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economic developmentand the demand is just growing’.The festival has grown from lessthan 2 000 visitors in 2006 to more than10 000 this year. With the FIFA WorldCup in 2010, Ngobeni is confident itwill attract as many as 15 000.Many come from South Africa, buta number of visitors also come fromneighbouring countries as well asfrom Europe. Ngobeni says that it isthe locally brewed marula beer thatvisitors come to experience – about15 000 litres of beer are consumed.The marula is harvested by 10Victoria West,Northern CapeWith probably more sheep than peoplethe little village of Victoria West is anunlikely location for a festival of anysort, but each year this tiny part of theKaroo hosts the Apollo Film Festival.Showcasing local, independent films,the festival is a celebration of one of thelast art-deco theatre complexes in thecountry, preserved in its original form.The theatre, which used to seatcoloured and black patrons in separateupstairs galleries, closed in the 1950sand reopened 40 years later, when theidea of a film festival arose as a way ofpromoting this heritage and to sharewith locals the social issues filmsexplore, says former festival organiserReggie Khanzi.For a small town with a populationof 14 000 people, the festival plays animportant role in promoting the area.Since 2000 it has attracted directors,filmmakers, film lovers, the mediaand passing tourists, says CEO ofthe Apollo Development Association(ADA), Petrus Martens. The ADA isa non-profit organisation made up ofcommunity members who help run thefestival and ensure that the benefitsare spread throughout the community.It includes representatives from theUbuntu Municipality and Pixley KaSeme District Municipality.Their focus is largely on the youth,explains Martens. ‘The youth notonly help organise the festival butare themselves film enthusiasts andmany benefit from the scriptwritingand film-making courses during theevent.’ The festival also ‘operatesa LoveLife franchise that assistswith HIV/AIDS advocacy and skillsco-operatives of 10 community memberseach established specifically to helpkick-start the industry in Limpopo.Last year more than R25 millionwas generated during the week of thefestival. ‘All 1 200 beds in Phalaborwawere booked out and some visitorswere staying as far as Tzaneen,100km away,’ he says. ‘One Britishvisitor came during the first festivaland the next year he came back withhis friends, and the year after withhis friends and family. That’s exactlywhat we want.’training among the youth.’Through the festival, 23 part-timeemployees acquire skills in hospitalityand administration while B&B ownersbenefit from some R30 000 generatedbetween them. There are also stallswhere locals can sell their goods andthe festival features the work of PietThousand, a local artist who specialisesin burning portraits into wood.N a t i o n a l F i l m a n d V i d e oFoundation’s Azania Muendane saysthat they have previously supportedthe festival ‘because it is a localinitiative to promote film and it is acommunity managed project that looksfirst inside to develop the local skillsbefore looking outside. The successof the festival has always been due toThe restaurants are full until 1am.Ngobeni hopes the festival canexpand from a weekend to a wholeweek affair, and there are plans for acooking competition to help continuedeveloping new, unique productsfrom marula.While municipalities do assistwith the festival, Ngobeni says thatin time ‘they should all ideally takeownership. They already see the valuein it because every year the festival’seconomic study goes into council aswell as their annual report’.Victoria West locals are treated to a festival celebrating local, independent film.the community’s involvement’.She adds that because of the‘nostalgic value’ of the festival, it‘has always received favourableattendance’. Martens says that thetown has ‘benefited tremendously.Its profile has been lifted, economicbenefits have been created and thetown attracted a lot of people whobought houses here.’But he adds that the municipality‘really needs to get involved’. Hebelieves they should use the festivalto establish its tourism brand,pointing to a similar one-day filmfestival held in Colesberg that isorganised by the municipality. ‘Themunicipality really needs to be thedriver of activities in this town.’Photo: ADAGrahamstown,Eastern CapeGetting people to support the arts intough economic times can be extremelydifficult, unless it’s the National ArtsFestival. The annual 10-day celebrationin Grahamstown is the ‘biggest festivalin Africa and one of the biggest in theworld’, festival publicist Gilly Hemphillsays. Last year, the event saw 200shows being performed on the mainprogramme and 400 others on thefringe across 87 venues in the region.Once the second largest town inSouthern Africa (1830s), Grahamstownis home to Rhodes University and, sincethe early 1900s, the town has built on itsstatus as a centre of culture, learningand creative expression. The festival,now in its 36th year, has become anannual must for art enthusiasts, offeringa creative space to celebrate therichness and diversity of our country.In 2008, despite the economicrecession, the festival recorded 170 000visitors, a 13% increase from the yearbefore and about 40 000 more visitorsthan in 2004.Keeping ticket prices down hashelped and adding heaps of free showsto the festival menu has allowed peopleto visit and enjoy the festivities withouthaving to buy tickets, Hemphill says.And although international visitorsare ‘just a sprinkling’ many areshopping for local talent, and someshows get to perform overseas.The economic benefits are obvious.Last year, the event saw R53 millioninjected into the region over just10 days, research figures show.‘Obviously some of the money thatcomes in goes out again, but a fairamount stays,’ says Hemphill.While local business and theh o s p i t a l i t y i n d u s t r y a r e b i gbeneficiaries, the festival is also usedto address poverty and build thetourism profile of the historical town.A massive arts and craft market isan important element of the festival,helping local artisans sell and markettheir goods. ‘We work closely with theEast Cape Craft Market and we aretrying to turn this into a world-classcraft market, not with goods fromChina but from Africa.’Over about four months, there are300 temporary jobs created withabout an extra 100 jobs in the 10 daysPhoto: Robert RichThe National Arts Festival is the biggest in Africa and places emphasis on activities thathelp develop local communities in the region.of the festival.With the Dolphin Coast regionalready a tourist hotspot, thereis room to continue growing. Thenearby area of Alicedale, once aghost town, is now a Khoisan villagePhoto: Kynsna TourismKnysna Oyster Festivalwith immense tourism potential. ‘Themunicipality has also been amazingwith policing, security and trafficand with services like refuse, whileall the locals try very hard to assistthroughout.’SThe tourist town of Knysna has hosted its Oyster Festival for 26 years during winter. Heldover 10 days, the latest figures are over 200 000 oysters sold, 71 000 bed nights takenup and an estimated R63 million injected into the local economy. Among the events are anoyster-cooking festival, where chefs cater for 800 people, and mid-week events such as awell-attended cycle race.32 | delivery delivery | 33

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