BREWSTER, NY - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

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BREWSTER, NY - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

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PEEKSKILL BREW5TER DANBURY

YONKERS / \ WHITE PLAINS ianhard

BREWSTER,THE HUBZQJFITHE HARLEM VALLEY »t

VOL. LXXVIIL No- 10. Brewster Putnam County, N. Y.t Thurs., June 26, )&*"M Established 77 Years $3.00 Per Year

H. H. Wells Addresses

Putnam Valley Class

Speech delivered by Henry H. Wells

at Commencement, Putnam Valley

Central School, June 20, 1947:

Mr. Schiei'ber, Members of the Grad­

uating Class, of the Faculty, of

the Board of Education and Other

Friends:

• -* Dear Brutus

Several years ago I went to a play

"Dear Brutus." In the first act a boy

felt his laziness came because his

father had left him rich, and a wife

knew she would have been happier if

she had married her other lover. What

the other persons were dissatisfied

about I don't remember.

In the second act the boy is poor

and Just as lazy poor as he was when

rich. The wife gets her other lover

for a new husband and she is unhap­

py with him. Only one person is hap­

pier for the change. The teaching Is

that we to a great extent make our

lives what they are.

The play is called "Dear Brutus", as

you may know, from some lines in

Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar**. Caa-

sius is trying to stir up Brutus against

Caesar and says. 'Men at sometime are

masters of their fates. The fault, Dear

Brutus, is«tiot in our stars, but in our­

selves that we are underlings."

If it be true that you young people

will to a great extent make your lives

what they become, then you have a

right to some suggestions from older

people who have made their mistakes

and wish to help you.

My mother tried to teach me never

to cry over spilt milk—not to look

back—but I have had many regrets

over wasted time and ooor decisions.

Place To Work

First. Get the right place to work.

You should think hard on what kind

of a place you will work in. I have

heard that President Wilson advised

a place of 15,000 people. Some of you

may stay in Putnam Valley because

you feel you ought to. Some mav stay

here because you like country life.

Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln developed in a

very small community, Salem.' Ham­

ilton Wright Mable. assistant editor

of The Librarv of the World's Best

Literature, spoke at New Haven many

vears ago. I can't^ remember his sub­

ject but I think it was "Abraham Lin­

coln." He said one reason Mr. Lin­

coln • succeeded was that he knew

thoroughlv every community he lived

in. He knew Salem. Illinois He knew

Sorinefleld, Illinois, when he lived

there. He widened his area when he

went to Congress but knew Washing­

ton well.

Think weft on where you will work.

Then go to work and avoid the coun­

try vice of chatting long on the street,

in your offices, or in your stores.

Don't chat on the 'phone.

' Mr. Vreeland's Advice

Next. You all have chances for

leading satisfactory lives. Mv cousin,

by marriaee, was Herbert H. Vree-

land. He rose from lower •oosltlons to

become the president of what is now

the Putnam Division of the New York

Central: Later at an early aee he be­

came president of the Metropolitan

Street Railway in New York. In

Pearson's Magazine he is quoted as

saying. "To win success in life a young

man should select congenial employ­

ment and work hard at it; be honest,

regular, and punctual: do a little more

work for his' emolover that he has

a creed to: not open his lips too often,

but his eyes and ears keep always onen

to their utmost. It does not require

exceptional genius to achieve success.

Nature give* evervone-^11 the genius

necessarv. The reason for so many

failures is that those aspirants to suc­

cess have not been sufficiently per­

sistent."

So try to pick out work you like and

keep at it.

Change In Work

If you work hard and learn to grasp

facts in one line vou can no doubt

more easilv zrasp facts in another line

you may chanae to. Mr. Vreeland told

me of a man who had risen to be a

street railway superintendent. This

man became so interested in his son's

medical Kindles that he "Himself took

no medicine and became a prominent

Washineton nhvslclan.

Detail Work

Next. Do not be afraid of detail.

In law. "banking, business, railroading

or medicine, vou must handle drv de­

tails, must, have some drudgery. I Be­

lieve in Latin and mathematics be­

cause you mind is on detail in those

subjects and they make hard brain

work. Latin is so helpful too in mak­

ing us. understand English words.

"Caolo" meanine "I take." makes us

understand "capture." "Manus." Lat­

in for "hand", makes us understand

(Continued on Page 4)

TI'NNEY PLIES FROM ARMONK

Gene Tunney. former world heavy

weight chamoion. and former director

of physical training activities for the

U. S. Navv. flew from th*» Westchester

Airport in Armonk. N. Y. last week.

His destination was Southampton. L.

I., where he was scheduled to play

in a golf tournament. The plane was

a New Stinson. four passenger air­

plane and the pilot was Howard Mat-

teson. chief pilot at the airport and

well known in the county.

Mr. Tunnev uses the charter planes

regularly and finds the service a great

time saver, especially to points where

airline connections are poor.

Lecturer To Talk On

Modern American Art

The Brewster Woman's Club again

offers the public another interesting

evening's entertainment. So mark

your calendars for Thursday evening,

July 10th at 8 p.m. at Brewster High

School. At that time Mr. A. L. Cha-

nin, an American painter and lecturer

on the staff of the Museum of Modern

Art, will speak.

Mr. Chanin attended the Barnes

Foundation in Merlon, Penn. for seven

years. In 1934, he received a fellow­

ship from that Foundation to study

the collections of the major museums

in Europe. Since his discharge from

the Army, he has been connected with

the Museum of Modern Art.

The program will consist of a lec­

ture on Modern American Painting

accompanied by slides.

Mrs. J. Wellington Truran, program

chairman, has made arrangements for

this most • interesting event and Mrs.

Paul Freeman is chairman in charge

of this meeting.

o

Chevrolet Displays

New Model Trucks

Featuring the cab that "breathes,"

the new Advance-Design line of Chev­

rolet cars and trucks is on display to­

day at the Brady-Stannard Motor Co.,

inc.. Brewster, N. Y.

"Chevrolet is the largest producer

of trucks in the world," D. E. Stan-

nard of Brady-Stannard Motor Co.,

Inc., declared, "and its new line is

undoubtedly the finest in the history

of the company. We cordially invite

truck owners, fleet operators and

others interested in trucks to view the

exhibit in our showrooms."

Produced in a wide variety of mod­

els to accomodate practically every

hauling job, the Advance-Design line

of vehicles is manufactured in nine

wheelbases with gross vehicle weights

(combine weight of the chassis, body

and load) ranging from 4,000 to 16,000

pounds.

"Each model in the diversified line

has been precision-engineered for a

specific load rating, u%h. all compon­

ent parts designed for the work load

and to provide the utmost in safe,

comfortable, low-cost transportation."

Re-styled, the Advance-Design ser­

ies are unusually attractive in appear­

ance and provide more room, more

comfortable seats and other improve­

ments for the comfort and conven­

ience of the "man behind the wheel."

Chief of these is the ' cab that

"breathes," in which a new ventilat­

ing system circulates fresh air in the

cab and keeps windshield and windows

free of fog.

Completely welded, instead of bolt­

ed, the new cab is much stronger, and

its doors have an inner and outer seal.

Increased driver comfort is also ac­

complished through the new three-

point type of cab mounting—two body

tension and shear mountings in the

front, and one shackle mounting In

the rear center.

"Windshield and side and re win­

dows in the cab provide greater vision.

Instrument controls are re-styled and

rearranged for improved driver con­

venience," Mr. Stannard said. "A new

dome light is another cab feature.

"In general, the improvements of the

truck cab have been included in the

panel model trucks. Bodies are wider

and load space has been increased 13

per cent. All pick-up bodies are now

50 inches wide. Stake models now

have more convenient load space,

achieved through making the front

corners of the body square'instead of

rounded."

Light and medium-duty trucks with

gross vehicle weights ranging from

4.000 to 8,800 pounds are powered by

the dependable Chevrolet Thrift-Mas­

ter engine, while the equally high re­

garded Chevrolet Load-Master engine

is used in heavy-duty units with gross

vehicles weights up to the 16.000-

pound classification.

Chevrolet's famous full-floating hy-

pold-gear rear axle provides a wide

variety of capacities, and rugged dur­

ability. Vacuum power brakes are pro­

vided on all heavy-dutv models and

som*» medium-duty units.

"We predict that the new trucks

will be enthusiastically welcomed and

endorsed by truck drivers and truck

owners," Mr. Stannard said, "and are

confident that the line establishes new

standards for the trucking industry."

o

Grimes Co. Sells

Salem Center Colonial

Vesper Service For

Old Southeast Church

Historic Edifice in Doanesburg Will Be

Open for Special Services, July 13

To September 14. Community Or­

ganizations to Assist Programs with

"Accent on Youth."

Rev. W. Dyer Blair of Brewster

Presbyterian Church, with the support

of The Westchester Presbytery's ef­

forts for Rural Church Extension Pro­

grams, has been engaged in a busy two

months of shepherding a committee

toward organizing Vesper Service Pro­

grams at Southeast Church in Doanes­

burg, for eight summer Sundays this

season, July 13 through Sept. 14.

To stimulate the most ' gratifying

participation, those engaged in out­

lining the programs are attempting to

co-ordinate the non-secterlan religious

messages of the Vesper Services with

the most significently constructive

community endeavors.

So that our younger citizens obtain

the greatest advantages from the

chedule, "Accent on Youth** win be

the chief motif. Major clubs and fra­

ternal organizations are being invited

to participate; one organization at

each service, in offering special fea­

tures which will promote enjoyment

and interest for members of all groups

in the community — young and ma­

ture.

A Little accomplished by All should

continue our revered and "oldest com­

munity Shrine," Southeast Church, on

its long and- richly deserved destiny

of spiritual inspiration.

The words of Macauley might af­

ford a beckoning signal for all inhab-

bulldlng amid our lovely "Hills o'

Home",—"The real security of Chris­

tianity is to be found in its benevo­

lent morality; in its exquisite adap­

tion to the human heart in the

facility with which it accomodates it­

self to the capacity of every human

intelect ..."

Those who are interesting them­

selves in the organization of the Ves­

pers Programs have sought a key fash­

ioned somewhat in the above design

in order that the entire community

may join in ading to open the portals

that veil, during these days of read­

justment from war and destruction,

our bounteous blessings of true peace

and security. The lock, perhaps, bears

the- label "Good Neighbor Policies."

— o

"Facul Tea

At JRubymede

The authentic old Colonial owned by

Stanley Hayter at Salem Center has

been sold to Martin Koski, of New

York City. The house is one of the

oldest in Northern Westchester and is

situated next to the Town Hall in Sal­

em Center. Mr. Koski will further

remodel the old homestead and out­

buildings and will occupy it as a year-

round residence.

Thomas C. Grimes Co.. Bedford Vil­

lage, was the broker who sold the

1 property for the owner.

Despite the rigors of a lustv sum­

mer down-pour, with charteristlc per­

severance and courage, the members

of the faculty of Brewster school con­

tinued steadfastly on their way to the

"Facul Tea" given in their honor at

Rubymede, home of Mr. and Mrs.

Thomas L. Briggs, Friday afternoon,

June 20th.

The Garden party plan having been

rained out, the scene was chanced to

an indoor gathering around an an­

cient fireplace where a snapoing fire

proved not unwelcome on such a day.

Tea was poured by Mrs. Alexander

Addis, president of The Woman's Club

and member of the School Board who

most graciously represented both or­

ganizations.

Miss Rose Mary Lally, recently ap­

pointed head swimming counselor at

Peach Lake Day Camp for the forth­

coming season, efficiently presided as

co-hostess.

An interesting incident came about

by the discovery that one of the fac­

ulty members, Mrs. Florence Lord, was

born in a first floor room of the house

where the gathering took place.

A few members of the faculty, main­

ly those whose homes are out-of-

town, were obliged to leave before the

date of the tea but the following rep­

resentative group attended: Miss Ga-

brielle Blocklev. Miss Anna M. Crane,

Mr. and Mrs. Herman H. Donley, Mrs.

OU.A\ 'uupjgum jndiuure uu 'sppoa

zella. Mrs. Volhborg Duffy. Mrs. Eva-

Ivn J. Faean, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon

Furnis*. Miss Kdith Harwood, Mr. and

Mrs. Harold Knapo, Mrs. Florence

Lord. Miss Grace Lazarus. Mrs. Ber-

nice McCarthy. Mr. and Mrs. Donald

McLagan, Miss Jane Meldrum, Mr.

and Mrs. Stephen Merrltt. Mrs. Flon

Miller, Mrs. Eva Owens, Mrs. Miriam

R. Owens. Mrs. Vera Owens, Mrs. Kay

Pugsley, Miss Muriel Pinckney. Mr*

Katherine Ronan, Mrs. Vera Ron an

Mr. Kenneth L. Richards and Mr.

Walter T. Reid, Jr.

ENGAGED

Jack Markel Wins

Regis Scholarship

Jack Edward Markel, son of Mr. and

Mrs. Edward Markel, of All View Ave­

nue, Brewster, N. Y., won a four year

scholarship at Regis High School, New

York City. Jack graduated in the

eighth grade class of St. Lawrence

Parochial School June 22, 1947. He

took the examination for entrance to

Regis and rated the high standing

that merited the four year scholarship.

Regis stands at the top of high

schools in the United States and this

fact supports the natural pride of the

teachers at St. Lawrence, the parents

and friends of Jack in his capability.

He will enter Regis in September.

Brewster Central

Stndent Honor Roll

Teachers Association Lists Grade' Pu­

pils of High Honor and Second

Honor Rolls.

Davis—Reid

Mr. and Mrs. George Davis, of 24

Carmel Avenue. Brewster. N. Y.. an­

nounce the engP2ement of their

daughter. Lois Lucille, to Mr. Thomas

Reid, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harl«nH

Reid. of Dutcher Avenue. Pawling.

New York.

The Thomas C. Grimes Co. has sold

for Mrs. Lucy A. Meade her residence

I property on the Croton Falls-Mahopac

I Road. Mrs. Meads is leaving soon to

live ia Chicago. The new owners. Mr.

and Mrs. Robert Palmateer, formerly

of Syracuse. N. Y., will take possession

early in July.

MIDGET RACE STARS

Spicing the eight events at Danbury

Speedway Saturday will be such col­

orful pilots as Dee Toran, Al Keller

Art Cross. Len Wofsev. Len Duncan.

Llovd Christopher. Johnny Zeke and

Bud Tatro. A 25 lap feature will high­

light the night's show with the even­

ing's first race slated to get under way

at 8:30 p.m.

o • •

It takes a great deal of grace to be

able to bear praise. Censure seldom

does us much harm.—Spurgeon

The Brewster High School Teach­

ers' Association, at a recent meeting,

inaugurated what is to be known as

the High School and Grammar School

Brewster High School Honor Roll.

This honor roll is to be made up four

times, or at the end of each quarter,

during the year. First and second

honor rolls will be published. The first

honor roll will Include the names of

pupils whose average standing for the

quarter is 90 per cent and above. The

second honor roll will be~ those pupils

whose average is between 80 and 90.

Because of lack of time the commit­

tee found it inadvisable to publish the

high school honor roll for. this year,

but the grade school honor rolls have

been prepared and are herewith pre­

sented.. Beginning next Fall both

grade and high school honor rolls will

be collected and presented to the pub­

lic. It is hoped that the recognition

of scholarship will stimulate many

students to better school work and

more serious application to their

studies.

High Honor Roll

(90 - 100)

Robert Williams. John Ravbeck,

Vincent Genovese, Mary Jane Bloom­

er. Marilvn Knapp. Janet Brewer,

Donald Millar, Marion J ah arias. Dean

Smalley, James Truran,..Philip Blaney,

Frank McDonald, John Anderson.

Richard Folchetti, Daniel Force, Jas.

Fulling, George Gallagher, John Lew-

jis, Frederic Loomis, Eugene Tebordo,

Marlere Bnilev, Evelyn Brown. Rob­

ert Bruschini, Alma Christensen,

Theodore Dlmon. John Gilbert!. Phyl­

lis Gardinier. Elsa Holze, Kenneth

Gross.

Also, Donald Hauenstein, Stratton

Kane, Elizabeth LaCondi, Betty

Louchs, Faith Snow, Brenda Truran,

Marjorie Tetro, Edward Conroy, Man-

ley Makenny, Daniel Moore, Richard

Ross, Renee Ackler. Gail Adams, Pa­

tricia McMeekin, Beverly Taylor, Gail

VanScoy, Barbara Ferris. Linnia Gun-

narson, James Healy. Wilkin Mead,

Sandra Millar, Robert Pigat, Warren

Radler, Marilyn Robinson, Melissa

Smith, Anita Snldero, Anne Mae Snl-

dero, Thomas Timms. jj?

Also, Dopald Selfert, William Walsh,

Georgia Freeman. Margaret Ronan,

Lillian Taylor, Kenneth Eastwood,

Peter .Kane, Bill Lewis, Ellen Nielson,

Dorothy Petersen, Joan Ruffles, Ken­

neth Shuker. David Smith, Mary

Storms, Justin Tavino, Rose Tavino,

Margaret Tuttle, Faith Vanderburgh,

Jeanette Vassak, Clara Willis, Joan

Zeechin. Betsey Cregar, Janet Galla­

gher, Lydia Halle, Polly Hancock,

Robert Millar, Robert Zecher. Joan

Mattioli, Jacqueline McMeekin.

Second Honor Roll

(80 - 90)

Doris Walsh, Helen Gallagner, David

Smith, Virginia Eastwood, Martha

Schutz. Kenneth Sterry, Maryann

Rassow, Mary Elizabeth Bettcher,

Theodore Jackson. Audrey Lobdell.

Susan Wernecke, Minnie Griffin. Rich­

ard Cable, Donald Mill, Carol Ann

Reid. Ralph Sherwood. Ronald Strand,

Roberta Strand, Roberta Roberts.

Ronald Michell, Richard Zeechin, Lar­

ry Folchetti. Robert Barrett, Ross

Beal. Charles Fowler.

Also. Thomas Fulling. Jds. Grand-

staff. Martin McNicholas. John Peter­

son, Daniel Schutz. Eileen Cable, An­

na B. Carlone. Carol Miller. Lucille

Willis. Joan Pezzulo. John Werneke,

Joseph Barese, James Durkin. John

Folchetti. Barbara Bailey. Elizabeth

Blair, Marcelle Genovese, Donald

Heinen, Donald Polverari. Wilbur

j Ernst. Leigh Blake. William Foster.

Richard Hunt, Betty Ingersoll.

Also. Nerissa Snow, Bertha Wil-

jliams, Barbara Buenger. Ralph Bur-

jdlck. Lester Eastwood, Robert Ernst.

Patricia Ford, Edward Grass. Cather­

ine Herdman, June Lois Kellenberger.

Alfonso Lotrecchiano. Robert Schnei­

der, Donald Stevens. Jacqueline Tay­

lor. Shirley Teborda. Betty Weizen-

ecker, Patricia Balfe, Marie Barese.

Dolores Casey. Robert Gabriel. Rob­

ert Hansen. James Innes. Donald

Ives. Orrln Penny. Edward Schneider.

Mary Dennison Wins Medal

WEDDED

Richards—Pinckney

Miss Muriel Pinckney, daughter of

Mr. and Mrs. Remington Pinckney, of

Brewster, N. Y„ and Mr. Kenneth Lee

Richards, son of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew

Sine, of Trenton, N. J., were married

at two o'clock Sunday afternoon, June

22, 1947 in the Brewster Baptist

Church. The ceremony was perform­

ed by the Rev. Harry P. Foulk In the

presence of a large company.

Decorations of white flowers and

foliage were used at the altar. Mr. E.

Clayton Hopkins played the wedding

march and Mr. Harold V. Blood, solo­

ist, sang "Ave Maria?' "Because*v and

"Thine Alone." ;

The bride was escorted by her fath­

er who gave her in marriage. She

wore a white floor-length gown of net

over faille, the bodice fashioned with

high neckline, yoke of net and three-

quarter length sleeves. Her veil was

fastened by a coronet of orange blos­

soms. She carried a nosegay of white'

roses, sweetpeas and baby's breath.

Her sister, Mrs. Raymond -Ward,

matron-of-honor, wore a floor-length

gown of pink dotted swiss with fish­

tail back and a sweetheart shaped hat

to match. She carried pink roses.

Miss Phyllis Gay Martin, brides­

maid, wore blue dotted swiss, and

Miss Jeanne Durkin, yellow dotted

swiss, similar to the costume of Mrs.

Ward. Their flowers were old-fash­

ioned nosegays.

Pfc. Frank P. Richards was best man

and the ushers, La Verne Pinckney agd

Edward Phelps, of Schenectady.

The bride's mother wore a Ughtblue

dress with white accessories and a

corsage of peach galadioli. The bride­

groom's mother wore a French bluoj

dress with pink accessories and a cor­

sage of pink gladioli.

A reception at Yeomanoak followed

the ceremony and a large company

enjoyed the hospitality Dr. and Mrs.

E. R. Richie prepared for the bridal

party. Mr. and Mrs. Richards went

on a -motor trip into Canada. The

bride wore a light blue gabardine suit

with white accessories. They will be

at home after Sept. 2 at Orchard

Drive, Peach Lake, Brewster, N. Y.

The bride, a graduate of Brewster

High School, has been secretary to

the principal, Mr. H. H. Donley, Mr.

Richards, teacher of commercial sub­

jects at Brewster school, is a graduate

of the State" College, for Teachers at

Trenton'. N. J. Djuring the war he flew

a B-29 from a base on Okinawa.

Otto—Halkh

Miss Marion Henrietta Haigh,

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Haigh

of All View Avenue, Brewster, N. Y..

and Mr. Cornelius Otto, Jr., son of

Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Otto, of

Poughkeepsie. N. Y. were married at

five o'clock Saturday afternoon, June

21, 1947 at the rectory of the Church

of St. Lawrence OToole. Brewster.

The ceremony was performed by the

Rev. John C. Lyons.

Miss Francis Haigh was maid-of-

honor for her sister, and Mr. Albert

Cerille, of Poughkeepsie. was best man.

The bride wore an off-white suit of

gabardine with white accessories and

a corsage of white tea roses. Frances

Haigh wore a light blue suit with

white accessories and a corsge of pink

tea roses.

A reception followed at the home of

the bride. The guests were of Brew­

ster, Poughkeepsie, Hyde Park and

Yonkers. Mr. and Mrs. Otto, left on

a wedding trip to Washington, D. C.

The bride's going away costume was

a flowered silk dress and a grey ton-

coat. They will be at home after July

S at 81 Cannon Street. Poughkeepsie.

Mrs. Otto, a graduate of St. Law­

rence school and, Brewster High

School, is a graduate registered nurse

of St. Francis School of Nursing.

Poughkeepsie. She is employed in her

profession with the DeLevay Com­

pany, Poughkeepsie.

Mr. Otto was educated at Rochester

High School and Rochester Univer­

sity. He served four vears in the U.

S. Marine Corps. He is also emDlnved

in the DeLaval firm. Poughkeepsie.

o

Eighth Grade Graduates

At St. Lawrence School

Mary Dennison, of North Brewster,

graduated Sunday, June 22, from the

eighth grade of St. Lawrence School.

She was the winner of the medals for

Excellence and Religion. The twelve

year old student expects to enter St.

Mary's High School. Katonah, N. Y..

this Fall.

Pedestrians should be seen and not

hurt.—The Dummy.

Exercises of the Eighth Grade of St.

T awrence school were held at S o'clock

Sunday afternoon in th» Church of

S*. Iflwrence OToole where a large

attendance indicated the deeo inter­

est of parents and friends of the grad­

uates.

The students who received dio)o«n*Js

from Father Joseph A. Heaney were:

Dorothv Babon. Marv Dennison. John

Folchetti, Ann Fox, Gregory Fox. Mary

Jane Gavaehan. Marv Glowney. Helen

Haieh. William Maile. John Edward

Markel. William Morey. Marlene Mur­

phy. Kathleen Osnoe. Joseph Palmer.

William Peterson. Christine Rooney.

Dorothy Schlump and Claire Sharkey.

The clasp entered to the procession­

al hvmn. "Praise Ye the Father."

Father Heaney made the address and

presented the diplomas and honor

awards.

Mary Dennison won medals for Ex­

cellence and Religion: Dorothv

Schlump. the Excellence Medal. Marv

Glowney and Jack Markel received

certificates for blah standing in the

Cardinal Hayes Memorial examina­

tion. Announcement was made of the

award to Jack Edward Markel of a

four vear scholarshio in Regis High

School. New York City.

The singing of "Ave Maria" ©reced­

ed the Benediction of the Blessed

Sacrament "The Star Soannled Ban­

ner" brought the exercises to a close.

Junion Drivers

Attract Attention

Police and traffic officers have, been

alerted to check the night driving of

Junior motorists. It's no surprise

Brewster was a port of call for the

authorities for juniors get • around

here ^t all hours. What with day­

light saving, beach parties and the

hunger that follows a swim not to

mention the dance spots the Juniors

are apt to disregard the passing of

time.

This tip goes for parents fas well as

for the youngsters, it's a nice break,

for offenders.

——o —

New Shoe Salon

Opens In Brewster

Xe Mar Footwear, Located in the

Richie BIdg. Offers First Class Lines

Of Shoes ' for Men, Women' and

Children.

Mr. J*. ,W. Speg, owner-manager of

the Le May Footwear, announces in

this issue the opening of a modern

shoe salon for the needs of the en­

tire family at 4 North Main St., Brew­

ster, N. Y.

The salon will feature Physical Cul­

ture shoes, manufactured by the Sel-

by Shoe Co., of Portsmouth, Ohio, one

of the leaders in the women's field.

The Physical Culture line of women

shoes handled at this salon are of the

newest and latest designs and the

styles for the Summer in sports, dress

and general walking oxfords, are oT

the finest material available. Women

and high school girls will find these

shoes most attractive.

The men's line is outstanding for

this section, featuring the Bostonian

shoes. The workmanship and mater­

ials in this line is the best obtainable.

Manufactured by one of the oldest

men's manufacturing concerns in New

England. Sturdy, well built shoes for

every day and formal wear up to the

minute dress shoes for evening, cas­

ual and sport wear are available.

The boy's line of shoes, made by the

same company, are called the Boston­

ian Juniors. These boy's shoes are of

exceptionally good rugged construc­

tion, embodying all the features of

stvle and class.

Mr. Speg has a number of years of

experience in shot fitting and is well

qualified for properly fitting men's wo­

men's and children's shoes. He has an

honorable discharge from the XT. S.

Navy having served during World War

II. He is married and expects to lo­

cate with his family in Brewster, N.

Y., in the very near future.

o

Rotary To Dine At

Gallagher's Homestead

Monday night at 7 o'clock Brewster

Rotary Club will hold Ladies Night

with a dinner and dance in Galla­

gher's Old Homestead, in the village

of Brewster. The restaurant will be

devoted solely to this affair and will

be closed all day until the Rotarians

and guests arrive.

Raymond Knoeppel. past district

governor and past president of the

New York Rotary, is expected to act

as master of ceremonies. The new

staff of officers, headed by Carl Amend

of DeForest Corners, president, will be

installed.

Rex Stout will be granted honorary

membership in Brewster Rotary Club

because of his inability to attend all

meetings.

Charles T. Wilson, Jr., of the Put-

nsm County Press, addressed the

meeting on advertising. Charlie is a

member of Kiwanis. and a World War

Two Naval officer who served on the

Atlantic and on the Pacific.

Some Figures On

Red Cross Service

In Putnam Countv tOjjft cent of the

1850 World War Ily^ervicemen and

women, or their famines, have received

assistance from the Putnam Countv

Chapter of the American Red Cross,

Mrs. Ralph Smith. Home Service

chairman, announced today.

A check of individual case records

dating back to.September 1940, when

the Selective Service Act went into

effect, revealed this percentage of

Red Cross service to veterans and

servicemen, Mrs Smith said. The to­

tal number of cases handled from

September 1940, to d8te is 1095. Mrs.

Smith pointed out that this figure

does not tell the whole storv sin-p

each instance of aid to an individual

serviceman or his dependants is list­

ed under the same case number, al­

though many were aided by the Put­

nam County Chapter on more than

one occasion.

"During the war. we often had as

many as 135 cases open a month."

Mrs. Smith said. "These included re­

quests for emergency furloughs, health

and welfare reports and requests for

financial or budgeting assistance' to

tide applicants over until allotment

checks started coming in.

o——

WINS MEDICAL SCHOLARSHIP

38 BHS Graduates

. Receive Diplomas

Doane C. Comstock, President of the

Board of Education, Awards High

School Diplomas to the Class of

1947, Presented by Principal Donley.

Brewster High School accommodat­

ed a large crowd at the commence­

ment exercises of the class of 1947

Tuesday. A heavy downpour of rain

was in progress as the people gathered

and all were well served by police

and firemen in rubber coats who as­

sisted passengers to leave cars and

drivers to park. Within all was gay.

Red and white streamers decorated

the hall and foliage and roses the

platform where the thirty-eight mem­

bers of the class were seated.

Among this number several had al­

ready made notable records:

James Terwilliger put in his fresh­

man and senior years in BHS class­

rooms; the years between in service

with the Navy.

John A. Schlump, who may win a

state scholarship, received the Wo­

man's Club award of $100 for excel­

lence in scholastic pursuits as well as

character and service to the school,

also the Rotary Club student loan.

Gladys Johnson, also considered

among applicants for state scholarship,

won the Teachers Association prize for

best all around girl student.

Arthur E. Hansen Won the boy's

prize awarded by the Teachers Assoc­

iation for outstanding performance.

Marjorie Howell won the $10.00 prize

given by the Cecillan Society for her

ability in music, also the Good Citi­

zenship award of the Daughters of the

American Revolution.

The theme "Our School," developed

by the spokesman of a panel, sought

questions from the audience, and pro­

duced comment by Mr H. H. Wells

which was ably answered by Gladys

Johnson. It seemed there are as many

views on the educational process as

students, to each his own.

1947 CLASS ROLL

Henrv Bechen has been awarded a

nine month $1000 scholarship at Co­

lumbia University Medical College in

New York. He will be engaged in

Health Department work this sum-'

mex.

College Entrance

DAVID P. BRUEN

JAMES H. DURKIN

VIRGINIA T. DURKIN

GLADYS VICTORIA JOHNSON

FRANK J. McQUAID

GERARD F. MURPHY

JOHN/ A. SCHLUMP

RICHARD E. SHALVOY

Commercial

MADELYN B. DENNISON

GENEVA FRANCES ERICKSON

ARTHUR E. HANSEN

VELMA HAZEL HYNARD

MARGARET ELIZABETH PERLINI

ANNE LILLIAN ROBERTS

MARY CATHERINE SNIDERO

THERESA ALICE SNIDERO

BETTY JANE TILFORD

Homemaklng

MARY ANNE BRADY

Academic

•ROBERT C. BAXTER

FRANCES M. BUCKO

ROSARIA ANN CARLONE

•GEORGE ALFRED DAVIS

LOIS LUCILLE DAVIS

WILLIAM J. FARRELL

PROVIDENCE C. GILARDI

MURIEL E. HEINCHON

MARJORIE LOUISE HOWELL

LETIZIA ANN LOTRECCHIANO

PHYLLIS ANNE MERRITT

WILLIAM JOSEPH. NEWMAN

FRED PETER PERLINI

•GERTRUDE JANE STERRY

JAMES TERWILLIGER

•RICHARD J. TROHA

DAVID F. WALSH

WILLIAM J. WIEGERT I

General

CHARLES M. BAROLA

MARIE DESTINO

0

GIRL TO THE RECHENS

Lieut, and Mrs. Behrend Rechen.

US.N., 2092 Merrimac Avenue, Savan­

nah Gardens, Long Beach, Calif, an­

nounce the birth of a daughter, Carol

Cole Rechen, on June 15, 1947. They

have one older child, Nancy Louise.

Lieut. Rechen is temporarily as­

signed to extra duty on Radio at Ter­

minal Island, San Francisco.

• o

SON TO THE HOWLEYS

Mr. and Mrs. James Howley. of

Brewster, N. Y., are receiving con­

gratulations on the birth of a son.

Gary William, in Danburv Hospital.

I Saturday. June 21. 1947. He weighed

in at 6 lbs.. 6 ozs. He is the brother

of Deborah Ann and James, Jr., who

are spending some time with their

grandparents. Mr. and Mrs. Prank

Darlin. on Prospect Street.

• — - o

DAVID WATERS ARRIVES

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard J. Waters, of

Prospect Street. Brewster. N. Y* wel­

comed the arrival of their first born,

a son. David Bernard, in White Plains

Hospital, on Monday. June 23. 1947

He weighed 0 lbs.. 14 ozs.

Mrs. Waters, the former Katherine

Hubbard, of Coxsackie. H Y. and the

boy are both very well. Mr. Waters,

manager of the First National Super

Market, of Brewster, is receiving con­

gratulations from a host ol friends.


PAGE TWO THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY. UVNE 26, 1947

iiimuiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiinwn

I Happenings of Yester Year

•onmttwiiinmiiiiinnniiiiiiiiminiiMMmiioiiiiiiMiiui inanninmnnniimimmniinmiiiaiinniiiffluiiuiiMmu MiiiLMMfHiinuiimiiiiiHUiiiniMMLjmwiinuuuuninntaiimiiniTic

ninomiiiiniiinmiiH

WWBfflt TEARS AGO—1«W THIRTY YEARS AGO—1917

Mr. and Mrs. T. Reed Vreeland announce

the birth of a son at Danbury

Hospital June 24.

Mrs. B. O. Nichols has returned from

a New York hospital after an operation

for the removal of tonsils.

The dates for the big fair to be given

under the auspices of Brewster

Firemen are Aug. 10, 11, 12, IS.

Mr. and Mrs. P. L, Shelp are motoring

to New Mllford, Pa., to spend the

week end with the Shelp family.

On Saturday the property known as

Sodom School was sold at public auction.

The purchaser was Mrs. Philip

Beal at the bid of $3425.00.

The Basset Hounds of Starr Ridge

Kennels made an excellent showing at

Ridgewood dog show on Saturday, Mr.

Tefft's Runt taking three firsts.

Hon. William P. Bleailey will deliver

an address at the corner stone

laying of the North Salem Junior and

Senior High School to be built at

Purdys. The ceremony will take place

on July 9th at 3:30 p.m.'

The County Memorial Building will

be dedicated July 2 at Carmel. Clayton

Ryder win speak at the unveiling

of memorial tablets. H. H. Wells and

CoL N. K. Averlll will receive veterans

and their relatives. The West Point

Band will give a concert. Formal

dedication services will take place on

Sunday evening.

Mrs. James K. Smith is entertaining

Mrs. Gerow, her sister, of Springfield,

Mass.

Mrs. H. H. Wells and children are

at their camp on Mt. Riga for the

summer.

Mr. and Mrs. Philip D. Hoyt and

children will spend two weeks with

Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Budd.

Miss Elizabeth F. Morgan is visiting

Mrs. Wieller in Richmond, Ind.

She will return to her office July 5.

Mr. and Mrs. Chester A. Barber entertained

on June 28th with a dinner

in honor of the fifth wedding anniversary

of Mr. and Mrs. Seeley vA.

El ting.

On July 4th the Ryder homestead at

Peach Lake will be the scene of the

40th anniversary of the descendants

of -Capt. James H. Ryder, the distinguished

Revolutionary hero who organized

the fighting forces of Putnam

County.

Mrs. Mary Brandriss Lukins, widow

of the late Alfred T. Lukens. died on

June 30, at the home of her daughter,

Mrs. Wallace Hopkins. Mr. Lukins

died in 1918 and Miss Clara Lukins,

a daughter, died in 1919. The

surviving members of the family are

Miss Grace Lukins. Edward Lukins

and Mrs. Wallace Hopkins. Interment

will be at Fort Wayne, Ind.

The date for tne M. H. G. clambake

at the milk factory will be on July 18.

Rev. Thomas Bond, of New York

City, will preach in the Methodist

Church next Sunday.

Dr. John B. Merritt will resume his

practice in dentistry- in Brewster and

Carmel after his recovery from illness.

The Trustees of the Putnam County

Savings Bank have declared a dividend

at the rate of 4 per cent per annum.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wells attended

the annual convention of the Banker's

Association held at Hotel Champlain

and Adirondack resorts. They also

visited the Plattsburg camp.

At the Heartfleld farm, Milltown,

Auctioneer Towner will sell 100 acres

of standing grass for C. E. Scheuber

on July 3rd. See ad and bills.

Mrs. Anna Vail is recovering from

an operation performed at Danbury

Hospital. '

* •—^—^~

A strawberry festival was held with

Mrs. George B. Griffeth in Ludlngtonville

on Thursday' for the benefit of

the Red Cross.

The Brewster High School graduates

were entertained at the Casino on

Friday evening with a dance under the

auspices of the Alumni Association.

First Sergeant H. H. Vreeland, Jr.,

Howard E. Foster, Jr., of White Plains,

and Joseph Morschauser, Jr., of

Poughkeepsie, having passed the

"weeding out" period look good to win

commissions at Plattsburg camp.

FORTY YEARS AGO—1907

Dr. William A. Granger, of Mount

Vernon, left on Wednesday for a two

months tour of Europe.

Miss M. Mary Grady graduated from

Packard's Commercial School "on Friday.

Captain James Wells Finch has

reoched Paris on his European tour

which will be rather brief.

Fairview. the home of Mr. and Mrs.

Edward H. Hatch, Jr., has been sold

to Mr. Henry Ives Cobb, of New York.

Professor Howard Butler sailed for

London and Constantinople on Wednesday.

He will have an Important

work published on the Princeton Ex­

pedition to Syria of which he is the

leader.

Mrs. Margaret Strang Brewster, widow

of Frederick G. Brewster, died on

Wednesday in the 88th year of her

age. Funeral service will be held at

her late home where she had resided

the 62 years of her married life,

o :

Teacher tourist: "This seems to be

a very dangerous precipice. It's a

wonder they don't put up a warning

sign."

Native: "Yes, it is dangerous, bu£

they kept a warning sign up for two

years and no one fell over, so they

took it down."—Phoney Phun.

Ten new Daughters of Isabella were

initiated and given a banquet at the

Southeast House last Sunday.

Susan Emily Tuttle celebrated her

fifth birthday on Wednesday, June 28.

Twenty members of the younger set

were seated at tyftte when the birthday

cake was lighted and the ice cream

served. .

Martin Mygan died on June 28 at

Mr. Herbert Samuel Bell and Miss

Danbury Hospital aged 47 years. He

Alice May Maher were married at St.

is survived by his wife, the former

Andrew's Church on Saturday by the

Dora Brady and six children. Funeral

Rev. James L. Lasher. The maid of

service was held at St.- Lawrence

honor was Miss Irene Bell, of New

Church on Friday.

Putnam County Chapter of the Red York. The bridesmaids were the Misses

Cross has raised $1600 for the war Marion and Emma Maher, Miss Julia

Mrs. Albert Mead died on June, 30 fund. This amount will be increased Taylor and Miss Esther Scott. The

at Sidney, N< Y. She was the former when extra dividends declared by cer­ best man was J. T. S. Klngsman, of

Bertha Erickson and her age was 40 tain corporations to benefit the Red Newark, N. J. After a large reception

years. Funeral service was at the Cross will be turned over to Mr. Geo. at the home of the bride Mr. and Mrs.

home of Mrs. Charles Erickson on Reynolds, treasurer of the County Bell left on a tour of the Adirondacks.

Saturday. Interment was at Milltown Chapter.

Rural Cemetery.

TREE EXPERTS

W. C. RUFFLES

"The Scientific Tree Service"

POWER SPRAYING

Pruning • Bracing

Cavity Feeding

Woodland Adaptation

Orchard Culture • Grating

Grab Proofing

TEL. BREWSTER 421

17 Yean of Consecutive Tree

Sacrioe in Pmtnam and

Adjacent Counties

TOPS

FOR

HOME CANNING

ZINC CAPS!

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BRADY-STANNARD MOTOR COMPANY, Inc.

90 North Main St Phone 2180 Brewster, N.Y.


THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1947 THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED 1869 PAGE THREE

g>00 POOOOP0OOOOO»»OOOOOOOO6»

SPORT OF THE WEEK

Top Trotters Enter

Grand Circuit Races

Goshen's Historic Track Will Welcome

Record Crowds at 5-Day Meet, June

30—July 4.

A new Historic Track will greet the

Grand Circuit Cavalcade at Goshen

Monday when a five-day meeting gets

underway at the half-mile oval.

With $72,000 offered in purses, the

five-day meeting is expected to attract

the target crowd in years. The E. M.

Smith Starting Gate arrived Tuesday

and was installed at Historic Track.

tJsed for the first time in the East at

Historic, the E. M. Smith Starting

Gate is certain to assure proper starting.

Miss Gladys Goodding. the soncbird

and organist of Madison Square Oarden

and Ebbets Field, will play dally

at the console of the new Hammond

organ.

Two $10,000 stake races are certain

to provide fans with the best in racing.

The trotting Club Oaks, scheduled

for Monday, will serve as preview

to the Hambletonian. It is an event,

for three-year-old trotting fillies.

Then there's the Tltan-Free-Por-

All featurlne Algiers and Walter

Spencer. Algiers barely nosed out

Walter Spencer in the $50,000 Golden

Gate Classic at Hollywood. This will

be their second meeting of the year

and railbirds are showing plenty of

interest in Walter Spencer.

Rodney, one of the top favorites for

the 1947 Hambletonian, will no to the

post In the Historic on Friday, an

event worth $5,000 for three-vear-old

trotters. This alone will provide a fine

preview of the 1947 Hambletonian race.

kEverv dav is a big dav at Historic

"where vou will see the finest in racing

and pacing. Post time 2 p.m. daily.

Officials

The officials named for the Grand

Circuit Trottlne Meeting are as follows:

Members of th* New York Stnte

Haro oc « laclwr Commission• B«»ni*»mln

W. Downing, chairman, Mflnh*>sset.

N. Y.: John F. Williams. Recretarv,

Albarv. N. Y.: Roscoe C. Holmes. Orchard

Perk. N. Y.: Henry M. James,

Hudson, N. Y.

Stewart representing Racing Commission:

Dr. J. D. Pierce, Springfield,

Mass.

Associate Judges: Stuart McLean,

Hambure. N. Y.: jOeorge Snyder, Troy,

N. Y.

Starter: Dr. A. C. Goff{ Ithaca. N.Y.

Timers: Robert Hoeffner, Montgomery.

N. Y.: Geo. Walsh, Goshen, N.Y.;

Peter Mitchell, Middletown. N. Y.

Clerk of the Course: John Gahagan,

Goshen. N. Y.

Announcer: Richard McCarthy.

Kingston. N. Y.

Track Veterinarian: Dr. J. F. Kane,

Goshen. N. Y.,

Supervisor of Saliva Tests for State

Racing Com.: Dr. H. B. RIsley. Brooklyn.

N. Y.

Track Suot.: Joseph McFadden.

Goshen. N. Y.

Paddock Judge: Harold S. Miller,

Goshen. N. Y.

Mutual Manager: Walter Johnson,

Baltimore. Md.

Marshal: Joan Chambers, Montgomery,

N. Y.

o

"So vou -want to try that proof-reader

lob, eh?"

"Yes. sir."

"And do you understand all the responsibilitv

attached to it?"

"Yes, sir, when you make a mistake,

I take all the blame."—Phoney Phun.

More than eight out of. every ten

New York residents live in a metropolitan

district.

Sick Veterans Need

Cards and Cigarettes

The chairman of Camps and Hospitals

for the North Salem-Somers

Branch of the American Red Cross,

Mrs. Jeffry Nichol, has stated there is

urgent need in veterans' hospitals for

playing cards and cigarettes. Anyone

wishing to contribute, please call Croton

Falls 667.

Bedford Playhouse

To Show "Henry T

The management of the Bedford

Playhouse is happy to announce that

it will present the first showing In this

vicinity of the Theatre Guild technicolor,

film hit "Henry V, H starring

Laurence Olivier. "Henry V" now plaving

a series of selected engagements

in a few key cities, will be shown in

Bedford Village, Tuesday, Wednesday

and Thursday, July 1st, 2nd and 3rd.

All seats will be reserved for this

widely heralded film, which will be

shown Wednesday matinee at 2:30 and

once each evening at 8 o'clock (feature

at 8:30).

The first film ever to be sponsored

by the Theater Guild, "Henry V" has

become the talk of the country as the

first successful translation of Shakespeare

into modern screen entertainment.

Set as a play, taking place on the

stage of the famed Globe Theatre In

Shakespearean England, circa 1600,

the photographed play is a stage performance

in celluoid until the camera

helps the mind to piece out imper-

VETERANS

IT'S

FLYING TIME

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for

SUMMER FLIGHT

TRAINING !


Private Pilot and

Instructor Courses


Ground School

Competent Instructors

Modern Planes

Danbury School

OF

Aeronautics, Inc.

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MUNICIPAL AIRPORT

DANBURY

TELEPHONE 5577

Have you ever tasted a

"SQUAB" Turkey?

V you haven't, you've a delightful epicurean experience

to look forward to and your guosfs will hag

remember rhe occasion.

These luscious Utile bird* are only eight week* old and

they're from one of the finest flocks in the East—Shagroy

Farm's Broad-Breasted Bronze Turkeys. They weigh about

a pound and a half each—dressed and drawn, with head,

feet, wings and akin removed—ready for the oven.

About ten days before we ready them for market we take

them off their growing mash (which is the stuff that really

pushes them along into the big, fat 15- to 20-pound turkeys

we hope you'll be ordering for Thanksgiving and Christmas),

and we feed them a concentrated diet of finely ground grain

and skimmed mttk. That's the "finishing touch," and it really

does the trick! It "plumps up" their rotund, little bodies and

adds just the right amount of fat to the tender, young flesh.

These Shooroy "SQUAB" Turkeys are sold only by the

brace (two birds), packed in cellophane with a recipe folder

enclosed, showing a few' of our favorite ways of cooking

them. One brace (two birds) will serve four people generously

and the price is $550 for the pair.

rsosfa "Baby" Turkeys—broilers —from 4 to 6 lbs. net weight,

dressed and drawn, all set for the broiler, $1.25 per lb.

Early Roasting Turkeys from 10 lbs. up, dressed and drawn,

ready to put in the oven, $.75 per lb.

INVITATION

If lime weigh* heavily this week-cod—and you're casting arooad

for f^wnt-thing to do—come over and see u» at Shagroy Fa

We'll do everythkng we can to make your visit cujoyablc.

SsacerWy,

MBS. AGNES HOSE

Shagroy Farm

Milierton, N. Y.

TeL Miiierton SS

Baseball

Katonah Indians and Westchester

Yankees continued their winning

strings Sunday in Putnam-Westchester

basball play. Behind Bob Ferguson's

regularly effective pitching Katonah

beat Croton Falls, 6-3, while

the Yanks whipped Chappaqua, 4-1.

The Danbury Lecos tripped the

Brewster, Bees, 5-1. At Bedford Hills,

Bud McGrath's two hit pitching carried

the home team to iwin over Carmel.

McGrath struck out eighteen.

Peeksklll Leelonnalres snapped their

losing streak by thumping Mt. Kisco,

9-6. At Somers, the Elephants fell to

Doug Reynold's shutout pitching for

the Mahopac Chiefs, 1-0.

League Standings

, W L Pet GB

Katonah 5 0 1,000 -

West. Yankees 4 0 1,000 %

Danbury 4 1 .800 1

Mt. Kisco 8 2 .600 2

Bedford Hills 3 2 .600 2

Mahopac 3 3 .500 2%

Croton Falls 3 3 £00 2%

Peeksklll i 2 3 .400 3

Chappaqua 1 4 .200 4 *

Carmel 1 4 .200 4

8omer8 1 4 .200 4

Brewster 0 4 .000 4H

Score: Wednesday, July 18th, twilight

contest, Croton Falls 4, Mahopac

0.

Scores Sunday, Jane 22nd .

Katonah 6, Croton Falls 3

West. Yankees 4, Chappaqua 1

Danbury 5, Brewster 1.

Bedford Hills 10, Carmel 3

Mahopac 1, Somers 0

Peeksklll 0, Mt. Kisco 6

Schedule Sunday, June 29

West. Yankees at Danbury

Chappaqua at Carmel

Bedford Hills at Katonah

Croton Falls at Mt. Kisco

Peeksklll at Somers

Brewster at Mahopac

iections and breaks o through the limitations

According of the to playing a recent platform Cornell surto

vey bring the to cheapest the screen method the of Invasion harvesting of

hay France, from the the exciting standpoint charge of total of cost the

is Knights the auto of buokrake. Aquicourt, the charming

love scenes between Henry and Princess

Kate.

2:2

Etypllan Boatman Seizid In

$4,100,000 Narcotic Trade

CAIRO.—Police announced the arrest

of a boatman accused of controlling

an illegal traffic of over

$4,100,000 annually in Middle Eastern

opiates.

Lt. Col. Abdel Azziz Safwat, chief

of the narcotics investigation bureau,

said Abu El Maati Abdou E.

Feki, known as "the master," had

been arrested with 32 other men and

three women. A ton of hashhish and

opium, worth more than $1,640,000,

was seized.

Swafat said it was "comparatively

easy for the gang to label boxes of

narcotics as oil, medicines, etc., and

have them transported from Palestine

to Egypt by British war department

trucks."

Explosion at Jutland It

Blamed on Sunken Munitions

COPENHAGEN, DENMARK. —

Danish naval authorities said that

they believed the explosion of 20

tons of German munitions dumped

into the sea by the British after the

war, was responsible for a mysterious

blast which rocked the city

of Aarhus, Jutland. What caused the

explosion was not determined.

22.17 Per Cent off U.S. Costs

In Germany Went for Relief

BERLIN. — Public relief rolls,

rising steadily in the American occupation

zone of Germany, require

22.17 per/ cent of all governmental

expenditures for the 1946-47 fiscal

year. Lt. Gen. Lucius D. Clay,

deputy military governor, reported

these figures.

The American zone, which has

a population of 16,231,648 persons,

haa 1,130,638 on relief in November.

This represented an increase

of 52,653 from October.

In the same period, relief expenditures

mounted from $2,991,918 to

$3,188,333. Public welfare budgets

for the fiscal year were estimated

at $139,600,000, Clay's report said.

The figures also include funds for

operating welfare institutions.

PROBABLY that faithful Buick of yours

still can show a clean pair of heels to

other cars on the road — probably still

rides and runs like a charm. It makes you

realize how wise you were to have picked

a Buick in the first place.

Even though time always takes a toll,

Buicks do carry their years well. They

can keep their eagerness to go, their lighthearted

gait and gentle comfort — particularly

when they are rewarded with the

considerate care that Buick dealers know

how to provide. It's care that brings out

your car's youthful spirit — care that lets

you feel that suddenly it's young again.

uddenly

DAT CAMP NOTICE

Registration for Day Camp at Peach

Lake will be held Saturday afternoon,

June 28th, from 3-5 pm. in the basement

of Brewster Library.

The registration fee Is $5.00. Boys

and girls from school age to 12 years

are eligible,. |4lf

Camp opens July 7. Mrs. Sadie

Nagle, camp director, will be at the

Library to give more information on

Saturday.

The worst form of child labor is

child labor by a grown man. — The

Dummy. •

A sailor pounding on the door of a

Chinese restaurant located on the water

front, hears a voice Inside saying:

" 'Ello! 'Ello! rt

Sailor: "How are the chances to

eat?" |

Chinese: *You hungly?"

Sailor: "Yeah."

Chinese: "You likee fish?"

Sailor: "Sure."

Chinese: "Come back Pliday." —

Phoney Phun.

MIDGET

AUTO RACES

Danbury Speedway

I Danbury, Conn.

Every Saturday Nite

8:30 P. M.

FEATURING THE* NATION'S

LEADING DRIVERS

Gen. Adm. --- - $1.20 tax Inc.

All Reserved Seats - $1.80 tax Inc.

Children -------60c tax inc.

FREE PARKING

its young again

r\

Buick car care is something far different

\

/

from what's regularly called service. It's

something that only a Buick man can give.

Because he is trained in all the needs and

preferences of Buicks. The tools he uses

are the right Buick tools. And any replacement

part your car may need is a

Buick-engineered part

So it's easy to see why your car is so ready

to give you its best when it receives regular

Buick car care — care by men who

know Buicks through and through and

love them heart and soul.

UICK CARE

KEEPS BUICKS BEST

VAILS GROVE GOLF CLUB

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE

May to Oct.—Week end ball sweepstakes.

May 30-31, June 15—36 holes medal

play handicap.

July 4th—18 holes medal play handicap:

kickers handicap.

July 5-6—Best ball foursome; first

round.

July 12-13—Best ball foursome, second

round.

July 19-20—Best ball foursome, final

round.

July 26-27—Green Cup and Black

Cup qualifying round.

Aug.2-3—First round.

Aug. 9-10—Second round.

Aug. 16-17—Third round.

Aug. 23—Pinal round.

Aug. 30-31, Sept. 1—Club championship.

36 holes. Also 36 holes under

handicap scratch.

Sept 1—12 HL. Mixed foursome; 2:30,

driving contest; 4, hole In one*; 5, 19th

hole.

ADVERTISE IN THE STANDARD

"There are two sides to every question,",

proclaimed the sage.

"Yes," said the fool, "and there are

two sides to a sheet of fly paper, but

It makes a big difference to the fly

which side he chooses."—Phoney Phun

o

When sprinkling clothes for ironing,

wrap the colored pieces carefully

in waxed paper to keep them from

fading on the white clothes.

-rat

STARR RIDGE

Boarding and

Sales Stables

Gentle, Well Mannered Saddle

Horses for Sale and Rent

Riding Instruction by Appointment

Horses Schooled to Jump

Eugene O'Riordan

Tel. Brewster' 2703

A FOUR DOOR PLYMOUTH SEDAN

WILL BE GIVEN AWAY

at the

South Salem Fire Department

ANNUAL DANCE

SATURDAY, JULY 12th - 9 p.m. - 1 a.m

at the

LEWISBORO SCHOOL

BOUTON STREET - SOUTH SALEM

2 Orthestras - 2 Dance Floors

Inside *•*- Outside

Modern and Square

. Admission Incl Tax - - $1.50

'°*»-«P.. "" *» wt,hZ *• 9*.,

a**w;sgrVfc

core

A

whot "dtht

wr , n rr*«/,;?"rw*

flio/o **d$^

or

SOUTHEAST MOTOR COMPANY

it/floi

•'«*• mil

87 North Main Street Phone 2540 Brewster, N. Y.

'•Po/r.

,.


PAGE FOUR THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY. JUNE 26, 1947

r

QDbe JJretoster fttanbarb

E. W. ADDIS ESTATE, Publisher MARJORIE L. ADDIS, Editor

Published Weekly at Brewster, Putnam County, N, Y.

Entered at the Post Office at Brewster as Second Glass Mall

Subscription per year, $3.00; single copy Ten Cents

THURSDAY, JUNE 26, 1947

SHADING PARKING SPACE

H. H. fyells Addresses

Putnam Valley Class

(Continued from Paare 1)

newsnaper undisturbed. Oet your families

to let you alone.

Try to get In some reading about

your work and for pleasure, so your

conversation will be more interesting

land your enjoyment greater by having

Presumably lack of interested, active cooperation of business more to think about(and talk of.

and political persons to provide adequate parking space for commut- Saturday evenings.

ers and other all day parkers brought about the six month trial of General Curtis

J it i i • t MI r n. ..... u»... V^AMIAI Next. I wish to warn you not to exmeters

and parallel parking in the village of Brewster. How people jDect absonite fairness in this world.

wish the opportunity to get the city lot adjoining the B r e w s t e r ' l ^ g ^ % ^ i * $ ^

Standard had been seized back in the good old Mayor Walker days. Curtla, the hero of the Battle of Port

I Fisher in the Civil War. He lived on

The present predicament may turn up a vigorous movement to secure. mint* Place, New York. He told me

, . - , - , * , , •. . :. „•« a t «: AU-TM£ TIME.

THIS WEEKS SPECIALS

UNIVERAL VACUUM CLEANERS

(Tank Type)

13 Attachments - 18 Ft. Cord

$79.95

We Carry a Complete Line of ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES

from ELECTRIC RAZORS and DQOR CHIMES to RE­

FRIGERATORS and RADIOS.

LEAR RADIOS

ome unkind Salvia's Delicatessen

East Main Street, Brewster

Tel. 940

FREE DELIVERY

~

See Us if You are Planning a Picnic

WE CAN SUPPLY

All Needs For Picnic Baskets

— alsostatements

I have pub-

1

lished. Do not be afraid to express

an opposite opinion but follow my

mother's advice.

Sing Sing

Of course you can sometimes soften

a harsh statement. There was that

women who wanted her family genealogy

written and engaged a leading

Journalist. She gave him the family

Bible and old letters and old histories

and he went to work. After a week

he called the woman and said, "What

am I going to do about your Uncle

Ezra?" The woman said, "Well, what

about Uncle Ezra?" The journalist

said, "Oh, nothing, excejpt that he

killed a man and was electrocuted at

Sing Sing. I have ethical standards

and must tell the truth." The woman

said, "Weell, go ahead and tell the

truth but be as nice about it as you

can."

When the book was printed the woman

looked to see what the conscientious

man had said about Uncle Ezra

and she found this sentence: "Ezra

Collins, the uncle of Sarah Collins,

occupied the chair of applied electricity

in fine of our leading State institutions

and died in harness."

Intolerance

Next. Another good rule is to avoid

intolerance. President MacCracken of

Vassar spoke In White Plains several

years ago on the intolerance of youth.

Don't dislike oeople bacuse you don't

wish to be thick with them. Think

kindly of persons outside of your own

group. Sensitive persons may feel

hurt if you are not cordial. I do not

believe in secret societies, especially

in schools. I believe there are too

many heart breaks. I belong to two,

but doubt if I would loin again, the

Masons and Zeta Psi. Peoole will

group socially but there should be no

secrecy.

One girl in White Plains committed

suicide because her sister wasn't taken

into a sorority in school. Too much

false value is put on secret societies.

Respectable Sins •

Next. Do not commit re8»*t*b1«»

sins. At Great Barrington, Mass., I

I heard an Episcopal minister preach on

', respectable sins. One of these sins

I WAS being cross at breakfast.. I don't

i believe we realize how sinful we are

when we are unpleasant in our homes

and quarrel at the table and tease.

President Eliot

Next. Think of vour manners. Always

thank promptly by letter anyone

doinw you a favor. In 1909 I heard

President Eliot of Harvard speak on

"Preparation For an Effective Life" at

Hotcbkiss School in Lakeville, Conn.

In the speech he said. "The next part

of education for an effective life,

which I want to speak about, is manners.

It would be difficult to exaggerate

the importance of manners with

reference to an effective career in the

world. Just the bearing of the body

has great importance, in business, in

the practice of a profession, in public

speaking to any audience, educated or

uneducated, to the masses of the peoole

or to a select few. The mere bearing

of the body is of great importance

to your success in future life. Military

education has an excellent feature of

this sort. In all military schools the

(Continued on Page 7)

o——

The prehistoric woolly elephant didn't

develop its woolly coat until the

owning of an ice age gave him a need

for it.

o

"Mv friends." said the campaign

orator. "I am full of uncertainty."

A number of people looked at one

another and hoarselv whispered. "He

must have been eating hash."—Phoney

Phun.

1

Stienies

Quarts BEER-ALE

Cans

LEGION and V. F. W. MAMMOTH

CELEBRATION

BREWSTER

AD Next Week June 30lh (o July 5th

60 - Tons of Out-door Attractions - 60

Rides - Games - Fireworks

Thousands in Awards including

1947Studebaker

Save 2c to 1 Sc

TO HELP PAY FOR

Parking Meters

Cigarettes, were 2 - 37c NOW 2 - 35c

Cigarettes, carton, were 1.79 __.__NOW 1.69

French Ice Cream, Pt., was 40c. NOW 37c

All 5c Candy and Gum is .... NOW 5c

NOT 6c

EXTRA SPECIAL

Parkers Ink was 15c .....NOW 10c

Parkers Ink was 25c — NOW 15c

Anderson s Drug Store

36-38 MAIN ST.. BREWSTER. N. Y.

Phones: 934 and 936

Because Cadillac's objective is

quality—first and always—it is not

necessary to compromise with

any element of Cadillac goodness.

There are no restrictions on those

who design and build Cadillacssave

to provide the finest personal

transportation it is practical to

produce. Consequently, Cadillac

excels in all the things which

make a motor car a joy to possess

and a pleasure to drive.


THURSDAY, JUNE 26. 1947 THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED 186?_ PAGE FIVE

WHAT YOUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING

On Wednesday night a small company

gathered for a covered dish supper

in Reed Memorial Chapel. "Why

didn't I know about it?" is the rhetorical

question of those who find the

pace too swift even for theif^"desire

to catch up with good home cooking.

——o

The Rev. and Mrs. Frederick A.

Coleman have left for Chicago where

Mr. Coleman will attend the annual

convention of Kiwanis International

being held in that city from Sunday,

June 29th until Thursday, July 3rd.

As the president of the Putnam County

Kiwanis he will represent it at the

convention staying at the Bismark Hotel

where all the delegates from New

York State will t>e housed. Mr. and

Mrs. Coleman plan a brief stay with

relatives in Canada on the trip.

O. Rundle Gilbert, auctiofleer of

Garrison-on-Hudson, sold the contents

of the Shove house on North

Main Street yesterday afternoon. Buyers

and spectators enjoyed every jninute

of the day. Mr. Gilbert's tent set

at ease any who suspected the weather

might play tricks disastrous to

hair-do and costume. Dealers of New

York and Philadelphia arrived earlv

a6 usual at an O. Rundle Gilbert sale.

o

Announcement is made of John

Whitnev Irving's association with the

Edear L. Hoag real estate agency. Mr.

Irving, a graduate of Princeton University,

has spent most of his early

life on his father's Brewster estate

(Spv Hill Farm). He served four

years in the Army Air Forces, two

years of which were spent* In the

Africa-Middle East Theatre. About a

year ago he was placed on inactive

duty with the rank of Major,

o

PATTERSON

Mrs. Emma C. Wright was a guest

of Mrs. D. G. Ludlngton several days

this week.

Mr. and Mrs. Myron Spaulding, of

Standlordville. N. Y.. were dinner

guests on Sunday of his sister. Miss

Esther Spaulding.

_——— i

Mr. and Mrs. Joseoh Weber of New

Yor^ ^itv, were Sundav callers on Mr.

and Mrs. T. Walter Birdsall.

The regular meeting of the Grange

was postponed on account of the manv

graduation exercises, from this week

to next Monday evening, June 30th.

Mr. Edward Fitzpa trick and son,

Eddie, were guests on Sunday of Mr.

and Mrs. Lynn Evans in Danbury

where his daughter ie staying while

her mother is away.

The community was deeply shocked

by the sudden death of the popular

milkman, Jack Henriques. who was

killed in an accident to his car on

the Danburv Road Friday evening

about 7 o'clock. Excessive speed was

blamed as the car ran up on a bank,

struck a boulder and overturned. The

driver was thrown out and so badly

injured that he died on the way to

the hospital without recovering consciousness.

He was only 45 years old

and was well liked by his many patrons

here who sent a handsome floral

piece to the funeral services held in

the Catholic Church in Danbury on

Monday morning as a token of their

esteem. He is survived by two daughters

and one son. It is probable that

the milk route will be continued.

On Monday evening the graduating

class at the Carmel High School Included

eight from Patterson: Jean

Hampe, Joyce VanKeuren, Patricia

Townsend, Carol Bloch, Howard Smith,

Daniel Ludlngton, Laurence Nell and

Haines O'Harn. Daniel Ludlngton was

awarded a prize, for being the best

athlete, and Howard Smith for doing

the most for the school, and both of

these young men received recognition

for their work on the school paper

during the year.

o

Protestant Children

Need Foster Homes

WORK by day or contract: Landscaping,

trucking of top soil, sand and

graveL Foundation masonry work.

Handmade cement blocks for sale. Tel.

741 Brewster. Leo Glowney, 74 North

Main St. 4tf

ON-PREMISES LICENSE

Notice is hereby given that License

No. FB 1772 has been issued to the

undersigned to sell beer in Tinie's

grocery store and restaurant, Fairfield

Drive, Putnam Lake, Putnam

County, New York, for on-premises

consumption under the Alcoholic Beverage

Control Law. '

JOSEPH MIRAMONTES

Brewster, N. Y.

Dated June 26, 1947

Brewster, N. Y. 10p2

Special This Week

Hot or Sweet

Italian Sausage

Swift's Premium

59 c

lb

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE SOCIETY

Masonic Temple, Railroad Ave.

Pawling, N. Y.

O. B. REFRIGERATORS and Freezers

for immediate delivery; also G. E.

Radios, Vacuum Cleaners. M. J.

Fischer A Son, 4 Progress St., Brewster.

Tel. 654 or 572. 37tf

ED MARTIN

Main St., Brewster Phone 2556

Household Furniture

Chests, Beds, Chairs, Davenports, Studio Couches, Dining

Tables, China Closets, Dressers, Corner Cupboards, Wall

Shelves, Shadow Boxes. Dressing Tables. Children's Chairs,

Beds. Baby Carriages. Electric Washer, Oil Stoves, Oil Ovens,

China Dinner Sets, Odd Lots. Vases, China, Glass, Antique,

.Pottery. Old Glass and China Lamps. 65 Piece Crystal Glass

Set. Colored Glassware, Goblets, Glasses, Vases. Lamps,

Brass, Maple Dresser and Pin-Ups, China, Glass. General

Electric Radio. Metal Novelties.

READING NOTICES

Tonight at 8:30 the Odd Fellows will

entertain a public card party,

o

Miss Millie Fazzinga will spend two

weeks vacation in Springfield and

Paterson, N. J.

o—'—

Mr. and Mrs. Edmond Weill will be

at their home at Brewster this week

end to prepare for a long stay.

o———

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Cutler, of

Florida, have arrived at the Green

Cabins for a long stay.

Mr. and Mrs. John Eastwood have

purchased a home at Ft. Meyer, Fla.,

where they expect to live after Dec.

1. Fishing Is a leading attraction.

: o

The Junior Catholic Daughters of

America, Court Bernardine, 185, will

hold a card party July 9 at the K. of

C. Home.

>

GARDNER wanted, part or full time, CARMEL—Delightfully situated on

Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.

temporarily. Tel. 635 Croton Falls. lOtf 4 acre hillside, overlooking two lakes

Sunday School \ 10:45 a.m. ARTHUR C. HAMILTON

and country, in residential section,

Testimonial meeting, the' first Wed­

Mrs. Herbert Turner has accepted,

Real Estate and Insurance EXPERIENCED BABY SITTER, built 1941, a beautiful, fully insulated

nesday of each months at 8:00 p.m.

a position in Stamford, Conn., where

TOWNERS, N. Y.

mother of five now grown np, seeks home of 10 rooms, 4 baths, 6 bed

All are cordially Invited to attend

employment. Tel. 2124 Brewster. lOpl

she spent last week.

our services.

Phone Patterson 8291

rooms, living room 27x17 with flre-

Office: One mile east of Towners

nlace; library 18x20 in knotty pine,

FOR SALE—Reasonable, hot water

Mrs. Hogan of Mount Kisco, Is vis­

o-*—

bay window, open sun deck, butler's

R. R. Station on Route 216 stove, pipe and connections. Box 3,

iting her daughter, Mrs. Lester Pfahl

pantry with dishwasher, spacious cab­

ON-PREMTSES LICENSE Tilly Foster, N. Y.. lOpl

and family here.

inets, marvelous kitchen, adjoining

Sick Veterans Need

Notice is hereby given that License

PAINTING

roofed terrace; master bed room 18x20,

Mrs. Percy Hall, of Belleville, N. J.,

No. SB 167 has been issued to the

Cards and Cigarettes

First Class at Just Rates

dressing room with 4 full length mir­

spent one day in town last week and

undersigned to sell beer in Tonetta J. STONE, Tel. 8426 Carmel 10p2

rors, imported wall papers, removable

called on numerous friends who were

Lake pavilion, Brewster, Putnam

windows, party room 30x15 satin wood

pleased to greet her.

The chairman of Camps and Hos­ County, New York, 'for on-premises FOR SALE: Chest of drawers, $12; finished walls, bar room rare black

The Department of Public Welfare, pitals for the North Salem-Somers consumption under the Alcoholic Bev­ desk, $6; bookcase, $7; four matching cypress walls, laundry, steel and con­

Seward Robinson, having completed Carmel, N. Y., is In need of foster Branch of the American Red Gross, erage Control Law.

chairs; blanket box; packing trunks crete boiler room, G. E. oil burner,

his college studies for this year, has homes for a number of Protestant Mrs. Jeffry Nichol, has stated there is TONETTA LAKE CORP. 91 np. Tel. 584 Croton Falls. lOpl vapor vacuum heat, copper and brass

left for Camp Sloan for two* months children. Anyone interested, please urgent need in veterans' hospitals for Frank C. Smith

plumbing, inter-room phone system,

where he Will serve as counselor. contact Mr. Ralph A. Smith, Commis­ playing cards and cigarettes. Anyone Brewster, N. Y.

EXPERIENCED PAINTERS want­ city Water, 5 minutes walk to high

sioner, Carmel 670.'

wishing to contribute, please call Cro- Dated: June 18, 1947

ed. Good wages. Tel. 2458 Brewster. school and stoves. Priced to seR

The many friends of Paul W.

. — o

ton Falls 667.

Brewster, N. Y. 9o2

9p3 quickly.

Townsend are glad to hear that he is DAY' CAMP NOTICE

recovering nicely in St. Francis Hos­

: STANDING GRASS, 40 acres, some

new seeded, on Ronte 22. Clifford

pital from an operation performed last •Registration for Day Camp at Peach

Sherwood. Tel. 808 Brewster. 9tf

week and will be home again this Lake will be held Saturday afternoon,

week.

June 28th, from 3-5 p.m. in the base­

WASHING and Ironing done at

ment of Brewster Library.

n

home. 206 E. Main St. Tel. 665 Brew- I window, modern

The new cement block garage of The registration fee is $5.00. Boys GOOSSEN FURNITURE CO. inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest C. Hopkins left

ster. 80S >

Philip Buxbaum is nearlng completion and girls from school age to 12 years

last Sunday on a motor trip to Ann

and contains -a convenient "grease are ellgibta.

Arbor, Michigan, where they will spend

92-94 MAIN ST., BREWSTER. N. Y.

ball" room as well as office and extra Camp opens July 7. Mrs. Sadie

a few days with the O'Hern family.

space for display of cars will be added Nagle, camp director, will be at the Tel. 2379 Mall and Phone Orders Accepted

o

later, also gas tanks. Mr. Buxbaum Library to give more information • on

At Birch Hill Acres, the "former plans to build, a large porch on the Saturday.

Murty estate, P. F. Beal and Sons, ar­ west side of his house making that

o • —

tesian well contractors, struck a flow the front entrance and more secluded

of over 40 gallons per minute at 200

" CARD PARTY TOMORROW '

from the front street.

" •

ft. after a week's operation.

Are Your Week End Guests Comfortable?

o

Vall's Park Association is all set to

Miss Alma Ruth Ballard celebrated There was a large attendance of open the Summer card parties in the

her fifth birthday on Monday, June parents and friends at the Union Community House.. The first meeting

23rd, with a family party at her home School last Friday evening for the is Friday night, June 27. Mr. Richard Goosscns have many of the items you will rieed

on Turk Hill. On Wednesday she en- graduation of five members of the Hlnsh, Jr., chairman, will have bridge

Joyed a trip to Playland with her par­ eight grade who were Joyce Clark, and pinochle with prizes and refreshents,

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford H. Ballard, Lucy GHara, Alice Macartney, Arlene ments.

Mattresses $19.95 up Outdoor Chairs $ 3.95 up

and her playmate, Sonia Wolter Slocum and William Conklin. A com­

„ . tio

Bloomerside, N.

v

Y„

-v

Sat

D.t

and

..j

Sun.

o«« 0n, view, large living room, dining room

9o3lwUh bav w|ndoWt pood slw, kltche„, 2

SECOND-HAND WASHERS for sale. nice bed rooms, modern bath on first

M. J. Fischer & Son 4 Progress Street, floor. .larre kitchen, flne living room,

Tel. 654 or 572 Brewster. J 36tf 2 bed rooms and bath on second floor,

2 car parage, full basement oil hot-

TRUCKING, local and long diswater boat, city water, copper plumbtance.

Sand, Gravel and Wall Stone ing. A bargain at $11,250.

for sale. Driveways repaired and filled.

Call 748'Brewster. 5tf VA miles from Croton Falls staflon,

on one secluded acre nicely set among

FOR SALE—Used window frames, rare trees, shrubs and a beautiful gar­

complete with sash; interior doors; den, overlooking reservoir, is a 5 room

bath tubs on legs, complete with fit­ all year home, full basement, garage,

tings; lavatories, complete with fit­ hot water heat, good plumbing, spring

tings; stairs. TeL 724 Brewster. 49tf water, large pdrch 11x44, 28 ft. livinr

room with stone, fireplace, raftered

ceiling, library. 2 bed rooms with closets,

kitchen with wall closets and gas

range. Asking $16,500.

Mrs. Marv Hall, district nurse, has

resigned her position to accept one

as srhool nurse in Brewster this fall.

She will, however, not leave town for

Another year while her daughter is in

hiah school and has rented the upstairs

apartment in the remodeled

George Chase house near the factory

now owned by Jacob Bloch. We understand

' that the first floor apartment

is also rented and that Mr. Bloch

has now purchased the former William

Cruthers house in the seme

neighborhood for remodeling. »

About thirtv of the H. A. G.'s with

members of their families and friends

held an en .lovable party at the Sloat

cottaste at Whaley Lake last Thursdav

evening to celebrate the completion of

the nlay. Some enjoyed a swim while

others preferred conversation and enjoyment

of the delightful lakeside

view and surroundings. Hot dogs were

roasted over an outside firenlace and

with rolls, coffee, cakes and cookies,

mad* flne refreshments for all. Personal

gifts were given to Miss Jones

imd Miss Anderson and gifts of monev

to those non-members who assisted in

the play. The onlv near traeedy was

the fate of Master Jamie Genovese

who went uo earlv with his brother

and mother for a.swim and after teeing

dried and dressed. promDtlv fell

In the water again before supper and

tnlsftH the fun of the evening.

CEILING fixtures and rlobes. used,

91.99 each. Goossen Furniture Co. Tel.

2379 Brewster. 19ol

WILLIE'S STORE

76 N. Main St., Brewster Tel. 491

Launderette

8 Keeler St., Danbury, Conn

21 -Automatic-21

BENDIX

Washing Machines

9 lbs 25c - 30 Minutes

We do Blankets, Curtains,, ,

Slip Covers, Diapers

For appointments phone Danbury 8-1442

L. C. FISH

Owner and Manager

Next Door to Main St. A 8 P and,Large Parking Lots

Mergardt's Progress Market

OPPOSITE U..S. POST OFFICE

Frozen Food Lockers For Rent

ATTENTION - Home Freezer Owners

We have what you need to pack those

Early Fruits and Vegetables

Containers - Cellophane Bags - Paper


We Call a Full Line of FRUITS and VEGETABLES

FRESH FROSTED FOODS

CHAS. G. MERGARDT 8 SON Tel. 706

BATHING SUITS

Misses' Bathing Suits $4.95 and $5.95

(New Styles)

Children's Bathing Suits — —98c to $3-95

Men' Swim Trunks $1-95 and $2-95

Boys' Swim Trunks $1-00 and $1-95

Bathing Caps 25c to 95c

Bathing SHoes r—*~r 79 c and 89 c a pair


New York Store

58 Main Street Brewster. N. Y.

REFRIGERATOR for sale. Frostair

Duplex combination box, 7 ft. cold

wall refrigerator, plus 90 cube ice maker,

plus 3*4 cu. ft deep freeze. Geo.

Juengst & Sons. TeL 333 or 607 Croton

Falls. 6tf

PRIVATE SALE

Beginning Jane 26. Antique and

Modern Glassware, Limoges, Wedgewood,

Royal Ducal and Willow China;

also also bric-a-brac. Call Thursday,

Saturday and Sunday afternoons; Mrs.

Albro Travis, 26 North Main Street,

Brewster. - . 9tf

PURDYS—7 room white colonial

house on 3/4 of an acre, At condition,

bath and lavatory, automatic oil heat,

screened porch, garage, near school

and stores, 5 minutes walk to station.

Immediate occupancy. Price $11,000.

Swenson. TeL 605 Croton Fulls. 9o2

AN OPPORTUNITY

Several owners of Putnam and

Dutchess County estates offer approved

buyer at VERY LOW PRICES

5 to 20 acre parrels of their choicest

lands. Inquiries solicited. EDGAR L.

HOAG, 320-5th Ave., New York City.

Phone 2595 Brewster, N. Y. 8o4

TRUCK BODY for sale, rack type.

All good oak planks. TeL 2051 Brewster.

9p2

EXTRA SIZE WORK PANTS, sizes

44-50, for sale at $4.95. Buck Se Van

Scoy, Brewster, N. Y. Otf

WANTED — LONG LEASE on large

unfurnished house by Christian family,

all adults. P. O. Box 247, Rye, N.

Y. 9p5

BILLIARD TABLE, Victrola, G. E.

Ironer, 'Baby carriage, Wood Stoves

with fittings. CaU 2093 Brewster after

6 ji.m. 9tf

BREWSTER PUBLIC LIBRARY

May B. Hancock. Librarian

Open Dally Except Sunday

2:30 to 6 pan. and 7 to 9 p.m.

10:30 to 12 m. Saturday

SLOATS FUNERAL SERVICE

Licensed New York and New Jersev

Fmhainwir and Undertaker

TeL 570 408 Carmel

FOR SALE—Gas water heaters, refrigerators

and ranges for bottled gas.

Berk Refrigeration Sales & Service.

TeL 6033 ML Kisco. 39 tf

FOR SALE — Bntter churns, both

hand and electric, in suitable sizes np

to six gallons of cream at one churning.

De Laval Sales St Service. Inc.

Poughkeepsie. N. Y. 38tf

* J. RALPH TRURAN

INSURANCE — REAL ESTATE

TeL 2064.' Coarsen Bldg.

APARTMENTS. HOUSES. FARMS

ALFRED n. VORES. Jr.

General Carpenter Work

Repairing A Specialty

No Job Too Small

29 Prospect St.. Brewster 2008

FRlGiDAIKE SERVICE

Authorised, Dependable

PUTNAM APPLIANCE SALES

and SERVICE

TeL 686 Day — 401 Night

Main St, Brewster, N. Y. 13tf

CARD OF THANKS—We wish to

express our sincere **"»«'"' to neighbors

and friends and to the Legionnaires

who gave us their sympathy

and assistance ' at the time of the

death of Edward P. Reed.

Mrs. May Reed and

Mrs. Blanche Heinchon

CARD OF THANKS

We wish to extend our sincere

thanks to all who were so kind to us

during our recent bereavement.

Mrs. J. F. Keough

Mrs. Ferdinand Guss

Mrs. Alfred Negrey

Miss Genevieve Keough

CARMEL—New 4 room insulated

rustic summer/ cottage on beautiful

grounds of Hill and Dale Club, private

beach, fishing, bathing, boating, modern

bath and kitchen, large living

room, stone fireplace, 2 bed rooms,

flagstone natio, nicelv set on 150x200

among flne birch .and maples. $6,900.

Have also Cottage for rent for

month of July In Hill and Dale Club.

$250.00.

WALTER G. LUDEWIG

Realtor, Carmel, N. Y.

Carmel 2136. Always Open

USED WESTINGHOUSE Vacuum

Cleaner $15.00. Inquire Goossen Furniture

Co., Inc., Tel 2379 Brewster.

lOol

TO RENT—5 rooms and bath apartmint

outside of Brewster, walk to station,

heat furnished. $70.00 a month,

3 yr. lease. Thomas C. Grimes Co.

TeL 701 Brewster. lOtf

PART or Full Time Positions open

to men or women, $2.00 to $3.00 per nr.

immediate earnings while in training.

Call Patterson 3308 Inserra after 8 p.

m. ^ lOpl

DAY NURSERY

Nursery School to be held during

summer months. Ages of children

from four to six years. Any one interested

call Mary Palmer, 2565 Brewster.

10p2

FOR SALE—100 laying pullets, one

yr. old; 2 cows, calves at side; one

first calf heifer due next month; one

John Deere tractor on rubber, 2 plows,

cultivator, spring tooth harrow, snow

plow, corn chopper. Call 575 Brewster.

lOpl

WANTED—Reliable woman as attendant

to assist with care of retarded

boys in small private boarding

school. 40 miles from Manhattan.

Write giving age, reference and salary

expected. Bailey Hall, Katonah,

N. Y. lOol

FOR SALE—New Bungalow, prewar

material, 5 rooms, bath and shower

first floor, one room upstairs, full cellarp

insulated, hardwood floors, garage,

good high location, over acre, walk to

station, school bus passes door. Immediate

occupancy, sacrifice, $9,700.

TeL 2297 Brewster. lOol

NOTICE

EDGAR L. HOAG. specialising for

many years in Westchester, Putnam

and Dutchess County real estate, announces

that John Whitney Irving.

Maple Road. Brewster, is now associated

with his office. His uhone number

is Brewster 2355. Mr. Hoag's number

Brewster 2595. Offices 320 - Fifth

Avenue, New York City. lOol

DAY CAMP

Boys and Girls, ages 3 to 11; daily

exceut Sunday, 9 a.m. to 12 and 2 p.m.

to 5:39: full activity program with

qualified staff, under highly experienced

directorship; private lake with gently

sloping sandy beach; spacious

grounds. conmlete facilities: full ^season

only (July and August.) Phone

Brewster 642 at noon or after 6 p.m.

BOATS FOR SALE

1941 GAR WOOD SKI)AN. 20' 6"

powered with 115 H.P. Cnrvsler Crown.

Completely refinished inside and outside

like new.

NEW INBOARD MOTOR BOATS

from $695 up.

Largest display of boats in Connecticut.

THE LAKE MARINE BASE. Inc.,

Candlewood Isle Causeway. Route 39,

New Fairfield, Conn. TeL 4747J2 Danbury.

10©1


PAGE SIX THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY. JUNE 26, 1947

PEACH LAKE NORTH SALEM PURDYS CROTON FALLS

THIS SPACE IS DEVOTED TO OUR NORTHERN WESTCHESTER READERS HAPPENINGS GATHERED BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENTS EVERY WEEK

North Salem Library

Entertains June 27

The Women's Society of the Methodist

Church held a strawberry festival

today on the church lawn.

CROTON FALLS

Marie Tomokbis. daughter of Mr. and

Mrs. Leonard K. Tompkins, of Windham,

Conn., and Richard Joseph Lundv,

son of Mr. and Mrs. Martin • Lundv

of Purdys, N. Y. were married in St.

Joseoh's Church at Willimantic.

Conn., by the Rev. Joseph E. Farrell.

spots of this section. A rftCeotlon wa8 heM on the lftwn at

* ——--?- •D,«J„„ „,0e roil i-AnrMPnt- ' *he home of the bride's Barents. Af-

«^t^Ks3£S sy-as'srss- - vntaMwn

will live in

0"V)en* Bridge. N. ,Y.

Th*» bride is a graduate of Wind-

Mahopac Playhouse

Opens Tuesday, July 8

NORTH SALEM

Gala Crowd Attends

Starlight Opening

The North Salem Free Library,

Dr. and Mrs. Matthew Ratchford of

serving Croton Falls, North Salem,

Dingle Ridge, have, left for a vacation

Salem Center and Purdys, will hold

trip and expect to return July 14th.

the annual meeting in the library of

Program with Surprise Number and

the North Salem school, Friday, June

27th, at 8:30 p.m.

Wilder's "Skin of Our Teeth" Starts Members of St. James Auxiliary who

Refreshments to Follow Unique Bus­

International ieasom *Mad"y Corell,

iness Session ftt Annual Meeting. All

Welcome.

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Oothouse and

daughters are planning to spend part

How the North Salem Free Library

of the summer at Lake Tonetta.

functions, followed toy an entertaining

program including a surprise number, Paul DeLaura of Mt. Klsco, broke

will be the features of the Associa­ his thumb while playing ball here on

tion's annual meeting in the North Sunday.

Salem school at 8:30 p.m., Friday, June

27. Refreshments will be served and The card party of the Croton Falls

every resident of the North Salem Fire Department bastoall club will be

School District is cordially invited to held in the fire house on Friday, June

attend.

27th, at 8:30 p.m. A good assortment

The entertainment will include solos

of prizes have been secured and ice

by Miss Luella Christian, accompanied

cream and cake will toe served.

by her mother, Mrs. H. A. Christian;

recitations by Mrs. Charles Nichols, Mrs. Edward Juengst, Edward, Jr.,

and a surprise number by the famous and Mrs. Nellie Juengst visited the

artist, H. Winfleld Scott.

Zoo in New York City on Saturday.

The functions of the different library

committees will toe described and The Croton Falls Fire .Department

the respective chairmen will tell how

is conducting a drive for funds to

they fulfill their duties. The annual complete the building and sincerely

reports on finances and book circula­

appeal to your generosity. All comtion

will be presented by the treasurer munications should be sent to Henry

and the librarians. The chairman of A. Blumlein. Box 177, Croton Falls, or

the recent membership campaign wfll telephone 483.

pay special tribute to the captains and

solicitors who were responsible for the The next regular meeting of the

outstanding success of the fund rais­ Auxiliary of the Fire Department will

ing effort.

be held on Wednesday, July 2nd at

8 p.m.

Mrs. E. R. Tostevin and Mrs. Blair

Muller are the librarians; Mrs. Walter The Sisters of the Missionary Cir­

Howe, chairman of the administration cle of Maryknoll will be at St. Joseph's

committee; Blair Muller, general Church next Sunday.

chairman of the book committee; Mrs.

Frederick Nelson, chairman of the

non- Action book selection commit­ James D. McAuliffe observed his

tee; Edward Stevenson, chairman of first birthday at the home of his

the fiction book selection committee; Krandmotheri Mrs. Mary Doyle and

Mrs. Albert Tibbets, chairman of the family.

Juvenile committee. .

The trustees are Miss Cornelia Federated Church Notes

Crooke, Mrs. Walter Howe. Miss Ruth

Keeler, Mrs. Howard Maurhoff, Blair Rev. Laban Chamberlin, Minister

Muller, R. L. Parish, I. Hart Purdy,

Mrs. H. Tappey

Mr. and Mrs. Albert B. Tibbets.

Organist and Choir Director

The officers are: Albert B. Tibbets 10:00—Bible School and Adult Bible

president: Mrs. Howard Maurhoff, vice Class.

president; Mrs. Arthur H. Vail, Jr.,

treasurer; Mrs. Donald Ferguson, re­ 11:00—Morning Worship.

cording secretary, and Mrs. Edward Evening meetinc of the Young Peo-

Stevenson, corresponding secretary. nle's Group and choral practice. Meet-

Election of four new trustees

Ins at 8 p.m.

#and

the officers for the ensuing year will

The Ladles Aid Society wish to

follow the business session.

fhnnk all who through their oartlcipation

made the supper on Wednesday

evening such a success.

Choir rehearsal each Thursday even-

GOLDENS BRIDGE ins.

Saturday, 9 a.m.—Junior choir music

Charles Green is the only pupil

»

of study.

the Goldens Bridge school with a per­ On Saturday, June 28th, the choir

fect attendance record for the whole

of the Church of the Redeemer, of

school year. Credit should be given

Brooklyn, N. Y, will hold a picnic at

the little boy.

Hill Top Farm. Mr. and Mrs. F.

Schultz invite niembers of the conprregation

to hear this choir sing at

Miss Helen Burt, Mrs. Irwin Thom­ 7 pjn.

as. Mrs. George Brown and Mrs. Jas.

Gilbert were guests" of the Women's

Society of the Katonah Methodist

Lundy—Tompkins

Church at the meeting at the home of

In a verv pretty ceremony, Lucia

Mrs. Oliver Todd, Wednesday.

a ^?^_ t h e _, ^ i ^ * 0 ^ . m A man In a hospital for mental Salesman at an automobile show:

cases sat fishing over a flower bed. "And what kind of horn would you

A visitor approached, and remarked, like, sir? Do you care for a good loud

condescendingly: "How many have you blast?"

caught?"

"Petticoat Fever" brought a fine re­

Haughty Customer: "No, I want

sponse from the first night audience

"You're the ninth," was the reply. something that Just sneers."—Phoney

last Tuesday at the opening of Star­

—Phoney Phun.

Phun.

light's twelfth professional Acton#

.?5^!

Hollywood Star, Plays the Lead. at the home of Miss Eloise Luquer at Equity season. The play is as charm­

Bedford Hills, Friday afternoon, June ing and entertaining as has been seen

The second season at the Putnam 20th were: Mrs. Charles Keeler, Mrs. hereabouts in many months. With

County Playhouse, Mahopac, starts A. H. Vail, Mrs. Benjamin Van Scoy, David Lewis as Deascom Dlnsmore, the Cardinal Cleaners and Dyers

Tuesday, July 8th, as an International Mrs. E. Kling, Mrs. T. F. Hyland, Mrs. same brilliant acting is brought to the

Season in honor of the United Nations James Dbole, Mrs. Fred Tompkins and Pawling Summer Theatre Playhouse Laundry, Tailoring, Pressing, Rug Cleaning

featuring eight plays from eight mem­ Mrs. John Meldrum. The principal that made him so popular last year.

ber nations. , speaker was Miss Alice Palmer, who Lynne Carver, the new leading wo­

WE CALL AND DELIVER

The first attraction will be the

told about her work for the church at man, has both charm and beauty, and

American play by Thornton Wilder,

Ellis island.

her scenes with David Lewis fairly

sparkled, and they were, perfect in 74 NO. MAIN ST BREWSTER 2596

"Skin of Our Teeth," with Mady Corell,

who appeared on the screen as Mr. and Mrs. George Shott of timing and mood. Samuel Fertlg and

Chaplin's wife in "Monsler Verdoux." Brooklyn, spent Sunday at their home Margaret Fullerton, direct from New

Just previous to that Miss Corell play­ here.

York playing, are excellent additions

to the company, which also included

ed for a year on Broadway in the

leading part of "School for Brides." Miss Bessie Ryder, Miss Mary Ritch, in this opening production: Allen

For many years she has divided her Mrs. Charles Keeler and Mrs. Thomas Nourse, Peter Barno, William Weyse,

time between Hollywood and Broad­ Hyland drove to Harrison, N. Y., last Marion Townsend and Cecily Bow­ ADRIAN CARGAIN

way. Miss Corell was a member of the Monday afternoon and called on Mrs. man. The staging of Stuart Warring­

original group of actors who form the C. Nickerson and Mrs. E. Reynolds at ton shows great skill and sense of

(Successor to the late Edward Ganong)

nucleus of Jill Miller's ' company at the Miriam Osborn Home.

comedy values, and the setting by Ayr-

11 Gentles brought forth spontaneous

Mahopac.

FUNERAL DIRECTOR and EMBALMER

Members of the delegations to the The June 18th meeting of the Lad­

applause.

United Nations will Journey to Maies Aid of the Methodist Church} was Isobel Rose Jones, the managing dihopac

each week to view the produc­ held at the home of Mrs. James Ellrector of the famous Starlight Thea­ FUNERAL HOME

tion from their country. The other iott.tre,

Introduced to the audience on the

seven plays are: "Escape" toy John

opening night, Mr. John Barclay, who

Galsworthy, English;' "The Arbitra­ Mrs. Charles O'Shea, of Vista, vis­ will be guest star for the next play,

Carmel - New York

tion" by Monander, Greece; "Hedda ited Miss Bessie Smith recently. "The Bachelor Father," which opens

Gabler" by Henrik Ibsen, Norway;

Tuesday, July 1st to run through Sun­

Tel. Carmel 672 Day or Night

"S. S. Tenacity" toy Charles Vildrac, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Cooper and day, July 6th. •

France; "Adam the Creator" toy Karel son, of Long Island, were recent guests

o—-—

and Josef Capek, Czechoslovakia; and of Mrs. George Hoyt.

iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiuitiiiiiiniiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiii

Grimes Co. Sells -

"Squaring the Circle" by Valentin

Katayev, Russia. A Chinese play to Mr. and Mrs. Harry Taylor, of New Lucy Meade Place

PHONE

be selected.

Britain, and Mr. James Hanford and

grandson, Allen Vollmer, of Stratford,

Conn., called on Mr. and Mrs. T. F.

The Thomas C. Grimes Co. has sold

PURDYS

Hyland last Sunday.

for Mrs. Lucy A. Meade her residence

property on the Croton Falls-Mahopac

Road. Mrs. Meads is leaving soon to

Morey—S toiler

The July meeting of St. James

Office

live in Chicago. The new owners, Mr.

Frances M. Stolter, daughter of Mr. Guild will be held at the home of Mrs. and Mrs. Robert Palmateer, formerly

and Mrs: William Stolter, of Sheno­ Leonard Morey, Salem Center.

Brewster 2288

of Syracuse, N. Y., will take possession

rock, N. Y.', was married Friday even­

early In July.

ing at seven o'clock in St. Joseph's Mr. and Mrs. Robert Milligan and

rectory, Croton Falls, N. Y., by Father family were at their home over the

o—»•—

Res. - Night

Joseph Cotier, to Orln J. Morey, son week end.

CARD PARTY TOMORROW

of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Morey, Purdys,

Croton Falls 555

New York.

Miss Margaret Burt attended a.class

Vail's Park Association is all set to

The bride wore a navy blue street- reunion at Smith College, Northamp­

open the Summer card parties in the

length dress and 'wore a corsage of ton, Mass., recently.

Community House. The first meeting*

is Friday night, June 27. Mr. Richard

24 Hour Service

pink talisman roses.

Hinsh, Jr., chairman, will have bridge

Mrs Douglas Finch, of Shenorock, Miss Ruthanne Maurhoff, who re­ and pinochle with prizes and refresh­

SHELL

sister of the bride, served as the cently graduated, will enter Plattsments. bridesmaid. She wore a white print burg College in the Fall. Ruthanne

—:—r° ••

jersey street-length dress.

will spend the summer months work­

The bridegroom had as his best ing at an inn in Pennsylvania.

A man never gets ahead of his bills

if he lets them do all the running. —

man, Mr. Douglas Finch, brother-in-

The Dummy.

law of the bride, as best man.

Mrs. Aiken Knox has been enter­

o——•—

Fuel Oil and Range Oil

Mr. Morey attended Central High taining a friend from Philadelphia The new cars are so streamlined a

School. Purdys, and served two years for the past several days.

/edestrian can't tell whether he's been

with the U. S: Army. He is now em­

' n—O I •un over or backed into.—The Dum­ BRADY-STANNARD FUEL CO. I

ployed toy the State Highway Depart­ ADVERTISE IN THE STANDARD my.ment.

87 North Main Street. Brewster. N. Y.

A buffet lunch was served after the

L. A. M. BRADY STEPHEN BROWN

ceremony to about 25 guests by Mr.

Morey's parents at their home on

iiimnmumiiKiiiuuiiuinwuiimHnuiiim

Route 116. Guests were present from The Sentimentalist Orchestra

Purdys, Shenorock, Peekskill, Tarrytown,

Mill Plain, Conn., and New York

City.

MUSIC FOR ALL OCCASIONS

The couple plan to make their home

with Mr. Morey's parents for an Indefinite

time.

Dr. and Mrs. E. V. Hastings and the Saturday morning, June 21, 1947, in

twins have moved to Battle Creek, a double ring ceremony.

Michigan, where he is stationed.

The bride, given in marriage toy her

«. a J .. »«- „,,A «*«. r-h.,vi«.i.-' f p thT. hM as mald-of-honor, her sls-

On Sunday Mr. .and Mrs Charles Tomokins of Wind-

Williams were Kuestaofjfcelr J^md-hanv the bridesmaids were Mrs. Geo.

ter and family. Mr and Mrs. Raymond | Franklin. c*mn..MI»

Nagel and the^oys at their home in K„therIne L Uaht of wlndham,and

Miss Gladvs A. Tompkins, of Croton

Falls. N. Y.

Martin Lundy. Jr.. of Purdvs. N. Y..

K

ro^he»* of the bridegroom, was best

man: Ravmond Lundv. another brothttfhomri.

, Mr.nn" < & m pS n Mrs. Gordon Fear is visiting her

mother. Mrs. E. Noxon, in Osslnlng,

N. Y., for a few days.

Mi"'^ns or th< br.de. were usher*. .

dock and the boys in Virginia for a

Tho hride'R pown was of white eyelet

with long train, her veil of tulle

short visit.

was of can shane «athere^ at each side

with rosettes of lace and seed pearls.

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Jennings,

*f *J5 EJ« in tZZm**'* for n few She carried a bouo"et of white roses

who had been in the village for a lew ; ... «.*_„„.„__„ ««,» -,-u „# uftnn.

weeks, left for their home in Ford.'*"* 1 Miss Kitty Ward, of Purdys, and

Miss Shirley Mayes, of Croton Falls,

who are classmates in the seventh

grade at Purdys Central High School,

celebrated their 13th birthday anniversaries

on Thursday, June 19th.

Mrs. Mason Ward. Kitty's mother, invited

the class of twelve students and

their teacher, Mrs. Everett Seldel, to

luncheon at her home to celebrate the

occasion. There were two birthday

cakes. Two gifts were brought by

each guest who presented them to

Kittv and* Shirley. Miss Louise Carey,

Mrs. Ward's sister, of Newport, R.

II, helped Mrs. Ward with the serving.

Mr. and Mrs. O. E. Bittner entertained

relatives and friends at a reception,

held at their home, in honor

of their daughter. Doris, who graduated

Monday, June 23 from Central

Hiah School. Purdys. Among the

auests were Miss June Bittner and

Miss Leatrice Palumbo. of Elmhurst,

streamers. The mald-of-hnnor L. I.; Bud Breeden, of Long Island,

wore a pnwn of vellow evelet. match-

N. J., on Saturday.

formerly of Willows, Md.: and Mrs.

inn: hat. She carried yellow rose buds Bittner's cousin. Mrs. Gertrude Cote

and son, Wilfred, of West Cheschire.

Conn, and Mrs. Melandy Hamel, of

Waterbury. Conn. Miss Bittner will

enter Syracuse Universitv in Septem­

2 ^ J & . S ? " & t o w E f S B S - * . wore . .own of ber. Her cousin. Miss Rita Bittner.

who graduated with her, will enter the

Washington School for Secretaries in

the Pall.

Miss Hildur Halvor*en will graduate

from Vassar College, Poughkeepsle, N.

Y., Monday. June 30th. She will

from Goldens

spend the summer at home with her

evening Michael at Bartone the Katonah *"T High »adu'atel, school. ham Hi*h School and School of Nurs-

In Bridge. the class were of among 37. Jean ^ Seymore W j \ and i n v Pt Hertford. Conn. Hosoital. She

family.

The Commencement, address was giv- i fj*rv#v1 i" the A»-nw Wiirsp CorDR in trip

en bv the Rev. James H. Link of To#t-

Miss Kitty Ward and her cousin.

South Pp«*in> for m


THURSDAY. JUNE 26, 1947 THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED i*«° PAGE SEVEN

ADVERTISE IN THE STANDARD

DAN CARLO

Mason Contractor

Tel. Brewster 2359

PAINTING

DECORATING

Heppner & Sons

Tel. 2150

Peaceable Hill Road

BREWSTER. NEW YORK

Mid-County Roofing Co*

General Contractors

RESmTNG and REROOFTNG

Asbestos • Insulbriok

AaphaH Roofs

Leafless • Gotten

Free Mkthnato - No Down Payment

I Toon to Pay

Call North Salem 2272

P. J. Cahin - E. P. Cahill

Over SO Years Experience

Robberoid - Flintoote

Johns-ManrOle Product*

THE

PUTNAM COUNTY

SAVINGS BANK

Brewster, N. Y.

Incorporated 1871

OFFICERB

Goorge E. Jennings, Prwklml

Arthmr P. Bodd, Vloe Preatdect

I. Hart Purdjr, Vloe Preatdent

Margaret R. Mackey, Secretary

Daane C. Comatook. Coanael

Depoatto made on or eefore the

tenth oootnoai day of Janoory,

and July wRl bear interest from

the first of theae raentht. ro-

-*• - •

•peciiTeiy.

Member of

Federal Depealt Insaraaoe Corp.

• , FIRST

NATIONAL BANK

BREWSTER, N. *.

Member of Federal Deposit

Insaronoe Corporation

Capital $100,000

Surplus $50,000

BURGLAR

PROOF VAULT

A modern burglar proof safe

deposit vault has recently

been installed. Boxes.rent

for $5 per year.

I. DOUGLASS MEAD. President

E. D. STANNABD,

I

Vlce Prtoident and Oaabler .

D. E. STANNABD, Aaat-Cuhler

iiiitiiiunminfiuunuiiuiiiiunuiiiiiumwiiiiiiiiyumiimumi^gi

You get what your architect

specifies when you get Building

Materials from us.

LUMBER, M1LLWORK

MASONS' MATERIALS

PAINTS. HARDWARE

Danbury-Brewster

Lumber Co.

232 - 260 Main Street

Tel. 787

The Methodist Social Group win go

on a picnio to Pahnestock Park on

Saturday, June 28. All members should

be at the church at 3:30 pan. Joe

Young, chairman, hopes for a good attendance.

A mixed softball game Is

on the program of entertainment.

Marvin Lawn

Mower Shop

SALES and SERVICE

Power and Hand

Fire Extinguishers

V. S. CAROLLO

Brewster. 698

JAMES SNIDERO

Bulldozer Work and'

Trucking

Excavation, Road Building

Sand, Gravel, Top Soil

Phone 402

68 Marvin Ave, firewater, N. T.

HORN'S

Funeral Service

Our service available to all re­

gardless of financial condition.

Pawling, N. V.

Phone Mil

ALFRED VICW

Mason

*

General Contractor

Phone 2269

Tt Oaneel Ave, . n. r.

N. TRANQUILLI

General Contractor

and

Builder

Phone 2385

50 N. Main St. Brewster, N. Y.

OVER 80 YEARS EXPERIENCE

^

Oliver was careless about his personal

effects. When his mother saw

clothing scattered about on the chair

and the floor, she Inquired: "Who did

not hang up his clothes when he went

to bed? .

A mufflel voice from under the covers

murmured, "Adam."—Phoney Phun

FLOORS

Scraped - Refinished

Waxed - Laid

PHILIP WIRTA

MT. KISCO 6337

Visit Our Gardens This Week End

They are Filled with Blooms.

HARRY~PAYNE -

PEACH LAKE

North Salem 2664

PBRHCTLY BEAUTIFUL!

VENETIAN BUNDS

Light... Lovely... Laager Lasting

... Easy to clean.,. made of

flexible aluminum alloy for long

life. Sun-proof plastic finish won't

chip, crack or peel. Custom-made to

fit Come in for our estimate today.

MANES

Venetian Blind Co.

110 Westville Ave. Extension

DANBURY, CONN.

Tel. Danbury 8-0931W

fit H. Wells Addresses

Putnam Valley Class

(Continued from Page 1)

proper bearing of an officer is carer

Make service your object. President

Hadlcy of Yale held service out as the

object in life and I read a few days

ago that President Compton of the

Massachusetts Institute of Technology,

advised the graduates of William

and Mary College in Williamsburg,

Virginia, to have service as their ideal

fully cultivated and, indeed, the best, .t

part of the physical training of a pri- "ft,?* tnan Setting something for

vate soldier is what is called the •*et» notmnf.

ting up" drill. A public speaker needs! Good Age

to have a firm hold on the ground. It i Next. Peel you are living in a good

is very ineffective to stand in a slouch- age. The good old times were not the

tag way while speaking, or to limp I good old times. Protestants don't go

first on one leg and then on the 6th- I to church as they did years ago but

er, or to give-anyssign of body feeble- ; there has been much progress In chardlers'

position of attention and re- itable work, in welfare work, in comness

or limpness. You know the sol- j batting cruelty to children and cruelspect

is with the heels together and.ty to animals. You have this fine

body erect. That position is always school, not the same as fifty years ago.

an element In the best manners, and Drinking went on in the good old

there is hardly a more efficient ele- 1 times. Mr. Stannard, our County

ment. The mode of speaking is im- Treasurer, told me that Senator

portant. Gentleness, clearness and.Towner told him of at least one parcourtesy

In speech are valuable injty, at an tan northeast of Brewster,

every profession and in every business, attended by representatives of Colon-

Church Services

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH

Rev. W. Stanley Shuker, Minister

Sunday, June 20, 1947

10:00 a.m.—Church School.

11:00 am—Morning Worship with

sermon by Mr. Donald McLagan.

All welcome.

o —

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

Brewster

Rev. 'Harry P. Foulk, Pastor

Mrs. WW. WaabJburn, Supt.

• •

i Sunday, June 29, 1947

10:00 am.—Sunday Church School.

Come and meet your friends and

neighbors who are now coming to

Sunday School. Join them in a friendly

class discussion of the lesson topic

for this Sunday. There is a class for

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH

Rev. Gordon E. Hohl. Pastor

SO North Main Street

Brewster, N. Y.

Sunday, June 22, 1947

9:30 a.m.—Sunday School.

11:00 am. *— Morning Service to be

conducted by Mr. Arthur E. Baron,

student for the ministry at the Lutheran

Theological Seminary, Philadelphia.

• — -o — •

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Rev. W. Dyer Blair, Minister

P. O. Box 655, Mt. KIsco, N. Y.

iiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiitiiiNniiHiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiaiii

I LIGHT

DELIVERIES

TO AND r*ROM

D. CEASRINE

Telephones

BREWSTER 704

MT. KISCO 6519

iiiniiiiiiHimauiiiiimgarainuiiiiniimiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiuiiiaiiuuiiiuii

Theo. K. Schaefer

Counsellor at Law

Br«wtt«r, N. V*.

Telephone 888 .

A choice •election of American

o antiques In OLA88,' CHINA,

CLOCKS, FURNITURE, etc

FurpJture restored promptly

ana expertly In our own shop.

STOUT HILL FARM

Croton Falls Road • Mshopse, N. Y

MAMARET 8. L0IINI

TeL 594...

St. CAMPBELL LORIM

Tony Gioccolanti

General Contractor

and Mason

Brewster, N. Y.

TeL 2371

Cheerfulness of manner Is everything lal families. The women went home

in some businesses. And then a real early,~the men stayed on and drank _ every member of your family. The 11-

sincerity ought to be expressed in-and" thenext"day one man went back|lustrated Bible story will help your

manners, a difficult, and yet, a very and paid for the broken furniture. "I child.

precious thing. Frankness is a good, Forty deaths from diphtheria oc-l "500 am.—Morning Worship Servpart

of it. When you shake hands with crrred in the small village of Brew-1 ice. The message of the morning will

a man or woman, look in the eyes, ster about 1880—no antitoxin "such as me "Shadows." Every person is cast­

straight In the eyes, with no blinking we have today.

ing a shadow upon some one. We can

of the encounter." I You have politely listened. I hope! either be a blot or a

blessing, but

President Eliot urged the Hotchkiss you will listen to your parents and to; never * blank,

boys to learn some skill or intellectual other older 'people thouah you may Wednesday, July 2, the Ladies. Aid

factulty to give pleasure to other peo- not always think our advice good. will meet at the summer home, of Mrs.

pie. You young men and women may { General Putnam ] Harry G. Buck at Whaley Lake. All

go into some activity just because you | During the Revolution, not far from members are asked to bring plates and

want to set in the social swim. Presi- here, in'the southwestern part of what silverware. A covered dish luncheon

dent Eliot said the way to make your- .is now Putnam County, General Israel !will be served at one o'clock.

selves welcome guests among the rich Putnam was stationed with his solor

the poor, in the palace or In the diers. This was the first break for ' Rev. Harry P. Foulk, pastor of the

tenement or on the farm, is to learn j freedom. On down through the years First Baptist Church of Brewster, was

to do something to give pleasure to from 1776 'till tonight men and wo- appointed the Union Baptist Assoclaothers—learn

to stag a song or to play men have struggled at home and In tion representative for the Crusade for

an instrument, or to read aloud, or battle to get and keep that freedom. Christ through Evangelism, at the

to take part In plavs. I accldently \ Some men and women, have made the Board of Managers meeting of the

learned to Imitate President Hadley supreme sacrifice. As we think of New York Baptist State Convention at

of Yale and am often called on to those who have struggled, as we hooe the First Baptist Church of Syracuse,

show off/ President Hadlev said, *Yale the spirits of those from Putnam Val- N. Y, June 2, 1947. It will be the re-

Unlverslty, considered from an under- lev who have made the supreme sac- sponsibllity of Rev. Foulk to promote

graduate standpoint; is unexcelled by riflce are hovering over us, let us old the Evangelism Crusade among all the

any institution, but Yale, in her irrad- and young go "forth from this hall Baptist Churches of the Association,

uate courses, cannot compete with in- [bent on leading lives of satisfaction to which Includes the following churches:

sti tut ions situated in our large cities.' ourselves and of service to our fellow Antioch Church, Bedford Hills: First

Our Incipient lawyers do not get the men. I Baptist, Brewster; Mt. Carmel, Carbenefit

of the numerous cases which j As you members of the graduating mel; Cross River, Katonah, Croton

come \?n in the Boston courts. Our class go forth to lead those useful and Falls Baptist, Croton Falls: First Bapyoung

doctors do not get the benefit satisfactory lives I know you have the tlst. Dykemans; First Kent, Kent

of the numerous complications and best wishes'of all who are gathered Cliffs; Second Kent, Ludingtonvllle:

diseases which occur in the New York .here tonight. Kent and Flshklll, Farmers Mills; Red

hospitals, and furthermore our theo- o 'Mills, Mahopac Falls; Towners, Patlogical

students are somewhat handl-! ORDINANCES terson, and First Baptist, Peekskill.

Vacuum Cleaner

WASHING MACHINE

SERVICE

All Makes Repaired

M. J. Fischer A Son

Tel. 654 or 572

|j 4 Progress St., Brewster, N.Y.

=

Qelker & Cox

Distinctive Funeral Service

BREWSTER . MT. KIgOO

Nursery Stock

For Spring Planting

Dogwood Trees - . Rose Boshes

Perennials - Flowering; Crabs

Evergreens - Tans - Phlox

Giant Flowering

capped by the lack of sin in NewHav- J ' I The Evangelism Crusade for New

en. But nevertheless we endeavor to At a regular meeting of the Board York State is a part of the Crusade

teach the underlying principle govern- of Trustees of the 'Village of Brewster, for Christ through Evangelism of the

tag all." 'held at the Village Office. No. 94Main Northern Baptist Convention which

Not onlv learn how to give pleasure street. Brewster, New York, on the was adopted at their annual meeting

to others by your skills or intellectual | loth day of June. 1947, a full Board In Atlantic City,

faculties, but go out of your way to be being present and voting in the af- The minimum objectives for the two

friendly.. Dr. Clark, who has a camp. flrmative, the following Ordinances year Crusade in up-state New York

on Mt. Riea, Conn., near ours, said,were enacted, to wit: includes the winning of 10.000 souls to

"If you want friends you've got to do I All music 'boxes, Juke boxes, phono- Christ, 10,000 non-resident re-enlisted,

something for them." You don't need graphs, pianos, radios and musical 10.000 new church school pupils, 100

to be amusing all the time or brilliant machines of any nature whatsoever in new teaching and preaching outposts

to have friends. Through friends life taverns, restaurants and commercial established, 10 new churches organ-

Is pleasanter. I establishments within the corporate ized. This will mean for eacr? church

People Who Differ j limits of the Village of Brewster shall a ten per cent increase in their mem-

Nekt. One very 'good trait Is getting not be operated between the hours of bershio and the Church School enalong

with people who differ with you. J twelve o'clock midnight and nine rollment.

o'clock A. M. During the period of Rev. Foulk will attend his first

the year that daylight saving time is meeting for representatives of the I ^ f ^ e e thousand "souls.*" And tfcSJ"

in effect, such time shall be deemed Evangelism Crusade Committee a$jomMn|una dallv ,,«th on_ accorri «„

_ m Standard Time for the purpose of this the First Baptist Church. Albany, on K3E£3e and bTeaklna bread? from

ocrat and Lincoln was a Whig before j Ordinance. .July 9. • At this meeting the state cru- K^eto house did eat the?? rmSJ

GLADIOLUS BULBS

$5.00 per 100

the Republican narty was formed but| Any person violating any provision sade director, Rev. Gordon H. Schroe- 22g badness and sineleness3' hVarr

Mr. Lincoln made Mr. Stanton Secre-'|of this Ordinance shall be punishable. der, of Syracuse, will outline suggest- Satetae God and havine favour 585

tary of War. Secretary of the Treas-j by a fine or penalty not exceeding \ ed procedures for the pastors and ,, th B V And the I^rd added

urv Salmon P. Chase tried to get the Twenty-five Dollars for each offense. ,church leaders to follow in attatagthe' Jf 1 Sunday, June 29, 1947

10:00 a.m.—Sunday Church School.

Classes for all age groups. The leader

of the adult forum will be Dr. Alexander

Vanderburgh.

11:00 am.—Church Service,of Worship.

Sermon theme: "Choose ye thia

day whom ye will serve."

The Lord's Supper or Holy Communion

will be celebrated on Sunday

morning, July 6th at 11 o'clock.

A series of ten Sunday afternoon

Vesper Services will be conducted at

the Southeast Church beginning July

13th at 3 o'clock. Dr. Philip Watters,

president of Drew Seminary, will be

the speaker. Other outstanding speakers

will follow.

ST. LUKE'S CHURCH

Somen

Rev. S. R. Brinckerhoff, Rector

Sunday, June 29, 1947

St. Peter's Day

8:00 am.—Holy Communion.

9:30 am.—Morn in? Prayer and sermon.

Thursday, Friday and Saturday

8:00 a.m.—Holy Communion.

i o

ST. JAMES' CHURCH

North Salem

Rev. S. R. Brinckerhoff, Rector

Sunday, June 29, 1947

St. Peter's Day

11:00 am — Morning Prayer and

sermon. >.

-o

CHURCHES OF CHRIST,

SCIENTIST

"Christian Science" is the Lesson-

Sermon subject for Sunday, June 29.

Golden Text: "Heal the sick, cleanse

the lepers, raise the dead,, cast out

devils: freely ye have received, freely

give" (Matt. 10:8).

Sermon: From the King James version

of the Bible (Acts 2:38. 39. 41, 46,

47): "Then Peter said unto them,.Repent,

and be baptized every one of' you

in the name of Jesus Christ for the

remission of sins, and ye shall receive

the gift of the Holy Ghost. For the

promise is unto you. and to your children,

and to all that are afar off, even

as many as the Lord our God shall

calL Then they that gladly received

his word were baptized: and the same

Abraham Lincoln was a good example.

day there were added unto them

Edwin M. Stanton, an Ohio lawyer,

had been very mean to Mr. Lincoln

in Cincinnati in 1855. He was a Dem-

£?ch3dSMTLX Jf^QUM 2

CARL CHIRASELLO

Bulldozer Work

EXCAVATING, GRADING

Trucking

TOP BOO* SAND, GKAVKL

STONE, COCDERS, MANURE

Brewster 2155

Republican nomination in 1864 away objectives of the Evangelism Crusade. IJJVJ3M y y S Sm>UW **

from the President but Mr. Lincoln' NO private vehicle shall be parked

Correlative passages from "Science

later made him Chief Justice of the i or allowed to remain standing in any FINDING TB EARLY and Health with Key to the Scrip­

United States Supreme Court. area designated as a "Bus Stop" or

tures" by Mary Baker Eddy include:

Character a "Cab Stand."

, Much serious illness could be averted "Is it error which is restoring an es­

Next. I wish to sneak about char- Any person \ violating any ., F provision |ff every adult formed the habit of sential element of Christianity, name­

acter. President Taft was a graduate of this Ordinance shall be'punishable J having an annual physical examinaly, apostolic, divine healine? No; it is

of Yale and it is said that he remark-,j>y a fine or penalty not exceeding tion, including a chest x-ray. A loss the Science of Christianity which is

ed at a reunion that in the end char-. Twenty-five Dollars for each offense. ! of weight and that "tired feeling," for restoring it, and is the light shining

cater was the real thing that counted.'

example, would not send some people in darkness, which the darkness com­

Bv character I mean backbone, inde­ Progress Street in the Village of to the doctor for a check-up, yet these prehends not. Today the healing

pendence, standing up for the under- Brewster between Main Street and _ symptoms could be signs of early tu­ power of Truth Is widely demonstrat­

doar, taking the unoopular side whenJHoyt Street is hereby designated as a berculosis. It is estimated that there ed as an lmmenent, eternal Science,

riffht. treating people, old and young, j street in which vehicles shall pass in are approximately 500,000 people in instead of a phenomenal exhibition.

right, honestly. _^^^^^^^ the southerly direction only from Hoyt the United States suffering from tu­ Its appearing is the coming anew of

Decisions

Street to Main Street.

berculosis, yet only about half are re­ the gospel of 'on. earth peace, good­

To have good character we should, Any person violating any provision ceiving proper care.

will toward men'." (pp. 347. 150).

as much as possible, form our decis* of this Ordinance shall be punishable What prevents the other 250.000

o———

ions ahead of time by good habits—not by a fine or penalty not exceeding from seeking medical help? Many of

CHURCH OF ST. LAWRENCE

leave decisions to be made on the spur | Twenty-five Dollars for each offense! them do not know they have tuber­

of the moment. Professor James in

culosis. The disease in its early

Rev. Josepli A. Heaney, Rector

his book on Phychojogy said that if In addition to the fines or penalties ] stages is almost symptomless, and peo-

Sundav Masses

a person will practice unselfish acts aforesald it is ordained each and every pie who overlook "minor ailments"

8, 9:30 and 11 o'clock.

day by day his mind gets so grooved violation of any of the provision of j may have tuberculosis for weeks or

Novena devotions Monday evening;

that when some life must be saved at any of the foregoing Ordinances or months without discovering it. Yet, at 8 o'clock.

a fire that person does not hesitate parts thereof shall constitute disor­ it is in this early symptomless stage

St. Lawrence Church, Brewster, 7,

but goes up the ladder as if by habit. derly conduct, and the person violat­ that their disease would respond best

i Bravery is a part of his character. ing the same shall be a disorderly and fastest to medical care.

9 and 11 o'clock.

Wendell Phillips

person.

The principal diagnostic device for

o u

Next. Take up some charitable work.! All Ordinances or parts of Ordln- detecting early tuberculosis is the

FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING

Wendeil Phillip's, the crusader against ances in any way inconsistent with chest x-ray. Chest x-ray helps find

A meeting for worshlo according to

human slavery, once said, "I would i toe provisions of these Ordinances are the disease before outward signs and

he custom of the Society of Friends

say to you, my young friends, throw hereby repealed.

symptoms appear or are recognized.

Quakers) is held every First Day

yourselves upon the altar of some The foregoing Ordinances shall be­ That is why. in many communities

lornlnp (Sundav» at 11 o'clock in the

come effective July 1, 1947.

throughout the U. S. and its territor­

'roton Valley Meeting House, situat-

inoble cause. Enthusiasm is the life.

ies, the search for tuberculosis is bed

about two miles northwest of Mt.

of the soul. To rise in the morning (Dated, Brewster. New York

ing carried on among apparently

218O0 near Croton Lake. Anyone car-

only to eat and drink and gather gold; June 10th. 1947

is a life not worth living.

W. BOYNTON TOWNER. healthy people who. without even

ng to worshlo is welcome,

So Join the Red Cross, help the Boy

Village Clerk. knowing that they are 111. are losine

o

Scouts, row the children at the church

o

their health and endangering the Grange Pays Tribute

picnic if you don't go into welfare Pedestrians should 'be seen and not health of others.

work as a full time Job.

hurt.—The Dummy.

——o

To Laura W. Bloomer

'Continued on Page 4)

o

Christian Science Radio Program

The Indians and early settlers be- „ • . " "7~. ' . . . I Resolutions, adopted at a stated

ilieved that no poisonous serpents ^Z

would be found in the same area with

The dollars $aved on every ton the Oregon ash tree.

Will buy an awful lot of fun I

Make Heading BriqueH your household fuel,

and you'll have many an extra dollar lor

shows or trips or partie*, or what you will. MUIR'S

Beading Briuueu are made with wuall tixe*

of genuine Vauiuub Beading Hard Coal,

FOR

preued into briquets, in size between stove

and nut coaL

They give the. advantages of large size NURSERY

coal at much lower cost. Ideal for furnace,

hot water heater, fireplace or

wherever you use coal. Why not try STOCK

them? We know you'll luce them.

Wholesale ^— Retail

• Rhododendrons

• Azaleas

• Taxus

• Flowering Shrubs

LANDSCAPING

CALL DANBURY 8*0741

W. & M. MUIR

Danbury-Brewscer Road

OPEN SUNDAYS

1 "?^ ?° W 1S „, the s u b i e c t /V meeting of Brewster Grange. No 1344

Christian Science radio program to be p of JJ . * ' '

Y?ri?^tvT7l0^

Almighty God ln HIS Wis -'

T85L& LJ1 W J, i„„: oiJS of ovS dom has called from o^ midst our be-

Chap erl 0n June 9tl 8t :3 loved

tLi 2L. ? i ° Sister. Laura Waite Bloomer, a

K n, |SrLv^? , th i rSZ £ro?H,JX U m e m b e f ° f ! ° n * stand!n » ° f Blw *eJ

ing the courtesy System, of is the aoproved Mutal Broadcast by The - Grange.

Whereas,

No.

throushout

1344. P. of H.,

the

and

years of

Christian Science Board of Directors. her association with us.we knew her

June 20. 1947.

GEMS OF THOUGHT to be 'loyal, friendly and a deeply interested

member of our fraternity,

^^^^^ Personal Praise and

«_ ..t. u j j. Whereas, as a neighbor and citizen

Praise, like gold and diamonds, owes ^ win ^ ^ ^ y missedi ^ it there.

its value only to its scarcity. It be- fore

comes cheap as it becomes vulgar, and Resolved, that we. the members of

will no longer raise expectation or Brewster Grange. No. 1344. P. of H.

animate enterprise—Samuel Johnson ;do hereby express our deep sense of

*L « t TT" .. l06S at her Passing and our sympathy

As the Greek said, manv men know m thelr bereavement, with the memhow

to flatter: few know how to bers of her famllVt and be it further

praise.—Wendell Phillips Resolved. That we cause one copy of

these resolutions to be spread upon

It is difficult to say which may be the minutes, one copy sent to her fammost

mischievous to the human heart. Uy, and one copy to the local paper

the praise of the dispraise of men.— ! for publication.

Mary Baker Eddy , j MERLE L. GREENE

The 1947 Canning Time Table for

ELLA W. STANLEY C. GRADY SHUKER

Vegetables has just been completed by

Committee

the College of Home Economics at

WILLIAM L. AVERY. Sec.

Cornell. Free copies are available to

0

New York residents from the Mailing The praises of others may be of use

Room. Roberts Hall. Ithaca, N. Y. in teaching us not what we are, but

what we ought to be.—Hare

It takes a great deal of grace to be

o -

able to bear praise. Censure seldom Speech should be free. So little of

does us much harm.—Spurgeon it is worth anything.—The Dummy.

READING

BRIQUETS

THE NEW 'STkEAMUNED" ECONOMY FUEL

Eaton-Kelley Co.

LUMBER — COAL — FEED


PAGE BIGHT

ADVERTISE IN THE STANDARD

STARLIGHT

Theatre - Pawling

ROUTE 22

This Week thru SUN., JUNE 29

PETTICOAT

FEVER


Next Week: JOHN BARCLAY

— In —

BACHELOR FATHER

Thar*. Mat. Tel. Patterson 271

A Cornell farm economist . reports

that saving one minute ft cow -at each

milking for a 20-cow herd means a

month's time saved to a year.

o

Think not those faithful who praise

all the words and actions, but those

who kindly reprove thy faults.—Socrates

Antique Furniture

Wanted In Any Condition

Will Pay Top Cash

also for

Guns, Swords, Anything Old.

Get My Appraisal Before Ton Self

JOHN KENT

P. O. Box 312 BREWSTER, N.Y.

VISIT OUR SHOP

Opp. Bailey Farm on Rt. 312

Bedford Playhouse

Phone B. V. 7348. Mats. Sun, Wed., Sat. at 2:30. Dally, 7 and 9

Last Times Thursday, Jane 26

Charles Boyer with Jennifer Jones In CLUNY BROWN

Friday and Saturday, June 27-28

Dick Haymes - Vera Ellen - Cesar Romero

^ • CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA in Color

Sunday, Monday, Jane 29-30

Dick Powell and Evelyn Keyes

• JOHNNY O'CLOCK

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, July 1 - 2 - S

FIRST SHOWING

EVENINGS — ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY AT 8 \ '*

(Feature at 8:30) I Matinee Wednesday Only at 2:30

* Admission Prices for This Special Engagement Orffy

Advance Reservations Held Until Preceding Day Only

LeMar

of JBfc^ !

— THE BREWSTER STANDARD—ESTABLISHED 1869 THURSDAY. JUNE 26, 1947

Patterson Firemen

Plan Celebrationi

BREWSTER, N. Y.

Patterson firemen plan a big time,

June 30 to July 5, with a carnival and

parade. The parade wilj consist of

about thirty fire departments with

about 400 men and thirty pieces of

apparatus and six drum corps in line.

Line of march:From Harmony Road

through Main St. to West St., through

West St. to Mill St., through Mill St.

to Front St., through Front St past

judges' stand to railroad crossing

thence along Route 216 to carnival

grounds where refreshments will be

served to visiting departments.

Prizes will be awarded as follows:

Cup to best appearing department in

line, cup to, department with largest

number of men in line, cup to department

coming longest distance, cup to

best appearing musical unit^ in line.

The Judges will be Supervisor Ralph

8. Othouse of Patterson, Ex-Chief S.

E. Green of Pawling, William Lowe, Jr.

of Putnam Lake, Hon. John P. Dono-

CAMEO THEATRE

BREWSTER. N. Y.

Telephone: Brewster 688

Frl., Sat, June 27 and 28

RONALD COLMAN In

The Late

George Apley

and Introducing

PEGGY CUMMTNGS

Sat. Mat. Continuous from 2 P.M.

"RAIDERS* OF THE SOUTH"

with Johnny Mack Brown .

Sun., Mon„ Tues., June 29. - 30

• x July 1

Matinees Mon. & Tues. at 3 P. M.

The Yearling

. Starring

GREGORY PECK

JANE WYMAN

Claude Jarman, Jr. as "JODY"

Due to the length of feature, our

show will start Sunday at 2 p.m.

Wed., Thurs., July 2 and 3

Matinees Wed. & Than, at 3 p.m.

BUD ABBOTT

LOU COSTELLO

Buck Privates

Come Home

ALSO

The Big Town

PHILIT REED

Fri., Sat., July 4 and 5

Friday, July 4th Continuous

from 2:30 P. M.

Saturday Continuous from 2 P. M.

CORNEL WILDE

MAUREEN O'HARA In

The Homestretch

In Technicolor

Saturday Matinee Only:

AN ALL TECHNICOLOR

CARTOON SHOW

Announces the Opening of a Modern

Hand

Richie Bldg

Shoe Salon

Specializing in a full line of

popular Brands of

Men/ Women and Children Shoes ,

PHYSICAL CULTURE

AND

B0ST0NIAN SHOES

Bags

BREWSTER, N. Y.

Hosiery

4 No. Main St.

hoe of Garrison, County Clerk Harry

Barrett of Carmel.

There will be about 20 booths on

the grounds where you may enjoy

yourselves at games, etc. A 1947 Fleetmaster

Chevrolet automobile given

away on the last night of the carnival.

Large parking place. Come,

bring your family and have a good

time with Patterson Fire Department,

o

ADVERTISE IN THE STANDARD

WAKNi

BROS. PALACE

D A N B U R V

8 Days Beg. Sunday, June 29

Joel McCREA - Veronica LAKE

.

RAMROD

Plus

IT'S A JOKE SON

4 Days Beg. Wed., July

EDMOND O'BRIEN

ELLA RAINES

THE WEB

Plus

LOST HONEYMOON

William was thirsty tot knowledge!

and constantly spouted interesting

facts.

"I read today," he said to Michael,

"of the wonderful progress made in

aviation. Men who can do anything

—absolutely anything—a bird cart do."

But Michael was tired of wondershe

was more matter of fact. 'Is that

so?" he quiered. "Well, when you see

an airman fast asleep, hanging onto a

branch of a tree with one foot, 111

come and have a look."—Phoney Phun

Native Turkeys

WARNER BROS.

EMPRESS

Danbnry

Starts' Friday—For One Week

Gene . Rex

TTERNEY - HARRISON

George SAUNDERS In

"THE GHbST and

MRS. MUIR"

Co-Hit!

"THE BRASHER DOUBLOON"

Cont. Perf. Sunday from 1:15

Sat. Nlte Only: Doors Open 6 p.m.

Performance Starts at 6:30

Next Week, Starting July 4th

Ann Sheridan - Lew Ayres

In "THE UNFAITHFUL"

HENS—15 lbs. - 18 lbs,, live weight

TOMS—30 lbs. - 33 lbs., live weight

WILL SELL HALF TURKEY

• - Dressed weight 65 c fo*

Roasting Chickens and Broilers'

Fresh killed, dressed - - 55 c !&•

Live weight at the farm 40 c ft*

ORDER IN ADVANCE

Croton Falls 618

Fred W. Schultz, Hilltop Farm

.CROSBY ROAD, CROTON FALLS. N. Y.

He was a very aristocratic fish. His j The worst form of child labor la

ancestors swam under fihe Mayflower. I cWW laDor by a grown man. — The

—The Dummy. 'Dummy.

}WP)PJTN AM

fOUNTY

pL AY HOUSE

International Season

in honor of United Nations

8 plays from 8 member Nations

OPENS 1W¥

V

with THORNTON WILDER'S

-Pulitzer Prize Winner

"SKIN OF OUR TEETH"

VERNON RICE. N. Y. CRITIC . . .

on our first season—"BEST among

twenty-three summer theatres." v

'4- M»

MAKE RESERVATIONS EARLY

Phone Mahopac 2026

•\\i miles from Route 6

312 miles from Route 22

Croton Falls Road Mahopac, N. Y*

CHEVROLET TRUCKS

NEW FOUR-POINT DRIVER COM­

FORT: I. The cob that "breathe*."

2. Driver's compartment is wider

and deeper—with more leg room.

3. Wider, deeper, more comfortable

teals—fully adjustable. 4. Larger

windshield and windows give 22%

better visibility.

FLEXI- MOUNTED CAB—rubber*

cushioned against road shocks, tor*

sion and vibration.'

Stronger, sturdier FRAMES.

LONGER WHEELBASES.

t/iCREASED LOAD SPACE In pickups

and panel:..

V AIVE-IN-HEAD TRUCK ENGINES

•..•orId's most • -onomical for their

."OrtAUUC TRUCK CRAKES—

:n occlusive design for greater

-i tke-lining contact—assure quick,

safe stops.

with Hie exclusive CAB

—greatest contribution to driver comfort and safety In truck history!

See this truck at our showroom! See today's newest trucks, with

the cab that ^breathes"—that "inhales" fresh air and "exhales" used

air—keeps glass clear and free from fogging. See this line of advance-

design trucks, with new increased load space, longer-than-ever wheel-

bases and a host of other improvements destined to make Chevrolet

•f nMSvelr batting tat »eatti*Mlo£

even more highly preferred by truck buyers. «*•« ****«>«... *«

CHOOSE CHEVROLET TRUCKS FOR TRANSPORTATION UNLIMITED

BRADY-STANNARD MOTOR COMPANY, Inc.

90 North Main Street Phone 2180 Brewster, N. Y.

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