-\'0''lUie... 713 878""

549

Sf't 2SS2 989 S339

W.:::::'8% 5«-:^|2

J^i:e 2713 «>(J|

1589

c>«6.^,v. 797 10©:: i|^

De Kalb i? il- 1? . ''5.-4

Sf^?P--"554 491..2ti85 74l"iSj '^^

^^^{"••"^ DeWitt....i4fy IISO-- 670

1S71

gon^las... iJonglas 1069 ^iq

... 924 649..

953

99.3 m" ?J

527.. 1816 " • ""' 724

520


o"*-

Pulaski.... 564 503::

Putnam.... Ml

687 344 ?ii

^f/'


Legislatuee, 1866.

Republicans

Dtiuocrats

.

Senate.ffoune.Joint BaJ.

...16 62 78

... 9 53 S2

Rep. mai 7 39 46

Note.—There was no State election In 1867.

In the vote for county officers there were

large gains for tlie Democracy.

WISCONSIN.

G0V'lfOK,'67.EQ.SCF.'K.PKES.'C4.

Co u titles. Hep .Dem.

Bep.Dem.

Fairchild.Tall'ge. Yes. No. Linc.McClel.

Adams 634 194.. 433 161.. 581 222

AxMaiKl 3 34.. 23 26.. 14 29

Bavfield 12 9.. —

Brhirii

Buflalo

Burnett

Calinntt

815

708

41

687

121'...

^'^

6..

823..

378

416

24

471

899!!

214..

4..

576..

730

597

444

1286

284

Chippticu 309 361.. 172 247.. 205

Clark aas 98.. 46 JO.. 171

Columbia ....2649 1003.. 1669 1356.. 2652 1483

Crnwj-ord.... 845 1007.. 225 7-12.. 711 786

Dane 4530 4217.. 2743 3253.. 4018 3811

Dodge 2804 4795. . 2282 3729. . 3226 4698

Door 404 125.-. 224

VouQkiH 51 64.. 25

Dunn 679 282.. 285

Ban Claire ... 66-2 467.. 329

Fonri du Lac.37S9 3698.. 2395

Grant 3095 1649.. 1790

Green 2094 1137.. 12:S

Green Lake.. 1197 640. 886

Iowa 1677 1604.. 710

Jackson 736 801.. 303

JnTvrxoii 2344 3112.. 1799

Juneau 1030 924.. 434

Kewaunee 268

81

Kenosha 1173 1088.. 937

La Crosse 153C IISJ.

Lu Fdi/ette. . . .1526 1730. 8^9

La Pointe — — .. 3

135.. 256

71. 87

367. 506

515

2738. .'M84

1697. 3^7

845. ~" 2017

511.. 1441

1215.. 1282

299.. 6S0

2443.. 215

707.. 776

429.. 157

594.. 1318


.

I

I

Gibson

Brownlow.EtheridRc. Scc«sfi.XoSec«M.

687 277.. 1U99 286

t'iles

Grainier

Greene

Grundy

Hamilton

Hancock

Hardiu

Uardeman

Hawkins

Ihivwooil

Hehclcrsou

Henry

Hickman

Hwmphreya

Jackson

JeflerBOU

JoUusou

Knox

Lawrence

Laaderdale

Lewis

Lincoln

Mc.Miun

xMcNalry

1 Macon

Madison I

Marion

Marshall

Maury

Meiga

Monroe

Montgomery

Morgan

Obiou

Overton

Perry

Pulk

Putnam

Rhea

Koaae

RoberUoii

Rullierford

Scott

SequatcMe

Sevier

Shelby

smith

Stewart

Sullivan

Sumner

Tipton

Union

VanBurea

Warren

Washington

Wavne.

Weakley

WTiite

Wilson

Williamson

Military vote

1879

857

15B0

45

1480

579

875

440

1107

1655

7ni


262

267

630

2112

623

2881

203

29G

74

780

1295

608

600

343

472

831

2817

S5S

977

1527

179

272

411

216

211


252

1503

S48

2937

250

122

1353

4419

9S3

252

776

891

178

648

67

415

1296

622

769

350

1248

170-1

SIS

153.. 2458

2;57.. 5SU

S02.. 744

59.. 52S

S02.. 8S1

20.. 279

U'... 498

603. 1529

186.. 906

4-12.. 930

112.. 801

19.. 1746

117.. 1400

131.. 1042

312. 1483

161.. 60S

42.. Ill

1021.. 12U

48.. 1124

162.. 763

1.. 223

267.. 2912

887.. 9^1

127.. 131S

47.. 447

503.. 2751

30. 414

449.. 1642

238.. 2731

135.. 481

161.. 1090

588.. 2631

100.. 50

67.. 2996

17.. 1471

62.. 780

48.. 738

— .. —

55.. 360

109.. 554

493.. 3839

361.. 2392

9.. 19

14.. 15;j

86.. 60

2735.. 7132

278.. 1249

C31.. 1839

22.. 1586

224.. 6465

1273.. M3

208.. —

11.. 308

158.. 1419

102.. 1022

24.. 1409

282.. 1189

28.. 1370

789.. 2529

574.. 1949

2.. —

11

1492

2691

9

1260

630 ov.J. White and .Icscph Willi:imson..ie87 600

1051 Powell, 14tp . 10,151 . Wilson 1212 782

29

II. .M.ouard.\Villiani8.

1460 Anderson... no ret'rns Total 9357 3163

1.S9 Blount 1393 344 Johu Trimble over

1013 Bradley 1098 291 Bailev Pevton, 6,194.

317 Campbell ... 653 219 Peyton and D. H.

3 Claiborne... 824 156 Mason, Ind. KepnbU-

Knox 2875 1031 can, 5,314.

714 McMinu 1296 880 VI. Amcll.Thomas.

2987 Monroe 980 151 Decatur 193 76

787 Morgan 194 103 Dickson .S14 123

3190 Polk 213 45 Hardin 8?J

Roane 1520 108 Hickman 259

Scott 288 4 Humphreys. 260

14 Union 660 207 Lauderdale . 204

Lewis 74

1144 Total 11994 3040 Maury 2823

586 Horace Maynard ov. Monigomeryl525

697 Johu Williams, 8,954. Perrv 209

20 HI. stok(

Steicart 218

600 Bledsoe 408 51 Wayne 608 25

101 Cumberland 2^0

58 DeKalb 862 158 Total 7596 2170

207 Fentress.... 233 1 '1 Sam'l M. Arnell over

774 Grundi/ 46 49iDor8ey B. Thomas,

33 Hamilton ...1503 173 5,426.

630 Jackson 643 307| VII. Hawkin..Culdn!.

64 Macon 596 47)Benton 271 13

364 M-irion 480 24iCarroll 1557 65

ISS Meigs 350 126 Dyer 320 35

317 Overton 414 _9G4)SOU __^_

: 7g4 233

Putnam no elec'nHendersou .! 7S6

202 Rhea 259 30' Henri/ — 19

1568 Se(^natchie.. 125 7|Lauderdale . 287 154

17 Smith 1000 267JObion 284 55

Van Bnren.. 71 9 Weakley.... 791 303

521 Warreu 418 154

100 TVTutc 360 25| Total 5000 981

! 1528

Isaac K- Hawkins OV.

5 Total 80.' 1614|W. P. Coldwell, 4,019.

670 Wm. E. Stokes over| VIIl. Xunn.Leltw'k.

99 Eli G. Fleming, 6,409. Favette 1428 521

627

MuUiii^.Etijivnd. Tiardemnn .. 378 625

69 Bedford I7l'.i Haywood ...1718 391

10 Cannon 43« McNairy .... 589 126

Cqifee 22:^ Hadison 352 498

13 Kranklm .... 6srj Shelby 4414 2745

12 Giles 1863 Tipton 178 1275

1445 Marshall .... Slfi

905 Rutherford. .2932

Total. 905' 6189

1201

David A.Nunnov. J.

121 Total 9H8 3221 F. Leftwick, 2,863.

Legislatube, 1867. Senote.Eo nw. Joint Bal.

28 Republicans 25 79 104

— Consercatices 4 4

Total 74481 22548.. 103470 48236

Percent 76.76 23.24.. 6S.'.:1 SI. 79

Total vote in 1867, for Governor, 97,0.32 ; Wil-

11am G. Bro\\nlow over Emerson Etheridge,

51,930. In IStS, total vote for Governor 23,387,

ol which Wm. G. Brownlow received 23,352,

Wm. B. Campbell 2.1, Horace Maynard 7, and

3 others 1 each. The vote for 'members of

Congress in 1S05, was 01,788 ; omitting the vote

illegally recristerert, it was reduced to ."9,509.

In 18(51 tofal vote oa Secession Ordinance,

151,700 : majority tor Secession, 55,234.

COXGEESS, 1867.

Counties. Rep.CouS. Bntler.White.

I. Butinr.wiiit-. Haococlc 578 21

Carter 918 S.'i Hawkins ....1093 183

Cocke 9^4 56 Jeflfterson....210G 166

Grainger.... 852 2 !0 .Johnson 598 35

Greene 1537- 807 Sevier 1S4S SS

Bntler.White. .Tames Mnlllns over

Sullivan... . 709 22 Edward Cooper, 0227.

\va6hingtun.l314 93 V. Trimljle.Ptyton.

Cheatham. .. 208 58

Total 11972 1717 Davidson . ..5367 980

Roderick R. Butler Ti'o/yc/^-sort ... 838 510

over J. White, 10,195: Sumner M5 283

Eepubllcan maj 25 .100

I>£I.AWARE.

Gov'.voB,'66. Pbes.'OI. Pre8.'60.

Counties. Mep.hem. Vn.Item. UnVem.

Ridale.Sanlsburj-.Linc.JlrClel.Liuc.Otlitrs.

Kent 1790 2725.. 1652 240'?.. 1070 2348

New Castle... 4423 424S.. 4274 3813.. 2074 .•i2£0

Sussex 2374 2837.. 2223 2552.. 671 3986

Total 8598 9810.. 8155 8767 .. 3815 12224

Percent 46.7: 53. •29. 48.15 51. »2. .2.3. 7S 76. ij

In 1S66, whole vote for Governor, 1S,4CS

Gove Saulsbury over James Riddle, 1,212. In

1»64, whole V'te for Congressman. 17.015

JJicholsou over Smithers, 509; whole vote for

President, 16.922 : ilcClellan'smaj 612.

Cong '66. linj. Don. Dem.maJ.

J.L.McKIm.S553 J.A.Xlcholson.9933 1^0


.

THE TRIDU>rE ALMANAC TOR 1868.

TEXAS. I

yo election, ISflT. The liegistration ehows I

r.G.Oijt) white aud 41.430 colored voters. An elf c-

431 155. . 442 497

; 1

Tarlc. Will. For.Against.Linr.McCIel.

Macon 950 664.. 742 S28. . 1757 28

JIadisou 169 157. 71 303. . 240 14

Maries — —..81 332.. 215 244

lien for Conveiitlon begins on the lOth of Kcb.

i

Marion Sa C40. 016 547. . 828 375

JSG^. In 1S66 there were 60,682 votes for Gover- McDonald.... 101 —..29 1.. 26 —

nor ; J. W. Throckmorton having 3C.580 real, Mercer 9:14 123.. 770 35.. 1158 3

over E. 11. Pesise ; but Throckmorton and iiiller 431 34.. 460 5.. 565 111

\As friends in the Letris'.aLure proved to be MU^-iisiPiji.... — 438.. 22 S3).. 108 257

out-and-nut rebels, and the Sta*e w;i8 pnt nn- Moniteau 7C8 470.. 531 247.. 866 434

rter military rule, Feaso bein^ civil C4overnor. 2Ionroe 103 240.. 74 926.. 158 597

In lSii6, the vote on the State Constitution Montgomery. 575 296.. 372 159.. 530 225

was 48.519; majority for amendiDC, 7,710. In Morgan 457 373.. 282 77.. 348 2t>4

ISGO, total vote for President. fv>j\:,t

; Breck- ^'eu• Madrid.. — 872.. 45 477.. 99 9

inridpe, 47,547; Bell, 15,110. The l?st I.feisl.v Xewton 357 20. 11 13. . 212 1

tarc consisted of 83 Senators and TO Ilppresen- iioddway 734 99.. 380 285.. 829 9

tatives, among whom the Kadlcals had but Oregon — — — .. — .. — —

here and theie cue.

Osage 563 624.. 898 721.. 764 679

Ozark — — — . —..38 —

Peinitcot — 134.. — 122.. — —

ItUS-SOirKI.

Perry 581 542.. 435.. 527.. 509 118

Pettis 694 490.. 258 834.. 879

SDPT.V,6.KEV>-Cojf8.'G5.PBsr.'34.

396

Counties. Jiep.Dcm.

Phelpa 251 ISO.. 422 269.. 985

i^.i-Dem.

263

Park. Will. For.Against.Linc.McClel. Pike ^. 983 1245.. 638 HIS.. 1143 930

Adair Platle 653

7C4 139.. 569 25.. 797

781.. 410 321.. 496 882

1(52

Andrew 1079 130.. lai IJG.. 1141 Polk 695 190.. 644 106.. 870 5

i30

Pula:,ki 121 16.3.. Atchison 587 13.. S46 IK,. 6S9 1

50 15.. 105 28

Audrain Putnam 20) 2&1.. 180 4i4.. 126 392

1101 83.. 038 15.. 1292 47

Barry 191 !«.. 99 33.. 197 17

lialls 216 277.. 191 235.. 292 194

Barton 67 50.. — — .. 28 — Randoli^h .... 182 1168.. 96 817.. 484 327

Bates 216 'J6.. — — .. 27 13 Kay 585 .522.. 350 403.. 531 798

Benton- 600 275.. 309 C3.. 574 21 lievnolda — 137.. 1 20.. 7 20

Bollinger 255 IS.. — — .. 213 13 Ripley — — .. — — .. — —

/looue ]:» 031.. 1E2 17G3.. 2^ 813

St. Charles... 1239 891.. 512 11^3.. 1488 394

Buchauan....l447 1292.. 866 789.. 1914 bl3 St. Clair :318 1.. 125 — .. 223 1

Ji'itlrf 27 49.. — — .. — — at. Franayis. 270 325.. 146 408.. 246 134

St. Caldwell 496 207.. 405 53.. KG 8S

Genevieve, lis 394.. 172 213.. 423 217

Callaway — — .. 146 16^0.. £74 CCo

St. Louis . . . .12076 9331. 5322 11248. .14027 8882

Camden 355 n2. 2e0 43. . 468

Saline 442 857.. 317 137.. 170 98

1

C.Girardeau . 804 370.. C96 448.. 1213 551 Schuvlcr 388 152.. 260 23.. 546 191

Carroll 669 460.. 291 Sftl.. 2S5 113 Scotland 655 519.. 404 162.. 612 533

Carter 10 — .. — — . . — — Scott 259 236.. 131 142.. 155 186

Cass 3S1 336.. 1C7 73.. 'TC 1C5 Shannon — — — .. — .. — —

Cedar S52 15.. 203 n.. 207 — Shelby 475 200.. 282 104.. 366 216

(Jharilon S-SO 561.. 2S6 63.. 363 Stoddard 2

117 147.. 130 105.. Ill 6

Christian 437 58.. :^ 40.. 557 Stone

5

103 89.. 23 lO.S.. 100 —

Clark 1082 132.. C45 56.. 097 133 Sullivan 764 254.. 540 140.. 1074 52

Clay 121 114.. 90 890.. 216 777 Taney 103 8.. — —..29 —

Clinton 4J5 .322.. 269 196.. 297 492 Texas 88 126.. — —..37 10

Cole 809 635.. 416 575.. 1256 502 Verncn 46 189.. 11 196.. — —

Cooper 8£6 497.. 704 492.. 939 331 Warren 655 273.. 451 280.. 948 271

Crair/wd.... 323 382.. 170 295.. 297 307 Washington.. 2% 575.. 167 699.. 788 239

Dade 57 1.. 417 15.. 507 4 Wayne 105 87.. 15 247.. .'J43 189

Dallas 4SS S4. 363 40. . 243 i2 "Webster 407 259.. 292 163.. 5.33 193

Daviess 795 315.. 554 43.. 775 286 Worth 277 194.. 167 106.. 346 121

DeKalb 382 193.. 221 90.. 400 197 Wright 192 41.. — — .. 65 2

Dent 145 96.. 52 37.. 107 1 Soldiers' vote — — .. 3995 1168.. — —

Douglass 261 3.. 31 1.. 189 2

Dunklin — 120.. — — .. — — Total 62187 40953. .43670 41308. .71676 31626

Franklin

Percent 60.11 39.09.. 61.68 4«. 32. .69.41 30.69

1387 C07.. 847 838.. 1717 401

Gasconade ... 905 227.. o


62

KANSAS.

Col. Supp.Fem.Suff.Di8t.Rbb8.

Cnnniies. For. Aast. For. Aqxt. For.Agnt.

Allen... .:... 324 266.. 248 303.. 454 168

Antlerson 258 259.. 218 275.. 393 138

Atchison .... 413 1161.. »15 1235.. 736 884

Bourlion .550 725.. 464 736.. 1350 .3:?

Brown 263 S46.. 248 341.. S42 232

Butler 28 76.. 33 70.. 39 64

riK-rokee 278 241.. 405 122.. — —

riiase ... 120 123.. 118 125.. 164 83

(lav 47 53.. 39 58.. 78' 32

Crawford 50 199.. 45 150.. 150 41

Coffey 239 iU.. 299 359.. 272 S64

Davis 183 883.. 167 364.. 281 304

Dickinson.... 89 93.. 34 140.. 151 41

Doniphan 338 1425., 858 1390., 576 1126

Donglas 1017 1147., 652 1464.. 635 1484

Franklin .280 539.. 120 709.. 652 175

Greenwood... 133 158.. 87 198.. 280 11

Jackson 173 445.. 162 387.. 301 310

.Tetterson..... S92 1159.. 335 1188.. 649 894

Jolinson...... 400 852.. 325 868.. 655 438

LatiPtte .115 213.. 95 217.. 207. 134

Leavenworth. 890 2703.. 1588 1775.. 1135 2289

Linn 340 798.. 259 791.. 737 178

Lyon 503 273.. 209 565.. 701 S2

Marion 13 58.. 16 59.. 16 56

TClarstiall 167 421.. 160 410.. 804 229

Miami.... 486 865.. 243 970., 850 413

Moiri3 48 212.. 66 203.. 71 190

Nemaha ..251 421.. 227 427.. 896 178

Neosho 151 322.. 101 367.. 236 180

Osaire......... 207 143.. 121 238.. 225 113

Ottawa 44 27.. 34 32.. 57 15

Pottawotomie 226 456.. 153 501.. 852 SSO

Riley.... 351 277.. 218 378.. 329 207

Shawnee 494 670.. 439 731.. 900 2M

Saline 162 219.. 112 233.. 252 123

Wahansee 149 108.. 114 152.. 230 28

Washington.. 89 118.. 19 143.. 93 78

Wilson T...... So 138.. 4.3 170.. 132 81

Woodson..... 88 149.. 94 141.. 56 187

Wyandotte... 159 826.. 168 798.. 235 779

ISthKas.Cav. 34 103.. 32 105.. — —

Total 10529 19600.. 9200 19858. .15672 12990

Percent .34.95 65 05. ..31 .66 68.1:4. .64 .64 45. .'^6

Majority against staking out the word

"white," 9,071: majority against striking out

the word "male," 10,658; majority in favor of

disfranchising rehels, 2,68,': hiehest vote cast

(on striking out the word ''white,") 30,129.

In 1866, total vote for Governor (inclusive of

9 scattering), 27,530 ; Crawford over McDowell,

11,219. Total vote for member of Congress,

27,308 ; Chirke over Blair, 11,196. In 18&1, whole

vote tor President, 19,382; Lincoln over Mc-

Clellan, 12,000; whole vote for Governor,

19,371; Crawford, "Lane" Union, over Tliatcher,

" Anti-Lane " Union, 3,782.

Legislatuke, 1867. /Senate.House.Joint Bal.

Republicans. 22 66 88

Democrats 5 22 27

Eep.maJ 17 4-1 CI

LOUISIANA.

1867—VOTEES REGI8T'D.C0NVENT'N.

Parishes: White. CoVd.Total. For. Ag!


.

.

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868.

Jackson

Registered For. Ag'at. Bell.Breck.Doue.

2865.. 983 85.. 130 MBO 565

Jett'erson I?i0..

Jones 1178..

Lauderdale . .2466 .

Lawrence 2305.

LlmeBtone . .23M)..

Lowndes .. ..4654..

Lee 3561..

Macon 3305.

624

444

1009

1264

11T<

8521

1789

2C89

15 .

23.

16 .

5!)..

195..

11..

8..

1..

245

444

831 77

> adison 4770.

Marengo 516S..

Marshall 1391..

Marlon 837..

Mobile 8595..

Monroe 2391..

Montgomery .8654.

Mor.'an 1497..

Perry 5359..

Pickens 2777.

Hke 2682..

Randolph ....1469..

2-185

3863

471

357

4556

1150

58S1

895

3594

1430

619

814

1..

28..

160..

9..

3..

81..

47".'.

99.

74.

Eussell 3551.. 1774

St. Clair 1760.. 604

Shelby

Sumter

1929..

4634..

1083

3144

50.

2.

Talladega.... 2988.. 1527 273.

Tallapoosa .. .2965. 705 255.

Tuscaloosa .. .3390.

Walker 901..

Washington .. 650..

Wilcox 4727..

Winston 542..

1955

424

285

296G

295

3.

30.

8.

3.S9.

63


Kemper' ..-... '..1044 051 1009.. 499 689 69

Lafayette - 1161 949.. 086 1034 141

Lauderdale ... .1203 1235 1102.. So3 9.il 142

Lawrence — PSl 392.. 146 840 5

Leake - Si4 442.. 363 690 2

Lee C13 1904 828.. — — —

Lowndes SSfM 1120 4233.. 676 929 83

Madison - 5.32 1.82.. 524 62, 1.

Marion — 31;J 183.. 35 298 2

Marshall ;:.... 3001 1S13 1S£9.. 10-13 1119 269

Monroe ..2158 1.503 2790.. 612 1273 49

Keshoba 401 388 97.. 162 732 10

SItvton .....:. 891 1022 .VJl.. 217 631 29

No.xubee 2507 936 S.344.. 442 701 67

Oktibbeha 1291 825 1461.. 259 716 20

Panola 1556 637 586.. 700 551 18o

Perry. 217 260 114.. 103 201 6

Pike 750 !!93 831.. 221 831 -

Pontotoc 942 1491 470.. 845 1512 339

|-«° ^^^?;:ri^?:: I9I li 'I

f^r ^ ^1 i?::if ^ I

Kunaower 400 136 W2.. 138 173 1

Tanahatchie...616 168 1S9_,. 266 2S3 85

TlDoah 12*^ 754 14... !526 lla6 2.^

Tishomingo.... 032 2617 C26..1412 1748 3ft3

Tnnica — 795' — .. 140 lii y

-\Va-ren'" ....5004 1433 4794.. 816 530 R3

Wa'.hlDgt'on.... - 200 2031.. 201 180 -

-\VaTne . 4rfl 353 459.. 110 180 -

Willinson. .... - W7 2274.. S24 404 34

^- nstou 550 i;37 506.. 299 800 8

Tallobusha 1260 1313 1746.. 707 919 76

lazoo 1769 1014 2316.. 739 688 4

i

. , .

.

. .

SOLTH CAKOLINA.

Con VKXTioN, 1867.

DiitrlclB. i"i-. Against. RegiMcrea.

WLitc.Cora.\Vhitc*.Wnil«.Col'd.

White.Col'd.Bell.Breck.DonB.

Carroll 1640 1196 2313.. ^88 1185

Claiborne 1799 549 l'."7T.. 263 4J1

Clarte ... 959 IJl 1105.. »13 904

Chickasaw 1555 1195 liWl.. 533 lOTl

Choctaw - 1T74 620.. G42 1386

Coahoma - 231 ST5.. 210 lol

Copiah 1274 1173 l;U>9. 538 1052

C0?ington: 3bl i;i5' -.. 106 391

Davis l*'**

*^'*^ r3. — —

DeSuto ;.;.'!!;." 1514 ion 2251.. ^-SS 745

>'rankUn CIO 5G5 55?.. 135 S35

Greene — 214 97. 45 250

Hancock — i>64 259.. 47 J5<

Harrison — 56S o05.. 83 4b0

Hinds 3337 1551 S6-30..m3 1615

Holmes - 262 013.. 626 784

Issaquena...... - 124 1293.. 133 101

Itawamba 553 1W8 WO.. 72. Ibb4

Jackson — 521 256.. 2o 316

jaaner — fM 83i.. Sol 712

Jeiterson 1873 541 1916.. 266 r.33

•Tones . — — — . 96 264

II

26

76

83

2o

41

14

8

•—

4ul

o


40

9

6

C3

li

18

49


Abbeville . .

Anderson ...

Barnwell ...

Beaufort

Berkeley ...

Charleston .

Chester

Chesterfield

Clarendon..

Colleton....

Darlington .

Edgefield

Fairfield

Georgetown

Greenville

Horry

Kershaw

Lancaster

Laurens

Lexington

llariou

Marlborough

Newberry

Orangeburg.

Pickens

Kichlaud

Spartanburg..,

Sumter

Union

Williamsbnrg

York

29-30

— 1361

— 2472

— 4220

- 71C4

C9 4>i39

i,s-;3

877

— 1241

— 2775

.50 23i5

— Sail

— 2016

— 2144

— 1570

— 402

— 1133

— 833

-—

21.53

— 1060

1 1172

l;37

30 1969

2991

863

2.329

1661

3.035

1689

1368

1757

79..

1..

1..

loj..

245..

1.


1.

7.


290.

-.


324.

6.


13

11.

."W.

254..

24..

510..

10.

61..

— ..

7.

1751 3121

2032 1670

1S89 :'.719

934 6273

993 £.i26

3G38 5192

1129 2201

1094 8:13

748 1553

1449 3931

1372 2910

2760 4007

ii83 2451

474 3177

2214 1311

1127 513

8*1 1815

&S0 372

1743 2411

1500 973

18.37 1737

959 1241

li:a 2351

1686 3:330

2305 812

1254

2589 1538

1511 1774

800 1?35

1990 2029

.

Total 130 6S376 2031.. 47010 80286

Pef c^.ut 97.01 2.9j.. M V3 63 01

There were very few colored votes against

Convention, perhaps not a dozen. The whole

registry was 127,2y6; necessary to carry the

Convention, 63,649. The Convention will be

composed of 34 white and 63coloreQ members.

ARKANS.^S.

CONVKNTION, '67. FKEBrDEirT,

Total . .56309 46636 60167. .25040 40797 3283

Percent " H'" "" ^ '" 55.3". .35.94 59.31 4.7.S


TVTiite and colored not separately returned.

The whole number registered was much

larser—nearly 140,000—but we hare no figures

Bhowins the division of white and colored except

as above. Of the votes given, nearly all

were by colored men, and nearly all were in

favor of the Convention. Gen. Ord, in command

of the District, on the 3th of Dec. 1S6,,

declared that a majority of registered voters

had voted on the Convention question, and

called the Convention to meet at JacKson on

the 7th of .Tanuarv, 1868.-In 1S60, the, whole

vote for President was 69,090 Breckmridge

;

over Bell, 15,737; over Douglas, 37,514; over

aU, 12,474.

INDIAN TERRITOItY.

Jobn Ross, who, for nearly 40 years was the

Chief of the Cherokee Nation, died last year, and

Lewis Dowiung was chosen as his successor.^ He

was Inaugurated on the 6th of November, 13GT.

'60,

Cnun ties.

Vn.JJem.Jjem.

For. AK'rt. Bell.Breck.Uoug

Arkansas 927 109.. 417 426 55

Ashley

.531 549.. 422 604 13

Benton 92 392.. 838 702 2.53

Bradley

230

440 633 .36

Calhoun 211 134!! 204 S98

Carroll

173 2?7.. S63 791

Chicot

809 156.. 253 231

Clarke

Columbia

Conway.

Craighead..

Crawford...

Crittenden.

Cross

Dallas

Desha

Drew

Franklin

Fulton

Greene

Hempstead

Hot Spring

Independence

Izard

Jackson.

Jefferson

Johnson

Lafayette

Lawrence

Little River

Madison

Marion

Mississippi

Monroe

Montgomery

685

970

200

23:1

70

197

... 374

425

694

285

73

72

1188

303

513

8

80

2516

296

896

125

2^11

323

100

114

514

288

400..

594..

123.'!

233..

163;.'

326..

8S6;'.

198..

17..

149..

8-37..

121..

281..

239..

239..

203..

57.'!

107..

161..

201..

31..

500

716

336

193

374

257

871

312

560

2S:i

33

60

675

237

893

271

732

eoo

210

290

474

176

232

176

804

8:j9 133

549 52

819 20

244 357

88 173

55

115

84

44

56

208

45

722 231

524 123

762

664

780

436

906

626

527

8S

301*

360


NewtoD 177

Ouachita 817

Perry 114

PWlliDS 2178

Pll.e.1 195

Poicseu 55

Polk Ill

Pope 4S3

Prairie 467

PnlasKi 24S0

Kandolpli . 105

St. Francis 893

Saline 142

Scott 195

Searcy 3S6

Sebastian 276

Sevier Sol

Union 102

Van I'uren 249

Washington S\;6


Wliite 134

Woodrulf

Yell S«

As St.

3.

551.

34.

451.

77.

60.

51.

91.

5^.

'U9.

249.

150.

261.

11.

20.

113.

195.,

52'.

062.,

539.

75.

HI.,

Bell.Br&-k.Dou

67

no

82

006

51

102

11

396

651

899

414

S37

159

197

544

361

668

248

309

315 fg

929

149 50

619 C2

294 77

253 53

254 28

663 12

673 113

813 172

416 281

556 48

363 73

276 117

575 319

754 106

757 78

504 51

1028 244

602 140

533 65

Total 24979 11293. .20094 28732 5227

Per ceut GS.jS o1U..39.U0 61.S0 9.70

In 1867, vote on Convention, about 40,010)

maj.iafavor about 14,000; whole number ol'registered

voters, 54,,v!54 ; of \vhom ahout 20,ou0

were colored. >;carly all tbe delegates elected

to the Convention were Radicals. In 18U6,

total vote for Auditor. 31,107 ; Miller over

Tagan, 2,551. Combined democratic vote (Miller

and Faga:i) over ISerry (Conservative)

Union, 21,455. In ISGO, tot;;l vote fT President,

54,053; Brecklnridse over Ecll, 8,038.

Eegisteked VoTECe, 1867.

EJAKOTA.

The Dakota Ten-itorial election, Oct. 8, was

carried by the Republicans, who elect a majority

of the Legisiatuve. In Laramie County (Cheyenne,

&c.), 1,552 votes were polled, electing J.

R. Whitehead to the Legislature, and J. S. Casement

to Congress, the latter as a delegate in the

interest of a separate Territorial organization.

.

The Laramie vote was larger than the Pike's

Peak country polled when, under the Kansas

territorial organization, they sent the first volunteer

Delegate to Congress. Of course, if Congress

creates the new Territory of Wyoming or

Laramie or Cheyenne, whatever it may be called,

a new election for delegates will be required.

The Legislature met at Yancton, Dec. 12.

AKIZONA.

Legislative officers were elected in 1867, nearly

all of both branches being Republicans. In only

one County (Yavapai) was there a party contest,

and there the members chosen were upon a

straight Democratic platform. On the 1st of

December the capital was removed from Prescott

to Tucson. In 1SC6, Coles Baslifcrd was

elected Delegate to Congress ; Le had 1,009 votes

to 518 for I'osten and 103 for Adams. There

was no strictly party contest.

UTAH.

No elections nor other political movements of

importance occurred in this Territory during

the past year.

1

Co unties. White. Dlack ., Count Ic!!. White . Black

Ai-kansas.... 4y8 l030MississippI .. 292 193

Asbley 706 OOS|Monroe 525 551

•Benton — 1009 Montgomery 492 26

Bradley 908 SOSj^ewton 424 1

" " 1

1

1

|

'

IDAHO.

The last election of which we have returns

was for Delegate in Congress and Legislature in

1806. E. D. Ilolbrook, Dem., was chosen by

Calboun "" 42; 184 Ouachita ..., 10:il 870

•Carroll — 767 *Perrv — 318

Chicot 208 894 Phillips 955 2681

•Clark - 1576ipik;e — 5(55

Columbia 1313 870 Poinsett 172 39

Conway 921 llSPolK BJ4 1

Craighead... 522 41 Pope

855

Crawfoul.... 704 147 *Prairie — 1583

Crittenden . . 245 505 Pulaski 1194 yu2

(Dross 415 184 Randolph.... 818 59

Dallas- 668 337 St. Francis.. 564 464

JDeshaf. 231 592 Sr-aline 712 42

Drew 1081 576 Scott 557 17

Franklin 741 102 Searcy ,574 1

*Fulton — 300 Sebastian.... 1011 195

Greene 921 5 Sevier 567 260

Hemnstead.. 1307 1195 Uidon 922 708

Hot Spring.. — 8,25 Van Euren.

806

Independo'ceWJS 1)2 Washington. 1S13 81

Izard 702 3lUyiiite 1273 156

Jactaon 849 2i3|* Woodruff... — 1027

Jefferson.... 1048 2733|YeU 731 150

Johnson O'il

Lafayette.... 500 931 Total.. i047 21207

-Lawrence.. — 75J! » in taese counties

Little Kiver. -V.j 327 the ligures show the

'Madison — 716,twtal registry without

-*Marioa — 391 division by color.

about 300 majority, and both branches of the

Legislature were strongly Democratic.

NEW PURCHASES.

TERRITORY OF ALIASKA.

Aljaska, or Russian America, purchased in

1867, for $7,200,000 in gold, and was formally

delivered to the United States Government on

the 1 th day of October. This teiTitory extends

from the nortli line of British Columbia in

5-4° 40', whence the line ascends Portland Cliannel

to the Mountains, following their summits,

nearly parallel with the coa^t, to the 141it meridian,

thence along that meridian to the Arctic

Ocean ; the west line returns from some unknown

point in that ocean, down through Eehring

Strait, thence diagonally west of St. Lawrence

Island, to longitude 193° (or 107° east),

and thence on the line ofiatitude to the place of

beginning. The peninsula of Aliaska, and the

long line of inlands reaching nearly to Kamschatka,

are included. There are about 6,000

Russians in the Territory, and probably 50,000

Indians.

WEST INDIA ISLANDS.

Arnrngements have been made (but not confirmed

by Congress) for the cession to the

United States of the Dani.:h islands cf St. Thomas

and St. John's, the consideration being about the

same as that for Russian America. The King of

Denmark leaves the question ultimately to the

people of the Islands, who are to decide by bal- J

lot on or about the 18th of January, 1868. It is I

presumed that their vote will be in favor of the |

cession. St. Thomas is 12 miles long and about >

3 wide ; area 27 square miles ; population about

14,000; the capital is Charlotte-Amalie, where

seven-eighths of the population reside. St. John

has an area of 22 square miles, and about 2,500

inhabitants.


AORTH CAROLINA.

Alamance — — •

Alexander — —..471 403 2

Alleghauy — — .. — — —

Anson... 1182 604.. 871 245 7

Ashe — — .. 717 229 1

Bertie — — .. 597 3'J9 17

Bladen .1043 889.. — — —

Bruu8Wlclc 813 S43.. 386 326 1

Buucombe 1012 421.. 705 662 49

Burke 792 230.. 447 470 4

Cabarrus 1042 280.. 810 443 18

Caldwell — —..449 229 9

tamden 700 — .. 5U3 83 8

Carteret — —.. 441 370 42

Caswell — - . 237 994 13

Catawba 7S0 S03. 302 878 3

Chatham 2116 330.. 970 004 194

Cherol-ee 412 54.. 677 459 15

Iv'orthampton — — . . 506 654 43

Onslow... - -•• 153 781 24

Orange — — 956 787 72

Pasquotank 565 — .. 477 239 55

Perquimans

Person

Pitt.

-42

T-- ?:^i

746., 483

."^

420

i

9

.. ....:. - -•• 731 8

Polk - -.. lis 270 1

Rimaolph - -..1224 3|1 44

xtichmoud — —..544 269 4

Kobeson 1043 389.. 643 720 134

Bockingham — — .. 485 1017 162

Rowan 2610 540.. 1023 1026 13

Rutherford 1026 74.. 495 095 3

Sampson 1129 7S5.. 529 879 6

Stanley 039 89.. 931 53 9

Stokes 548 96.. 432 745 —

Burry 853 191.. 502 811 28

Transylvania 256 31.. — — —

Tyrrell 173 -..300 77 22

tnion 1059 174.. 879 858 5

'

Convention, '67. President, 'CO.

Counties.

Union. Dem.Veni.

VVakc 4020

For. Ag'st.


Bell.Breck.Doui;.

•'61 536 y6

Wan en 22U0

Washington 400

Watauga —

Wayne 12^

WilKes IICO

Wilson 8ai

Tadkin 803

Yancey —

Ap'sl. Eell.Brsck.Dou >ufr.

602. 1139 1216 276

OUO. 138 858 5

413

822

158 44

S28. 239 ^359

259.. 1323

582.. —

863

230. .

— ..

812

275 500

Total 57359 18635. .44990 48539 2701

Percent 75 61 i.'4 ;iil. . 46. ^.I 6U.44 2. SI

In 1S67, whole number registered, 174,717, of

whom 103,060 were whitos, and 71,057 were colored.

* n Convention, about l.;0,000vote8were

cast, about 60,000 being cobircd. The afllrma-

live vote was over 90,000. Of Hie Delegates, 107

are Heps, and 13 Indepe dents or Dems. ; 107

are white and 13 are colored men. lu ISGO,

whole Vote for Governor, 45,094 Vv^orth over

DocKery, 23,596. The same year an Amended

Constitution wfis rejected, 19,570 to 21,552. Total

vote for Governor, in 1805, 58,55-l : Jonathan

Worth over W. W. Holden, 6,7:^0; over all,

0,524. In IfeCO, total vote for President, 96,230

Chowan 823 277.. 239 194 33

Clay

— — .. — — —

Cleveland 8E8 392.. 19G 1091 —

Columbus 577 505.. 822 723 6

Breckinridge ovL-r Bell,

Craven 3232 585.. 693 492 122

3,549.

Cumberland 1720 859.. 670 879 35

EEGrsxr.ATioN, 1867.

Crrrituct — — .. 66 595 — Counties. While. Btack. Counties. White.Black.

Davidson — — .. 1186 728 15 Alamance ... 1326 777 Jones 485 525

Uavie - -.. 611 329 31 Alexander.. 799 130 Lenoir 904 1075

Duplin 1055 987.. 149 1380 3 Alleghany... 864 57 Lincoln 8S6 407

Edgecombe — —.196 1789 17 Ausou 1081 1067 Macon 860 53

Forsyth 1062 29.. 965 825 70 Ashe 1174 76 M»dison 932 53

Franklin 1460 770.. 313 759 11 Beaufort .... 1157 907iWartin 965 791

Gaston 822 84.. 131 826 50 Bertie 963 1265'McDowell... 877 221

Gates — — .. 394 338 12 Bladen 1000 1135 Mecklei^b'g . 1835 1645

Granville — — .. 8C8 870 fc3 Brunswick

Mitchell 735 53

Greene — — .. 326 381 — Buncombe, 1(322 Montgomery 874 317

Guilford 1766 638.. 1838 304 118 Burke

Moore 1348 558

HalUax 2543 737.. iH6 757 22 Cabarrus ..

J^ash 1048 869

Harnett — -.. 138 542 73 Caldwell ., 997 N. Hanover. 1736 2975

Haywood — — .. 348 867 13 Camden ... 593 Northampt'n 1039 1810

Henderson 598 55.. 490 425 4 Carteret 1120 Onslow 787 899

Hertford 705 503.. 418 246 20 Caswell 1105 Orange 1956 1294

Hyde 175 -.. 459 395 3 Catawba 1315 Pasquotank . 757 819

Iredell - -..1625 328 31 Chatham 2406 1055 Perquimans. 673 683

Jackson — —..142 403 — Cherokee 826 31

Johnson 1329 603.. 630 974 40 Chowan 586 640

Jones - -.. 165 197 10 Clay 389 14

Lenoir 1131 S49.. 317 53:1 21 Cleveland... 1390 373

Lincoln 677 283.. 243 473 5 Columbus.... 744 681

Slacon - -.. 469 221 S Craven 1531 3108

Madison 400 -.. — — — Cumberland. 1454 1421

Martin - -.. S33 751 22 Currituck... 919 381

McDowell 498 162.. 349 276 1 Davidson.... 21C4

Mecklenburg 1985 447.. 856 1101 135 Davie 803

Mitchell •— — .. — — Duplin 1414


Montgomery 774 — .. 725 102 o Edgecombe.. 1194 2593

Moore - --. 583 299 179

Nash - -.. W 1323 4

New Hanover 2928 1081.. 664 1617 5

Forsyth 1351 437

Franklin.... 1100 1483

Gaston 1007 445

Gates 734 468

Granville.... 1845 2662

Greene 690 692

Guilford 2457 1054

Halifax lOi'5 3140

Harnett 830

Haywood.,.. 818

Henderson.. 814

Hertford 700

Hyde 863

Iredell 1859

Jackson 767

Johnson 1704

Person 941 903

Pitt 1296 1500

Polk 474 120

Randolph.... 2192 452

Richmond... 991 1067

Robeson 1509 1404

Rockiuiih'iu. 1121 1302

Rowan TO3 1054

Rutherford.. 1459 454

Sampson I4fil 953

Stanlv 927 259

Stokes 124S 897

Surry 1482 273

Transylv'ia . 457 69 ,

Tyrrell 595 246 !

Union 1294 422

Wake 2998 2862

Warren 803 2208

Washington. 674 548

Watauga.... 725 40

Wayne 1453 1283

Wilkes 2139 241

Wilson 1021 8!)7

Tadkin 1502 245

Yancey 746 49

Total 103060 71857

Percent 58,98 41, OS

AVYOMING.

The people of Southern Idaho and Northern

Utah have uaidertaken to organize a Territory

by this name on the eastern side of the Rocky

Mountains. The consent of Congress, however,

has not been obtained.

;


GEORGIA.

Reqistbatiok 'C7

Dist. CaunliM. "White. Col.

1—Bryao 253 SB'J

Chatham 2358 4784

Effingham 404 333

2—Liberlj' 326 869

Wcliilosh 207 585

TatnaU 456 103

S—Appling 453 W

Pierce 173 131

Wayne 156 68

4—Camden 145 536

Charlton 160 52

Glynn 165 576

5 Cliuch 402 ISO

Coflee 356 91

Ware 227 131

6—Berrien 459 61

Echols 167 60

Lowndes 520 627

7—Brooks 59;i 874

Colquitt 173 15

Thomas 758 1440

8—Decatur 1024 1115

Miller 27

Mitchell 390 607

9—Baker 284 999

Calhoun 309 646

Earlv 332 774

10—Dougherty 380 21;^

Lee 353 1509

Worth 332

U-Clav 411

Itaiido'pli 838

Terrell 595

12—Quitman

THE TRIBUKE AL5IANAC FOR 1868. 67

193

451

1053

864

398

6'tewart ..;;..;..; 830 1410

Wehstcr S9» 386

13—Macon 619 1281

Schley 358 501

Sumter 970 1S94

14—Dooly

Pulaski

Wilcox

15—Irwin

Montgomery

837

858

248

194

SOG

770

1103

114

37

146

Telfair

16—Emanuel

Johnson

Laurens

17-Bullock

Bmke

Scriven

'18—Glascock

338

524

273

6S6

55-1

791

622

342

161

23G

142

635

235

2543

891

173

Jefierson

Kichmond

19—Greene

693

2254

822

1273

3259

1431

Taliaferro

Warren

20—Baldwin

Hancock

Washington

21—Jones

Twiggs

Wilkinson

22—Bibb

Monroe

3a'!

725

595

740

1267

479

512

908

1590

1109

553

1217

1146

1545

1.336

1071

999

849

2286

1623

Pin;e 958

2&-Crawford 53B

Houston 920

Tavlor 618

24—Chattahoochie ... 438

Marlon 067

Muscogee 1083

25-Harn3 1121

Talbot 777

Upson 800

26—Butts 531

Favette 786

Spaulding 722

27—Clark 880

833

729

2596

504

567

649

1750

1274

1226

756

409

378

800

1109

2!

'

.Contention.


68

. .

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1868.

NEBRASKA.

GOV'NOE,'66.CONG.'f;6.TBEAS'R.'65.

Counties. Rep . Dem . Un . Vem.Hep . Dem.

Butler.Mcrtou.T.atfe.Part'k.K'tM.G'd'h.

Bnrt 125 H2.. 1«12 94.. 65 41

Bvffalo 10 82.. 11 16.. - -

Caes 375 343.. 573 898.. 433 40?

Cedar 29 31.. 24 SI.. 15 15

Clay — -.. -—..- —

Cumming 28 51.. 41 43.. 28 —

Dakota 87 106.. 83 109.. 47 83

Dixon 30 49.. 32 41.. 10 88

Dodge 110 S3.. 147 49.. 85 29

Douglas 426 645.. 690 695.. 418 559

Gage 116 49.. 124 54.. 86 12

Halt 10 27.. 46 — .. 67 —

Johnsoji 121 7G.. 131 45.. 88 13

Jones 59 2.. 45 11.. — —

Kearney 22 28.. 14 80.. 8 8

Lancaster 112 53.. 128 69.. 100 8

L'eau-qui-Court 10 1.. — 6.. — —

Lincoln 16 36.. 18 134.. — —

Merrick

Nemaha

16

533

8..

306.

26

665

8..

308.

25

500


82

Otoe

Pawnee

462

238

&t2..

32..

445

239

782..

44..

422

225

714

-

Platte

Richardson

90

487

89..

419..

85

564

96..

473..

50

489

82

237

Saline 11 50.. 44 68..

Sarprj 106 ^55.. 147 210. . 146 200

Saunders — — .. 49 39.. 28 10

Seward' 28 14.. 23 16.. 16 —

Washington ....283 205.. 275 156.. 222 21

IstNeb.Vet.Vol.

Cavalry 152 41.. — -..— -

Total 4093 3948. . 4820 4072. . 8-122 2519

' Percent 59»00 49.10.. W.O.! 45. M. . 67.16 -li 84

For Governor, David Butler over J. S. Morton,

145. For Congress, John Taffe over A. 8.

Paddock, 748 ; over all. 718. In 1S65, total vote

for Territorial Treasurer. 5,950; Kountzeover

Goodrich, 852. In 1864, Hitchcock's (Union)

majority for Delegate to Congress, 793. In

i

1862, Daily's (Union) majority, 153.

j

i ( Coos

' Curry

Legislatcbk, 1867. Senate.Howse.Joint Bal.

Kepublicans 10 30 ; 40

Democrats 3 9 12

Bep. maj 7 21 28

Note.—In 1867, the voting was for local otDcers

oniv ; the result showed very large gains

in almost every county in the new State for

tbe Republican tickets.

Counties.

OREOOIV.

Balcer 283 299.

Benton 527 494..

!

\

Douglas

Grant

Jackson

631

317

562

545..

254.

691.

.

Gov'NOB '66. Cong. '64. Gov.'GS.

t/nion .Dem. Un.Dem. Un.Dem.

Woods.Kellv.Hond'n.Kellv.Gibbs.Miller.

590 483.. - -

318 254. 253 214

Clackamas C82 560. 522 268.. 650 2G2

Clatsop

Columtna

117

89

135

58

48.

104..

85.

42..

144

01

50

63

42..

65..

57..

24.

89

110

10

46

4

9

35-4 257

447 504.. 540 417

Josephine

Lane

Linn

' Marlon

•I Multnomah

y. Folk

'

Tillamock

153 179.. 174

579 709.. 527

1015 12-33.. 799

1380 83:3.. 1069

120i 1025.. 950

560 565.. 462

47 39.. —

216..

492..

761

.366.

392.

330.


235

446 ""

661

951

643

384

26

245

3.53 ""

498

253

199

116

-

Umatilla 270 517.. 3.52 394.

— .. 148 24

Umpqua — — ..

Unk>n 235 416.. ——.. — —

Wasco 355 413.. 833 583.. 698 291

Woods. Kellv.Hend'n.Kelly.Gibbs.JIiUer.

"Washington 465 !>59.. 872 143.. 313 87

Yamhill 563 555.. 423 296.. 408 165

Total 10283 9956. . 8719 5992. . 7039 3450

For cent 50.51 4a.l9. .SU. L'7 4U.7a. .6-.U 32.89

In 1866, total vote for Governor, 20,239

"Woods over Kelly , o27. In ISfrl, whole vote for

member of Congress, 14,711 ; Ilenderson over

Kelly, 2,727. In 1SG:5, ivhule vote for Governor,

10,480 : Gibbs over Miller, 3,589. In 1860, whole

vote lor President, 13,903 ; Uem. maj. 3,378.

CoNQ.'Ce. Hep. Dem. liep.maj.

Eufus Mallory, 10362 Jas. U. Fay ,9809 553

Legislattjee, 186G. Senate.House.Jolnt Bal.

Republicans 14 24 38

Democrats 8 23 81

Rep. ma,1 6 1

NoT£.—JNO election in Oregon In 1867.

VIKGINIA.

Convention, '67. Pbesident, '60.

Counties. For. Agsl. Vn.Dem.Dem.

Wbite.Blar.k.White.Black.Bell.Breck.Doni;.

Acccmac... 35 11S3..1327 3.. 736 737 80

Albemarle .. 97 2.353.. 1499 29.. 1317 1056 97

Alexandria.. 193 1576.. 838 8. .1012 565 141

Alleghany... 52 53.. 163 5.. 250 844 37

Amelia 22 1359.. 306 81.. 282 249 32

Amherst ....160 1208.. 981 15.. 622 808 26

Appomattox 83 839.. 453 3.. 221 563 10

Augusta 233 1024.. 1646 9. .2553 218 1094

Batli 8 33.. 177 1. 220 163 22

Bedford 120 1878.. 1556 22.. 1468 1037 91

Bland 128 39.. 227 0.. - - —

Botetourt... 133 577.. 735 4.. 590 589 174

Brunswick.. 55 1616.. -146 2., 808 444 137 '

Buchanan... 09 0.. 55 0.. 14 134 19

Buckingham 58 1537.. 709 12.. 544 523 22

Campbell.... 83 2537. .2006 24.. 1521 1208 146

Caroline 7 1241.. 1166 20.. 561 772 18

Carroll 692 41.. 163 2.. 815 T29 11

Chark'8 City. 93 585.. 83 0..224 111 9

Charlotte.... 74 1878.. 555 20.. 418 465 25

Chesterfield. 37 1972.. 1082 0.. 788 328 583

Clarke 19 340.. 514 3.. 288 835 49

Crafg 44 14.. 181 6.. 112 322 2

Culpepper... 17 809.. 849 17.. 526 525 19

Cumberland. 26 1235.. 345 1..278 276 37

Dinwidrtie .. 42 1483.. 326 1.. 389 251 183

Elizabeth Cy 55 1427.. 39 0..248 161 24

Essex 24 1020.. 394 3.. 279 308 4

Fairfax 245 909.. 773 12.. 691 6a5 91

I'auquier.... 60 1128. .1305 13.. 789 1027 39

Floyd 613 1.59.. 95 0.. 384 400 35

Fluvanna,... 64 857.. 686 19.. 487 448 7

Franklin ... .497 900. .491 11.. 863 1076 133

Frederick... 431 477.. 1001 5.. 963 1315 66

Giles 12 9.. 257 2.. 866 244 68

Gloucester.. 5 756.. 569 4.. 301 460 —

Goochland.. 8 1338.. 364 1.. 244 428 87

Grayson 4-47 106.. 170 0.. 815 447 —

Greene 10 220.. 880 7.. 74 521 10

Greeusville.. 22 672.. 192 1.. 139 151 41

Halifax 577 2748.. 582 11.. 563 1312 138

Hanover 63 1453.. 1003 2.. 575 749 27

Henrico 53 1606.. 669 1..1403 641 189

Henry 3C3 902.. 126 3.. 543 444 59

Highland.... 43 21.. 214 4.. 215 170 255

l3loof"Wight303 613.. 401 2.. 147 757 19

James City.. 14 412.. 103 4.. 148 60 5

King & Queen.39 826. . 375 4. . 255 510 2

King George 9 S93..351 3.. 181 223 37

King "ft'illiam 11 C52..297 1.. 142 315 8

Lancaster... 6 472.. 256 0.. 209 142 12

Lee 307 51.. 191 0.. 462 894 10

Loudon 584 899. .1336 13.. 2033 778 120

Louisa 88 1393.. 542 3.. 498 754 2

Lunenburg.. 46 1124.. 434 7.. 251 527 32

Madison 55 556.. 557 1.. 74 884 20


Wiite. Black. Whlte.Black.BfU.Breck.Douc.

Matthe-n-B . . . 81 29S.. 289 0..251 ;«G —

Mecklenburg 92 2G23.. 7S4 10.. 430 901 63

Middlese.x... 6 376.. 237 0.. 151 241 —

THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S6S.

MoutjomeryG24 506.. 387 0.. 712 125 74

Nansemuml . 2U 1056. .099 0.. 477 429 1

Nelson 43 1100.. 753 17.. 733 390 112

New Kent... 23 405.. 159 1.. 264 172 2

Norfolk City 446 1&21..1130 2..&S4 439 233

Wise 152 4.. 234 C. 102 363 8

ATythc

York

riS5

20

406 , 569

987.. 115

3.. 017

0.. 227

795

90

22

3

Total . . . .14835 92507.61349 633.53145 51t;22 10290

Percent b.n 54.66. 36- 17 0. 4') 46 H 44. SB U.'s^i

In 1S67, total number of voters registered,

221,754; t'.lal vote on Coiiventiun, l6y,229; for

CouveiUion, 107,342; against Convention, 61,SS7:

ma.joritv for Convention, 45,155; total uumber

of Wtiite votes, 76,084 ; total number of Bla'-k

votes, 93.155. In 1S60, T%-hole vote for President,

115,25i; Bell over Breckinridge, 1,323; over

Douglas, 42,855. The KeeonsLrnction Convention

elected in October, 1807, consisted of

105 delegates, of whom -0 were whites, and 25

were cob red men. They were divided into

70 Republicans and 35 Conservatives.

Eegistee, 1867.

WUte.B.acd.

VThitc.Black.

Accomac . . .2042 1463 Charles City. 301 653

Albemarle.. 2227 2091 Charlotte ... 900 2064

Alexandria. 1354 lUlS Chesterfield 18C3 2018

Alloghany . . 469 92 Clarke 631 375

Am-lia. . .... 477 1478 Craig 439 47

Amherst . . . .1504 1356 Culpepper . . 951 818

Appomattox 748 884 Cumberland 518 1337

Augusta . . . .0336 1260 Dinwiddie . . 692 160a

Bath 415 110 Elizabeth C. 352 1570

Bedford 2242 1989 Essex 575 1121

Bland 648 56 Fairlax 1344 1021

Botetourt. . .1009 659 Fauquier . . . 1863 1371

Brunswick. . 810 1766 Floyd 1313 183

Buchanan... 4G3 5 Fluvanna ... 886 971

BuciringhamlOGl 1793 Franklin . . . .2092 1088

Campbell .. .25(5 2976 Frederick... 1691 S88

Caroline ....1291 1369 Giles 811 .140

Carroll 1377 64 Gloucester.. 851 863

White.

Goochland.. 646

Grayson 1270

Green 545

Greensville. 290

Halifax 1865

Hanover.... 1503

Henrico.... 1429

Henry 995

Highland ... 592

Isle ofWight 855

James City.. 209

King & Qu'n 700

King George 450

King Will'm 478

Lancaster. .. 354

Lee 1470

Loudon 2779

Louisa 1103

Lunenburg.. 7l7

Madison 802

Matthews... 643

Mecklenb'g.l253

Middlesex .. 382

Montgom'ryl537

Nansemotid.1074

Nelson 1213

New Kent .. 866

Norfolk Cityl876

Blnck.l White.

1501 Patrick 1175

128 Petersburg;. .1443

260 Pittsylvania 2^51

713i Powhatan... 451

3398 Prin. Kdward 745

l.")5S Prin. George 511

lsr9 Prin. WiUi;im 791

lOOllPrincessAnnSCO

55'Pulaski 693

655|Rappahan'ck 693

485'Eichmond .. 576

-SOg 2912..10CO 1..704 447 52

^'^i^f°TOO^'t^,i

Northampton 5 873.. 3W 1.. 2&4 214 6

NorthumM'd 84 434.. 363 0.. 276 850 1

Nottoway ... 42 l,i02..161 32.. 232 179 28

Orange 45 984.. 649 2.. 127 475 12

Page 185 1^1.. 2S2 3.. 141 937 75

Patrick 574 '•!.. I*! 0..4S3 432 70

Petersburgh. 59 21;,-...:;:/ 5.. 970 223 618

Pittsylvania. 814' 875 Eichmond C.5192

438 Eoauoke....l003

703 Eockbridge.2114

472 Rockingham26'J6

118 Eusseli 1415

1093 Scott 18G1

274u..io54 42..ir02 1057 177

1749: Shenandoah 2168

Powhatau ... 20 1118.. 298 10.. 225 127 120

1217 Smyth 1241

1

Prin.Edward 63 1518.. 468 8.. 374 423 65

598 Sonthamp'n.llffJ

Prin George 46 946. .108 1 343 191 126

329|Spott8y]va'al282

Prin.^Vllliaml07 244.. 491 6.. 2-13 7Ui 26

j 2837 Stafford. ... 825

Pnr.pes-3 Ann S-1 84S.. 561 0..451 079 16

406 Surrev 445

Pulaski 39 295.. 286 1..332 250 5

566; Sussex 520

Kappahan'ck 69 443.. 564 2.. 491 409 —

1142 Tazewell.... 1094

Eichmond... 91 475.. 273 0.. 853 185 6

1248 Warren 610

EichmondC.145 5184.. 4712 11.. 2402 1167 753

454, Warwick ... 121

Roanoke ....119 571.. 427 2.. 293 373 52

2030 Washington 2502

Rockbridge .145 932.. 886 5.. 1231 361 641 Norl.dkCo >„(.„. „.-,,.„ Westmorel'd 021

-''-''*

Kocklngham 261 304.. 1082 10.. 883 676 1354

"'-'", Portsmo'h J

Wise 653

Kuesell 369 160.. 244 1.. 473 526 &1 Northamp'n. 548 996 Wythe 1658

Scott 767 76.. S46 1..5&1 594 91 North umbl'd 640 443'Sork 411

Shenandoah .251 155.. 901 1.. -127 1888 170 Nottc.way... 457 1442;

Smyth 160 228.. 700 8.. 440 496 49 Orange 871 1068 Total.... 116982

Southampton 20 1242.. 612 0.. 545 563 9 Pa-e 1205 190Percent 52.75

SpottSTlvania40 8S-J..1085 10.. 599 516 257

Stallord 38 196.. C16 6.. 404 402 105 NEW MIEXSCO.

Surry lOl 510. .203 1..197 115 55

Congress, '67.CoNG.'G5. Cong. '63.

Sussex 32 1026.. 290 C. 177 294 96 Counties. Hep. Vein. liep.Dein. Rep. Dem.

Tazewell.... 90 165.. 501 4.. 306 934 ~

Chaves.Clever.Chaves.Perea.GalUfT.Peren.

Warren 31 1T2.. 406 8.. 276 462 54 BernaUUo . . . . S36 733.. 751 634.. 282 1078

Warwick.... 2 258.. 15 0.. 72 31 Dona Ana.... 703 563.. 1072 100.. 562 246

Washington. 454 498. .1142 5.. 916 1178 56 Mora 715 2128.. 488 1072.. 635 617

Westmorel'd 27 .596. . 360 3.. 128 160 4 Rio Arriba ... h'H 1497.. 626 1209. . 1125 477

San Miguel.. .2137 lOOO.. 1761 782.. 1811 1050

Santa Aua.... 296 130.. 303 116.. 223 203

Santa Fe 780 780.. 654 618.. 690 613

Socorro 573 662.. 745 413.. 176 1116

Taos 1037 821.. 995

Valencia 1123 577. . 1111

874.. 880 9.57

362.. 511 844

Total 8791 8891.. 8511 0180.. 6425 7231

Perteut 49.72 5U.28.. 57 65 4'i.U5 .47.08 62 I.'-'

In 1867, total vote for Delegate to Congress.

17,685 : Charles P Clever over J Francisco

Chavez, 97. Both candidates are claimed as

Republicans ; Clever is doubtless a Democrat.

In 1SU5, majority for Chavez, 2,331. Majority

for Perea in 1803, 806.

MONTANA.

Del.Con.'67.Del.C.'65.Del.C.'C4.

Covntien. Rep. Vein. liep.Dem. Rep. JJem

Sander3.CavEn.Upson.McLean.S:uid.lU'L.

Beaverhead.. 301 297.. 92 152.. 263 2:.T.

Big Horn — — .. — — .. — —

C'Uoateau 115 165.. — — .. 80 —

Dear Lodge . .1037 1298.

596 1133. 35 2.1

MIgerton 1259 1622.. 458 771.. — -

Gallatin 633 1037.. 36 30.. — —

Jefferson 286 368.. 116 127.. 190 307

Madison 1125 1022.. 1002 1535.. 2050 S24ii

Missoula 140 195.. 122 00.. 52 23

Total 4893 6004 . . 2422 3808. . 2665 3899

Percent 44 92 55 OS.. S3. SS 61 12..4J.60 50 4ii

Total vote in 1867 (incl. of 762 thrown out for

informality, and 30 cast in places where no

precincts had been established), 11,093, Cavanaugh

over Sanders, 1,108. Inl865.fi,2?,0 Mc-

Lean's maj. 1,386. In 1864,total vote, 6.56.1 Mc-

Lean's m'aj 1,234. The vote, in 3S67, was

.

.

.


70 THE TRIBUNE ALMANAC FOR 1S68.

larger than any ever polled by any Territory i

west of the Missouri Kivcr, before a State orgaulzatlon.

The vote indicates a populiitlon

of over R5,(inn.

Lkgisi,atui:e, IsfiT.—Hoth houses of the Les-

Islatnre arc coinpotied entirely of Democrats,

with the exception of one Kepubllcan member

of the House.

WASHINOTON.

Deleg. Congress, 18fi7.

Covnties. Bep. De.m.

Flandei-s. Claik. Totol.

Chehalls 57 20 77

f;1ark 842 279 621

Clallam 67 49 116

Cowlitz 83 83 166

Mand 81 84 105

Jefferson 129 113 242

King 15-1 128 282

Kitsan 171 111 283

Klickitat 38 13 51

Lnoin 76 85 IBl

Mason 83 38 73

Pacific 122 15 137

Heree 86 138 224

Snohomish 69 61 130

Skamania 28 43 71

Stevenn 48 103 151

Thurston, 225 205 430

Wakialcum 8 8 16

Flandora. Clarlc Total.

Walla Walla 482 606 1088

WfiaUtom 48 65 113

Yamima 19 25 44

Total 2868 2272 4640

Per cent .',10;; 48 97

In 1RC7, total vote for Deleeato to Congress,

4,f;40; Flanders over Clark, 96.

Legislature, 1867. Cou>icil.IJoiixe.,TointIiaL

Republicans 4 14 18

Dcinorratft 5 16 21

Dem.maj 12 3

rOLiORAlOO.

A territorial election holdin Colorado, An?.

12, for members of the Lesjislature and countv

ntiicers. Under an act of Congress, anproved

latit March, the members of the Legislative

Council will hold four years, and of the House

two years. The new Legislature stands

strongly Kepubiican in both brandies. Council—

Republicans 8, Democrats 4. House— Republicans

16 to 10 ; on joint ballot, 2:") to 14.

There were 9,^49 votes cast, of which the

straiglit out Republican received 4,1"R, the

Democratic 4,016, and the Independei^t Republican

•tfi'i. This shows a combined Republican

majority of 870, a Republican increase of 768

over the majority the year before.

POPUI.AK VOTE FOR PRESIDENT.


5,0 bf.Mo,>;o«

5u ,-f--2 -g o-gr c Re g o o

X t- CO i- '^ CO L-S 2^ ?v oJ 1-. OCi "T- CO i- t-- Ci i^


72 THE TIUBUKE ALMjVNAC FOR 1868.

AMERICA.

Argentine Repnb,

BoUvla

820,000

S74,UUU

Brazil

ChiU

Colombia

Costa Rica

Ecuador

Guatemala

3,0CH,46O

170,000

480,800

16,250

240,000

44,500

Havti

Honduras

Mexico

Ivlcaragna

Paraguay

Peru

San Domingo

San Salvador

Uruguay

Venezuela

10,081

33,000

833,000

39,000

84,030

870,000

22,000

7,500

75,000

426,712

EUROPE.

Anhaltt

Austria

Baden ,

Bavaria

Belgium

Brement

Bruaswickt

Denmark

France

Great Britain

Greece

Hamburgt

Hesse-Darmst'dtt

Holland

Italy

Llppe-Detmoldtt.

Lippe-Schaumbgt

Licutcnstein

Lubeckt

Meclr.-Schweiiu t

Meck.-Strelitzt ..

Oldenbnrgt

Portugal

Prusslat

Rens8-Elder linet

Reuss-Yonng." t

Russia

San Marino .....

Saxony t

Saxe-Altenburgt.

Saxe-Co. Gothat.

Saxe-Meiniiigent.

.s'xe-W'r-Eieen.t

Scdwzb'g-Und.t..

Schwzb'g-Sond.t.

Spain ,.

States of Church.

Sweden & Korw'y

Switzerland

Turkey

Wnrtemberg

WaldecktT.

.

11

1

Bqnare 'Population.

Milea, I

5,705 2,843,994

491 141 839

790 164,527

9681 178,065

1,403 280,201

405: 73,752

358 66,189

176.480 16,302,625

4,502, 690,000

292,440 5,814,386

15,161 2,510,494

1,895,194 37,430,000

7,568 1,748,328

455 59,143

FOUEIGN COUNTRIES.

December, 1867.

.

Name of Rcles, I "o °9 I Forma

of Qoveniment.

1,171 ,800 B. Mitre

President 1862 Republic.

1,987 ,352 M. Meliiarcjo President 1865 Republic.

9,106, ,000 Don Pedro II Emperor 18-10 Hered'v monarchy.

2,0*1 ,945 Jose Joaq'n Perez President 18C6 Repubflc.

2,794 ,473 Santos Gutierrez. President 1861

126 ,750 J M.Castro President 18C6

1,040, ,371 Geron. Carrion... President 1865

i.uoo: ,000 Vlncente Cerna . President 1865

7oy: jOOO Sri vain Salnave,. President..... 186]

350: ,000 joseMcfUna President .... 1S66

8,218, ,obO Benito .Juarez President 1867

400, ,Ij00 yernan'o Guzman President.,... 1867

1,337, ,lol Franc. Sol. Lopez President 1862

2,500, ,000 Mariano Ig.Prado President 1867

200. ,000 Gen.Cabial President 1866

600, ,000 Franc. Dnenas ... President 1865

240: j965 Venancio l lores . President..,.. 1865

1,565: ,000 Juan Falcon President 1865

-

Republic.

Republic

Republic.

Republic.

Republic.

Republic.

Republic.

Republic.

Hcpublic.

Republic.

Republic.

Republic.

Republic.

Reptiblic.

John , . ,

Ernest

Fred. Gunther ..

Albert.... ,

Isabella II

Abdul Azis....

Charles I

George Victor.

Dnke

Emneror

Grand Duko.

Eitg

King

Burgomaster,

Duke .,

King

Emperor ,

Queen

King ,

Burgomaster.

GraudDuke.,

King

King ,

Prince ,

Prince .,

Prince

Burgomaster.

Grand Duke.

Grand Duke.

Grand.Duke.

King,

King,,..,,..,

Prince ,

Prince

Czar

1,017 193,046 Leopold ..{

1817 Lim. monarchy.

239,048^ S2,5r2,932 Francis Joseph I.

1848 Const'l monarchy.

5,712 1.434,754 Frederic

1S52 Lim. sov., 2 chamb.

28,435 4,774,464 Ludwig II

1864 Lim.mon.,2cliamb.

11,313 4,893,0-


INTEEESTING DOCUMENTS.

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the years 1838 to 1868, inclusive—excepting 1842, in which year none was

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:

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I one

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76

The Methodist:

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lEl K-L I G- 1 O U S A IV D LITERARY-

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assisted bv the foIloTring contributors

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Prof. A. J. SCHEM

Fresh Sermons hj Eiuiiieiit Pulpit Orators,

Among whom are

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and the

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»

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BBaiGTQRS^

77

JAMES B. COLGATE,

of Trevor & Colgate, Bankers.

CIUUNCEY R DEPEW,

(late Secretary of State.)

JUSTUS LAWRENCE,

President.

G. niLTOX SCRIBNER,

Vice-President.

JOSEPH T. SANGER,

Merchant, No. 85 Liberty St.

M. B. WTNKOOP,

of Wynkoop & Ilallenbeck,

H3 Fulton Street.

Eev. henry C. FISU, D.D.,

Newark, N. J.

RICHARD W. BOGART,

of 0. M. Bogart & Co., E'krs.

LUTHER W. FROST,

New York.

Office Wo. 26 ISTassau Stbeet,

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Organizecl :>Xay lOth, 1S66, on tlie 3I\it\ia,l Plan.

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PoUcies issued to Dec. 1, 1867 5,092

Amount Insured $14,502,600

Annual Income

»

1,250,000



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These Billiard Tables have received the unqualified approval of the best players and most compe-

tent .j udges, who have universally pronounced them unequalled for general e.xcellence and durability.

t^-y?~ Seven distinct patents for improvements in Billiard Tables have been granted to us by the United

States Patent Office, and we have l ately obtained a patent from the French Government for our

improvements in Billiard Cushions, f-^g" We employ, in the construction of our tables, a yariety

of machines specially made for the purpose, by which means we are enabled to insure a scientific and

mechanical accuracy Mtherto unknown in billiard manufacture. American Cue Cement.—

Price, for large bottles, 50c. Warranted the best in use. Price Lists and full information sent by mail.

PHELAN & COLLENDER, 63, 65, 6/ iind 69 Trosby Strtcl, M. V.

Original Price $5 per package ; now sent bt mail on receipt of ONE DOLLAR ; 6 Bo.xes for $5.

This Wonderful Remedy (discovered by Dr. Henrt Zell) may be given, unknown, to the drinker'

in Coffee, Tea, or other drink, and will never sicken the -patient. Mark That !

Dninkenness is a Z>ij^ease. In Dyspepsia there is a continual craving for I'ood ; so in Dninkenness,

the unfortunate one is beset with an insatiate desire for Driiik. Dr. ZeU's Compound

weans the patient from this craving for Alcoholic Stimulants, not by producing nausea or sickness

but b)- bracing up and strengthening the coating and nerves of the stomach, so that the craving

for Liquor is gradually removed, hearty, generous food is begun to be sought after (and should be

freely supplied); then follows a firm power and will to resist the accursed cup.

Mrs

Packages sent by mail, on receipt of price, by:—Dr. R. HOMAN, 63 Division St., N. Y • E. C. HALSEY, 214 8th Ave., N. Y. ; Dr. J. AIKEN, Jr., 281 Hudson St., N. Y. ; C. W. RILEY 175

Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Dr. WM. T. MERCER, 224 Broad St., Newark, N. J. ; JOS. J. BRIEST '

46 South Second St., Williamsburg, N. Y.

Trade Supplied by CHAS. N. CRITTEIVTON, 38 Sixtli Avenue, N. Y.

'


80

?mm mil znmmi? cc^s

Through Line

TO

CALIFORNIA, CHINA, AND JAPAN.

TottcliiDg at Mexicau Ports, and carrying the Dnited States Mail.

Steamsliips on Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

ARIZONA,

HENKY C3aA^">iCE"y,

NEW YORK,

©CEAN aUEEN,

CHINA,

KISING STAR,

AliASKA,

JAPAN,

COLORADO,

CONSTITUITION,

GOLDEN CITY,

SACRAMENTO,

GOLDEN AGE,

MONTANA,

GREAT REPUBLIC, Sec.

One of the above large and splendid Steamships will leave Pier Xo. 42,

North River, foot of Canal Street, at 12 o'clock noon, on the 1st, 11th, and 2l6t

of every month (except when those dates fall on Sunday, and then on the preceding

Saturday), for ASPINWALL, connecting via Panama Railway with one

of the Company's Steamships from Panama, for SAN FRANCISCO, touching

at ACAPULCO.

Departures of the 1st and 21st connect at Panama with Steamers for SOUTH

PACIFIC and CENTRAL AJIERICAN PORTS. Those of the 1st touch at

MANZANILLO.

Departure of 11th each month connects with the new steam line from

Panama to AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND. Through tickets sold.

One hundred pounds of baggage allowed to each adult. Baggage-masters

accompany the baggage through, and attend to ladies and children without

male protectors. Baggage received on the dock the day before sailing, from

steamboats, railroads, and passengers who prefer to send down early.

An experienced surgeon on board. Medicine and attendance free.

For Passage Tickets, or farthfr information, apply at or address the Company's

TICKET OFFICE ON THE AVHARF,

Foot of Canal Street, North Kirer, New York.

Beware of all other Oices. F. R. BABY, Agent.


DUEUfG THE LAST FOBTY-FOUE TEAES.

"WAREKOOJtttS J

No. 246 Washington Street, Boston.


82

MANUFACTURERS f)F

SINGLE AND DOUBLE CYLINDER AND TYPE-REVOLYING

PRINTINGr MACHINES,

POWER PRESSES,

(ADAMS' PATENT,)

WASHINGTON AND SMITH HAND PRESSES,

SELF-INKING MACHINES, ETC.

£Jvery Arlicle connected n'ith ihe Ar/s of Leiter-'Pre$s, Copperplate,

and Z,ithograp?iic Printing aj}d 7iookbindi77g

always on hand, 07' furnished on short notice.

CAST-STEEL SAWS, SAW MANDRELS, &c.

PRINTING MACHINE.

This Press is pspecially designed to supply newspapers of moderate circulation with a cheap and

plain but serviceable Printing Machine, capable of doing also the ordinary Job Worli of a country

office. It will print, without noise or jar, from 600 to lOOU impressions per hour, and can be run

either by hand or steam power.

The bed is carried by a truck haying large friction-rollers running on a railway (whence the

name of the Press), and is driven backward and forward by a crank motion, which stops and starts

it so gently tliat ttie bed-springs usually employed are not needed. The paper is fed through adjustable

guiiles to the under side of the impression cylinder, instead of the up, er, and the feed-board

lifts the sheet up over the guides, and against the cylinder, as the fingers of the latter clasp it.

After an impression is given, the impression cylinder remains stationary while the l)ed returns; a

fresh sheet is in the meantime laid on the feed-board, and the fingers close on it before the cylinder

starts agiin. As the cylinder-wheel gears directly into a rack on the side of the bed, excellent

register is obtained. There is also a pointing apparatus. The bed is provided with irdn bearers,

to equalize the impression on the form. The impressinn cylinder is never shifted to suit forms of

different sizes, but the forward edge of the type is always placed to the same line on the bed, and

the fingers and fly-tapes are as easily adjusted as on our orrUnary Job Presses.

The ink fountain has the adjustable knife so necessarj' to job work. Th?. bed Is 31 x46 in. ; a

form I'Yi X 42 In. is inked by one roller, and a form 23 x 42 in. by two rollers. The Press has our

self-acting sheet-flyer, and can be run easily and safely by one man or strong boy at the speed

mentioned above.

It occupies a space 5} x 10 feet, and can be worked In a room seven feet higli. 'U'eight, boxed,

6,600 lbs. Each macidne is furnished with blankets, and extra stocks.

Illustrated Catalogues, with prices of this and other Machines, will be sent on application.

I^EW YOEK

29 and 81 Gold St., and on Broome, Colttmbia, and Sheriff Sts.

BOSTON, Mass. : I LONDON, Eng. :

On FocNDRT St. | 18 SAiiSBtmy Sq., Fleet St

:


New-York Type-Foundry,

^

USTA^ZISB'U^) IJr./8/3,

This Eoundry has on hand' ready for sale the

largest stock of Printing Types in America, and

can execnte the largest orders without delay.

Particular attention is called to our great assort-

ment of Poman T^-pe, many faces of Plain and

Ornamental Script, and new Pancy Ponts.

Printing Presses, Wood Type, and all other

Printing Materials furnished at manufacturers'

Ijrices.

Specimen sheets of new articles furnished regu-

larly to all printers Avlio will send us their address.

Address,

15 Chambers- Street,


l m^. ..J .i..l.l.'M. - l -. ..,Jli-l.---Llll..l-- .JlH »UlillJ'L.''t- I -U

VANDERBURGH, WELLS & CO,

110 Fciltou and 16 and IS Dutch Streets,

I^KTV^ YORK,

T"»vo Ulocks East of I5road.^vay.

MANUFACTURERS OF SUPERIOR

WOOD TYPE,

Eagle, California, and other Economical Cabinets.

BOXWOOD. MAnOCAAX MAPLE MD PINE, PREPARED EXPRESSLY FOE

TYPE. PRESSES,

And other PRINTING MATERIALS.

m^ PLEASE SEND FOE SPEOCiEKS. _^


_

Smith's Magnetic Salve.

iMAGNElJC^AlVEi

This wonderful Salve has been before the pub-

lic for over twenty years. Is a sure remedy for

Scrofula, Fever Sores, tlcers. Felons, Bums,

Chilblains, PJieumatism, Barber's Itch, Erysipelas,

Bronchitis, Corns, F^ir-ache, lieafness of

fifteen Years', Sore Eyes, 'Whoopinir Cough, &c.

This Salve has become a household word. For

all purposes where a salve is required. Price 25

cts. a Box. Sold bv the Proprietor,

Mrs. S. B. SMITH,

309 Broadway, N. Y.,

and all Druggists. A liberal discount to the trade.

EIectro-Ma;^iietic Macliines,

FOR MEblCAii PURPOSES.

The only Electro-Medical Apparatus having

a strong direct current, as well as a to-and-fro

current. A direct without intensity, in a medical

point of view, is of no value at all.

The direct current, at its negative pole, is powerfully

tonic and contractive, while at its positive

pole it is diametrically the reverse.

This Machine is universally recommended by

all leading physicians in the United States and

Canadas, as it has double the magnetic power of

any other machine.

This Apparatus is self-operating, and is in a

neat portable black-walnut case. Price, with

single cup battery, $18 ; double cup, §20. Send

for circular. Address,

, ^ ^ CHAS. F. SMITH, Son of the

late Dr. Sam'l B. Surra, 309 B'-way, N.Y.

The Best is the Cheapest.

MOORE'S

A "Weekly Journal,

Established in 1S50, is the Leading and Largest-

Circulating Bunil, Family, Literary, and

General Xewspaper on the Continent—most

conclusive evidence that it is

The Best Paper vf ita Class.

The Rural is superior in Value and Variety of ,

Contents and Beauty of Appearance. It em- \

braces more Agricultural, Horticultural, Scientific,

Educational, Literary and News Mattel;

interspersed with engi-avings, than any other

Journal, for it comprises Llepartments devoted

to or including Agriculture, Horticulture, Sheep

Husbandry, tiraxing, Dairj-ing, Rural Architecture,

Domestic Economy, Choice Literature,

Science and Art, Education, Youth's Reading,

General News, Commerce, Markets, with Illustrations,

Tales, Essays, Music, Poetry, Rebuses,

Enigmas, kc, &c.

Tub Rural New-Yorker is a Xat'onal Jmirval,

circulating largely in the East and West,

North and South. It employ < tke Befit Talent

in all departments. Its corps of Editors, Contributors,

Ac, comprises many of the best Farmers,

Planters, AVool Growers, Graziers, Horticulturists,

Ac, and also Authors, Scholars, Ac, of

note and ability. For example its Sheep Hca-

BA.XDRY Department is edited by the Hon. Henrt

S.Randall, LL.D., author of "The Practical

Shepherd," "Sheep Husbandry in the South,"

&c., and President of the National Wool Growers'

Association, the be^t authority on the subject

in this country. In brief, The Rural is

Ably Edited, Prqinsely llhi>.tr


Uorth American Steamship Co.

OPPOSlTBOIVa TO MONOPOLY.

THROUGH LINE TO

VIA PANAMA OR NICARAGUA,

SAIZIXG AT NOON FROM

PIER 29 NORTH RIVER,

FOOT OF WARREN ST.,

ON WE FOUOWtWO rm$T-OlA$$ STEAMSHIPS.

Q1


:

m-r: - 'I «!"} •• ' ' J ' i.-gg- .1., .. J^lifg

ALLCOCK'S

mow

ALLCOCK'S POROUS PLASTERS invigorate Hit circulation of the blood around the part upon

which they are applied. Nature is thus assisteil to repair any accident, or want in the part,

wliether It be in the ligaments, In the muscles, in the nerves, in the Bkln, or in the bones.

AN ELECTRICIAN

who has great experience of their effects in Incal rhevmatism, in tic dovloure'JCj and deepseated

nervous and other pains, and in affections of the kidneys, etc. etc., attributes their sedative,

stimulative, and pain-relieving effects to their e/ectric qualities. He asserts they restore the

healthy electric condition (equilibrium) of the part, and that being restored, pain and morbid

action cease, lie vi-as amazed at the great number of beneficial indications produced by one of

these plasters. He affirms that ITEADACIIK U cured by one worn just below the breast-bone ,

that one placed over the nave! will cure hysterics, as well as dysentery, and affections of the bowels.

Even CUUOSIC COHTIVENESS he found to be greatly relieved by wearing one over the

bowels.

^" Sold by tlie yard, or in any size to suit, and also by tine

tilngle Plaster.

$5,000 Worth Sold by One Dealer.

Messrs. J. Balch & Son, Druggists, of Providence, R. I., write, Nov. 23, 1867: "We have scdd

at retail over our counter upward of $5,000 worth of A LLCOCK'S POROUS PLASTERS, and

In every case they gave satisfaction. They are favorites with physicians, because the componentg

and method of making them are known."

HISTORY OF, Lc. &,c.

ALLCOCK'S POROUS PLASTERS are the result of studies and experiments of Dr.

Shecut of S. C, of Dr. Wm. Wagstaff, now Baron Wagstaff, of Horace H. Day, the distinguished

manufacturer of rubber goods, and of Thomas Allcock, Chemist and Member of the College of

Pharmacy of New York, now Col. Allcock, &c. dtc.

PAIN OF THE SIDE CURED.

Allektow.v, Penn., April 4, 1865.

Messrs. T. Allcock & Co.

£>ear Sirs : My daughter used one of your Porous Plasters. She had a very bad pain in her

side, and it c^lred her in one week. Yours, truly, JOHN V. N. HUNTER.

jNEKVOrS AFFECTIONS CURED.

Jtxnrs Metz. Esq.. No. 359 State Street, Brooklyn, the well-known Professor of Music, was long j

} subject to an affe.tiun of the muscles of the chest, attended with most violent spasmodic asthma.

B His physical sufferings were great, and his professional duties much interfered with. The appUcar

tion of one plaster cured him.

I

I Messrs.

! ters.

IMPORTANT FROM A PHYSICIAN.

*

Hartford, Conn., Nov. 11, 1864.

Thos. Allcock & Co. ; Please send, with dispatch, twelve dozen AUcock's Porous Plas-

Our daily experience confirms their very superior excellence. At this moment of writing a

man applies for one, who, by entanglement in the ^haft of machinery, had both his legs broken,

spine severely injured, and was for nearly a year entirely helpless. This man found relief very

soon by the application of n, plaster to his spine. He was soon enabled to work, and now he labors

a? well as ever, lie would cheerfully pay $5 for a single plaster, if they could not be had at a

lower rate. Knowing the plasters to be so useful, I have no scruples that my sentiments should

be known. J- W, JOHNSON, M. D.

Principal Agency, I

BRANDRETH HOUSE, NEW YORK.

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS.


THE GREAT AMERICAN CONSUMPTIVE REMEDY.

BALSAM FOE THE LUITGS,

FOR THE CURE OF

Consumption, Decline, Asthma, Bronchitis, TTastiDg of Flesh, Night Sweats, Spitting of Llood

Whooping Cough, Difficulty of BreatUng, Cough, Croup, Influenza, Phthigic, Pain in the Side, and

all Diseases of the Lungs.

10,000 DoLLAits FlEward is offered for a better recipe. It contains no opium, calomel, or mloer«l

poison, and can be safely taken by the most delicate child.

Dr. Wm. Hall's Balsam for the LrNos strikes at the root of the disease at once. The most

distressing cough is frequently relieved by a single dose, and broken up in a few hours' time. The

afflicted do not have to take bottle after bottle before they find whether this remedy will afford relief

or not.

This is NO PAREGORIC PREPAKATioy, but One which, if used in season, will save the lives of thousands.

It has effected cures in numerous cases where the most skillful physicians in this country

and in Europe have been emplo.ved, and have exercised their skill in vain. Cases which they have

pronounced incuruhh, and tturrendered ris hopeless beyond a doubt, leading the patienta

without a single ray to enliven them in their gloom, have been cured by Dr. Hall's Baham for

the Linirjs, and the " victims of consumption " are now as vigorous and strong as the most robust

among us. And these cases are not Isolated ones ; the.v are liumerous, and can be pointed out in

every community where this most unrivaled remedy has been tested. Full directions will be found

In pamphlets around each bottle.

For sale by Druggists and Dealers in Family Medicine in all parts of the United States.

SCOVILL'S

Compound Extract of Sarsaparilla and Stillingla,

OR,

BLOOD AHD LIVER SYRUP.

for the cure of

Scrofula or King's Evil, 'WHte Swelling, Ulcers, Chronic Rheumatism, Goiter or Swelled Neck,

Scrofulous Inflanmiations and Indolent Tumors, Mercurial and t^yphilitic Affection?, Ulcerations

and Enlargement of the Joints, Lymphatic Glands, Bones, Ovaries, Uterus, Liver, and Spleen ; of

Tabes Mcsenterica, Dyspepsia, Epileptic Fits, Old Sores, St. Vitus' Dance, Dropsy, and all Diseases

of the Skin, such as Pimples, Bolls, Tetter or Salt Rheum, Ringworm, Erysipelas, or St. Anthony's

Fire, Scrofulous Sore Eyes, Emaciation and Debility. Also, many Diseases peculiar to Females,

such as Leucorrhea or Whites, Suppression, Irregularity, Sterility, or any other Diseases arising

from Impurity of the Blood.

Kobert S. Newton, M. D., Professor of Surgery in the Eclectic Medical College of the

citv of New York, and editor of the American Eclectic Medical R6vie>w, gives the followin

testimony to the great virtues of the BLOOD AND LIVER SYRUP:

" In the 3Iedi nl Juumnly Mav, 1859, we published the formula for the preparation of SCO-

VILL'S EXirwVCT OF SARSAPARILLA AND STILLINGIA, OR BLOOD AND LIVER SYRLT,

recommending it to physicians as an alterative. Soon afterward we received communications from

a number of eminent and successful practitioners informing us of the satisf ctory results which

had almost invariably followed its use. In the August number, 1860, we republished this formula,

with communications from physicians and persons of respectability giving instances of its efGcacy

in reUeving obstinate Chrenic Diseases, since which time we have heard of hundreds of physicians

who have used this medicine in their practice, and it is conceded by all to be the best alterative in

use. Messrs. A. L. SCOVILL & CO., of this city, are largely engaged in the manufacture of this

compound, and have great facilities for purchasing pure ingredients; are reliable men, and sell I

nothing but the pure, unadulterated article

Sfo. 12 ^Vest EigSitli Street, Cmcinnati, Ohio, and

No. 7 Rose Street, ^ew York City.

Seepage 96.

89


I the

j no

I

:

B. T. BABBITT^S

ARTICLES OF EVERY-DAY USE,

B. T. Babbitt is the manufacturer of the following celebrated arUcles, all of which bear the

maker's name

'' glctritmai;* " Skirf M^mir antr "mmait" Sakrafus;

S0ap l^ofobrr. Star g^ast IPnioir^r, Conrtntratj^b-

^fltaslj, '' ^^tra Stardj," €xmxa Tartar,

Sal Soba, §ahm0 Snba, Jrrofo

Make Ydur own Soap with

8, T, BABBim puii[ mmmm potash,

Warranted double the strength cf common Potash, and superior to any other saponifier or lye in

market. Put up in cans of one pound, two pounds, three pounds, six pound?, and twelve pounds,

with full directions in Enplish and (leiman for making Hard and Soft Soap. One pound will

make fifteen gallons of Soft Soap. No lime is required. Consumers will find this the cheapest

Potash in market.

B. T. Babbitt's Medicinal Saleratus.

A perfectly pure and wholesome article, free from all deleterious matter; so prepared that, as

the circular accompanying the Saleratus will show, nothing remains in the bread when baked but

common salt, water, and flour. Put up neatly in papers, one pound, half pound, and quarter

pound.

B. T. Babbitt's Concentrated Soft Soap.

One box, costing $3.00, will make forty gallons of handsome Soft Soap, by simply adding boiling

water.

B. T. Babbitt's Labor-Saving Soap.

B. T. B.iBBiTT has for a long time been experimenting, and has now produced an article of Soap

that is composed of the best washing material, and at the same time will not rot or injure the

clothes in the slightest possible manner, lie staraps his name on each bar, and guarantees that

Soap will not injure the most delicate fabric, while it will be foimd to be the most pleasant

washing soap ever offered in market. It is made from CLEAN and PCIUC materials, contains

adulterations of any kind, and is especially ad.ipted for woolens, w-hich will not shrink after

being w:;shed with this Soap. Ask for U. T. BABBITT'S SOAP, and take no other. Each bar is

in a circular containing full directions for use, printed in English and German. One

wrapped I

pound of this Soap is equal to three pounds of ordinary family soap. Directions sent in each box i

making one pound of the above Soap into t'aree gallons of handsome Soft Soap. It will repaint,

grease, tar, and stains of all kinds. It will not injure the fabric; on the contrary, it

preserves it. It will wash in hard or salt water. But little labor Is required where this Soap is

•used. Machinists and printers will find this Soap superior to anything in market.

.FOR SALE EVERYWHERE.

B. T. BABBITT,

64, 65, QQ, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72, and 74

Washington Street,

NEW YORK. See also Page 86.)

; for

\ move


203, 399, 511 & 756 ,

AND FOURTfl AVENUE, corne. of 17th Street.

Drugs, Medicines, Fancy Articles, &c.

Hegeman &. Co.'s Benzine,

For the instant removal of Paints, Grease Spots, etc.

Hegeman &. Co.'s Camphor Ice, with Glycerine,

A certain cure for Chapped Hands, Sunburn, Sore Lips, CliUblains, etc.

Hegeman &. Co.'s Genuine Cod Liver Oil,

Warranter! pure, and prepared from the Frfsh Livers, without blearhin; or any chemical preparation.

This article has stood the test of fifteen years' experience, with increasing reputation, for

Consumption, Scrofula, etc

Hegeman &. Co.'s Cordial Elixir of Calisaya Bark,

Prepared from the Calisaya (or King's) B:irk, bcin^ the best variety of Peruvian Bark. It is an

agreeable cordial to the taste, and possessing the valuable tonic properties of the bark—3D escellent

preventive to Fevers, Fever and Ague, etc., for residents in malarious districts.

Hegeman & Co.'s Velpeau's Diarrhea Remedy and Cholera

Preventive.

Used with unfailing success daring and since the cholera of lS-15.

check or cure the Diarrhea. No family should be without it.

A single dose will usually

Hegeman's Ferrated Elixir of Bark, the

Tonic in Use.

ost Ported Iron

This Elixir is composed of the active principles of Calisaya Eark, combined with ryrophosphate

of Iron, and in all cases where an efljcient Iron Tonic is required will prove very valuable.

Hegeman's Odonto, or Pearl Dentifrice.

A most agreeable and economical Powder for cleaning and preserving the teeth.

Hegeman &. Co.'s Bronchial Pastilles.

They allay irritation of the mucous membrane, and cure Catarrh, Cough, and incipient Bronchitis.

Particularly valuable for Clergymen and Public Speakers, as they keep the throat moist, etc.

THE ABOVE PREPARATIONS ARE SOLD BY DRUGGISTS GENERALLY,

In the United States and Canadas.


:

: : :

92

Mishler's Celebrated Herb Bitters.

MISHLER'S HERB BITTKRS is not a nostrum designed to temporarily excite the nerves or

tickle the palate, but is scientifically compounded according to the prescribed modes of the Pharmacopoeia,

as practiced by every chemist and skilled apothecary, or observed by every educated

physician.

It has more Voluntary Testimony of its great Curative Qualities

than ANY OTHER BITTERS.

The proprietors of MISHLER'S HERB BITTERS have more genuine certiOcates of real cures

effected solely by its use, than are owned by all the other Patent Medicine Manufacturers in the United

States. They have on file, at their Medical Institute, thousands of testimonials from parties in all

classes of life, rich and poor, educated and illiterate, irritten in every conceivable style, manner

and language, but all attesting to the one great fact that Mishler's Herb Bitters cured them of

disease when every other remedy failed. Below we give a few certificates lately received from the

city of Pittsburg, the headquarters of one of the most extensive Bitters manufactory in the country,

at which place Jlishler's Herb Bitters has effected more cures, received more substantial encouragement,

and to-day enjoys more popular favor among the people, than any other medicine in the

country.

TRUSTWORTHY CERTIFICATES.

Washington, D. C, Oct. 8th, 1867.

Messrs. S. B. Habtmas & Co.

Gents,—I hereby certify that four bottles of Mishler's Herb Bitters have effectually and per

manently cured me of an inveterate cutaneous disease, which had previously resisted the treatment

of several of the most eminent phvsicians of this citv. It is a powerful Blood Purifier and an e.xcellent

tonic. Respectfully, WM. J. A. WATERS,

Formerly teacher in the Parochial Schools of Paint Dominick's and Saint Aloyslus Parishes,

and" late of Trinity Church, Georgetown, D. C.

Messrs. S. B. Hartmax & Co.

Gentlemen,—I have been suffering with Chronic Dyspepsia for about twelve years, in its worst

form. I have tried one remedy after another, and without any but temporary relief. I have been

using Mishlfer's Herb Bitters regularly for about six weeks. I feel satisfied that they have cured

me entirely. I can eat whatever my appetite craves, without any unpleasant feelings afterwards.

I really think I am a changed man, altogether owing to the efficacy of Mishler's Herb Bitters.

Those "suffering with the same disease, Dyspepsia, are at liberty to call on me at any time at my

place of business, Slack & Sholes' Planing Mills, Barbury Street, Pittsburg. ALFRED SLACK.

Read what Dr. Bissel, one of the best physicians in the country, and the Health Officer of Xew

Tork, says of these Bitters

Genesee, Livingston Co., N. Y., December 12th, 1866.

G. S. ROWBOTHA.M :

Dear Si-r,—You wrote me last April, and sent me a dozen bottles of Mishler's Herb Citt«rs,

with a request that I would use them on board the Cholera Hospital in the harbor of New York, on

which I was the physician in charge. I thank you for your kind letter, as well as for the Bitters,

and beg leave to say that I used them, and found them an excellent Tonic for convalescents from

Cholera and Typhoid Fever. A lady (to whom I gave a bottle) wishes me to write to you for half

a dozen bottles. Please send me one dozen of the Bitters by express, and send bill for the same,

and I will remit the amount.

Very respectfully yours, D. H. BISSEL,

Physician, Cholera Hospital, New York Bay.

Dr. Lane, of Chicago, a physician of twenty-five years' practice, writes as follows

Dr. B. MiSHLER

Dear Sir,—I was called in to see a case of inflammation of the kidneys of four months'

standing, that had been treated by one of the best physicians. From the symptoms, 1 saw at once

that a preparation like your Bitters should be taken, and I prescribed it, and found it had the

desired effect. The patient had not been about for some time, but after a few days' use of the

Bitters she was able to walk about, and is doing her own housework, with a sure prospect of regaining

her usual health. You will please send me a dozen bottles of your Bitters, as I intend using it

constantlv in my practice in the future.

Yours, &c., JOSEPH S. LANE, No. 351 State St.

Dr. S. B. HAETMAN & Co., Sole Proprietors, Lancaster, Pa,

:


STEAM ENGINES,

*# All eiisf

THE OLD AND WELL-KNOWN

Mt. Vernon Iron Works

ARE MANtTFACTDRENG AND SUPPLYING THEIR LARGE

AND INCREASING TRADE WITH

Heavy Stationary Engines,

OF FROM 20 TO 150 HORSE POWER.

Improved Portable Engines,

FROM 5 TO 30 HORSE POWER.

OF ALIi SIZES.

Gf^st Mills, Feed Mills, Cane Mills,

^

Complete Flouring Mill Machinery,

With all Modem Improvements, and. complete Fixtures for Lumbenng,

Milling, and other purposes. Millwriglits are furnished to erect

the Machinery, with Drafts, Plans, &c., thus assuring

perfect success and satisfaction.

All Machinery fully IVarranted.

Prices and Terms at all times the most favorable. For Circulars,

&c., address

C. it' J. COOPEB,

Mt. Vernon, Ohio.

93


THE OLDEST ESTABLISHMENT IN THE UNITED STATES.

Manufactory, corner of Niagara and Maryland Streets,

Buffalo, N, T.

OVER 40,000 NOW IN USE.

Ceo. A. Prince ^ Go.^s

MELODEONS AND AUTOMATIC ORGANS,

SUB BASS,

CAN BE FOUND IN AliL

THE PRINCIPAL MUSIC STORES

Throughout the United States, Canada, and the British

Musical Instrument ever obtained the same popularity.

Provinces. Xo other

We now manufacture over FORTY DIFFERENT STYLES of the

MELODEON, ORGAN MELODEOX, SCHOOL ORGAX, AUTOMATIC

ORGAX, (fee, and during the existence of our Manufactory have sent forth

A GREATER NOIBER OF INSTRUMENTS than the whole of the other

Manufactories in the United States combined 1 And we have the proud satisfaction

of adding,

WE HAVE NEVER HAD AN INSTRUMENT RETURNED

from any imperfections or deficiency in construction.

Our NEW ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, just issued, is sent free

of Postage to any applicant. Address orders or communications to

GBO. A. PRINCB


95

Ka W\m Ixa

A REMARK A.BLE INSTANCE OF

PEKSOMiiL SEAUTT

Rastaped t© a tady ctisftgmfed fey tfi© Ra\pag©s Q,f a fpfgPitfttll Bfsease.

From advanced sheets of a new medical work called

FALSE AJSTD TRUE.

EXTRACT PROM DR. RADWAY'S MEDICAL DIARY.

The subject of the above likeness is at present one of the most intellisent, brilliant, and beautiful

ladies of this metropolis, in the full tnjojTnent of redolent health, vigorous life and strength,

dispensing charity to the needy, consolation and attendance to the sick, devoting her leisure hours

to assisting the poor and distressed, and contributing to their necessities.

This lady was rescued from a miserable existence through the instrumentality of Dr. Radway'a

Resolvent. Two years since, she was an object of pity, and almost av^ rsion ; her personal appearance

repulsive, her blood impregnated vath cnrruption, gradually consuming her vitality. Infirm,

wretched, and almost hopeless, discharging ulcers on her neck, her skin covered with sores, pustule?,

tetters, insects under the cuticle in the form of black spots, her head divested of hair, her

Bcalp with riJgcs of dry scabs, strumous di-charges cf offensive matter from her ears, her arms

covered with eruptions, her hand swollen and incrusted, lier nails worn off, her strength wasted by

continued leucorrhea discharges, and pain and inflammation in the kidneys, bladd^.r, and uterus.

Much of her sufTerings were undoubtedly augmented by improper treatment. Mercury, Iron,

I'otash, SarsapariUa, tulphuric Acid, Unguents, Lotions, were tried: baths of Sulphur, Mercury,

and, in fact, every remedial agent known were used, until her strength was exhausted. Such was

her condition Ln the early part of 18C6, when she commenced the use of Radway's Resolvent (aided

with Kadway 's Pills, to augment the expulsion of the acrid and corrupt humors through the bowels,

sweat and urinel. She commenced taking two teaspoonfuls of the Resolvent three times per day,

and from two to four fills every other night.

FIRST COTTLE.— At the end of the first bottle, her strength, appetite, and spirits were improved,

and the small pimples, blotches, and pustules disappeared. Applying the Resolvent over the su-.face,

with a fine spontte, relieved tlie inflammation and itcliing, and served as a reliable antiseptic

in cleansing and purifying the putrid flesh.

SECOND BOTTLE.—At the end of the second bottle, signs of improvement in the discharges

from the uterus, inflammation, paiu and swelling abated, thej skin greatly improving, the eyes

growing brighter, strength aud appetite increasing.

THIRD BOTTLE.—Dry scabs on the scalp, and sores on the arms, and incrusted scales on the

hands gradually disappearing, leucorrhea greatly lessened, water becoming clear, and kidneys and

bladder improved.

FIFTH BOTTLE.—Finger nails growing, hands and arms clear and smooth, hair growing on

the scalp, bowels regular, and skin free from irritation, face clear of sores.

SI.XTII AND SEVENTH BOTTLES.—Ulcer on the neck greaUy improved, leucorrhea discharges

stopped, menstruation regular, pain of the abdomen, irritation in the uterus, bladder, and kidneys

stopped, face clear of all spots, hair covering the scalp, great increase of flesh, spirits buoyant, step

elastic, and appetite good.

NINTH BOTTLE.— All signs of disease gradually disappearing, frequent rides in the Park,

great improvement in personal appearance, hair continuing to grow rapidly, skin smooth and clear,

and the nicer in the neck healed.

T'UTLFTII BOTTLE.—Continuing the Resolvent after all eruptions had disappeared, she

gained in fle«h and personal beauty. No more trouble in the uterus, kidneys, etc. Bowels regular,

digestive organs regular, blood pure, her nails perfect, hair growing luxuriant, spirits excellent,

she exhibited to her friends a picture of health aud beauty.

For six months after the use of the twelfth bottle, she continued faking three teaspoonfuls of the

Resolvent per day, and two of the Pills three times a week. On the — day of October, she presented

us with her photograph (as above) of her present appearance, with permission to publish the

course of treatment and cure, but requested us to withhold her name.

In this wonderful cure a lesson may be learned in regard to the true means of securing personal

beauty. Good, pure, rich blood will make healthy fiber and clear skin, beautiful complexion, and

luxuriant hair. Cosmetic powders, painting the skin with brushes, applying greasy substances

and alcoholic lotions to the hair, is injurious. The paint, powder, Ac, clogs up the pores, obstructs

the free escape of sweat and insensible perspiration, thus preventing the absorption of oxygen in

%he atmospheric air, so essential for the vitality and purification of the blood and fluids of the skin,

&c. Pure blood is secured by the Resolvent, and all who use this medicine will enjoy the possession

of its blessings.

R. R. RESOLVENT is sold at 81 per bottle, at No. 87 Maiden.

Lane. Six bottles for $5.


96

Dr. Mott's Vegetable Liver Pills

will be found superior to any other cathartic

FOIi ALL PUHPOSES FOR WHICH A PURCATIVE IS NECESSARY,

and for the cure of Colds, Inflammations, Dyspepsia, Indigestion, Costiveness, Liver Complaiutii,

Jaundice, Biliousness, Sick Headache, Scrofulous Sores and Ulcers, Diseases Of the Skin, Scald

Head, Tetter, Salt Rheum, Tumors Glandular Swellings, Dropsical Effusions, Diarrhea, Dysentery,

and Worms ; and by their Powerful, Penetrating, and Cleansing Influence upon the various Secretory

Functions of the Abdominal Viscera, will prove a great

PURIfll^R OF THE BLOOD.

As the bile is the natural purgative by which the bowels are stimulated to carry off the excromenlitious

matters, If there is a deficient secretion from the liver coaticene^m results, and in

its turn aggravates all the distressing symptoms.

Dr. Mott's Vegetable Liver Pills have a direct and powerful action upon the Hrer, and will

with great certainty relieve torpi-cfi'fy and congestion of this important vmcuit, and on this account

are superior to any cathartic pill yet brought to the notice of the public, in the diseases

Incident to the malarious climate of the Jlississippi Valley, as they all partake, more or less, of

the biliowi character.

They can be found for sale at all the principal Druggists and Dealers Ln Family Medicines In the

Unitod States.

Dr. Bennett's Golden Liniment,

FOE MAN AND BEAST.

TMg Valuable Preparation is admirably adapted to the Cure of aU those Diseases for which a

Counter-irritant or External Remedy is required.

The experience of years has fully demonstrated the superiority of this compound for all the purposes

for which it is recommended. Thousands who have used it give it the preference over all

other Liniments. Its rapidly Increasing popularity furnL-hes ample evidence of its great curative

powers, and justifies us in the sanguine expectation that it will speedUy take the place of all other

praparutions of its class. It is valuable not only as a counter-irritant to drive pain and iiiflommiitinn

from the internal organs to the surface, thereby relieving deep-seated injuries and organic

lesions, but will be specially useful in restoring the skin to a healthy condition ia all those annoy-

' ing affectio ns attended with irvH " matioii, and erujitioi'X, but where the surface is not broken,

such as Frost Bites, Chilblains, Bums, Scalds, Erysipelas, Tetter, Ringworm, Boils, Felons, Corn?,

Bunions. Ingrowing of Nails, etc. Rheumatism is successfully treated with the Golden Lisiment.

Swellings and Bruises, Contracted Muscles, SiiCf Joints, Lameness of all kinds. Chapped Hands,

Caked Breasts. Old Sores, will readily yield to its magical influence, and Its wonderful healing

powers, if faithfully applied.

For Horses it is equally as efficacious as upon the human family. Farmers and stable-keepers

have learned this, as they find it impossible to dispense with IL They might almost as well undertake

to get alonj' without hay, oats, or corn when their horses are well, as without the Goldes

Lejuiest when their horses are injured or lame.

PROF.~DALE'S

Persian Horse and Cattle Powders.

The only Scientific and Reliable Medicine for Horses and Cattle ever offered to the Public. Will

be found superior to all other condition Powders la the treatment of the various diseases to which

Horses and Cattle are liable, and fur the cure of Indigestion, Loss of Appetite, Distemper, Hide

Bound, Surfeit, Heaves, Influenza or Lung Fever, G.ease, Cracked Heels, Mange, Liagworm,

Larvre, and other affections of the sldn ; Coughs, Colds, Sub-Acute Laminiti? or Founder, tig-IIead,

Poll Evil, Fistula, Rheumatism, and Lampas. The daily use of this valuable preparation will also

enable the d-eale.i- to put bis horses on the market in the highest and most perfect condition, and

from their peculiar and powerful alter tire effect upon Hie ikin, will soon change a coarse and

rough coat of hair into a smooth and glossy one,

Thev can be found for sale at all the principal Druggists and Dealers in Family Medicines in the

United States.

A. L. SCOVBLL & CO.,

iLANUFACTUREES AND PROPRIETORS,

In Ci:XCi:X>rA.TI, Olaio, and. :rvi:\V irOKEl CITY.

Professor Dale has kindly published in the United States, for the benefit of the public, an

abridged edition, in pamphlet form, of his celebrated treatise on the Diseases of Horses and Cattle,

and their treatment, which can be had by mail by Inclosing 80 cents to A. L. SCOVILL & CO.,

No. 7 Rose Street, New York City.

Se6 page 89.


TALUABLE TO THE SICK OR WEIL.

No Pay Expected until Received, Read -s. FITCH, KING & CHA ifBRE." Consultation and advice free. Office hours, 9 A. M. to

5 P. M., Sundays excepted.


Saves Time, Money, end Health.

When cur body feels heavy ; when we cannot wake up as usual in the moniinp ; when we have

heat at the stomach or dizzy-headed ; when we are nervous from the use of stimulants or otherwise

; when we cannot sleep, or it is not sound and refresliiug ; when we have aches and pains in

any part of the body ; when we have rheumatism, salt rheum, skin affections, or erysipelas ; when

our food is thrown off or does not digest well ; when our skin has a yeUow tint, with or without

pain frum the right eide to the shoulder-tiliKle ; whea our .

Koirvels arc Costive or Relaxe


FITS—INDIGESTION.

Remarkable Cure.

TiLCOTTn.LE, Coaa., Sept. IT, ISCT.

3. BP.A.VDRETH, >L D.

My Dear Sir : For many years past I hare been a suffering invalid. About a year ago my

troubles came to a crisis, and my doctor said I must die. I had fits often, and my stomach and

digestive organs were so paralyzed that the lightest food would be thrown off undigested, even

after being down twelve hours. I wasted away almost to a shadow, and every day expected that

death would relieve my sufferings. The doctors had abandoned my case, and my mother determined

to try Braudreth's Pills.

She first gave me two, which I liept down eight hours. I then vomited them up entirely undissolved.

My mother then powdered four pills and gave them to me in molasses. These stayed

down and act«d slightly. I continued dail.v to take them in this way for a month, and each day

gradually gained. My appetite returned with full powers of digestion. For the past six months I

have daily increased in flesh and strength, and am now a stout, healthy girl.

Hoping my case will induce others suffering from sickness to try the rirtues of Erandreth'3

Pills, I remain vours trulv,

MARTHA J. TALCOTT.

We certify that the above statement is true : Florilla H. Talcott, E. II. Moore, >. K. Talcott,

Joidrew Dexter, Francis Tuttle, Miss Nellie Moore, Miss Emerett Talcott, Mrs. Vr'ealthy A. Dexter.

Magnolia Bend Plantation,

Batoct Bcecf, Louisiana, August 4, loCT.

An extract of a letter from the proprietor of the above plantation to a friend in Westchester

County tells its own story :

'• Although a stranger to the doctor, please give him my compliment?, and say to iiim tliat one

quarter gross of BRANDRETH'S PILLS did more good in preserving good health on my plantation

this year than THREE HUNDRED DOLLARS EXPENDED IN DOCTORS' BILLS did last year.

I have no sickness this year worth mentioning, while all my neighbors have considerable. I have

given out a few boses of pills to some of nr. neitjhbors, who invariably reoort crood success.

'A. J. ?."

WOrorS and all PARASITES

are infallibly destroyed by the use of Brandreth's Pills. Should be used three days in succession,

then rest three days. Mr. Sandford, of Bridgeport, Conn., agent for Brandreth's Pills for forty

years, can testify to their wonderful curative qualities upon Sir. Dimon, whom their use cured of

Tai^e Worm when every known remedy had failed to cure.

The Hon. Demas Basses says: "I sell more of Brandreth's Villi than all other piUs put t>

gether."

Brandreth's Pills are sold by a!] Druggists.

Observe S. S'RA^'^'RSJTM i/i white letters in Governineni

Stamp, which ifjsures the TTiU^^ ^ILLS.



^Icohanios, jTIanufactMrcrs, Inventors,

Parmers.—Oa the 1st of January the SCIENTIFIC

AMERICAN was enlarged to the size of the most costly

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INVENTORS and PATENTEES will find a complete account

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THE SCIENTIFIC AMEPJCAN is acknowledged to be the best and cheapest Mechanical

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messrsPmunn & CO.,

Editors of tSxo Scientific American ?

SOLICITORS OF. AMERICAN Km

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only 25 cents. Address

MTJNN & CO., No. 37 Park Row, N. Y.


Demorest's Monthly Magazine

Universally Acknowledged

The Modt'l parlor MagaziDe of America

devoted to Ori^nal Stories. Poem?,

eketches. Model Cotfc^es. HouaeboM

Matters, Gems of Thought, Pereonal and

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bousowifo, can affonl to do without

the Model Monthly. Single. 30 cent? ;

back numbers, as specimens, 10 oents—

either mailed freo. Yearly. ^3, with a

valuable promluai; two coplea, g5.50:

three copies, ^.50 ; fire oopiefl. $12, and

splendid premiums forClubaat $3 eiu-h,

ititb the first premiums. Address,

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;

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MME. DEMOREST'

Emporimofrasliicns

473 & 3SS Eeoadwat, X. Y.

Plain and Elegantly Trimmed

PATTEENS

Of all the Latest and most Re-

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rely on each Pattern being Cut

with Accuracy, and the Best

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from the best authorities

in Paris.

S

ITLL BETS OP

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tIFTKEN

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lifu-size Models,

selected frora the best and

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Put up in a box at $5 ; smaller

sets of eight articles at $.3

either set to include a large

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and reliable information as to

the latest fashions.

S:glijMIM%

DEMiORESX'S |

Young )

The best Juvenile Magazine.

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All tbo Pre9a aay Bo

And Parents and Teachers confirm it.

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473 Beoapwat. N. T.

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AMERICA,

Prices of Plain Sl Trimmed

LADIES' PATTERNS.

Plain. Trim-a

Ladies* Dress, |1 50

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Waist and Sleeve, .... 26 75

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Plain. Trim'd

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Patterns sent postage free, on receipt

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always included and sent with the trim.

med patterns without extra charge.

Mme. Demorest's EiviPORiuivi OF Fashions,

DEM0REST8

MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

Tns best Magazine for tbe beauties

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, Mu£ic, Entertaining Readingand

other useful and novel features;

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model Parlor Magazine of America.

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473 Broadway, New York.

;


t02


aET THE BEST.

'S

NEW ILLTJSTKATED EDITION.

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The NEW Webster is glorious ; it is perfect ; it distances and defies competition ; it leaves

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AH young persons should have a standard Dictionary at their elbows. And while you are about

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too poor, save the amount from off your back to put it into your head. Phrenological Jo^irnal.

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;


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1SC8. With Designs and Plans of Country and Suburban Houses, and numerous examples

of the French or Chateau Roof. 12 mo. Post-paid, clotli, $1.50

WHEELER'S RURAL HOMES. Houses suited to American Country Life. Illustrated with

Original Plans and Designs, and full directions for designing, building, heating and furnishing,

and form of Contract and Specification. Post 8vo., beveled boards. 300 pp. I'ost-paid, $2.00.

WHEELER'S HOMES FOR THE PEOPLE. For the Suburb and Country. The Villa,

the Mansion, and the Cottage, with examples showing how to remodel and alter old buildings.

100 original Designs, with full descriptions and constructive and miscellaneous details. Post;

octavo, beveled boards, 440 pages. Post-paid, $3.00.

WOODWARD'S COUNTRY HOMES. A practical work, with 150 Designs and Plans of

Country Houses of moderate cost, with illustrated description of the manner of constructing

Balloon Frames. 12mo., 188 pages. Post-paid, $1.50.

JACQUES' MANUAL OF THE HOUSE. Rural Architecture ; or, how to build DwelUngs,

Bams, Stables, and Out-buildinps of all kinds, with a chapter on Churches and School-houses.

126 Designs and Plans. 12mo., 176 pages. Post-paid, $1.50.

TODD'S YOUNG FARMER'S MANUAL. Vol. 1. The Farm and the Workshop, with

Practical Directions for laying out a Farm, erecting Buildings, Fences, Farm Gates, selecting

good Farm and Shop Tools, and performing Farm Operations. Fully illustrated. One handsome

post octavo Volume, beveled boards, 4G0 pages. New edition. I'ost paid, $2.50.

TODD'S YOUNG FARMER'S MANUAL. Vol. 2. How to make Farming pay, with full

practical details of Farm Slanagement, Chara* t. r of Soils, Plowing, Management of Grass

Lands, Manures, Farm Implements, Stock, Drainage, Planting, Harvesting, ic. One handsome

post octavo volume, beveled boards, upwards of 400 pages. Post-paid, $2.50.

WOODWARD'S GRAPERIES AND HORTICULTURAL BUILDINGS. A pracUcal

work on the Design and Construction of all classes of Buildings for Growing Plants and

Papening Fruit under glass. 6tJ Illuitrations. Post-paid, $1.50.

WOODWARD'S RECORD OF HORTICULTURE. No. 1, for 180C. Kdited by Andrew S.

Fuller. An original and valuable illustrated record of Horticultural Progress. 12mo., 127

pages. Post-paid, $1.00.

WOODWARD'S RECORD OF HORTICULTURE, No. 2, for 186T. By A. P. Fuller.

Ready early in 1868. Post-paid, $1.00.

ELLIOTT'S LAWN AND SHADE TREES. Popular Deciduous and Evergreen Trees aad

Shrubs for planting in Parks, Gardens, Cemeteries, &.c. Fully illustrated. Ready January

1. Post-paid, $1.50.

FULLER'S FOREST TREE CULTURIST. A new iUustrated work on the Cultivation of

Forest Trees, for Shade, for Shelter, for Fuel, for Timber, and for Profit. 12mo., 1S8 pages.

Post-paid, $1.50.

HUSMANN'S GRAPES AND WINE. A new and practical work on the Cultivation of the

Native Grape and Jlanufacture of American Wine. Fully illustrated. 12mo., 192 pages.

Post-paid, $1.50.

JACQUES' MANUAL OF THE GARDEN. A new Manual of Practical Horticulture ; or,

how to cultivate Vegetables, Fruits, Flowers, Ornamental Trees and Shrubs. 12mo., 166 pages.

Post-paid, $1.00.

JACQUES' MANUAL OF T'riE FARM. A new Manual of Practical Agriculture ; or, how

to Cultivate all the Field Crops, with an Essay on Farm .Management. 12mo., 156 pages.

Post-paid, $1.00.

JACQUES' MANUAL OF THE BARN-YARD. A new Manual of Cattle, Horse and

Sheep Husbandry ; or, how to Breed and Rear Domestic Animals. 12mo., 168 pages.

i'ost-paid, $1.00.

THE HORTICULTURIST ALMANAC FOR 1867. ' With Calendar of Operations in the

Orchard, Vineyard, (faiden. Farm, and Greenhouse. Post-paid, 10 cents. |

THE HORTICULTURIST ALMANAC FOR 1368. With illustrations and rescrlptions

of all the best varieties of Strawberries. Raspberries, and Blackberries. Post-i)aid, 10 cents.

F. W. WOODWARD,

Publisher of Agricultural and Horticultural Books,

37 Park How, H. T.


vn

r»I^OSI*EOTrJS F'OI?^ 1©68

THE % by the Twelve College Presidents. The rule on which the LEDGER

Is conducted is to get the best of everything, whether it has been promised or not. The public

recognize this fact ; and it is from their desire to obtain the very best paper, that they give the

LEDGES the preference; hence its unparalleled and unapproached circulation, being over three

hundred thousand copies. .»

Now, for the New Year : All our present corps cf popular authors will continue to write for the

LEDGER; we shall begin the new year with a new story by Mrs. SOUTH WORTH ; the Hon.

HORACE GREELEY will continue las Autobiographv ; FANNY FERN her sparkling sketches;

JOHN G. SAXELis humorous Poems ; SYLVANUS COBB, Jr., his entertaining Stories ; HENKY

WARD ISEECIIEPi his original Papers; JAMES P.VRTON his instructive Biographical Sketches

Miss DUPUY her Dramatic NarraUves; MARY KYLE DALLAS. AMY RANDOLPH, CAROLINE

CONRAD, Mks. VAUGHAN, their deUghtful Short Stories; '^ILLIAil CULLEN BRYANT, ALICE

GARY, Dr. CHARLES D. GARDETTE, GEO. D. PRENTICE, NATHAN D. UENER, EMMA

ALICE BRO"\\'NE, Mp.s. SCHULTZ, ^WU ROSS 'WALLACE, their Poems.

A New Featcre of the Ledger,—Adrice io Young Women.—A new feature of the LEDGER,

in the beginning of the year, will tie a series of twelve Articles, written expressly for Young Ladies,

by Twelve of the most distinguished women of the United States, including Mrs. HoaiCE

Maxx, Sirs. Ltdu. Maeu Child, Mrs. General Basks, Sirs. Hobace Geeelet, and Madame Lb

Veet.

OUR TEE3LS FOR 1868-50W IS THE TDIE TO SUBSCRIBE.

Single copies, $3 per annum ; four copies, |10, wUch is |2.50 a copy ; eight copies, $20. The

party who sends us ^iO for a clab of ei^ht copies (all sent at one time) will be entitled to a copy

fi-ee. Postmasters and others who get up clubs in their respective towns can afterwards add single

copies at $-2.50. No subscriptions taken fcr a less period than one year. Canada subscribers

must send twenty cents in addition to the subscription, to pay the American postage, when a

draft or monev-order can conveniently be sent, it will be preferred, as it will prevent the possibility

of the loss of'money by maiL The postage on the LEDGER to all parts of the countiy is only

twenty cents a year]^ or five cents a quarter, payable at the office where the paper is delivered.

^^"We ernploy no Traveling Agents. Address all Cot7imunicatiou.'} to

ROBERT BONNER, Publisher,

No. 90 Beekman Street, Ne'w York

;


^tonic.

' The sparkling eye, the bloorainR cheek.

The ruddy glow of perfect health

These are the riches men should seek,

These arc, indeed, the truest wealth."

Tbe u.se of the Plantation Bitters i.s unpiirallclcd in the history of the world.

Over three million buttles are disposed of annually. They are adapted to old

and youns^, male and female. They are ag;reeable in taste, and always prodnee

an immediate beneficial resxdt. They purify, strengthen, and invigorate, and

are exhausted nature's j;reat restorer.

AVe have watebed the course of so many distressed, emaciated, and ft)rlorn

dyspeptics, who have taken a new lease of life, and gradually received new

vigor, strength, health, aiul the power of social pleasures—from the effects of

the Plantation Bitter.s—that «r are not surprised at the testimonials we receive,

although oiu' readers may be. It is a pleasure to do good in the world, but

our measin-e is more than full. AVe had no conception of the wide-sjjread sidfering

which exists, or of the almost infallible cures produced by these Bitters,

when we tirst commenced tifleriug them for sale. We now tind every house has

a weak child, au ailing parent, or a debilitated aged member who needs this

AVith Dysj)eptics everything goes wrong. Food does not digest ; sleep does

n


The Weekly TrilDuiie for 1868.

I'Yom every quarter, friends write us that systematic, determined efTorts are making, and witli i

coiisideraWe succe??, to push into circulation journals which sympathized with the Rebellion dur-

ing its progress, and are now moved and inspired by its fundamental principle that Liberty is

rightfully the birthright, not of rtWmen,but of W/iife men, that Blacks have no rights which

Whites are bound to respect. A desperate effort is preparing to give ascendency to this Reactionary

principle in our Government through the triumph of its champions in the choice of our next

President and Congress.

The journals thus crowded into circulation by offering them at cost are neither so large or so

varied in their contents, nor produced at anything like the cost of The Tribcne. They are politl- j

cal merely or mainly, while our columns are more generally filled with Foreign Correspondence, i

Farming Intelligence, Literature, &c., &c.

Nevertheless, in deference to the representations of our friends, and in view of the momentous i

issues of our Presidential struggle now opening, we have resolved to offer THE \VKKKJ,V TKIUU.NE ^

for IStJS to clubs of fifty or more for Onk Dollar pkr anncm: That is to say: for fifty dol- ,

lars we will send to one address fifty copies of THE WEEKLY TRIBUNE for one year, and any

larger number at the same rate.

Our prices will be


One copy, one year, 52 issues $2 00

Five copies, to names of Subscribers 00

Ten copies, t^ names of Subscribers 15 00

And one copy extra to the getter up of the club. Additional copies at same price.

Twenty copies, to -names of Saliscribers 27 00

And one copy extra to the getter up of the olub. Additional copies at same price.

Fifty copies, to names of Subscribers 55 00

And one copy to getter up of club. Additional copies at same price.

Twenty copies, to one address 25 00

And one copy to getter up of club. Additional copies at same price.

Wiy coytKi, to one add resH 50 00

And one copy to getter up of club. Additional copies at same price.

One hundred copies, to one address 100 00

And one copy pfr.ii-n eelily Tribune to getter up of club. Additional copies at same price.

This offer sliall remain open for the entire month of January.

No newspaper so large and complete as THE WEEKLY TRIBUXE, was ever before offered at

80 low a price. Even wlien our Currency was at par with gold, no such paper'/>'(y THE TRIBUNE

was offered at that price; and THE TRIBIINE then cost us far less than it now does. Hut the

next election must be carried for Liberty and Loyalty, and we mean to do our part toward effecting

that consummation.

W'e believe that the circulation of half a million copies of THE AVEEKLY TRIBUNE during

the coming year would be more effectual in influencing and confirming voters than five times their

cost .''pent in the ordinary way just before election. Almost every Republican knows honest

Democrats, who need only to be undeceived in order to vote right in the coming contest. See to it

that such are supplied with THE WEEKLY TRIBUNE. It costs but little, and the result will be

permanent.

Mail subscribers, 1 copy, 1 year, 104 numbers $4 00

Do 2 copies, do do 7 (10

Do 5 copies, or over, for each copy 3 00

Persons remitting for 10 copies $30, will receive an extra copy six months.

Persons remitting for 15 copies $45, will receive an extra copy one year.

For $100 we will send thirty-four copies and The Daily TRmrxE.

THK NE^V YORK WAII^Y TIUBIJIVE is published every morning (i?undaya

excepted) at $10 per vear; $5 for six tnoTiths.

Portrait of llorat'e Oreeley. On receipt of $2 for the AVeekly, $4 for the .Semi-

Wkekly, or $]0 for the Daily Tribune, we will send a copy of Ritchie's Fine !

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