maryland career clusters - Maryland State Department of Education

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maryland career clusters - Maryland State Department of Education

MARYLAND CAREER CLUSTERS

RESTRUCTURING LEARNING FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

IN A TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED, GLOBAL SOCIETY

Second Edition

Reprint - November 2007

An initiative of the Maryland State Department of Education, the Governor’s Workforce Investment Board, the Maryland State

Department of Business and Economic Development, and the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation.


“Public education is a joint investment.

We must all work together to see that our

curriculum is relevant and reflective of the real

world. Our students must be actively engaged in

the learning process and must have the knowledge

and skills they need to transition successfully from

school to postsecondary education and careers.”

Dr. Nancy S. Grasmick

State Superintendent of Schools

Maryland State Department of Education

“We are indebted to the over 350 Maryland

employers who partnered with us to create

a system of Career Clusters that will allow

CTE instruction to keep pace with the

21st century economy.”

Katharine M. Oliver

Assistant State Superintendent

Maryland State Department of Education

Maryland Career Clusters: An Overview 1

Guide to Maryland’s 10 Career Clusters 5

Career Cluster 1: Arts, Media, and Communication 6

Career Cluster 2: Business Management and Finance 10

Career Cluster 3: Construction and Development 14

Career Cluster 4: Consumer Services, Hospitality, and Tourism 17

Career Cluster 5: Environmental, Agricultural, and Natural Resources Systems 22

Career Cluster 6: Health and Biosciences 26

Career Cluster 7: Human Resource Services 31

Career Cluster 8: Information Technology 35

Career Cluster 9: Manufacturing, Engineering, and Technology 39

Career Cluster 10: Transportation Technologies 44

Maryland’s Career Clusters will

ensure that Career and Technology

Education programs are aligned with

GWIB’s demand-driven Industry

Initiative that seeks to ensure an

educated, qualified workforce for

the State’s employers.”

Robert Seurkamp

Executive Director

Governor’s Workforce Investment Board


Maryland Career Clusters

MARYLAND CAREER CLUSTERS

HELP HIGH SCHOOLS WORK

SMARTER IN TODAY’S

COMPETITIVE ECONOMY.

Maryland Career Clusters are driven by what students need to

know and do in order to be fully prepared for further education

and careers in the 21st-century global economy. Career

Clusters provide an important context for educational reform

efforts as outlined in the Maryland State Department of

Education’s (MSDE) Achievement Matters Most: Maryland’s

Plan for Every Student and the Policies and Procedures for the

Development and Continuous Improvement of Career and

Technology Education (CTE) Programs. Under the guidance of

MSDE, Maryland business, industry, and labor leaders

organized the state’s Career Cluster system.

Career Clusters have been embraced nationally at both secondary

and postsecondary levels. Maryland is a recognized leader in

successfully adapting the national framework to the state’s

economy and education reform. Local school systems and

community colleges, along with other providers of postsecondary

education, are using the Career Cluster system to organize

teaching and learning to meet the specific needs and resources

of their communities.

Career Clusters also help enhance economic development. They are

groupings of interrelated occupations that represent the full range of

career opportunities. By connecting educators and employers,

career clusters provide a common framework to help ensure that

Maryland has a high-quality workforce that attracts and retains

businesses to the state.

MORE RELEVANT

At a time when the need for skills-driven education and high

academic and technical achievement is greater than ever,

While nearly 80 percent of

America’s high school

graduates enroll in college,

an increasing number

require remedial help at the

outset. And overall, less

than half of four-year college

students complete the

degree within five years.

U.S. Department of Education, National Center For

Education Statistics (National Longitudinal Study)

we’re losing many of our

high school students to

indifference.

Students are struggling

to find the relevance that

coursework will have

on their future.

Too often students graduate

inadequately prepared for

challenging careers and the

rigors of continued learning.

Maryland Career Clusters promote student success by

relating students’ educational experiences to their future

goals and aspirations. Seeing the relevance of education,

more students can reach high levels of performance, thus

closing the achievement gaps.

MORE FOCUSED

Maryland high schools are changing to better prepare every

student for success after high school in higher education and

challenging careers. The Maryland Career Clusters system

directs students toward focused programs of study that make

the high school experience more meaningful. Not unlike

choosing a subject major in college, Career Clusters provide

students an opportunity to select a field of interest while they

are still in high school. They focus students and provide a

variety of career options to pursue. When students are

interested and engaged, learning takes place.

Concentrated learning in a given subject area is not a new

concept in Maryland. Many local school systems have in place

focused programs of study, such as the International

Baccalaureate; Performing Arts Magnets; Math, Science, and

Technology Signatures; and Finance Academies. Career

Clusters are a resource for high schools as they reorganize

into smaller learning communities. Instruction is organized

around career themes, providing more students the

opportunity to explore career choices while still in high school

and enroll in pathway programs that enable them to

successfully transition from high school to postsecondary

education.

Similarly, community colleges are adapting career clusters as

a means of organizing degree programs to ease the transition

of students from high school and provide focused programs of

study. Because learning is a lifelong process, Maryland

educators have taken steps to ensure that high school

students can readily transition to two-year colleges, four-year

colleges, or other postsecondary education to reach their

goals. Through articulated Tech Prep and CTE pathway

programs, students take a sequence of courses beginning in

high school and continuing at two- or four-year colleges

without repeating material already mastered.

The 10 Career Cluster frameworks include listings of available

career options with an associate’s degree or less, a bachelor’s

degree, or more than a bachelor’s degree.

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Maryland Career Clusters

MORE PREPARED

Today’s knowledge-based economy demands continuous

learning and innovation. It calls for a highly skilled and flexible

workforce with the ability to work in cross-functional teams with

people from diverse cultural and educational backgrounds. The

focus is no longer on performing a single job or task. To be

successful, students must be able to:

• Understand the educational requirements for success in

college and the workplace;

• Manage their own careers and their need for continuing

education in a constantly changing environment; and

• Identify and seek career advancement opportunities.

Aligns teaching and learning with students’ interests.

Helps students become more self-directed and

focused on their future.

Relates classwork to students’ goals and interests.

Provides a framework for organizing high schools into

smaller learning communities.

Aligns high school programs of study to college and

workplace requirements.

Organizes career opportunities into 10 Career Clusters.

Anticipates and responds to changes in the economy.

Guides the continuous improvement of career and technology

education programs.

Aligns course content to state standards.

MORE PRODUCTIVE

FEATURES AND BENEFITS OF MARYLAND CAREER CLUSTERS

FEATURES BENEFITS

“Two years after graduating high school, I

received my Associate Degree in Nursing. I

attended college classes while still in high school

and over each summer. The advantage to

participating in this program was I could work

part time, while still living at home. This

program was fast paced and intense, but it was

worth every minute. I love nursing and am very

proud to be a Registered Nurse.”

Tiffany Edwards

Associate Degree in Nursing

College of Southern Maryland

Career Clusters allow business leaders to be partners in

education where students can participate in more extensive

career development opportunities. As a result, students aspire to

learn and determine their own education and career goals.

Career Clusters create clear and smooth educational pathways

young people can follow from kindergarten through grade 12, on

to community college or other postsecondary education, and into

the workplace. Throughout high school and postsecondary

education, students participate in a variety of work-based

learning opportunities that assist in determining their future

career development and career goals.

When students are interested in what they’re learning,

they stay involved and perform better.

Students who set goals achieve greater success in

high school, community college and beyond.

Students are motivated to work harder, enroll in more challenging

courses, and make better career choices.

Students receive more personalized instruction,

advice, and support.

Programs of study ready students for college and

eliminate the need for remediation.

Students, parents, and advisors understand future career

possibilities, thus facilitating career decision-making.

Business and community leaders continue to keep educators

informed on the changing requirements of the workplace.

Students can earn industry credentials, and/or gain advanced

standing in college and careers.

Student achievement increases and dropout rates decrease.

“Career clusters and pathways are

designed to make options for students

easy to understand. In that way, students

are able to make better and more

informed decisions about their future

careers, inspiring them to do their very

best while still in high school.”

Shelley A. Johnson

Director, Career and Technology Education

Montgomery County Public Schools


Maryland Career Clusters

CAREER CLUSTERS ARE

ORGANIZED AROUND

10 BROAD CAREER

AREAS THAT REFLECT

MARYLAND’S KEY

ECONOMIC SECTORS.

Each Maryland Career Cluster encompasses a range of careers

based on essential economic activities, similar interests,

common skills, and training required by those in the field. When

students pursue a Career Cluster, they can still explore

coursework in related clusters.

Maryland’s system encompasses virtually all careers and levels of

education—from entry level to professional level—in the following

10 Career Clusters:

1. Arts, Media, and Communication

1. Arts, Media, and Communication

2. Business Management and Finance

3. Construction and Development

4. Consumer Services, Hospitality, and Tourism

5. Environmental, Agricultural, and Natural Resources Systems

6. Health and Biosciences

7. Human Resource Services

8. Information Technology

9. Manufacturing, Engineering, and Technology

10.Transportation Technologies

“I enrolled in the Academy of Finance because

of the internships. Now that I’m in college, I’m

motivated to take more advanced courses and

to learn about the variety of careers that are

available to me.”

Kim Wefelmeyer

High School Graduate

Northeast High School, Anne Arundel County

“Over the past two decades, 12th graders

have reported a declining interest in

school, while the effort they apply to their

school work has generally shown no

measurable change over the past decade.”

The Condition of Education 2002

National Center For Education

United States Department of Education

“The partnerships being forged between

the business community, state and local

economic development officials and

educators are a critical element of

workforce development in Maryland. In

the new fast-paced, global economy, it is

no longer sufficient to prepare workers

for today’s jobs; we must teach students

the skills they will need to fill the jobs

of tomorrow.”

Aris Melissaratos,

Maryland Secretary of Business and Economic Development

“The implementation of career clusters in

the Cecil County Public Schools’ high

school curricula has facilitated student

determination of career goals and defined

a focused grades 9-16 educational plan

for all students.

The career cluster model has enhanced

postsecondary and business partnerships

and increased the rigor and relevance of

the courses that students select.”

Mary Etta Reedy

Executive Director for High School Education

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Maryland Career Clusters

USING CAREER CLUSTERS, STUDENTS IDENTIFY CAREER

OPTIONS CALLED CAREER PATHWAYS

Maryland business leaders worked with MSDE to define the core

functions of each industry represented by the Career Cluster.

These core functions became the Career Pathways for each

cluster. The Career Pathways include a range of career

opportunities. Because each Career Cluster is broadly defined,

there is overlapping and common content across clusters,

allowing for flexibility in program design.

Career Pathways are like road maps of learning that help students

plan for and pursue further education and careers. Students can

explore a wide range of career options that require postsecondary

education and training. Students also have opportunities to apply

academics and develop technical skills in a career area.

Educators use the cluster materials to develop sequential

programs of study that include at least the last two years of

high school and two or more years of postsecondary education.

INFORMATION

TECHNOLOGY

Software Operations

Hardware Operations

HEALTH AND

BIOSCIENCES

Infomatics

Basic/Applied Research

Manufacturing

Programs provide multiple options for students (such as early

college admissions through dual enrollment, articulated credit,

and advanced placement at two- and four-year colleges) as they

prepare for further education and careers. Career and

Technology Education programs of study also prepare students

to earn industry-recognized credentials.

As shown in the diagram below, a high school may be organized

around four Career Clusters and multiple pathways. An example

of one related, CTE-focused program of study is provided for a

Career Pathway within each cluster.

Not every pathway will have a corresponding program of study.

However, counselors and parents must be aware of the entire

scope of the industry as they guide students in preparing for

college and careers.

Networking (CCNP) Biotechnology Media Production Engineering

Underpinning Career Clusters are the Maryland content

standards. These standards reflect the common knowledge and

skills students need for each cluster. Content standards include

three components: academic, technical, and workplace skills. In

Maryland, the workplace skills are known as the Skills for

Success. These include learning, thinking, communication,

technology, and interpersonal skills. The academic and technical

CAREER CLUSTERS

ARTS, MEDIA, AND

COMMUNICATIONS

CAREER PATHWAYS

Health Services

Print and Broadcast

Journalism

Visual Arts

Multimedia Production

Graphic Design

and Printing

MANUFACTURING,

ENGINEERING, AND

TECHNOLOGY

Project Engineering

Manufacturing Process

and Quality Assurance

Logistics and

Inventory Control

EXAMPLES OF HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAMS OF STUDY

Cisco Networking (CCNA) Biotechnology Multimedia Production

Project Lead the Way

(Pre-Engineering)

EXAMPLES OF COLLEGE PROGRAMS OF STUDY

THE PATHWAY TO ACHIEVEMENT

content standards are used by educators as they design more

challenging course sequences for each CTE pathway program.

Improved school and student performance is tied to the

Maryland School Assessment Program and the High School

Assessments based on Maryland content standards that drive

higher expectations. Students progress through a continuum of

learning experiences toward their future goals.


Maryland Career Clusters

“Students come to college better

prepared, more focused and ready to

acquire knowledge if they have had the

type of applied or experiential learning

that imparts the true application of

knowledge.”

Teri Hollander

Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

University System of Maryland

Maryland’s educational institutions must

provide rich and diverse opportunities for

learning, research, and preparation for

initial employment, career advancement,

and career changes.”

Kevin O’Keefe

Chair

Maryland Higher Education Commission

Maryland’s career clusters offer an

excellent framework to promote

collaboration between community colleges

and high schools to improve students’

transitions from one learning level to

the next. The clusters provide a roadmap

to the future as graduates continue

their education and enter employment.

The community colleges of Maryland

are committed to helping students

achieve their career goals through

lifelong learning.”

Clay Whitlow

Executive Director

Maryland Association of Community Colleges

GUIDE TO MARYLAND’S

10 CAREER CLUSTERS

The section that follows describes in detail each of the 10 Career

Clusters and their corresponding Career Pathways. Each

description features a diagram of the Career Cluster, which

graphically illustrates its specific features, including:

• Career Pathways that represent the major business functions

within the industry/Career Cluster;

• Career Cluster knowledge and skills, or a common core of

academic, technical, and workplace skills required by

professionals in the industry as a whole;

• Career specialties or occupations within each Career pathway; and

• Postsecondary education options that students may pursue to

advance in a cluster.

The Maryland State Department of Education is providing leadership

and technical assistance in the implementation of the Career Cluster

system by:

• Working with business leaders to refine and keep current the

content standards;

• Helping educators use Career Clusters to establish smaller

learning communities and program articulation;

• Providing a K-16 career development model;

• Identifying best practices and exemplary programs; and

• Monitoring outcomes for student success.

“Through career clusters and pathways,

employers benefit from a well-educated, focused,

and critically thoughtful workforce. Our society

gains a citizenry whose members are among the

best-prepared in the world.”

Martha Smith

President

Anne Arundel Community College

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Career Cluster 1

ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• Expanded global communication and travel are increasing the

multicultural content of visual and performing arts and

communication products and services, and providing new

audiences and markets throughout the United States and

the world.

• The growing complexity and rapid pace of modern society

and increased global communication and advances in

information technology are contributing to an information

explosion and expanding markets for mass communication

products and services. These products and services include

highly specialized journalistic content and coverage; including

business, arts and

MASS COMMUNICATION

PUBLIC

RELATIONS

GRAPHIC

DESIGN

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

PRINT &

BROADCAST

JOURNALISM

GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION

Looking at the industry as a whole, three core areas—Fine Arts and

Entertainment, Mass Communication, and Graphic Communication

—organize the pathways according to major functions in the

industry. Within the core areas, Career Pathways show more

specific business activities that offer a range of related career

opportunities. Students can prepare for a variety of career

options through two and four-year colleges (including graduate

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

PRINTING

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

entertainment, global events, and government. These mass

communication products and services are being distributed

across the full range of mass communication media, including

radio, television, and the Internet; and print media, such as

newspapers, books, and magazines.

• Advances in information technology are having major impacts

on the visual and performing arts, business communication and

advertising, and the graphic arts and printing industry. These

advances also are driving the growth of multimedia production

in traditional areas, such as movies and television; and new

areas, such as the gaming industry.

VISUAL ARTS

PERFORMING

ARTS

MULTIMEDIA

PRODUCTION

FINE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

programs), private career schools, and employee sponsored

programs. Appropriate work experience may also be important to

increase career opportunities. The center circle represents the

common knowledge and skills required of anyone in this career.

As students focus on a more specific Career Pathway, they

advance their readiness for careers in that pathway.


Career Cluster 1

ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION

CORE AREA 1: FINE ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT

PATHWAY: VISUAL ARTS

Creating, designing, developing, and producing

visual arts.

• Create fine arts, design, or photographic art.

• Promote, show, and distribute visual arts through

museums, galleries, retail stores, and other distribution

channels.

PATHWAY: PERFORMING ARTS

Creating, designing, developing, producing, and

performing in music, theater, and dance, and providing

business and technical services.

• Perform as a musician, actor, dancer, and/or singer.

• Promote, manage, and support performers and

performances.

PATHWAY: MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION

Creating and distributing multimedia content focused

on audio, film, video, and game production, including

simulation.

• Produce multimedia content.

• Market, manage, and distribute multimedia products

through radio and television broadcasting and cable,

retail stores, the Internet, and a wide variety of devices,

including PDAs, computers, and cell phones.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Cartoonist

• Fashion Artist

• Photographer

• Sketch Artist

• Craftsperson

• Illustrator

• Exhibition Installer

• Interior Designer

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Technician (i.e.,

audio-visual,

lighting, sound,

stage, props,

construction,

costume)

• Actor

• Dancer

• Musician

• Producer

• Assistant Producer

• Agent

• Playwright

• Light, Costume, or

Sound Designer

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Technicians (i.e.,

live action segments

and motion capture)

• Producer (i.e., film,

music, radio,

recording, television)

• Sales Agent

• Game Tester

• Level Designer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Textile Designer

• Conservator

• Museum Director

• Fine Artist (i.e.,

painting, sculpture,

ceramics)

• Animator

• Gallery Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Production Manager

• Director

• Theater Manager

• Casting Director

• Set Designer

• Stage Manager

• Dance

Choreographer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Programmer

• Game Designer

• Production Manager

• Artist-3D Modeler

• Web Designer

• Video Designer

• Character Animator

• Artist

• Screenwriter

• Editor

• Program Manager

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Art Historian

• Museum Curator

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Composer

• Arranger

• Conductor

• Musician Coach

• Artistic Director

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Researcher

• Software

Engineer-Usability

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Career Cluster 1

ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION

CORE AREA 2: MASS COMMUNICATION

PATHWAY: PRINT AND BROADCAST

JOURNALISM

Developing, producing, and publishing written, visual,

and multimedia journalistic content through mass

communication media.

• Write, present, and produce articles, stories, and related

journalistic content for radio, television, the Internet,

newspapers, books, and magazines.

• Provide business management services and technical

support.

PATHWAY: PUBLIC RELATIONS

Providing public relations and advertising services and

business communications.

• Create public relations communications for all forms

of media.

• Manage and support public relations and communications

operations.

CORE AREA 3: GRAPHIC COMMUNICATION

PATHWAY: GRAPHIC DESIGN

Designing and developing digital images.

• Prepare digital images.

• Provide business management and technical support

services.

PATHWAY: PRINTING

Printing digital images, managing business operations,

and providing technical support.

• Conduct press operations.

• Use tools and procedures for quality control.

• Manage business operations, including customer

service, sales/accounts, and scheduling, shipping,

and distribution.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

REQUIRES FOUR-YEAR

• Software

Applications

Support Specialist

• Electronic Technician

• Audio-Visual

Equipment

Technician

• Web Designer

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

REQUIRES FOUR-YEAR

• Advertising

Coordinator

• Public Relations

Assistant

• Community Relations

Coordinator

• Advertising Layout

Designer

• Media Buyer

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

REQUIRES FOUR-YEAR

• Graphic Designer

• Desktop Publisher

• Digital Imaging

Specialist

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

REQUIRES FOUR-YEAR

• Pre-Media/Pre-

Press Imaging

Specialist

• Bindery and

Finishing Technician

• Press Operator

• Circulation Agent

• Digital Imaging

Specialist

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Journalist

• Novelist

• Writer

• Reporter

• Broadcast News

Analyst

• Radio Announcer

• Television Announcer

• General Manager

• Operations Manager

• Advertising Copywriter

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Speech Writer

• Publicist

• Public Relations

Manager

• Communications

Manager

• Advertising

Manager

• Writer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• General Manager

• Operations Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Pre-Media/Pre-

Press Manager

• General Manager

• Operations Manager

• Ink Chemist

• Paper Scientist

• Production Manager

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Researcher

• Historian

• Editor

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Public Relations

Department

Manager

• Advertising Firm

CEO

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Graphic Design Firm

CEO

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Computer Systems

Engineer

• Equipment Design

Engineer


Career Cluster 1

ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Information Technology and Communications Support: Telecommunications, data and computer support

services, including communications systems, devices, and equipment, computer software and hardware, and

Internet services.

• Financial Management and Accounting: Business support services in finance and accounting.

• Purchasing and Procurement: Purchasing of materials and equipment for organizations involved in performing

and distributing.

• Legal Services: Legal services that address all aspects of the business, including purchasing contracts,

leases, human resources, and risk management.

• Public Policy/Government Relations: Managing government communications, lobbying, and managing

relationships with government agencies at the federal, state, and local levels.

• Human Resources/Training: Business activities involved in recruitment and hiring of employees, performance

reviews, compensation and benefits management, labor relations, and compliance with government laws

and regulations; training and development of employees, from orientation to professional and management

development.

• Marketing and Sales: Market analysis, advertising and promotion, sales, and customer service.

• Health and Safety/Environmental Management: Managing and improving health and safety, and maintaining

compliance with legal and regulatory requirements, including OSHA, EPA, and CDC.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

ARTS, MEDIA, AND COMMUNICATION

Maryland school systems have achieved national accreditation for their Graphic and Printing Programs

and an opportunity for students to achieve national certification through PrintED. PrintED,

administered by the Graphic Arts Education and Research Foundation (GAERF�), is a national

accreditation program, based on industry standards, for graphic communications courses of study at

the secondary and postsecondary levels. Program completers can receive up to nine articulated

credits towards an Associate of Arts degree, which further articulates to a Bachelor of Arts degree in

graphic design.

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Career Cluster 2

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• The financial services industry sector is becoming increasingly

integrated, with many businesses offering a complete range of

investment, brokerage, depository, insurance, and lending

services. This trend will require financial services professionals

to develop, sell, and service a much broader range of financial

products and services.

• Businesses are facing an increasingly global, rapidly changing,

and competitive environment requiring business management

services professionals to have stronger finance, marketing and

communication, legal, and management skills. They also will

face major challenges in recruiting, hiring, developing, and

retaining skilled workers and improving productivity, which will

require innovative thinking in human resource management.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

HUMAN

RESOURCES

FINANCIAL

SERVICES

MARKETING

Looking at the industry as a whole, two core areas—Business

Management Services and Financial Services—organize the

pathways according to major functions in the industry. Within

the core areas, Career Pathways show more specific business

activities that offer a range of related career opportunities.

Students can prepare for a variety of career options through two

and four-year colleges (including graduate programs), private

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

• Businesses will continue to expand the use of information

technology in all aspects of the business enterprise and will

seek more comprehensive e-commerce and information

management solutions to remain competitive. This will require

all business management professionals to have stronger

information technology skills. Information technology

professionals will need stronger business skills to better

design and manage information technology solutions that

meet business needs.

BUSINESS

ADMINISTRATIVE

SERVICES

BUSINESS

MANAGEMENT

FINANCE &

ACCOUNTING

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT SERVICES

career schools, and employee sponsored programs. Appropriate

work experience may also be important to increase career

opportunities. The center circle represents the common

knowledge and skills required of anyone in this career. As

students focus on a more specific Career Pathway, they advance

their readiness for careers in that pathway.


Career Cluster 2

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE

CORE AREA 1: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT SERVICES

PATHWAY: BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Managing and supervising activities related to the

organization of a business.

•Develop organization’s strategic plan.

•Implement plan of work.

•Provide effective and efficient management of

business operations.

PATHWAY: HUMAN RESOURCES

Managing business activities related to employment

and operating in compliance with government laws

and regulations.

• Recruit and hire employees.

• Evaluate performance.

• Provide compensation and benefits.

• Conduct training and development.

• Manage labor relations.

PATHWAY: FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING

Managing the financial operations of a business which

includes the assets, investments, liabilities, and

operating results.

• Manage, audit, and prepare financial and tax reports.

• Evaluate revenue, expenses, and financial

requirements, and manage business investments.

WITH AN ASSOCIATES’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Management

Trainee

• Executive Assistant

• Supervisor

• Small Business

Manager

WITH AN ASSOCIATES’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Payroll Clerk

• Human Resources

Clerk

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Accounting Clerk

• Accounts Payable/

Receivable Clerk

• Bookkeeper

• Payroll clerk

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Branch Manager

• Project Manager

• Operations Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Recruiter

• Trainer

• Compensation,

Benefits, and Job

Analyst Specialist

• Affirmative Action

Coordinator

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Accountant

• Credit Analyst

• Investment Banker

• Financial Analyst

• Budget Analyst

• Auditor

• Tax Analyst

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Chief Executive

Officer

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Human Resources

Manager

• Employee or Labor

Relations Manager

• Employee

Assistance Plan

Manager

• Training and

Development

Manager

• Organizational

Developer

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Economist

• Chief Financial

Officer

• Treasurer

• Comptroller

• Finance Director

• Certified Public

Accountant

11


12

Career Cluster 2

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE

PATHWAY: MARKETING

Strategizing business activities related to selling,

customer support services, and public relations.

• Analyze customer markets.

• Determine product mix, pricing, promotion, distribution,

and public relation strategies.

• Provide customer support services.

PATHWAY: BUSINESS

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

Providing administrative support throughout

organizations.

• Manage information.

• Provide computer applications support.

• Develop and manage report/document production,

communication, planning, and organization.

• Coordinate meetings and events.

• Manage the general office.

CORE AREA 2: FINANCIAL SERVICES

PATHWAY: FINANCIAL SERVICES

Selling, delivering, and supporting investment,

brokerage, depository, insurance, and lending services.

• Provide sales and services functions across a broad

array of financial products and services.

• Research and develop new financial products and

services, including pricing based on changing financial

risks and market demand.

• Provide transactional services.

• Evaluate and control risk in providing financial services.

• Manage relationships with major investors.

WITH AN ASSOCIATES’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Sales

Representative

• Customer Service

Representative

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Office Manager

• Administrative Assistant

• Secretary

• Data Entry Specialist

• Computer Support Specialist

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Securities/

Commodities

Sales Agent

• Brokerage Clerk

• Insurance Agent

• Bank Teller

• Loan Processor

• Insurance Policy

Processor

• Insurance Claims

Agent or

Investigator

• Claims Adjuster

• Claims Examiner

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Buyer

• Market Research

Analyst

• Public Relations

Specialist

• Media Coordinator

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Administrative Services

Manager

• General Manager

• Operations Manager

• Executive Assistant

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Personal Financial

Advisor

• Investment Advisor

• Financial Analyst

• Loan Officer

• Bank Operations

Manager

• Underwriter

• Insurance Appraiser

• General Manager

• Operations Manager

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Marketing Manager

• Advertising and

Promotions

Manager

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Economist

• Actuary

• Statistician

• Certified Public

Accountant


Career Cluster 2

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Customer Support: Providing sales and service support through call centers, help desks, and online services,

requiring strong communications and customer service skills similar to customer service representatives.

• Community Relations: Managing relationships with local communities, including activities required under

community reinvestment laws.

• Regulatory Compliance: Operating in compliance with government laws and regulations.

• Security: Private and public security services that protect the assets and lives of customers and employees.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE

Through a partnership with the National Academy Foundation (NAF), Maryland’s National Academy of

Finance program features two specialized courses each semester and a college level course in the

senior year. The program offers courses such as Financial Services, Economics, Banking and Credit,

Securities, International Finance, Financial Planning, and Insurance. Finance Academies introduce

students to the broad career opportunities in the financial services industry and equip them to make

sound choices for the future.

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14

Career Cluster 3

CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• Population and economic growth and the transformation of

major metropolitan areas will continue to fuel the demand for

more residential and commercial building construction and the

need to expand and upgrade the public infrastructure, including

transportation.

• The construction industry faces a more complex political,

social, and economic environment for the planning of

residential, commercial, and public infrastructure projects.

Construction professionals face challenges in creating plans

and designs for major projects that meet more stringent

PLANNING

Looking at the industry as a whole, four pathways represent the

major functions in the industry. Career Pathways show more

specific business activities that offer a range of related career

opportunities. Students can prepare for a variety of career

options through two and four-year colleges (including graduate

programs), private career schools, and employee sponsored

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

government requirements and gain the support of multiple

stakeholders. The construction and development sector also

faces new challenges in managing complex construction

projects so that projects are completed on time and meet

customer requirements for quality and costs.

• Advances in science and technology will continue to drive

innovation in the design, construction, and maintenance of

buildings and infrastructure, including new design concepts,

construction materials and methods, and the application of

information technology.

MAINTENANCE &

OPERATIONS

DESIGN CONSTRUCTION

programs. Appropriate work experience may also be important to

increase career opportunities. The center circle represents the

common knowledge and skills required of anyone in this career.

As students focus on a more specific Career Pathway, they

advance their readiness for careers in that pathway.


Career Cluster 3

CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

PATHWAY: PLANNING

Planning of construction projects, including the market

analysis that determines the need for the project and

builds public-private support; environmental impact;

and the financial analysis that determines costs and

financing requirements.

• Develop concept, feasibility analysis, and master plan.

• Manage business and marketing aspects.

PATHWAY: DESIGN

Designing and engineering physical structures

from original concept to complete architectural and

engineering plans for the development of land sites

and the physical structures built on sites.

• Develop budget.

• Program all elements of project.

• Develop concepts/schematics and construction

documents.

• Determine construction support.

• Manage business and marketing aspects.

PATHWAY: CONSTRUCTION

Conducting the bidding and award process and actual

construction of physical structures, including land

development, general contracting, and special trades

contracting activities.

• Procure labor, materials, and subcontractors.

• Construct site.

• Conduct inspection, closeout/acceptance, and

warranty processes.

• Manage business and marketing aspects.

PATHWAY: MAINTENANCE AND

OPERATIONS

Managing, operating, and maintaining/repairing

existing physical structures.

• Provide warranty and repair services.

• Maintain landscape.

• Manage business and marketing aspects.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Construction

Manager

• Civil Engineering

Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Construction Manager

• Drafter/CAD Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Construction Manager

• Drafter/CAD Technician

• Building Code Inspector

• Plumber

• Carpenter

• Electrician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Real Estate Manager

• Facility Manager

• Construction Occupations

(all trades )

• Heating, Ventilation, Air

Conditioning, Refrigeration

Technician

• Engineering Technician

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Architect

• Financial Analyst

• Environmental

Engineer

• Civil Engineer

• Land Surveyor

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Urban and Regional

Planner

• Engineers (all types)

• Architect

• Specifications Writer

• Environmental Scientist

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Engineers (all types)

• Project Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Engineers (all types)

• Project Manager

• Cost Estimator

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16

Career Cluster 3

CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Code Review: Public and private activities involved in ensuring that construction projects are in compliance

with government regulations and building codes.

• Equipment Maintenance: Maintaining the reliability and performance of construction equipment including

preventive maintenance and repair.

• Quality Assurance: Business activities that ensure construction projects are using processes for buildings and

physical structures to meet quality standards.

• Information Technology: Business services that provide telecommunications, data and computer support services,

and overall e-commerce support to the core business functions.

• Human Resources: Recruitment and hiring of employees, performance reviews, compensation and benefits

management, labor relations, and compliance with government laws and regulations.

• Training: Training and development of construction employees ranging from orientation and safety training to

apprenticeship training for specific trades.

• Marketing: Promotion and selling of construction projects and the overall business to targeted markets.

• Risk Management: Prevention and management of financial losses due to a range of causes, including accidents

and injuries, theft, and environmental impacts.

• Environmental Management: Management and reduction of risks associated with environmental impacts and

ensure compliance with government laws and regulations.

• Safety: Management and reduction of risks associated with health and safety, and compliance with government

laws and regulations.

• Legal: Legal services that address all aspects of the business, including contracts, human resources, and risk

management.

• Finance: Financial services that address the financing needs of construction projects and the overall business.

• Accounting: Accounting services that manage the revenues and costs of construction projects and the overall business.

• Apprenticeship: Apprenticeship programs that prepare workers for construction trades.

• Labor Union Management: Business, operational, and political activities involved in the operation and management

of labor unions, including activities carried out by political directors and legislative relations.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

CONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

Construction and Development programs offer opportunities for students to pursue interests in developing,

designing, constructing, and maintaining the built environment. Students in the Construction Pathway

learn basic design as well as plumbing, electrical, and carpentry skills as they earn advanced standing

in apprenticeship programs or college credit in postsecondary construction programs. Many schools

provide students the opportunity to construct a house under the guidance of professional mentors.

Students learn first-hand all aspects of the construction process from design to finish.


Career Cluster 4

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY, AND TOURISM

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• Global trade, travel, technological advances, and growing

consumer income continue to expand the consumer services

sector, including the range of products and services and the

growth of a wide variety of retail businesses and Internet sales.

• Increased competition will continue to force wholesale and

retail businesses to find new ways to provide high levels of

customer service at lower costs. Advances in logistics,

inventory management, and information technology are

leading to major innovations for responding to customer

needs and controlling inventory costs.

SALES & SERVICE

MARKETING &

COMMUNICATIONS

MERCHANDISING/

BUYING

LOGISTICS

Looking at the industry as a whole, two core areas—Sales and

Service and Hospitality and Tourism—organize the pathways

according to major functions in the industry. Within the core

areas, Career Pathways show more specific business activities

that offer a range of related career opportunities. A range of

educational options can prepare someone for a career in this

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

SALES

CUSTOMER

SERVICE

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

ATTRACTIONS &

RECREATION CONVENTION/

DESTINATION/

EVENT

MANAGEMENT

• Expanded global leisure and business travel and growing

consumer spending on leisure and tourism activities continue

to drive the growth of the hospitality and tourism sector.

States and local communities will increase the promotion of

destination events and tourism to attract outside spending and

economic development. These trends are also promoting

innovations and cultural diversification in the restaurant

industry with an expanded spectrum of cuisines and services

provided to customers.

FOOD &

BEVERAGE

TRAVEL

MANAGEMENT/

COORDINATION

LODGING

HOSPITALITY & TOURISM

industry. Appropriate work experience may also be important to

increase career opportunities. The center circle represents the

common knowledge and skills required of anyone in this career.

As students focus on a more specific Career Pathway, they

advance their readiness for careers in that pathway.

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18

Career Cluster 4

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY, AND TOURISM

CORE AREA 1: SALES AND SERVICE

PATHWAY: MERCHANDISING/BUYING

Providing products and services for sale to customers.

• Analyze, plan, purchase, price, and allocate products

and services.

• Conduct purchasing negotiations.

• Manage supplier/vendor relationships.

PATHWAY: MARKETING AND

C OMMUNICATIONS

Determining customer needs and product preferences,

positioning product/service mix in the market, and

communicating to and educating the customer to

retain interest.

• Conduct market research to determine customer needs

and product preferences.

• Develop major messages.

• Provide creative services for advertising and promotion.

PATHWAY: LOGISTICS

Planning and managing the distribution of products

and services to the point of sale, and the post-sale

delivery of products and services to the customer.

• Sort and organize merchandise at warehouses and

distribution centers, and transport.

• Process returned or damaged merchandise.

• Manage inventory.

• Prepare merchandise for sale, including marking.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Assistant Buyer

• Buying Clerk

• Visual Display Designer

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Visual Display Designer

• Advertising Coordinator

• Public Relations Assistant

• Community Relations

Coordinator

• Advertising Layout Designer

• Media Buyer

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Warehouse Manager/

Supervisor/Team Leader

• Security/Loss Prevention

Specialist

• Inventory/Quality Control

Specialist

• Inventory System Specialist

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

• General Merchandise Manager

• Divisional Merchandise

Manager

• Merchandise Manager

• Category Manager

• Buyer

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

• Marketing Director

• Marketing Manager

• Marketing Analyst

• Creative Services/Advertising

Manager

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Division/District Manager

Department Manager

• Traffic Manager

• Industrial Engineer

• Transportation Planner/ Analyst

• Logistics Manager


Career Cluster 4

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY, AND TOURISM

PATHWAY: SALES CUSTOMER SERVICE

Managing the sales process and overall consumer

relationship, including assessing customer need and

providing ongoing support before and after sales of

products and services.

CORE AREA 2: HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM

PATHWAY: FOOD AND BEVERAGE

Making, selling, and serving food and beverages to

the public for a fee, including services by restaurants,

caterers, institutional food providers, and other

recreational and entertainment venues.

PATHWAY: LODGING

Providing sleeping space to guests for a fee in facilities

such as hotels, bed and breakfasts, hostels, campgrounds,

resorts, and cruise ships.

• Market and sell lodging services.

• Maintain and operate facilities.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

Department Manager

• Branch Manager

• Sales Manager/Agent/

Associate

• Account Representative

• Real Estate Agent

• Cosmetologist

• Sales Manager

• Sales Associate

• Salon Manager

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Restaurant Owner

• Sales Manager

• Host/Hostess

• Chef

• Kitchen Manager

• Maitre d´

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Housekeeping Director

• Reservations Manager

• Front Office Manager

• PBX/Reservations Agent

• Front Desk Clerk

• Concierge

• Bell Captain

• Chief Engineer

• Network Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• General/Regional Manager

• Branch Manager

• Territory Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• General Manager

• Food Service Manager

• Executive Chef

• Menu Planner

• Nutritionist

• Registered Dietitian

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Lodging Owner/Franchisee

• General Manager

• Engineering Director

• Sales Director

• Marketing Director

• Rooms Director

• Activities Director

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20

Career Cluster 4

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY, AND TOURISM

PATHWAY: ATTRACTIONS AND

RECREATION

Providing recreation, amusement, and leisure services

to visitors at recreational, historic, amusement, heritage,

and cultural sites, including museums, parks and zoos,

marinas, campgrounds, and recreational vehicle parks.

• Market and sell recreational services and activities in

resorts and on cruise ships, at specialized retail centers,

and at facilities for skiing, sailing, golf, and other outdoor

recreational sports.

PATHWAY: CONVENTION/DESTINATION/

EVENT MANAGEMENT

Planning, organizing, and implementing special events

for the public, such as festivals, fairs, sporting events,

exhibitions, conventions, and convocations.

PATHWAY: TRAVEL MANAGEMENT/

C OORDINATION

Planning, organizing, and facilitating travel from

one location to another for leisure or business away

from home.

• Market, promote, coordinate, and sell travel services.

• Provide transportation services.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Business Owner

• Theme Park Manager

• Program Manager/Director

• Recreation Instructor

• Interpreter

• Promotion Manager

• Corporate/Community

Development Coordinator

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Group Sales Agent

• Product Development

Specialist

• Destination Manager

• Activities Director

• Tourism Specialist

• Facility Manager

• Security Manager

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Sales/Marketing Manager

• Contract Manager

• Travel Agency Manager

• Tour Broker

• Travel Agent

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• General Manager

• Property Manager

• Theme Park Manager

• Park Ranger

• Park and Recreation Director

• Cruise Ship Director

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Market Researcher

• Events Planner/Manager

• Account Executive

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• General Manager


Career Cluster 4

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY, AND TOURISM

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Information Technology and Communications Support: Telecommunications, data, and computer support

services to the core business functions of the sales and service industry, including point of sale and security

electronics, communications systems and devices, film and audio-visual services and equipment, computer

software and hardware, and Internet services.

• Financial Management: Business support services in finance and accounting.

• Legal Services: Legal services that address all aspects of the business, including purchasing contracts,

leases, human resources, and risk management.

• Government Relations: Managing government communications, lobbying, and managing relationships with

government agencies at the federal, state, and local levels.

• Human Resources/Training: Business activities involved in recruiting and hiring employees, conducting

performance reviews, managing compensation and benefits, handling labor relations, and complying with

government laws and regulations; training and developing of employees, ranging from orientation to

professional and management development.

• Risk Management: Business support services to provide health, safety, and environmental protection and

insurance for employees and customers; loss prevention for merchandise and facilities; compliance with

government laws and regulations; security.

• Maintenance/Facility Support: Maintaining physical facilities, from architecture, design services, facility, and

equipment maintenance services, to building cleaning services, landscape and grounds planning, and maintenance.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

CONSUMER SERVICES, HOSPITALITY, AND TOURISM

Through a partnership with the National Academy Foundation (NAF), Maryland’s Academy of Hospitality

and Tourism offers an in-depth look at all aspects of travel, tourism, and hospitality, including

coursework in geography, economics, and systems applications. Two specialized courses are featured

each semester and a college-level course is offered in the senior year. The program equips students

with the personal, analytical, technical, and communication skills they need to succeed.

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22

Career Cluster 5

ENVIRONMENTAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND NATURAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• The agricultural sector is a highly competitive global industry

creating new challenges in identifying global and domestic

markets; improving business planning, financing, risk

management, and productivity; and reducing costs. This sector

also will continue to face more stringent requirements for food

quality and environmental and natural resource management.

• Advances in science and technology, in particular biotechnology,

will continue to drive innovation and growth in agricultural

production and food processing through the development of

new markets, products, and processes. In addition, advances in

information technology will continue to improve the planning

and management of agricultural production.

AGRICULTURAL

PRODUCTION-

PLANT SYSTEMS

AGRICULTURAL

PRODUCTION-

ANIMAL SYSTEMS

Looking at this industry as a whole, five pathways represent the

major functions in the industry. Career Pathways show more

specific business activities that offer a range of related career

opportunities. Students can prepare for a variety of career

options through two and four-year colleges (including graduate

programs), private career schools, and employee sponsored

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

FOOD & FIBER

PROCESSING

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

• Growing public concerns over natural resources, environmental

quality, and public health will continue to expand the role and

scope of the natural resource management and environmental

services sectors. There will be increased public and private

efforts to improve the management of both public and private

natural resources, including water, air, and land quality, and

waste management. Advances in science, biotechnology,

and information technology will drive major innovations in

environmental and natural resources management.

ENVIRONMENTAL

SERVICES

NATURAL

RESOURCES

MANAGEMENT

programs. Appropriate work experience may also be important to

increase career opportunities. The center circle represents the

common knowledge and skills required of anyone in this career.

As students focus on a more specific Career Pathway, they

advance their readiness for careers in that pathway.


Career Cluster 5

ENVIRONMENTAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND NATURAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS

PATHWAY: AGRICULTURAL

PRODUCTION — PLANT SYSTEMS

Planning, producing, and distributing plant food, fiber,

ornamental, and environmental products, including

landscaping and horticultural services; related

research and technical services, and business

planning and finance.

• Conduct market and location analysis, soil testing, and

product testing/selection.

• Plan, manage, and control materials purchasing, land

preparation, production, product quality control, inventory,

and biosecurity.

• Manage health, safety, and environmental practices.

• Conduct research for new markets, products and

processes (genetic research).

• Develop and test advanced applications of

biotechnology.

• Plan for risk management.

• Manage health, safety, and environmental practices.

PATHWAY: AGRICULTURAL

PRODUCTION — ANIMAL SYSTEMS

Planning, producing and distributing meat, poultry,

seafood and dairy products; raising livestock,

aquaculture, veterinary services, related research and

technical services; business planning and finance.

• Conduct market and location analysis, soil testing, and

product testing/selection.

• Plan, manage and control materials purchasing,

production, product quality control, inventory, and

biosecurity.

• Conduct research for new markets, products, and

processes (genetic research).

• Develop and test advanced applications of

biotechnology.

• Plan for risk management.

• Manage health, safety, and environmental practices.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Field Production or

Farm Manager

• Compliance

Manager

• Arborist

• Landscaper

• Florist

• Certified Professional

Horticulturalist (CPH)

• Nursery/Garden

Center Manager

• Greenhouse

Assistant

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Animal Production

Manager

• Horse Trainer

• Environmental

Technician

• Veterinary

Technician

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Soil Scientist

• Geographic

Information

Systems Specialist

• Nutrient

Management

Specialist

• IPM/Pest Control

Specialist

• Soil Conservation

Planner

• Landscape Designer

• Landscape Architect

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Geographic

Information

Systems Specialist

• Nutritionist

• Inspector

• Soil Conservation

Planner

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Plant Scientist

• Research Project

Manager

• Geneticist

• Patent Lawyer

• Entomologist

• Plant Pathologist

• Tissue Culture

Specialist

• Plant Breeder

• Extension

Educator/Specialist

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Veterinarian

• Geneticist

• Product Developer

• Production Quality

Assurance Manager

• Research Scientist

State Health Official

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24

Career Cluster 5

ENVIRONMENTAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND NATURAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS

PATHWAY: FOOD AND FIBER

PROCESSING

Researching and developing products focused on

nutritional value; processing and packaging plant and

animal products.

• Convert harvested plant and animal materials into

end-use products.

• Plan and manage production, including process

engineering, quality assurance and food safety,

health, worker safety, environmental compliance, and

industrial maintenance.

PATHWAY: NATURAL RESOURCES

MANAGEMENT

Managing, conserving, and restoring natural resources,

such as parks, fisheries, forestry, wildlife and habitat,

watersheds and tributaries; and the environmental

monitoring of power plants.

• Plan and manage public and private natural resources

and inventory.

• Conduct scientific testing, monitoring, and research.

• Develop and maintain natural resource areas, including

civil engineering and construction.

• Improve the education and awareness of users about

natural resources.

PATHWAY: ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Planning, testing, monitoring, maintaining, and restoring

water, air, and land quality and waste management for

the protection of public health and environmental quality.

• Provide scientific research, safety, and technical

support services, including geological measurement

and geographic information systems; law enforcement;

and compliance monitoring and permitting.

• Communicate to and educate the public on maintaining

environmental quality and respond to environmental

and public health emergencies.

• Manage all types of water resources.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Buyer

• Inspector

• Logistics and

Inventory Manager

• Meat Grader

• Production

Supervisor

• Laboratory

Technician

• Quality Assurance

Associate

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Natural Resources

Police Officer

• Forestry Technician

• Naturalist

• Fishery Technician

• Hatchery Technician

• Wildlife Technician

• Geographic

Information

Systems Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Hazardous Materials

Specialist

• Lead/Abatement

Technician

• Environmental

Technician

• Emergency Response

Technician

• Geographic

Information

Systems Technician

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• New Product

Scientist

• International

Marketing and

Packaging Manager

• Nutrition Scientist

• Food Scientist

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Policy Analyst

• Forester

• Fisheries Manager

• Soil Conservation

Planner

• Park Manager

• Wildlife Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Planner

• Geologist

• Water Resource

Engineer

• Environmental

Compliance

Specialist

• Health Physicist

• Public Health

Engineer

• Air Quality Manager

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Information

Systems Manager

• Industrial Engineer

• Quality Assurance

Manager

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Biologist

• Physical Scientist

• Fisheries Scientist

• Environmental

Engineer

• Ecological Engineer

• Wildlife Biologist

• Forest Scientist

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Water Quality

Manager

• Toxicologist

• Land Use/

Environmental

Engineer

• Industrial Hygienist

• Environmental

Lawyer


Career Cluster 5

ENVIRONMENTAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND NATURAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Information Technology and Communications Support: Telecommunications, data, and computer support

services, including communications systems and devices, film and audio-visual services and equipment,

computer software and hardware, and Internet services.

• Financial and Business Services: Financial, sales, and distribution services to producers of agricultural

products, including capital and land acquisition, banking, financial management and insurance, sales and

product support, customer inventory, management, and storage.

• Agricultural and Environmental Engineering: Maintaining and supporting technological systems used to produce,

store, and distribute agricultural and natural resource products, including production and production control

equipment, structural facilities, and irrigation equipment.

• Strategic Planning: Long-range business planning to set the overall direction of the business and respond to

projected changes in environmental conditions.

• Legal Services: Legal services that address all aspects of the organization, including purchasing contracts,

leases, human resources, and risk management.

• Government Relations/Legislative Affairs: Managing government communications, lobbying, and managing

relationships with government agencies at the federal, state, and local levels.

• Human Resources/Training: Business activities involved in recruiting and hiring employees, conducting

performance reviews, compensation and benefits management, labor relations, and compliance with

government laws and regulations, training and development of employees ranging from orientation to

professional and management development.

• International Marketing and Distribution: International market analysis and management of product exporting.

• Transportation Services: Transporting agricultural and natural resource products by water, rail, land, and air.

• University Research, Teaching, and Outreach: Technical and educational services provided by universities to

support agriculture and natural resource management.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

ENVIRONMENTAL, AGRICULTURAL, AND NATURAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS

Agricultural programs give students the opportunity to incorporate and apply what they have learned

in their academic disciplines while preparing them to enter Maryland’s largest industry. Specific

courses range from traditional production management and agricultural mechanics to biotechnology,

veterinary science, and aquaculture. Programs offer students hands-on learning experience through

use of specialized equipment and participation in supervised projects outside of the classroom.

25


26

Career Cluster 6

HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCES

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• The aging of the American population, advances in medical

knowledge and technology, and growing public awareness

of health issues are contributing to a growing demand for

high-quality healthcare services.

• The healthcare industry will continue to shift the focus to

prevention, the promotion of wellness, and the improvement

of the health status of patients and communities over time.

The healthcare industry also will continue to face strong cost

containment and competitive pressures and will seek new

ways to improve patient satisfaction and health. The industry

will continue to move the delivery of healthcare services from

hospitals and residential care facilities to ambulatory or

outpatient care facilities and home-based care.

HEALTH

INFOMATICS

DIAGNOSTIC

SERVICES

ENGINEERING/

ENVIRONMENTAL

SERVICES

Looking at this industry as a whole, two core areas-Health and

Biosciences-organize the pathways according to major functions

in the industry. Within the core areas, Career Pathways show

more specific business activities that offer a range of related

career opportunities. Students can prepare for a variety of career

options through two and four-year colleges (including graduate

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

MANUFACTURING

• Advances in bioscience, information technology, and biomedical

technology will drive continuous innovation in patient care.

Healthcare professionals will need stronger science,

mathematics and information technology skills. Stronger

relations between healthcare and bioscience industries in

developing, testing, and implementing new products and

services will be required.

• Advances in bioscience will continue to drive major innovations

and create new business opportunities across most major

industries, including agriculture, natural resource management,

environmental services, forensics services, manufacturing, and

healthcare.

THERAPEUTIC

SERVICES

BASIC

RESEARCH

APPLIED

RESEARCH

BIOSCIENCES

programs), private career schools, and employee sponsored

programs. Appropriate work experience may also be important to

increase career opportunities. The center circle represents the

common knowledge and skills required of anyone in this career.

As students focus on a more specific Career Pathway, they

advance their readiness for careers in that pathway.


Career Cluster 6

HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCES

CORE AREA 1: HEALTH

PATHWAY: THERAPEUTIC SERVICES

Promoting wellness and improving the health statistics

of patients and communities over time.

• Use technology to provide physical, mental health, and

social services to improve health status.

• Collect data, create treatment plans, implement

procedures, and evaluate client status.

PATHWAY: DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES

Collecting images or data on the health status of the

client at a single point of time.

• Plan and conduct diagnostic procedures.

• Evaluate, interpret, and document results.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Registered Nurse

• Licensed Practical

Nurse

• Nurse Assistant

• Respiratory Care

Therapist

• Radiographer

• Medical Lab

Technician

• Medical Assistant

• Pharmacy Technician

• Surgical

Technologist

• Dietetic Technician

• Dental Assistant

• Dental Hygienist

• Dental Lab

Technician

• Massage Therapist

• Physical Therapy

Assistant

• Occupational

Therapy Assistant

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Medical Laboratory

Technician

• Phlebotomist

• Radiographer

• Cardiovascular

Technician

• Registered Nurse

• EKG Technician

• EEG Technician

• Radiation/Oncology

Therapist

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Physician Assistant

• Dietician/Nutritionist

• Occupational

Therapist

• Medical

Technologist

• Nurse Supervisor

• Chiropractor

• Registered Nurse

• Nurse Educator

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Occupational

Therapist

• Medical

Technologist

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Physician

• Nurse Practitioner

• Dentist

• Ophthalmologist

• Psychologist

• Pharmacist

• Physical Therapist

• Genetic Counselor

• Audiologist

• Speech and

Language

Pathologist

• Nurse Director

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Physician

• Psychologist

• Nurse Practitioner

• Physical Therapist

• Speech and

Language Pathologist

27


28

Career Cluster 6

HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCES

PATHWAY: INFOMATICS

Documenting client care.

• Determine information requirements and information

analysis.

• Determine abstracting and coding, information systems,

and documentation.

PATHWAY: ENGINEERING/

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Providing direct or indirect client care and creating a

therapeutic environment for providing that care.

• Implement aseptic procedures, aesthetics, and

resource management.

• Maintain and support biomedical technology and

the physical facility.

CORE AREA 2: BIOSCIENCES

PATHWAY: BASIC RESEARCH

Participating in scientific exploration with direct or

indirect applications to the improvement of the quality

of life.

• Generate large-scale and small-scale data, and analyze.

• Conduct strategic planning and forecasting.

• Prepare documentation, publication, and budget.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Medical Records

Administrator

• Medical Records/

Health Information

Technician

• Administrative

Medical Assistant

• Medical Office

Assistant

• Health Information

Technician

• Billing and coding

professional

• Health Information

Coder

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Documentation

Specialist

• Research Assistant

• Production

Technician

• Materials

Management

Specialist

• Quality Control

Specialist

• Animal Technician

• Biotechnology

Laboratory

Assistant

• Bench Technician

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Biomedical Equipment Technician

• Transport Technician

• Materials Manager

• Health Insurance

Manager

• Utilization Manager

• Corporate

Compliance Officer

• Health Information

Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Regulatory Affairs

Associate

• Laboratory

Technician

• Research Technician

• Technical Writer

• Biochemist

• Chemical Engineer

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Medical Librarian

• Safety Manager/ Engineer

• Biomedical Engineer

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Regulatory Affairs

Officer

• Quality Control/

Assurance Director

• Bioinfomatics

Analyst/Engineer

• Bioethicist

• Research Scientist

• Medical Review

Officer


Career Cluster 6

HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCES

PATHWAY: APPLIED RESEARCH

Testing and evaluating new products and services

in laboratory and field environments and developing

systems for producing products for large-scale use.

• Conduct legal reviews.

• Determine safety and efficacy of new products.

• Develop testing designs.

• Develop and acquire limited quantities of products and

related materials for conducting tests.

• Conduct tests and field trials and analyze and present

results.

PATHWAY: MANUFACTURING

Producing bioscience products, such as vaccines and

laboratory materials, on a commercial scale.

• Implement, manage, operate, and maintain production

systems.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Research Assistant

• Quality Control

Specialist

• Validation Engineer

• Process Engineer

• Compliance Training

Specialist

• Production

Technician

• Bench Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Manufacturing

Technician

• Validation Engineer

• Technical Training

Specialist

• Production Planner

• Clean Room

Specialist

• Media Technician

• Bench Technician

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Regulatory Affairs

Associate

• Laboratory

Technician

• Research

Technician

• Technical Writer

• Chemist

• Biomedical Engineer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Operations Manager

• Quality Manager/

Technician

• Manufacturing/

Chemical Engineer

• Analytical Chemist

• Microbiologist

• Industrial

Production Manager

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Medical Review

Officer

• Clinical Trials

Manager

• Manufacturing

Director

• Biostatistician

• Medical Director

• Quality Control/

Assurance Director

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Medical Director

• Senior

Methodologist

• Senior Scientist

• Medical Science

Liaison

• Regulatory Affairs

Officer

• Manufacturing

Director

29


30

Career Cluster 6

HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCES

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Information Technology and Communications Support: Telecommunications, data, and computer support

services to core business functions of sales and service and of the research and manufacturing industries,

including communications systems and devices, film and audio-visual services and equipment, computer

software and hardware, and Internet services.

• Business Management/Managed Care: Managing healthcare finances associated with insurance and

managed care organizations.

• Financial Management and Accounting: Business support services in finance and accounting.

• Legal Services: Legal services that address all aspects of the business, including purchasing contracts, leases,

human resources, and risk management.

• Public Policy/Government Relations: Managing government communications and lobbying and managing

relationships with government agencies at the federal, state, and local levels.

• Human Resources/Training: Business activities involved in recruitment and hiring of employees, performance

reviews, compensation and benefits management, labor relations, and compliance with government laws

and regulations. It also refers to the training and development of employees, ranging from orientation to

professional and management development.

• Risk Management: Business support services providing health, safety, and environmental protection and

insurance for employees and customers; loss prevention for both merchandise and facilities; compliance with

government laws and regulations; and security.

• Maintenance/Facility Support: Maintaining physical facilities, including architecture and design services,

facility and equipment maintenance services, building cleaning services, landscape and grounds planning, and

maintenance.

• Marketing and Sales: Market analysis, advertising and promotion, sales, and customer service.

• Accreditation: Attaining and maintaining organizational accreditation.

• Health and Safety/Environmental Management: Managing and improving health and safety and maintaining

compliance with legal and regulatory requirements, including OSHA, EPA, MOSH, and CDC.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

HEALTH AND BIOSCIENCES

Medical careers programs offer secondary students the opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in

diagnostic and therapeutic services, patient care, and health support services. These programs often

allow students to earn an industry-recognized certification to document their skill level and advance

their career options. Completers of medical careers programs are academically prepared to enter a

postsecondary healthcare program of study.


Career Cluster 7

HUMAN RESOURCE SERVICES

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• The aging and growing diversity of the American population,

advances in scientific knowledge, and increased public

awareness of social problems and issues are contributing

to a demand for more skilled social service workers and

high-quality social services, including early childhood

development; mental health/addiction; individual, family,

and community; and workplace/workforce support. The

emphasis in all these areas will shift to prevention and

community-based services.

• Public concerns over crime, security, and emergency response

and the increased demand for legal intervention in business

and communities will continue to drive the growth of legal and

court services. Advances in information technology and science

will drive major innovations in law enforcement, emergency

services, and legal services, including forensics, digital

imaging, and global positioning systems.

LAW ENFORCEMENT

& EMERGENCY

SERVICES

HUMAN

SERVICES

Looking at this industry as a whole, five pathways represent the

major functions in the industry. Career Pathways show more

specific business activities that offer a range of related career

opportunities. Students can prepare for a variety of career

options through two and four-year colleges (including graduate

programs), private career schools, and employee sponsored

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

EDUCATION &

TRAINING

SERVICES

• The evolving global economy will require all workers to have

advanced education and continual upgrading of their skills.

This need will fuel the growth of the education and training

industry in both the public and private sectors, including

K-12/postsecondary education, businesses, and businesses

that provide training and development services to businesses.

• The demand of this new global economy and social and

technological changes in the face of mounting pressures to

control costs will lead to the reinvention of government services

at the federal, state, and local levels. In particular, advances

in information technology will transform how government

agencies carry out their critical roles and functions.

LEGAL

SERVICES

GOVERNMENT

& PUBLIC

ADMINISTRATION

programs. Appropriate work experience may also be important to

increase career opportunities. The center circle represents the

common knowledge and skills required of anyone in this career.

As students focus on a more specific Career Pathway, they

advance their readiness for careers in that pathway.

31


32

Career Cluster 7

HUMAN RESOURCE SERVICES

PATHWAY: LAW ENFORCEMENT

AND EMERGENCY SERVICES

Protecting public safety through law enforcement,

security and protective services, and fire and emergency

services.

• Provide emergency rescue/medical and hazardous

materials services.

• Provide correctional services.

• Enforce compliance with government laws and regulations.

PATHWAY: LEGAL SERVICES

Providing legal services to individuals in communities

and restricted environments.

• Implement the following services: civil, criminal,

juvenile, and administrative judicial/court services;

dispute resolution; and legal assistance services.

PATHWAY: HUMAN SERVICES

Providing psychological, social, and community

services support to individuals and families.

• Implement the following services; early childhood

development; mental health/addiction; individual,

family, and community; financial support; and workplace/workforce

support.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Fire Marshal

• Police Officer

• Emergency Medical

Technician

• Paramedic

• Corrections Officer

• Crime Technician

• Dispatcher/

Communications

Officer

• Fire Inspector

• Fire Investigator

• Security Officer-

Public/Private

• Emergency

Manager

• Accident

Investigator

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Mediator

• Court Clerk

• Court Reporter/

Transcriber

• Investigator (Private

and Government)

• Legal Assistant

• Paralegal

• Legal Secretary

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Childcare Worker

• Housing Specialist

• Child Support

Worker

• Human Services

Associate

• Mental Health

Technician

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Parole Officer

• Case Manager

• Counselor

• Forensic Scientist

• Fire Protection

Engineer

• Police Agent

• Air Marshall

• Customs Officer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Assistant Court

Commissioner

• Law Clerk

• Arbitrator

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Program

Coordinator

• Job Coach

• Case Manager

• Employment

Counselor

• Childcare Licensing

Specialist

• Employee Assistance

Counselor

• Recreational

Therapist

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Federal Special

Agent

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Lawyer

• Judge

• Administrative Law

Judge

• Court Commissioner

• Hearing Examiner

• Court Master

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Human Resource

Administrator

• Psychologist

• Speech Therapist

• Speech Pathologist

• Family Support

Counselor

• Social Worker

• Psychiatrist


Career Cluster 7

HUMAN RESOURCE SERVICES

PATHWAY: GOVERNMENT AND

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Providing legislative, administrative, and judicial

services to carry out general-purpose government

functions at the federal, state, and local levels and to

provide for national security.

• Implement national security policy.

• Manage international relations.

• Manage research and information.

• Administer revenue and taxation plans.

• Administer grant programs.

• Conduct regulatory compliance and investigative

services.

PATHWAY: EDUCATION AND

TRAINING SERVICES

Providing education and training services, performance

support, and organizational development services to

improve organizational effectiveness.

• Provide K-16 instructional services and support services

within public and private schools and colleges.

• Conduct training and performance support services for

organizations and employees.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Policy Researcher

• Public Affairs

Assistant

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Teacher Assistant

• Laboratory

Technician

• Teacher

Paraprofessional

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Program

Administrator

• Financial

Administrator

• Auditor

• Public Affairs/

Information

Specialist

• Budget Analyst

• Policy Analyst

• Government Official

• Community

Organizer/

Development

• Counterterrorism

Specialist

• Accountant

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Pre-K-12 Teacher

• Librarian/

Information

Specialist

• Career Counselor

• Placement

Specialist

• Admission

Counselor

• Financial Aid

Advisor

• Trainer

• Organizational

Developer

• Performance

Consultant

• Academic Advisor

• Postsecondary

Instructor

• Curriculum

Developer

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Lawyer

• Certified Public

Accountant

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• College Professor

• School or

Postsecondary

Administrator

• Non-Public Pre-K-12

Teacher/Montessori

• Guidance Counselor

• Testing and

Assessment

Specialist

• Reading Specialist

• School Psychologist

• ESL Specialist

• Extension Educator

33


34

Career Cluster 7

HUMAN RESOURCE SERVICES

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Information Technology and Communications Support: Telecommunications, data and computer support

services, including communications systems and devices, film and audio-visual services and equipment, computer

software and hardware, and Internet services.

• Financial Management and Accounting: Business support services in finance and accounting, including

budgeting and fiscal operations.

• Legal Services: Legal services that address all aspects of the organization, including purchasing contracts,

leases, human resources, and risk management.

• Government Relations/Legislative Affairs: Managing government communications, lobbying, and managing

relationships with government agencies at the federal, state, and local levels.

• Human Resources/Training: Business activities involved in recruiting and hiring employees, performance

reviews, compensation and benefits management, labor relations, and compliance with government laws and

regulations, and the training and development of employees, ranging from orientation to professional and

management development.

• Risk Management and Security: Services that provide health, safety and environmental protection, insurance

for employees and customers, loss prevention, compliance with government laws and regulations, and security.

• Maintenance/Facility Support: Services involving the maintenance of physical facilities, including architecture

and design services, facility and equipment maintenance services, building cleaning services, and landscape

and grounds planning and maintenance.

• Marketing: Market analysis, advertising, and promotion and communications services.

• Health and Safety/Environmental Management: Managing and improving health and safety, and maintaining

compliance with legal and regulatory requirements, including OSHA and EPA.

• Customer Relations: Managing customer relations and insuring that customers receive the services they are

promised and are satisfied with the services they receive.

• Fundraising: Seeking and securing financial resources for the organization, including government and

foundation grants and corporate, community, and individual contributions.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

HUMAN RESOURCE SERVICES

The Maryland Academy for Teacher Education aligns with the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and

Support Consortium (INTASC) and the Maryland Essential Dimensions of Teaching (EdoTs). The program

prepares students for further education and careers in the education profession. The high school program

is designed to articulate to a Maryland postsecondary teacher education program. Upon completion of the

program and passing the ParaPro test, high school graduates are ready for employment in the teaching

profession. This program is based on the outcomes of the Maryland Associate of Arts in Teaching (A.A.T.)

degree, which aligns with the National Council for the Accreditation for Teacher Education (NCATE)

standards. Postsecondary students completing the A.A.T. can become a paraprofessional or transfer to a

bachelor’s degree program to prepare to enter the teaching profession.


Career Cluster 8

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• Advances in information technology will continue to drive major

innovations across all major industries throughout the world.

These advances will also change the face of government and

the non-profit sector. Businesses will continue to expand the

use of information technology in all aspects of the business

enterprise and will seek more comprehensive e-commerce

and information management solutions to remain competitive.

• Information technology businesses and professionals will face

increasing pressure to design, develop, implement, and support

more complex and reliable information technology solutions

SOFTWARE

ENGINEERING/

DEVELOPMENT

SOFTWARE

OPERATIONS

Looking at this industry as a whole, five pathways represent the

major functions in the industry. Career Pathways show more

specific business activities that offer a range of related career

opportunities. Students can prepare for a variety of career

options through two and four-year colleges (including graduate

programs), private career schools, and employee sponsored

programs. Professional certification is also an important

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

HARDWARE

ENGINEERING/

DEVELOPMENT

that will meet the needs of external and internal customers.

This will require that information technology professionals have

the skills to determine customer and business needs and

requirements, manage complex projects, integrate software

and hardware solutions, and deliver total solutions on time that

meet customer needs.

• The rapid pace of technological change and increased

global competition will require that information technology

professionals develop and continually update high-level

technical, project management, and customer relations skills.

INFORMATION

SYSTEMS

HARDWARE

OPERATIONS

consideration when pursuing career opportunities. Appropriate

work experience may also be important to increase career

opportunities. The center circle represents the common

knowledge and skills required of anyone in this career. As students

focus on a more specific Career Pathway, they advance their

readiness for careers in that pathway.

35


36

Career Cluster 8

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

PATHWAY: SOFTWARE

ENGINEERING/DEVELOPMENT

Designing, developing, and testing software solutions

to meet customer needs. Expertise required in project

management, programming languages, database

design, security systems, and website development.

PATHWAY: SOFTWARE OPERATIONS

Installing, deploying, maintaining, and supporting

software systems, including databases, software

programs and packages, Web products, and security

systems. Expertise required in project management.

• Monitor and manage software performance.

• Provide training and assistance to software users.

PATHWAY: HARDWARE

ENGINEERING/DEVELOPMENT

Designing, developing, and testing new hardware

technologies and products to meet customer needs.

Expertise required in project management.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Web Designer/

Developer

• Database Analyst

• Database Tester

• Data Analyst

• Documentation

Specialist

• Software

Applications

• Specialist

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Software

Applications Trainer

• Web

Designer/Developer

• Applications

Support Specialist

• Applications

Support Analyst

• Database Support

Analyst

• PC Support

Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• PC Support

Technician

• Network Technician

• Network

Administrator

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Software Architect

• Database Developer

• Information

Systems Architect

• Lead Programmer

• Applications

Developer

• Applications Analyst

• Project Manager

• Web Architect

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Database

Administrator

• Project Manager

• Operations Systems

Analyst

• Database

Administrator

• Technical Writer /

Editor

• Product Support

Engineer

• Systems Technical

Support Specialist

• Technical Support

Engineer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Operations Manager

• Computer Designer

• Project Manager

• Circuit Designer

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Business Analyst

• Software Architect

• Network Analyst

• Systems Engineer

• Operating Systems

Designer/Engineer

• Information

Systems Architect

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Project Manager

• Operations Manager

• Operations Systems

Analyst

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Network Engineer

• Mechanical

Engineer

• Computer Engineer


Career Cluster 8

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

PATHWAY: HARDWARE OPERATIONS

Installing, configuring, maintaining, and supporting

computer and network hardware to ensure secure and

reliable system performance. Expertise required in

project management.

PATHWAY: INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Designing, implementing, and supporting computer

network systems—both hardware and software—

to ensure that systems meet business and user

requirements. Expertise required in configuration

management and project management.

• Plan and manage system development projects.

• Maintain system documentation.

• Control system access and maintain system security.

• Troubleshoot system performance problems.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Computer

Technician

• Network Technician

• Cabling Technician

• PC Support

Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Information System

Administrator

• Network Analyst

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Network

Administrator

• Project Manager

• Technical Writer/

Editor

• Product Support

Engineer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Network Engineer

• Network

Administrator

• Systems Tester

• Security Analyst

• Quality Assurance

Manager

• Project Manager

• Systems Technical

Support Specialist

• Technical Support

Engineer

• Application

Integrator

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Operations Manager

• Network Engineer

• Mechanical

Engineer

• Computer Engineer

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Systems Architect

• Systems Analyst

• Systems Engineer

• Operations System

Engineer

• Security Analyst

• Operations System

Program Manager

• Chief Security

Officer

37


38

Career Cluster 8

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Business and Administrative Services: Core business and administrative services found in all businesses,

including finance and accounting services, human resource services, and administrative support services.

• Customer Sales/Service and Relationship Management: All activities involved in identifying customers, building

and completing customer sales, responding to customer requests, and maintaining customer relationships.

• User Services: All major applications support services provided to end users in major customer markets.

• User Applications Services: All activities related to providing technical support regarding user applications.

• User Applications Documentation – Technical Writing: Developing information on the use, operation, and

capabilities of specific user applications.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Through a partnership with the National Academy Foundation (NAF), Maryland’s Academy of

Information Technology features two specialized courses each semester and a college-level course in the

senior year. The program offers courses such as Introduction to IT, Information Systems, Logic for

Programming, Digital Networks, System Support and Maintenance, Advanced Web Tools, Digital Media,

Programming, and Databases. This program introduces students to the broad career opportunities in

today’s digital workforce and, in the process, equips them with the personal, analytical, technical, and

communications skills they need to succeed.


Career Cluster 9

MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• The Maryland Manufacturing, Engineering, and Technology

industry sector is an international enterprise with products

that are designed, manufactured, and sold within a highly

competitive global marketplace.

• American manufacturers are adopting leading global practices,

such as lean manufacturing, to find new ways to produce

high-quality products, better, faster, and more cost-effectively

with as little waste as possible.

• American manufacturers face new health, safety, and

environmental requirements and are searching for innovative

PRODUCTION

LOGISTICS &

INVENTORY

CONTROL

MANUFACTURING

PROCESS

PRODUCTION

P R O D U C T I O N S U P P O RT

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

HEALTH, SAFETY,

& ENVIRONMENT

QUALITY

ASSURANCE

Looking at the industry as a whole, three core areas—Production,

Product Development and Sales, and Production Support—

organize the pathways according to major functions in the

industry. Within the core areas, Career Pathways show more

specific business activities that offer a range of related career

opportunities. Students can prepare for a variety of career

options through two and four-year colleges (including graduate

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

ways to improve safety and lessen the environmental impacts

of both products and processes. Advances in science and

technology, such as materials science, engineering, and

information technology, will continue to drive product and

process innovation.

• With the increasing availability of information technology, the

industry will use logistics and resource planning systems on a

greater industry-wide basis. As supply chains become even more

global, this will improve the way suppliers, manufacturers, and

customers interact with each other.

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND SALES

PRODUCTION DEVELOPMENT AND SALES

SALES &

SERVICE

PRODUCT

ENGINEERING

INFORMATION

TECHNOLOGY

RELIABILITY &

MAINTENANCE

programs), private career schools, and employee sponsored

programs. Appropriate work experience may also be important to

increase career opportunities. The center circle represents the

common knowledge and skills needed to understand the entire

industry. As students focus on a more specific Career Pathway,

they advance their readiness for careers in that pathway.

39


40

Career Cluster 9

MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY

CORE AREA 1: PRODUCTION

PATHWAY: PRODUCTION

Producing products and continuously improving

production processes to meet customer and business

requirements.

• Manage production operations.

• Operate and control production equipment.

• Provide technical support to production.

CORE AREA 2: PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND SALES

PATHWAY: PRODUCT ENGINEERING

Designing, developing, or modifying products to meet

market and customer requirements.

• Design and develop products through concurrent

engineering processes that integrate product and

process development.

• Improve the manufacturability and sustainability of

products.

PATHWAY: MANUFACTURING SALES

AND SERVICE

Marketing, selling, customer service, and overall

customer relationship management.

• Identify and analyze customer value, markets, and

products.

• Identify potential customers.

• Establish and maintain relationships with potential and

existing customers.

• Promote and sell products and services to customers.

• Provide customer service, including providing product

information, tracking and reporting the progress of

customer orders, answering questions, resolving

problems, and providing technical support in the use

and disposal of products.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Manufacturing Technician

• Production Assembler

• CAD/CAM Technician

• Production Supervisor

• Production Team Leader

• Production Operator

• Materials Management

Specialist

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Engineering Technician

• CAD Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Sales Agent

• Customer Service

Representative

• Contract Specialist

• Sales Coordinator

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Manufacturing Engineer

• Product Engineer

• Controls Engineer

• Systems Engineer

• Project Manager

• Program Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Manufacturing Engineer

• Six Sigma Manager

• Test Engineer

• Materials Engineer

• Systems Engineer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Marketing Manager

• Sales Manager

• Customer Service Manager

• Sales and Application Manager


Career Cluster 9

MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY

CORE AREA 3: PRODUCTION SUPPORT

PATHWAY: LOGISTICS AND

INVENTORY CONTROL

Manage the supply chain from suppliers through

production to end-use customers using enterprisewide

resource planning systems.

• Plan and control production.

• Manage purchasing and just-in-time materials flow,

shipping and receiving, packaging, and transportation.

• Control inventory of material and products.

• Manage product support, including parts and warranty

issues.

PATHWAY: MANUFACTURING PROCESS

Designing, implementing, and continually improving

manufacturing processes.

• Develop manufacturing process plans and documentation.

• Audit manufacturing processes and systems.

• Provide technical support to production to prevent errors,

and reduce process variability and waste.

• Manage continuous process improvement.

PATHWAY: QUALITY ASSURANCE

Ensuring that products meet customer requirements

and supporting continuous improvement.

• Determine customer requirements.

• Develop and implement quality systems, including

monitoring processes and testing product quality.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Expediter

• Inventory Specialist

• Material Handler

• Contract Specialist

• Information Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• CAD/CAM Technician

• Engineering Technician

• Documentation Specialist

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Quality Technician

• Inspector

• Non-Destructive Tester

• Documentation Control

Technician

• Product/Process Validation

Specialist

• Metrology/Calibration Specialist

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Logistics Analyst

• Logistics Engineer

• Production Planner and

Scheduler

• Inventory Manager

• Purchasing Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Process Engineer

• Tooling Engineer

• Manufacturing Engineer

• Product Change Coordinator

• Six Sigma Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Reliability Engineer

• Quality Engineer

• Mechanical Engineer

• Six Sigma Manager

41


42

Career Cluster 9

MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY

PATHWAY: RELIABILITY

AND MAINTENANCE

Maintaining the reliability and performance of

manufacturing systems to ensure the maximum

utilization of capital assets.

• Select production equipment.

• Plan space and layout.

• Operate total productive maintenance systems.

PATHWAY: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Designing, implementing, and supporting computer

network systems (hardware and software) to ensure

that systems—enterprise-wide resource management

systems and e-commerce support systems—meet

business and user requirements.

• Plan and manage system development projects.

• Install and configure network hardware and software.

• Maintain system documentation.

• Control system access and maintain system security.

• Troubleshoot system performance problems.

• Provide user training and support.

PATHWAY: HEALTH, SAFETY,

AND ENVIRONMENTAL

Designing, planning, implementing, and supporting

health and safety and environmental management

systems to maintain organizational compliance with

government laws and regulations.

• Improve health, safety, and environmental performance

such as moving toward zero discharge, designing for

green, and recycling.

• Achieve organizational wellness through ergonomic and

health promotion efforts.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• CAD/CAM Technician

• Maintenance Mechanic

• Electrician

• Maintenance Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• User Support Specialist

• PC/System Technician

• Network Technician

• Software Support Specialist

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Laboratory Technician

• Health and Safety Technologist

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Facility Engineer

• Mechanical Engineer

• Electrical Engineer

• Six Sigma Manager

• Systems Engineer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Software Engineer

• Programmer

• Network Administrator

• System Engineer

• Knowledge Engineer

• Product Data Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Safety Engineer

• Ergonomic Engineer

• Environmental Engineer

• Industrial Engineer

• Scientist

• Remediation Specialist


Career Cluster 9

MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Human Resources: Business activities involved in recruiting and hiring employees, performance

reviews, compensation and benefits management, labor relations, and compliance with government laws

and regulations.

• Training: All types of learning services, including company and vendor training.

• Legal Services: Legal services that address all aspects of the business, including contracts, human resources,

and risk management.

• Financial Management and Accounting: Financial and accounting services that manage financial resources

and manage and report the revenues and costs of manufacturing businesses.

• Security: Business activities involved in property loss prevention and ensuring the personal security

of employees.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY

Maryland’s Project Lead The Way (PLTW) program is a sequence of courses which, when combined with

traditional mathematics and science courses in high school, introduces students to the scope, rigor, and

discipline of engineering and engineering technology prior to entering college. There are eight courses in

the PLTW program which are divided into three groups: Foundation (Principles of Engineering, Introduction

to Engineering Design and Digital Electronics); Pathway (Computer Integrated Manufacturing, Civil

Engineering and Architecture, Aerospace Engineering and Biotechnical Engineering); and Capstone

(Engineering Design and Development). Students in the Project Lead The Way pre-engineering program

take all of the foundation courses, one pathway course, and the capstone course. Opportunities to earn

articulated credit are offered to students who successfully complete the requirements for entrance into the

two- or four-year college program.

43


44

Career Cluster 10

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES

INDUSTRY INSIGHTS

• The expansion of global trade and travel, and advances in

logistics and distribution management in manufacturing and

wholesale and retail trade are driving the growth of the

transportation sector.

• The transportation sector is becoming increasingly integrated

and intermodal across all types of transportation, including

air, water, roadway, rail, and metropolitan transit systems.

Many businesses are now providing comprehensive services,

including logistics planning and management, inventory

management, and transportation.

DISTRIBUTION

CENTER

OPERATIONS

SALES &

CUSTOMER

SERVICE

Looking at this industry as a whole, seven pathways represent

the major functions in the industry. Career Pathways show more

specific business activities that offer a range of related career

opportunities. Students can prepare for a variety of career

options through two and four-year colleges (including graduate

programs), private career schools, and employee sponsored

THWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS –

LOGISTICS

PLANNING &

MANAGEMENT

CLUSTER

KNOWLEDGE

AND SKILLS

PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PATHWAY KNOWLEDGE & SKILLS – PA

• Advances in science and engineering are producing major

innovations in transportation technology, resulting in faster

movement of people and goods at lower costs and with fewer

environmental and safety risks. These innovations require

higher skills to manage and maintain transportation equipment.

• Advances in transportation technology and information

technology, the growth in global transportation, and increased

security and safety concerns are creating the need for an

expanded and more advanced public transportation

infrastructure, including intelligent transportation systems,

and advances in the management of this infrastructure at the

local, state, and federal levels.

TRANSPORTATION

SERVICES

TRANSPORTATION

PLANNING,

MANAGEMENT &

CONSTRUCTION

TRANSPORTATION

EQUIPMENT

SAFETY,

ENVIRONMENTAL

& SECURITY

MANAGEMENT

programs. Appropriate work experience may also be important to

increase career opportunities. The center circle represents the

common knowledge and skills required of anyone in this career.

As students focus on a more specific Career Pathway, they

advance their readiness for careers in that pathway.


Career Cluster 10

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES

PATHWAY: TRANSPORTATION OPERATIONS

Moving people, freight (goods and materials), and

information through one or multiple (intermodal)

modes of transportation, including air, water, roadway,

rail, and public transit systems.

• Dispatch, control, operate, and support mobile

equipment, including trains, ships, airplanes, trucks,

buses, and cars.

• Manage people, information, and inventory.

• Provide customer service.

• Communicate with and educate customers on improving

the use of transportation services.

• Maintain and improve safety compliance and performance.

PATHWAY: LOGISTICS PLANNING

AND MANAGEMENT

Planning and analyzing the movement of people,

freight (goods and materials), and information.

Managing organizational assets to improve the quality

of services and lower costs.

• Select transportation modes and carriers.

• Locate transportation hubs and distribution centers.

• Develop transportation routes and schedules.

• Determine packaging and material handling requirements.

• Determine documentation and information requirements

for domestic and international transporting.

• Analyze problems to improve performance.

PATHWAY: DISTRIBUTION CENTER

OPERATIONS

Managing and operating warehouses and distribution

centers.

• Process, sort, assemble, package, and handle incoming

and outgoing materials and products.

• Manage people and provide customer service.

• Maintain and improve safety compliance and performance.

• Control inventories maintained within distribution centers.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Truck Driver

• Pilot

• Fueler

• Air Traffic Controller

• Dispatcher

• Scheduler

• Bus Driver

• Ship Captain

• Harbor Master

• Flight Attendant

• Conductor

• Train Engineer

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• CAD Technician

• Route Planner

• Traffic Technician

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Forklift Operator

• Warehouse Supervisor

• Parts Manager

• Hazardous Materials Specialist

• Database Specialist

• Inventory Specialist

• Stationary Engineer

• Shipping Specialist

• Receiving Specialist

• Physical Distribution Manager

• Military Flight

Operations Manager

• Airport Manager

• Quality Manager

• Flight Service

Manager

• Business Process

Engineer

• Process

Improvement

Manager

• Operations Manager

• Terminal Manager

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Operations

Research Systems

Analyst

• Logistics Analyst

• Traffic Engineer

• Industrial Engineer

• Demographer

• Transportation Planner

• CAD Engineer

• Logistics Engineer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Industrial Engineer

• Distribution Center Manager

• Inventory Manager

• Quality Control Manager

• Import/Export Manager

• Logistics Engineer

• Industrial Engineering

Technician

45


46

Career Cluster 10

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES

PATHWAY: SAFETY, ENVIRONMENTAL,

AND SECURITY MANAGEMENT

Complying with government laws and regulations in

safety, health, and environmental management.

Maintaining security in transportation facilities and

operations.

• Prevent and reduce losses due to theft and product damage.

• Investigate safety, environmental, and security

problems, and improve performance.

PATHWAY: TRANSPORTATION

PLANNING,MANAGEMENT,

AND CONSTRUCTION

Planning, designing, constructing, and maintaining

public and private transportation facilities and

infrastructure, including:

• Highways

• Ports

• Airports

• Train terminals

• Railways

PATHWAY: SALES AND CUSTOMER SERVICE

Performing sales and customer service functions.

• Promoting and selling logistics and transportation

services and equipment.

• Providing ongoing customer service to businesses

and consumers.

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Safety or

Environmental

Inspector

• Accident Investigator

• Material and

Equipment Inspector

• Emergency Manager

• Emissions Inspector

• Security Investigator

• Security Officer

• Flight Attendant

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Construction

Supervisor

• Engineering

Technician

• Drafter/CAD

Technician

• Surveyor

• Security Engineer

• Facility Engineer

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Environmental

Analyst

• Public Administrator

• Traffic Safety Officer

• Civil Engineer

• Occupational Safety

Officer

• Air Marshal

• Customs Officer

• Process

Improvement

Manager

• Coast Guard Officer

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Reservation Agent

• Customer Service

Representative

• Salesperson

• Service Writer

• Leasing Specialist

• Title/Registration Administrator

• Transportation

Planner

• Traffic Engineer

• Civil Engineer

• Highway Engineer

• Real Property

Officer

• Environmental

Specialist

• Systems Engineer

• Structural Engineer

• Government Agency

Administrator

• Architect

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Environmental

Lawyer

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Lawyer

• General Manager

• Market Analyst

• Marketing Manager

• Sales Manager

• Parts Manager

• Contract Officer

• Procurement Officer

• Finance Specialist


Career Cluster 10

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES

PATHWAY: TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT

Planning, designing, manufacturing, and maintaining

transportation equipment, including:

• Automobiles

• Trucks

• Buses

• Airplanes

• Ships

• Trains

WITH AN ASSOCIATE’S

DEGREE OR LESS

• Parts Manager

• Automotive

Technician

• Collision Repair

Technician

• Fleet Maintenance

Manager

• Airframe Mechanic

• Power Plant

Mechanic

• Diesel Mechanic

• Railcar Technician

• Materials Specialist

• Welder

SAMPLE CAREER OPTIONS

WITH A BACHELOR’S

DEGREE

• Mechanical

Engineer

• Aerospace Engineer

• Design Engineer

• Structural Engineer

• Electrical Engineer

• Computer Engineer

• Mechanical

Engineer

• Manufacturing

Engineer

• Civil Engineer

• Manufacturing

Operations Manager

• Process Engineer

• Integration Engineer

WITH MORE THAN A

BACHELOR’S DEGREE

• Systems Engineer

• Quality Engineer

47


48

Career Cluster 10

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES

CROSS-CLUSTER SKILL AREAS

In addition to focusing on a Pathway, students gain transferable skills across Career Clusters. These cross-cluster

skills broaden a student’s understanding of how different careers connect and intersect.

• Information Technology and Communications Support: Telecommunications, data, and computer support

services, including communications systems and devices and equipment, computer software and hardware,

and Internet services.

• Financial Management and Accounting: Business support services in finance and accounting.

• Purchasing and Procurement: Purchasing materials and equipment for organizations involved in performing

and distributing.

• Legal Services: Legal services that address all aspects of the business, including purchasing contracts, leases,

human resources, and risk management.

• Public Policy/Government Relations: Managing government communications, lobbying, and managing

relationships with government agencies at the federal, state, and local levels.

• Human Resources/Training and Labor Relations: Business activities involved in recruiting and hiring

employees, conducting performance reviews, handling compensation and benefits management, labor relations,

and complying with government laws and regulations. It also refers to the training and development of

employees, ranging from orientation to professional and management development.

• Marketing and Sales: Market analysis, advertising and promotion, sales, and customer service.

• Construction Equipment and Material Supply: Providing necessary construction equipment and materials to

construct transportation facilities and infrastructure.

PROGRAM

HIGHLIGHT

TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGIES

The National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF), an affiliate of the National Institute

for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE), has established the rigorous technical standards by which

training facilities, programs and individual technicians become certified. Programs of study offer high

school students up to 18 articulated college credits. Students can go directly to work in the industry or

continue their education to earn an Associate of Applied Science Degree (AAS) along with advanced

automotive manufacturer and industry certifications, i.e. Ford ASSET and Toyota T-Ten. Postsecondary

students interested in further continuing their education and career options can receive full credit for their

AAS degree towards a Bachelor of Science Degree in Automotive Technology Management.


MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

Mr. Dunbar Brooks, President

Ms. Beverly A. Cooper, Vice President

Dr. Lelia T. Allen Ms. Rosa M. Garcia

Mr. J. Henry Butta Mr. Richard L. Goodall

Dr. Charlene M. Dukes Dr. Karabelle Pizzigati

Mr. Blair G. Ewing Mr. David F. Tufaro

Dr. Mary Kay Finan Mr. Renford Freemantle, Student Member

Nancy S. Grasmick

Secretary-Treasurer of the Board

State Superintendent of Schools

Deputy State Superintendents

Ronald Peiffer JoAnne L. Carter A. Skipp Sanders

Office for Academic Policy Office for Instruction and Academic Acceleration Office for Administration

Katharine M. Oliver

Assistant State Superintendent

Division of Career Technology and Adult Learning

Career and Technology Education Staff

Program Managers

Lynne M. Gilli Jeanne-Marie S. Holly Pat Mikos

CTE Instructional Branch CTE Systems Branch CTE Student and Assessment

Services Branch

Marquita Friday, Lead Kathy McNerney, Lead Mike Beck

Lori Fritzsche Rosemary Bitzel George Comegys

Douglas Handy Nancy Hauswald Louis Kaminski

Mary McGowan Marianne Hollerbach JoAnn Norris

Susan Oskin Clifton Martin Charles Wallace

Nina Roa

This document was developed using funds authorized under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act of 1998,

20 U.S.C. 2301 Et SEQ., as amended by Public Law 105-332

The Maryland State Department of Education does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin, religion or disability in

matters affecting employment or inn providing access to programs. For inquiries related to departmental policy, please contact: Equity Assurance

and Compliance Branch, Maryland State Department of Education, 200 West Baltimore Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21201-2595.

Voice: 410-767-0433, Fax: 410-767-0431, TTY/TDD: 410-333-6442

Copyright © 2003/2008 MSDE All Rights Reserved


MARYLAND CAREER CLUSTERS

200 West Baltimore Street

Baltimore, MD 21201-2595

Phone: 410-767-0170

marylandpublicschools.org

RESTRUCTURING LEARNING FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

IN A TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED, GLOBAL SOCIETY

Martin O’Malley

Governor

An initiative of the Maryland State Department of Education, the Governor’s Workforce Investment Board, the Maryland State

Department of Business and Economic Development, and the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation.

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