Il punto di vista del clinico - Associazione Italiana Epidemiologia

epidemiologia.it

Il punto di vista del clinico - Associazione Italiana Epidemiologia

Congresso dell’Associazione Italiana

di Epidemiologia (AIE)

Terrasini (Palermo) 4/6 Ottobre 2006

L’epidemiologia: una disciplina,

tante applicazioni

Prima sessione:

l’epidemiologia per la clinica

Luigi Pagliaro, Università di Palermo

1


L’epidemiologia per la clinica

1. Epidemiologia clinica: storia naturale e

definizione

2. L’epidemiologia clinica e il lavoro del

medico:

2.1 Diagnosi

2.2 Prognosi

2.3 Terapia

2.4 Rapporto con i pazienti

2


L’epidemiologia per la clinica

1.Epidemiologia clinica: storia

naturale e definizione

3


1. Epidemiologia clinica, una storia

Il concetto di malattia secondo Ippocrate

“According to the old humoral

concepts [of Hippocratic memory],

each patient had a unique disease,

based on individual imbalances in the

four humours. Clinicians would

discern those physiologic imbalances

while examining each patient, and

would then correct them by applying

such “rational” therapy as

bloodletting, blistering, purging, and

puking”(1)

AR Feinstein. J Clin Epidemiol 1996; 49: 1339-43

The 4

humours:

Phlegm, yellow

bile, blood

and black bile

4


1. Epidemiologia clinica.

Da Ippocrate a Virchow (1)

• Until the latter part of the 18 th century, diseases

were supposed to be due to an imbalance of the

four fluid humors of the body..… This was the

“humoral pathology”, which dated back to the

Greeks

! [In the 19th century] …Virchow saw the causes of

disease in changes of the cells. To Virchow the

body is a “cell state in which each cell is a

citizen”, and..the disease is a conflict between

the citizens of the state, caused by outer forces”

1.http://www.whonamedit.com/doctor.cfm/912.html

5


1. Epidemiologia clinica: l’origine

AR Feinstein. Clinical Judgement.

Williams & Wilkins, 1967, p. 220

“the numerical method” was

introduced into clinical medicine

more than a century ago by

PCA Louis…[He counted and

compared] the results of pts

treated in various ways. His

statistical techniques had many

defects,however, as might be

expected of any new approach

6


1.Epidemiologia clinica, 20° secolo

Paul JR. Clinical Epidemiology, J Clin Invest,

1938; 17: 539; University Chicago Press, 1958

Lusted LB. Introduction to MDM, Thomas Publ, 1968

Feinstein AR. Clinical Epidemiology, Saunders, 1985

Sackett DL & al. Clinical Epidemiology, Little, Brown & Co,

1 rst 1985 & 2 nd Edition 1991; Haynes RB, Sackett DL & al.

3rd Edition, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 2005

Sox HC & al. Medical Decision Making, Butterworths 1988

EBM Working Group. Evidence-based Medicine.

A new approach to teaching the practice of medicine.

JAMA 1992; 268: 2420-5

7


1. Epidemiologia clinica: che cos’è

…….is the study of groups

of patients to evaluate the

diagnostic, prognostic and

therapeutic decisions made

in patient care [using the

quantitative methods of the

classical epidemiology]

(AR Feinstein. Clinical

Epidemiology,

Saunders 1985)

8


1. Epidemiologia clinica: che cos’è

The distinction between clinical and classical

public health epidemiology can often be

discerned by answering the question:

what’s the denominator

• ….in classical public health epidemiology, the

denominator usually contains a general

population of a particular geographic region,

such as a city or nation.

• In clinical epidemiology, the denominator usually

contains a clinical group…[ie] people with a

particular clinical condition or disease.

(From: AR Feinstein. Clinical Epidemiology, Saunders 1985, p.4) 9


1. Epidemiologia clinica: che cos’è

EBM

1997

2005

2000

1985

1991

2005

10


1. Epidemiologia clinica: che cos’è

La malattia come

fenomeno individuale

Epidemiologia

clinica

Classifica l’individuo

malato in un gruppo

nosograficamente

omogeneo, al cui studio

applica metodi

quantitativi e statistici

• L’Epidemiologia Clinica è

una SCIENZA DI BASE

• Come tale ha

(o dovrebbe avere) un

ruolo primario nella

formazione prelaurea,

nell’educazione continua

postlaurea, e in tutte le

fasi del lavoro clinico

11


1. Epidemiologia clinica: l’importanza

Un aforisma di William Osler

(da Gruver RH & Freis ED. Ann Intern Med 1957; 47: 108-20)

“Give him good methods and a proper point of

view, and all other things will be added as

his experience grows”

…….e un altro (da http://www.gigausa.com/gigaweb1/quotes2/quautoslerwilliamx001.htm)

“The value of experience is not in seeing much,

but in seeing wisely”

12


L’epidemiologia per la clinica

• L’epidemiologia clinica e il

lavoro del medico: 2.1 Diagnosi

Remembering the real questions:

" What’s happening to me

" What’s goingtohappentome

"What can be done to improve what happens to me

(Cohen JJ. Ann Intern Med 1998; 128: 563-6)

13


2.1 Epidemiologia clinica e diagnosi

La diagnosi è una interpretazione dei sintomi e

segni di un/una paziente, sufficiente a prendere

decisioni cliniche; è di solito un processo diviso in

2 parti, che largamente si sovrappongono:

• “problem-solving”: dai segni e sintomi di un/una

paziente a una diagnosi, o ad una o più ipotesi

diagnostiche

• verifica delle ipotesi diagnostiche con l’aiuto di

test di lab e/o imaging

14


2.1 Epidemiologia clinica e diagnosi

Problem solving: matching the patient’s symptoms

and signs with a compatible mental illness script (1)

Communication

physical

patient non verbal verbal exam

Matching

physician

Illness scripts

1. Charlin B & al. Acad Med 2000; 75: 182-90

15


2.1. Diagnosi

Problem solving =

a. La capacità di ottenere e interpretare

l’informazione clinica dal/dalla paziente (#)

b. Una “biblioteca” di illness scripts realistici, e

c. La capacità cognitiva di collegare a.con b.

# “Much of the art of medicine lies in gathering

this information”: R Smith, BMJ 1996; 313:

1062-8

16


2.1. Diagnosi

Clinical Problem Solving: riferimenti essenziali

Da: The Evidence Base

of Clinical Diagnosis, JA

Knottnerus Ed. BMJ

Publ Group 2002

Kassirer JP. Clinical problem solving - a new feature

in the Journal. N Engl J Med 1992; 326: 60-61.

Jan 1992-Sept 2006: 69 case report

17


2.1. Diagnosi

• “Rather than relying on statistical data on disease

prevalence to generate diagnostic hypotheses

from a set of findings, [clinicians] often assess

the likelihood of diseases on the basis of their

familiarity or on the basis of the resemblance of

the findings in a given patient to those of a

known disease” (1)

• …..ma ignorare la prevalenza relativa delle ipotesi

diagnostiche(“base rate neglect”, Croskerry P.

Acad med 2003;78:775-80) può essere causa di

errore diagnostico

1. Kassirer JP, Kopelman RI. Learning Clinical Reasoning

Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins Publ 1991, p. 4

18


2.1 Diagnosi

Le ipotesi diagnostiche vengono verificate

con l’aiuto di test e/o imaging; la verifica

segue la logica bayesiana ed è basata sul

prodotto tra:

• prob pre-test della/delle ipotesi,

• misure di accuratezza e riproducibilità dei

test e dell’imaging

19


La probabilità pre-test delle ipotesi è poco

riproducibile e poco accurata

Phelps M, Levitt A.

Acad Emerg Med

2004; 11: 692-4

Black ER & al (Diagnostic Strategies for Common Medical

Problems, ACP 1999) adottano una classificazione della

probabilità pre-test in 3 livelli: ~ 20%; ~ 50%; ~ 80%

20


2.1. Diagnosi

I test:

• Raramente un singolo test èdecisivo per la

diagnosi

• L’esagerazione del testing implica eventi avversi da

test invasivi, probabilità di falsi positivi, e vicoli

ciechi diagnostici (1,2)

• ….ed è favorita dalla medicina difensiva (3)

1. Mold JW, Stein HF. The cascade effect in the clinical care

of patients. N Engl J Med 1986; 314: 512-14

2. Kassirer JP. Our stubborn quest for diagnostic certainty.

N Engl J Med 1989; 320: 1489-91

3. Kessler DP& al. Lancet 2006; 368: 240-6

21


2.1. Diagnosi

I test:

• Tutti i test hanno un variabile grado di nonaccuratezza

(falsi negativi, FN; falsi positivi,

FP) e di non-concordanza fra osservatori:

(Elstein AS & Schwarz A. BMJ 2002; 324: 729-32

“Reaching a diagnosis means updating an

opinion with imperfect information”)

• Le misure di accuratezza dei test non sono

parametri fissi, ma variano in rapporto al

contesto clinico

22


2.1. Diagnosi

I test:

• la concordanza (p.es di imaging o istologia)

dipende dalla qualità tecnica del dato e dalla

competenza degli osservatori

Non tutti vediamo

la stessa cosa…..

(da Tufte ER. The

Visual Display of

Quantitative

Information. Graphic

Press, 1983, p.56)

23


2.1. Diagnosi

" Why did I miss the diagnosis Top-five error

sources as reported by internists (1)

1. It never crossed my mind

2. I paid too much attention to one finding,

especially lab results

3. I didn’t listen enough to the patient’s story

4. I was too much in a hurry

5. I didn’t know enough about a disease

1. Bordage G. Acad Med 1999; 74 (10): S138-43

24


2.1. Diagnosi

Diagnosi ed epidemiologia clinica: una sintesi

Informazione

clinica da

un/una pz

Contributo dei

metodi

quantitativi

dell’epidemiologia

clinica

Problem solving:

matching tra

sintomi e segni di

un/una paziente e

illness script in

memoria

# generazione di

ipotesi diagnostiche

Scarso: probabilità

pre-test delle

ipotesi generate

Verifica delle

ipotesi

diagnostiche con

l’aiuto di test e

imaging

(“imperfect

information”)

Per valutare

l’accuratezza dei

test e la

probabilità posttest

della diagnosi

25


L’epidemiologia per la clinica

2. L’epidemiologia clinica e il

lavoro del medico: 2.2 Prognosi

Remembering the real questions:

" What’s happening to me

" What’s going to happen to me

" What can be done to improve what happens to

me

(Cohen JJ. Ann Intern Med 1998; 128: 563-6)

26


2.2 Prognosi

Perché interessa la prognosi (1)

• il/la paziente vuole sapere che cosa l’aspetta

• la prognosi influenza la scelta della terapia

1. RB Haynes, DL Sackett & al. Clinical Epidemiology. How to do

Clinical Practice Research. Lippincott Williams Wilkins, 2005

27


2.2 Prognosi

il/la paziente

vuole sapere che

cosa l’aspetta

(Da 1)

1. Glass RD. Diagnosis. A brief introduction.

Oxford University Press 1996

28


• La prognosi influenza la scelta della terapia

25

2.2 Prognosi

Prognosi (event rates) in pts with carotid stenosis and

decision of treatment (1)

Event rate

20

15

10

5

Stenosis

50-69%

70-99%

0

Medical

Endarterectomy

1. Rothwell PM. Lancet 2005; 365: 82-93

29


2.2 Prognosi

Perché interessa la prognosi

• La prognosi influenza la scelta della terapia

Prediction rule and recommendations

for community pneumonia

Class of risk

Low (1-2)

Intermediate (3)

High (4-5)

Recommended treatment

Treat as outpatient

Brief inpatient observation

Hospitalization

Fine MJ& al. N Engl J Med 1997; 336: 243-50

30


L’epidemiologia per la clinica

2. L’epidemiologia clinica e il

lavoro del medico: 2.3 Terapia

Remembering the real questions:

" What’s happening to me

" What’s going to happen to me

" What can be done to improve what

happens to me

(Cohen JJ. Ann Intern Med 1998; 128: 563-6)

31


2.3 Terapia

Fonti dell’informazione terapeutica (da trattati,

riviste, colleghi, promozione industriale)

• “Empirical evidence” (1): trial randomizzati (RCT),

meta-analisi, linee-guida

• Principio “all or none” (p. es: insulina nel coma da

chetoacidosi diabetica; vit B12 nell’anemia

perniciosa)

• Extrapolazioni da fisiopatologia, farmacologia

clinica, nosografia

• Esperienza precedente, personale o di gruppo

1. Tonelli MR. J Eval Clin Pract 2006: 12: 248-56

32


Il trial

L’RCT (v. struttura a fianco) è

lo strumento di valutazione

dell’efficacia dei trattamenti

universalmente considerato meno

soggetto a bias, ed è la base

per la costruzione di metaanalisi

e linee-guida

The GATE frame.

P = population;

I = intervention;

C = comparison;

O = outcome;

T = study time.

Da: Jackson R & al. ACP J Club 2006; 144, March-April [Editorial A8-A11]

33


2.3 Terapia

Ma: l’interesse promozionale proietta sugli RCT

sponsorizzati dall’industria un bias ottimistico verso

risultati “positivi”, che sono qualche volta falsi

positivi, più spesso clinicamente marginali e/o non

convincenti

Lancet 267: 97-8

From a report of the UK

House of Commons Health

Select Committee:

“The influence of the

pharmaceutical industry is

enormous and out of

control”

2004 2005 2006

34


2.3. Terapia

% RCT che concludono: “Intervento sperimentale

altamente preferito, dovrebbe essere il trattamento

di scelta”

60

Tipo di sponsor

40

Nonprofit

Non riportato

20

Nonprofit+profit

0

Profit

Da 370 RCT della Libreria Cochrane

Als-Nielsen B & al. JAMA 2003; 290: 921-8

35


2.3 Terapia

LexchinJ & al.BMJ 2003; 326: 1167-70

RCT con sponsor industriale: fattori di bias “ottimistico”

• Farmaco sperimentale con alta probabilità di

risultato positivo (p.es, un me-too drug)

• Molteplici aspetti del disegno del trial

• Comparator (placebo o inappropriato) !

• Esagerazione di risultati marginali (p. es, in

discussione)

• Publication bias !

…….Altri

! Principali fattori di bias

36


2.3. Terapia

Norman G: The paradox of evidence-based

medicine. J Eval Clin Pract 2003; 9: 129-32:

…the ultimate historical irony is that,

partly as a consequence of the

Pandora’s box opened by EBM, drug

companies now dominate medical

research far more than previously

37


2.3 Terapia

RCT e paziente individuale

Epidemiologia clinica ed EBM trascurano la validi

esterna degli RCT e sono di aiuto per trasferirne i

risultati a pazienti individuali, una decisione che è

lasciata alla variabile capacità dei medici

• Setting

Cinque domande (da 1):

• Severità della malattia

• Comorbidi

• Durata prevista del trattamento

• Preferenze del/della paziente

1. Rothwell PM. Lancet 2005; 365: 82-3

38


“A potentially serious error is interpreting the effect

size from an RCT as the effect of treatment on each

individual within the population studied”

(Kraemer HB & al. JAMA 2006; 296: 1286-9)

From: Kravitz RL & al. Milbank Q 2004; 82: 661-87

39


2.3 Terapia

Terapia ed epidemiologia clinica: una sintesi

Fonti di

informazione

terapeutica

Frequenza

di uso

Ruolo (da + a ++++) e

limiti di epidemiologia

clinica ed EBM

“Empirical

evidence”

Molto

elevata

++++; ma: aree grige,

generalizzabilità

limitata; promozione

industriale

Principio “all or

none”

Fisiopatologia,

farmacologia

clinica, nosografia

Limitata

Elevata

(aree grige)

Nessun ruolo

Occasionale:

extrapolazioni da RCT

Esperienza

Molto

elevata

Variabile

40


L’epidemiologia per la clinica

2. L’epidemiologia clinica e il

lavoro del medico: 2.4

Rapporto con i pazienti

Ippocrate…assegna al medico queste due qualità: un

vero timore degli dei e un amore disinteressato per

gli uomini. Gli dei d’Ippocrate sono fortunatamente

spariti, ma gli uomini restano e aspettano aiuto

(A.Murri. Dizionario di Metodologia clinica, Baldini M e

Malavasi A ed., Delfino, 2004, p. 191)

41


2.4 Rapporto con i pazienti

La comunicazione

0.55

0.92

I pazienti valutano più la capacità di comunicazione del

medico che la qualità tecnica della cura

Chang JT & al. Ann Intern Med 2006; 144: 665-72

42


2.4 Rapporto con i pazienti

Comunicazione medico-paziente nell’era

dell’EBM: vantaggi

" Collegare la decisione terapeutica a “evidenze”

selezionate, valutate e aggregate da esperti

(“prefiltrate”) potrebbe aumentarne la qualità

" In un’epoca di crescente partecipazione dei

pazienti alle decisioni cliniche, avere una base di

evidenze scientifiche per motivare le proprie

indicazioni

" Imparare che è necessario valutare la validi

metodologica delle pubblicazioni mediche (cartacee

ed online) prima di accettarne e trasmetterne i

contenuti

43


$

2.4 Rapporto con i pazienti

Comunicazione medico-paziente

nell’era dell’EBM: problemi e limiti

$ Quando non ci sono “evidenze”: (zone grige,[Naylor CD.

Lancet 1995; 345: 840-2 ]); “medically unexplained

symptoms”, MUS

$ Non è facile integrare le “evidenze”, che sono

disease-oriented, con le caratteristiche e le

preferenze dei pazienti e con il “setting”

$ Le “evidenze” sono troppo spesso distorte dalla

promozione industriale

$ Il medico può non avere il tempo di ricercare le

evidenze, o non è “amico” del computer

Il medico può non spiegare chiaramente le “evidenze”,

o il paziente può avere limiti di comprensione

44


2.4 Rapporto con i pazienti

Il medico come “reliever”:

“Perhaps the role of the doctor as reliever rather

than as healer should be accentuated to mitigate any

disappointment that he cannot appreciably reorient

mortality and morbidity trends”.

FJ Ingelfinger, N Engl J Med 1977; 296: 448-9

L Fildes, The Doctor, 1891

45

Picasso, Ciencia y Caridad, 1898


L’epidemiologia per la clinica:

note conclusive - 1

• L’epidemiologia clinica, applicazione clinica dei

principi e dei metodi dell’epidemiologia, è una

scienza di base senza la quale non è possibile dare

ordine razionale alle conoscenze e alla pratica

della medicina clinica

• Ma l’epidemiologia clinica ragiona per gruppi

nosografici assunti come omogenei e usa metodi

quantitativi, mentre la medicina clinica ha come

interesse primario l’individuo ammalato, e usa

principi e metodi che comprendono componenti

qualitative e di rapporto interumano

46


L’epidemiologia per la clinica:

note conclusive - 2

• Dunque, la medicina clinica richiede una continua

integrazione dei risultati ottenuti dall’epidemiologia

clinica con l’attenzione al paziente come individuo:

“Ogni caso [appartenente a un gruppo nosografico

omogeneo] contiene una storia umana di sofferenza

e una storia medica di malattia, che insieme ne

richiedono il trattamento come persona, come caso

e come parte di un sistema sanitario”

(da K Cox, Med Educ 2001, modif. da: L Pagliaro e

M Bobbio. Medicina basata sulle evidenze e

centrata sul paziente. Un dizionario di termini

clinici. Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore, 2006)

47


Grazie

48

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines