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POVERTY REDUCTION STRATEGY TN

essential for intensive

essential for intensive farming. Such farms tend to be subsistence oriented. Further, it is very difficult to raise agricultural income substantially, given the very small holding size. Land ceilings in Tamil Nadu (4.86 hectares for irrigated land with two crops and 12.14 hectares for irrigated land with one crop and 24.28 hectares for dry land) have relatively little effect on land distribution due to registration of land in the names of various family members and even in the names of workers. Nonetheless, the number of farms greater than 10 hectares is rather small accounting for only about 9 percent of area. a. Land Use Pattern The reported area of Tamil Nadu is around 13 million hectares. Of this, forest area is 2.106 million hectares (2006-07) and accounts for 16.17 percent of total land area of the state (Table 5.13), as against environmentally desirable 33 percent. However, from 1970- 71 onwards there has been increase in forest area largely due to many afforestation and conservation schemes implemented by the government. However, at the slow pace of expansion, it is most likely to be less than 20 percent in the next decades. Table 5.13: Land Use Pattern in Tamil Nadu (‘000 hectares) Details 1970-71 1980-81 1990-91 1999-00 2006-07 Reporting Area 13004 13003 13019 12991 13027 Forests 2013 2022 2155 2134 2106 Barren and Uncultivable Land 832 577 509 476 502 Land Put to Non-agriculture Uses 1489 1747 1820 1978 2160 Permanent Pastures and Grazing Land 231 159 124 123 110 Land under Miscellaneous Tree Crops 226 212 234 243 268 Cultivable Waste Land 507 343 290 349 354 Other Fallows 573 459 1044 1140 1493 Current Fallows 964 2120 1264 1085 907 Net Area Sown 6169 5364 5579 5463 5126 Area Sown More Than Once 1215 1109 1053 1054 717 Gross Cropped Area 7384 6473 6632 6517 5843 Source: Tamil Nadu - An Economic Appraisal (various issues). Area under permanent pastures and grazing and area of under miscellaneous tree crops and groves are shrinking (i.e., from 4.57 lakh ha in 1970-71 to 3.78 lakh ha in 114

2006-07). However, total area under these categories is very small (less than 3 percent of total area). Area under cultivable waste has come down, (from 5.07 lakh ha in 1970- 71 to 3.54 lakh ha in 2006-07), due to the pressure on land for cultivation of crops. But the area under current and other fallows is increasing (from 15.37 lakh ha in 1970-71 to 24 lakh ha in 2006-07). These are marginal low productive lands (cultivable but remains uncultivable for one to 5 years thereafter) and do not have assured irrigation. Table 5.14 shows that the current fallow is inversely proportional to the amount of rainfall. However, in the case of other fallows, this relationship does not hold. One suitable strategy could be to increase the area under cultivation through reclamation of cultivable waste and fallow lands and use of modern irrigation and farm practices to increase farm production in the present conditions of frequent monsoon failures and water scarcity in the state. Year Rain (mm) Table 5.14: Impact of Rainfall on Current Fallow Deviation from Normal Current Fallow (000 ha) Current Fallows as Percent of Total Land Other Fallow Other Fallow as Percent of Total Land 2000-01 874 (-) 19.8 1134 8.7 1228 9.4 2001-02 775 (-) 18.4 1026 8.0 1409 10.8 2002-03 748 (-) 20.0 1505 11.5 1491 11.5 2003-04 868 (-) 07.0 954 7.3 1863 14.3 2004-05 1226 (+) 32.0 692 5.3 1704 13.1 2005-06 1305 (+) 36.0 759 5.8 1518 11.7 Source: Government of Tamil Nadu (2007), Eleventh Five Year Plan 2007-2012, State Planning Commission. Note: mm – millimeters; ha – hectares The other fallows and cultivable waste can be brought under cultivation by suitable reclamation practices, involving investments that will yield very low return. Farmers may not be in a position to make such investments, because most of them are marginal and small farmers. Thus, availability of cultivable land sets the limits for extensive farming. In 2005-06 net shown area was less than 52. 4 lakh hectares. b. Landless Agricultural Labour According to Census 2001, there are about 13.8 million workers dependent upon agriculture and allied activities such as horticulture, forestry, live-stock and sericulture (Table 5.15). Of them only about 8 million are cultivators and about 3 million workers are in allied activities. The remaining are agricultural labourers who know only farming but have no land of their own. There is also not much land for redistribution. Therefore, they have to survive as wage earners in agriculture and seek jobs from cultivators. However, most of the cultivators are small land holders and use own family labour to the extent 115

World Comparative Economic And Social Data
Nammakal - Tamil Nadu Police
Police Stations - Tamil Nadu Police
N u m b e r o f S c h o o l s - DISE
Census 2011 population of Latur district
PDF: 1.0MB - Population Reference Bureau