WINDENERGY MAGAZINE 02 2018

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Wind

Energy

magazine

WINDPARK KRAMMER

LARGEST DUTCH CITIZENS’ INITIATIVE

INTERVIEW TENNET

FASCILITATING THE ENERGY

TRANSITION

DUTCH CLIMATE AGREEMENT

ARE WE STILL IN TIME?

WINDDAYS 2018 SPECIAL

Volume 5 - Issue 2 - 2018


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Volume 5 | June 2018 | issue 02

WindEnergy magazine, a quarterly trade magazine

for professionals who are involved or interested in

onshore and offshore wind energy developments in

the Netherlands.

Publication: WindEnergy magazine is a quarterly

publication.

Publisher: Roeland Dobbelaer

Publishing company: Vakbladen.com

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Website: www.windenergie-magazine.nl

Editor in Chief: Jan Spoelstra

Contributors to this edition: Antoon Oosting, Jaap

Meijers, Karin Broer, Christian Jongeneel, Joanna

Hughes, Geert Bosch, Peter Eecen & Erik van Huizen

Cover image: Windpark Krammer,

photo by Erik van Huizen

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foreword

GROWING DEMANDS

FOR ENERGY STORAGE

The Dutch wind energy sector is not a national industry and with the

upcoming offshore wind projects our editorial focus will be more and

more international. From which Dutch projects can the international wind

industry learn? And what is the contribution of Dutch companies to reach

international climate goals? For that reason WindEnergy magazine will

be published in English from now onwards. A great way to showcase our

innovative wind industry.

A good example of a national onshore wind project that should be

internationally showcased is the Windpark Krammer wind farm, owned

by citizens, producing energy for multinationals and built on top of

a primary flood defence (P12). The Dutch are already the #1 country

in building sea defences, what a business case if Dutch companies can

combine water safety with sustainable energy production and financial

constructions in which citizens can participate.

In this WindDays 2018 special we focus on going forward with wind

energy in the Netherlands. The technology is in place and startups (P28)

are anxious to optimise wind energy production and turbine maintenance.

However, the experts our editors interviewed only briefly mention the

biggest challenge for the wind energy industry: energy storage. Using

peak power to store energy, and transport this to the grid when demands

exceed the installed sustainable energy production.

The goal of our government is 49% reduction of CO 2

emissions by 2030.

Installing wind power can largely contribute to those goals. In the field of

energy storage, without the use of artificial lakes, dams and hydropower,

there is no country yet that adressed and solved the upcoming problem of

sustainable energy storage. Our Minister of Economic Affairs and Climate

is currently busy with meetings on his so-called ‘energy tables’, to reach

new climate legislation and policy programmes. One of the conclusions

this summer should be that the Netherlands should become a leading

player in the field of sustainable energy storage. Can we build an artifical

lake in the North Sea? Can we make gas infrastructure suitable for

hydrogen as a sustainable energy carrier?

The biggest challenge for the wind industry is to deal with fluctuating

energy production, which is not in conjunction with energy demand.

Fossil energy driven power plants to serve as

backup will disappear. Our sector should

come up with partnerships and projects

to deal with this challenge. WindEnergy

magazine will keep you informed on

the progress in future editions. For now,

the WindDays is a good place to start this

discussion – we are looking forward to

meeting you there!

JAN SPOELSTRA

Editor in Chief

WindEnergy magazine

j.spoelstra@vakbladen.com

WindEnergy 2-2018 3


CONTENTS

ISSUE 02

JUNE 2018

Wind energy: From

idea to permit

Photo: TenneT

6

6 PREPARING FOR OFFSHORE WIND TO LEAD THE

ENERGY TRANSITION. INTERVIEW FRANK WESTER,

TENNET

11 COLUMN GEERT BOSCH, BOSCH & VAN RIJN

12 JOINING FORCES IN THE LARGEST CITIZEN’S

INITIATIVE INTERVIEW WIND COOPERATIONS

DELTAWIND AND ZEEUWIND

Policy and permits

Spatial procedures, regional energy strategies,

environmental impact assessments, vision and

policy development

Stakeholder manangement

Participation, communication, stakeholders

engagement, visualisations, financial

participation

Photo: Erik van Huizen

12

16 NO MORE ROOM FOR PROCRASTINATION: THE

NETHERLANDS HAS TO ACT NOW INTERVIEW

OLOF VAN DER GAAG, DIRECTOR NVDE

19 WINDDAYS 2018 SPECIAL

20 INTERVIEW EVENT ORGANISATION

24 EUROPEAN WIND MARKET OUTLOOK

26 CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

Research

Environmental impacts, financial feasibility,

spatial feasibility, wind surveys

Support and secondment

Process managers, project leaders, specialists

in all relevant desciplines

28 FLOORPLAN & EXHIBITORS’ LIST

30 STARTUPS IN WIND

35 COLUMN PETER EECEN, ECN PART OF TNO

36 OFFSHORE NEWS

Photo by Milan Vermeulen

16

38 ONSHORE & GENERAL NEWS

41 WIND FACTS NETHERLANDS

42 AGENDA

In 2017 we obtained permits for more than 500 MW

onshore wind energy in the Netherlands.

Want to know what we can do for you?

Check out www.boschenvanrijn.nl

Photo: WindEurope / Bickley

24

WindEnergy 2-2018 5


INTERVIEW

FRANK WESTER,

SENIOR MANAGER ASSET MANAGEMENT

OFFSHORE, TENNET

PREPARING FOR

OFFSHORE WIND

TO LEAD THE ENERGY

TRANSITION

The Dutch government wants to bring down carbon emissions by 49 percent in 2030. To achieve

that target, more energy production from renewable energy sources is required. A significant part

will be coming from offshore wind. That is why more wind farms are planned to be built at sea

in the years to come. Transmission system operator TenneT is responsible for getting the energy

produced by the offshore turbines to land and to our wall sockets, which is quite an interesting

challenge.

JAAP MEIJERS

When the government, companies and relevant organisations

signed the National Energy Agreement

(‘Energieakkoord’) in 2013, offshore wind energy

did not yet amount to much. Only two offshore

wind farms were installed and operational at that

time in the Dutch section of the North Sea; Egmond

aan Zee (OWEZ) and Prinses Amaliawindpark. A

third, Eneco Luchterduinen, started construction

that same year and another, Gemini, would follow a

few years later. All combined representing almost

1,000 MW. But for the sustainable ambitions to

become reality, a lot more wind turbines needed to

be installed, faster and cheaper than before. Under

the Energy Agreement, 3,500 megawatts would

have to be added offshore until 2023, the equal of

around 437 8-megawatt wind turbines. For this

purpose, the Dutch Government assigned 3 areas,

Borssele and Hollandse Kust Zuid and Noord. In the

future even more wind farms will be added, such as

IJmuiden Ver (‘IJmuiden Far’) which will generate 4

gigawatts. All in all, in 2030 40 percent of the current

power consumption should come from these

offshore wind farms.

In the National Energy Agreement TenneT was appointed

the offshore transmission system operator,

which means that the company is responsible for

ensuring all those new wind farms are connected

to the Dutch electricity grid. Frank Wester is

responsible for TenneT’s offshore wind energy

infrastructure. “This is the best job one can have at

TenneT. Right now so much is happening because

of the energy transition. For years things at TenneT

were like relatively calm seas, but now we are

surfing the waves.”

WHAT CHALLENGES DO ALL THOSE WIND FARMS

POSE FOR TENNET?

“Wind farm owners used to be responsible for the

transport of the energy generated by their wind

turbines to shore themselves. That task has been

assigned to TenneT. So now wind farms connect to

our offshore substations. The 66 kilovolts electricity

produced by the wind turbines are transformed

at the substation to 220 kV and then transported to

shore by two export cables.

For the new wind farms, TenneT and the Ministry

of Economic Affairs and Climate looked into ways

how to connect the wind farms as efficient and cost

effective possible. By simplifying and standardizing

the platform’s design we can bring down costs

considerably. Up to 2023, five substations will be

built using the same design, therefore they are

easier to build and maintain, simply because they

use the same components and such. The first two

platforms, Borssele Alpha and Beta, are currently

being built by HSM Offshore in Schiedam. The first

of those will come online in the Borssele wind farm

in August 2019.

The challenge was to make the platforms as lean

and mean as possible. We have not added a helicopter

deck, and they are designed in such way that

the platform can be entered from all sides on the

outside. There is a passageway on the inside for

when the weather is really bad, but it is very narrow.

If everything had to be done from the inside,

the platform would have to be much larger. With a

weight of around 3,500 tons and dimensions of 20

by 45 meters and 25 meters high, it is still large but

now it’s a nice compact platform.”

IS CONSTRUCTING A POWER GRID AT SEA VERY

DIFFERENT FROM BUILDING ON LAND?

“The technology for an offshore grid is mainly

the same as on land, so the electrical components

are basically the same. We do need cables with

different armouring, because they are buried at the

bottom of the sea and during construction more

pulling force is exerted on them. But in general it’s

the same proven technology.

Offshore also has its advantages. The diameter of a

220kV offshore export cable is about 25 centimetres.

That’s the cable with three strands bundled in

it, including the armouring. On land the cable reel

for such cables would have to fit on a truck. Offshore,

a much longer cable can be transported.

A vessel could hold 35 kilometres of cable.

What really adds a new dimension to us, is the

need for remote monitoring. Already in the design

phase we have to consider which activities we wish

Example of a standardized substation

to remotely perform and monitor, simply because

accessibility is much more complicated. When something

happens at an onshore station, somebody

just drives up there, even at 1 AM. That’s a lot more

difficult offshore.

We installed two 350 megawatt cables for each

wind farm. They are buried in the sandy sea floor.

Those cables are designed for a maximum temperature

of 90 degrees Celsius, and you don’t want

to exceed this. When it gets too hot, the insulating

material will start degrading. It won’t be damaged

immediately, but it should be able to continue to

perform well during its 25 year life span.

The mantle contains fiberglass for communication

purpose, but also for monitoring the temperature.

This is done by injecting light laser pulses. From

the reflections, caused by the changing resistance

of the fiberglass, we can then measure the temperature.

This enables us to determine and localise

the precise temperature. This helps us to optimize

the use of the cable. When the cable is relatively

cool, more energy can be produced temporarily at

the wind farm and transported through the cable.

This means that when there are strong winds, the

capacity can temporarily be higher, up to 380 MW.”

>>

6 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 7


INTERVIEW

THE IJMUIDEN VER AREA IS LARGER THAN THE ONES

CURRENTLY BEING DEVELOPED: 4,000 MEGAWATTS

INSTEAD OF 700 MEGAWATTS IN THE OTHER AREAS,

AND IT IS LOCATED 100 KILOMETRES FROM THE

COAST. DO MORE REMOTE WIND FARMS POSE A

BIGGER TECHNICAL CHALLENGE?

“Because it is further out at sea and a lot more

electric power is involved, we have to switch from

alternating current to direct current technology.

Alternating current creates a lot of power loss in

the cable, and those losses increase with the length

of the cable. For that reason, and because of its

size, IJmuiden Ver will be connected using direct

current.

Three more 700MW wind areas that have been

designated by the Ministry of Economic Affairs and

Climate are located more closely to the coast. The

wind farms to be built there can still be connected

using alternating current, which we will be doing

with three more standardized platforms. This provides

us the time up to 2027 to further develop our

concept for IJmuiden Ver.

A larger wind area also allows you to think

bigger. The offshore platforms have to be bigger

to facilitate the conversion from alternating to

direct current. This means the platform would

have to be three times the size of the one we are

currently using for alternating current. We have

looked into the idea of constructing an island to

see if that would be cheaper. An island allows for

more flexibility and also the space to install, for

example, power-to-gas installations, provided that

development pushes through. You could also build

living quarters for wind turbine technicians. You’re

basically creating a near-shore environment. Everything

could be built there instead of building it at

shipyards and then shipping it out to sea.”

AN ENTIRE ISLAND IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NORTH

SEA? HOW FEASIBLE ARE THOSE PLANS?

“We are still performing a study to see what is really

the smartest solution. There are also non-technical

issues that need to be considered. The permits,

the environmental studies, all those things need to

be taken care of. And then add the time it takes to

build the island. We estimate that in 2027 we could

have the first wind energy running via the island.

The government is also charmed by the idea, and

we absolutely think this is a feasible solution. There’s

already quite a power struggle going on over

who gets to be mayor of the island!”

RECENTLY THINGS GOT A LITTLE TENSE WHEN ON A

CLOUDY, WINDLESS DAY NOT ENOUGH ELECTRICITY

WAS BEING GENERATED TO SATISFY DEMAND.

TENNET HAD TO INTERVENE BY QUICKLY IMPORT

MORE ENERGY FROM ABROAD. WILL THE LARGER

SHARE OF WIND ENERGY IN THE FUTURE MAKE IT

EVEN HARDER TO GUARANTEE THE LIGHTS WILL

ALWAYS STAY ON?

“Energy producers have to inform TenneT how

much they expect to generate. Based on weather

forecasts they can predict this very well. We are

responsible to ensure the right balance at the end

but the market will need to determine how much

they are likely to generate in upcoming days. When

PV producers inform us they will be supplying

1,000 megawatts and in the end they only come up

with 800 megawatts, then they will be presented

with a hefty bill for that lack of 200 megawatts.

They are the first ones to have a problem.

Things will become more dynamic, but the market

will have to be ready and anticipate. The grid needs

to retain a certain flexibility. Wind and solar are

quite complementary. In the summer there often

is less wind but more sunshine, and during winter

time it’s the other way around. The energy sector

will have to look into energy storage to mitigate

those highs and lows. The backups could be plants,

but also contracts with energy suppliers abroad,

or batteries, of which a large one was opened last

week in the north of Germany. Hydrogen is also

looked into, as well as using batteries in electric

cars. Those could also be used to mitigate peaks.

The Netherlands already have quite a few existing

connections with other countries, so we can get

more power from abroad. But if there’s an unbalance,

the energy suppliers will have to foot the bill.”

CV

Frank Wester is senior manager Asset

Management Offshore. He is with TenneT

since 2007. Before that he worked for KEMA

in Arnhem and utility Nuon.

Wester studied electrical engineering at

Hogeschool InHolland and Delft University

of Technology. In 2004 he got his Ph.D. on

diagnostics of electric cables.

DC cables for offshore wind farm alpha ventus, Germany. All photos courtesy of TenneT

8 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 9


WindEnergy magazine is a quarterly trade magazine for professionals

who are involved or interested in

onshore and offshore wind energy

developments in the Netherlands.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on current

and upcoming wind projects, tenders, subsidies, grid

connections and innovations, and learn from Dutch

manufacturers, developers and researchers.

Interested? Request your free copy:

www.windenergie-magazine.nl/abonneren

Wind

Energy

magazine

INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING IN WindEnergy magazine?

Your media advisor Arjan Cornelisse will be happy to discuss advertising

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T: +31(0)6 10 62 85 64 or +31(0) 88 6440 623

WWW.WINDENERGIE-MAGAZINE.NL

HOW MUCH

WIND POWER

DO WE NEED?

GEERT BOSCH,

Director Bosch & Van Rijn

column

In this WindEnergy magazine special WindDays 2018 edition I will

address the question: how much wind power does the Netherlands need

in 2030 and after? The Dutch government formulated very ambitious

climate goals: 49% less greenhouse emissions in 2030. A reduction of

56 million tons of CO 2

. This will be achieved by closing coal power plants

(12 Mton), CCS (18 Mton), ending gas heating and electric driving.

In the last century the Dutch concluded the famous Deltawerken

by strengthening our dikes, closing off estuaries and empoldering

agricultural lands. The energy transition poses an even bigger challenge:

it will take major investments and radically change the economy and

affect every company, family and citizen.

What does wind power have to offer? First and foremost: it prevents

CO 2

emissions. Closing a coal fired power plant and replacing it by wind

turbines reduces 5,000 to 7,000 tonnes of CO 2

per turbine. 200 turbines

is 1 Mton. Secondly, wind power is cheap, 5 to 7 Eurocents per kWh and

decreasing. Many times cheaper than CCS or electricity generated by

coal or gas power plants. Especially when you take the negative impact

of fossil fuels into account, such as climate change and earth quakes in

Groningen. Being cheap and clean, wind power is the workhorse of the

future energy supply.

This will even be truer, when storage of electricity in hydrogen or

batteries improves. Wind can deliver the lion’s share of CO 2

reduction.

Doubling the current onshore capacity to 9,000 Megawatts will reduce

15 Mton CO 2

. Offshore can deliver an even amount of reduction, so

together wind can deliver more than half of the reduction target for

2030!

The energy transition has far-reaching local consequences: in

the landscape, in people’s living environment and therefore in

municipalities. Together with provinces and social partners

municipalities are working on regional climate plans: energy saving,

residential areas without gas, heat pumps and electric driving. The social

debate is gaining momentum. How can we generate renewable energy

in the region and how can we store this energy? Who’s going to pay and

how are we to make sure the bill gets equally split? Will we accept the

significant changes wind and solar power will cause in our landscape?

Which are the best (or least bad) spots? How do we alleviate nuisance

for people and animals? Drafting and executing regional plans gives

the energy transition practical meaning. To heat 10,000 houses with

heat pumps, 2 wind turbines or 12 hectares of solar panels are needed.

Driving 25,000 kilometres with 3,000 electric vehicles asks for another

two turbines.

So, back to the question we started with. How much wind power do we

need? Much depends on the choices we make: can we considerably save

on energy consumption? Will we say goodbye to gas? Is CCS desirable

and affordable? Are we prepared to hand in a little bit of horizon,

so the citizens of Groningen can live in safety? We and our political

representatives at provinces and municipalities, in Brussels and The

Hague, have some important decisions to make. I am convinced that

wind power will play a crucial role in any future energy system. The

wind power community, governments and social partners are inspired

to work together to make this happen. As a visitor of the WindDays you

will also participate and I’m sure the conference and exhibition we put

together to help you gain knowledge and inspiration to do so!

WindEnergy 2-2018 11


INTERVIEW

COOPERATIVES DELTAWIND & ZEEUWIND:

JOINING FORCES

IN THE LARGEST

CITIZEN’S INITIATIVE

A unique wind farm is emerging around the Krammersluizen, with 34 wind turbines that

have a total capacity of 102 megawatts. The initiators of this wind farm in and around the

Krammersluizen are in fact the 4,800 members of the Zeeuwind and Deltawind cooperatives,

making Windpark Krammer the largest citizens’ initiative of the Netherlands. Construction

began in January 2017, and the wind farm should be operational next year.

ERIK VAN HUIZEN

21 of the 34 wind turbines are already in position

at Windpark Krammer, with a height of 125 meter

and with 56 meter long rotor blades that weigh 26

tonnes. The turbine’s weight, including tower and

foundation, equals 4,381 tonnes. Approximately

3,000 employees will work on the wind farm in the

forthcoming period, an average of 200 people per

day and 650 unique individuals each week. The

ascending tower cranes are also striking features.

There are only four of these cranes in Europe, three

of these are presently used for constructing this

wind farm. 95% of the wind farm’s power is sold

to four multinationals, namely Google, AkzoNobel,

DSM, and Philips, without intervention from an

energy company. As Windpark Krammer is a citizens’

initiative, the consumer in this case supplies

the industry.

DELTAWIND COOPERATIVE

As a local cooperative, Deltawind also owns, alongside

its share in Windpark Krammer, a total of 22

MW of installed wind capacity and a 0.85 MW solar

farm. The cooperative currently has 2,500 members,

all of them are inhabitants of the island. With

wind farms Battenoert (40 million kWh per year)

and Piet de Wit (43 million kWh per year), Deltawind

is now already producing more than the electricity

consumption of all the Goeree-Overflakkee

households combined. Deltawind expects to build

another 9 MW on the island in the years to come.

This will bring the total for Goeree-Overflakkee,

which Deltawind is focusing on, to a capacity of

225 MW. ‘We have completed this’, explains Deltawind

Director Monique Sweep. ‘We will now target

other parts of energy transition, such as collective

solar roofs for private individuals. We will also be

examining other forms of energy such as hydrogen

and methane from seaweed, and storing energy at

the Krammersluizen.’

ZEEUWIND

Citizens’ cooperative Zeeuwind will also focus

on storing energy. Zeeuwind has been around for

some 30 years, and back in the days we started

with three wind turbines. The cooperative counts

2,300 members, mainly private individuals. All of

the 13 municipalities in Zeeland are members too,

as well as several companies, associations, and

foundations. The cooperative owns multiple wind

farms, with a total capacity of 20 MW. Zeeuwind

in the following years expects to double the total

capacity with new projects and scaleups. An old

turbine of one of the wind farms was replaced by a

new one at the beginning of this year. This 2.3 MW

turbine is expected to annually produce 3.9 million

kWh. Zeeuwind also finances 25% of Windpark

Bouwdokken, which is built on the dams of the

former Bouwdokhavens on the Neeltje Jans production

platform. These seven turbines have a capacity

of 4.2 MW each, and have since early 2018 onwards

jointly generated 112.5 million kWh of electricity

per year.

TWENTY-YEAR OLD PLAN

Deltawind and Zeeuwind have already collaborated

on a smaller scale, but the project on the Krammersluizen

came into view in 2008. The cooperatives

now together have 51% of the shares in Windpark

Krammer. The remaining 49% is owned by turbine

builder Enercon. The idea for the wind farm originated

over two decades ago. According to Marten

Wiersma, Chairman of the Zeeuwind supervisory

board, the fact that it did not materialise back then

is because the Rijkswaterstaat (Department of Waterways

and Public Works), the owner of the land

in those days, thought it was ‘a scary idea’ to build

on top of a primary flood defence. ‘The wind turbines

back then also had a capacity that was far too

low, which made the grid connection far too costly.

>>

Windpark Krammer, photo by Erik van huizen

12 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 13


INTERVIEW

With the current scaleup and the turbines delivering

more capacity, it can now be realised. So one of

the most important innovations of this farm is that

we are now building on a primary flood defence.

This was a pilot project for Rijkswaterstaat. We had

to demonstrate that the flood defence would not

be affected. We have consequently created a basis,

which in future might possibly open doors to other

projects.’

Turbine installation at

Windpark Krammer,

photo by J.J. de Wit

The fact that most of the generated power goes to

the four multinationals was a conscious decision.

The supplied capacity may indeed soon suffice for

100,000 households, but as the members of the

cooperatives do not purchase a lot of energy, these

enterprises were important for completing the

business case.

IMPROVED TECHNOLOGY

The technology of wind turbines is still improving

every day, along with their efficiency. Both cooperatives

also noticed this at Windpark Krammer. ‘The

turbines that we had ordered from Enercon for

Windpark Krammer have in the meantime already

been improved’, adds Wiersma. ‘The technology

has improved to such an extent that they generate

even more power. This often only concerns several

percent, but when you generate a lot of energy, this

soon adds up quite nicely. The blades, for instance,

now fit seamlessly onto the housing, so that they

catch a lot more wind. In the early days, we were

content if a turbine managed 1,900 running hours

annually, this number now often exceeds 3,000.

The turbines are now also full of sensors, so everything

can be remotely monitored. This allows for

improved maintenance and less frequent turbine

shutdowns.’

EMOTIONAL

Sweep certainly noticed that the new wind farm

is larger than other farms by the resistance it

caused. ‘For nearly thirty years, we were able to

just proceed with the smaller projects, but now we

did meet some opposition. The opponents often

express emotional arguments, rather than rational

ones. The main argument is that wind turbines

are unattractive and disrupt the landscape. We

certainly understand these feelings, but there is not

a lot we can do about this. You also frequently hear

that the land owner makes a lot of money on the

farm. This involves jealousy, another aspect that a

developer cannot really do much about as the market

determines the price of the land. You also hear

people complaining about the lights of the wind

turbines. This light is mandatory for heights over

150 metres, and we understand that it is pity when

the countryside is no longer dark. We can do something

about this though, and we will gladly address

this aspect. We are therefore carrying out a pilot

with lighting that works on radar. This involves the

lights switching on only when something moves.’

A wind fund was established to meet the needs of

the three surrounding municipalities and inhabitants

within 2.5 kilometres around the wind farm,

which is good for the annual distribution of EUR

150,000. Citizens in this case receive a discount on

the energy bill for green power. One village asked

for the money in one single payment. This money

has now been used for installing solar panels on

186 residences in the village, more than 80% of all

of the houses.

BOND LOAN

Although the financing was already lined up, the

cooperatives via Windpark Krammer wanted to

realise participatory opportunities for members

and for the near surroundings. A bond loan was

hence issued. According to Sweep, citizens have different

reasons for participating in the cooperatives’

wind farms. ‘It is partially about people wanting to

do something in energy transition, though another

important reason is the good interest rate of 6%

that we give on the bond loan issued for Windpark

Krammer.’ The bond loan was supervised by the

Netherlands Authority for the Financial Markets

(AFM), which was a novelty for the cooperatives.

There was a strong interest in the loan, which was

substantially overwritten by 232%.

ECOLOGY

Another challenge in constructing the Windpark

Krammer was the fact that the farm is located

amidst Natura 2000 areas. The movements of birds

in the area was therefore already considered in

both the farm’s design and the positioning of the

wind turbines. ‘We have furthermore taken ample

measures, including additional ones,’ adds Sweep.

‘We created a swallow bank, and the turbines are

provided with bird and bat detectors. The wind

turbines are hereby halted when bats are active or

when birds are nearby. Anything so as to cause the

least damage to nature.’

When asked if the two cooperatives also want to

start developing wind farms at sea, both Sweep and

Wiersma answer in the negative. ‘We never had the

intention to build at sea’, states Wiersma. ‘We are

developers of projects that would otherwise never

be launched. We are not needed at sea.’

14 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 15


INTERVIEW

OLOF VAN DER GAAG,

DIRECTOR NVDE

No more room for procrastination: The Netherlands needs to switch to a more sustainable

energy system as quickly as possible. A Climate Agreement on how this should be achieved,

is currently being negotiated. “Everyone understands something should be done — now.”

JAAP MEIJERS

WTIV Aeolus on its way to Gemini Offshore Wind

Farm, photo: Gemini

Photo by Milan Vermeulen

Sustainable energy has been a topic of debate in

this country for decades, without really achieving

all that much. The first attempt to actually make a

change, was the National Energy Agreement (‘Energieakkoord’)

in 2013. Government, companies and

environmental organisations agreed to increase the

renewable energy share to 14 percent in 2020 and

reduce power consumption by 100 petajoules.

In early March negotiations for a new climate

agreement (“Klimaatakkoord”) started. It won’t

contain targets for a larger share of renewable

energy, nor for energy saving. The idea is mainly to

delineate how to bring carbon emissions down by

49 percent by 2030 compared to 1990 emissions.

The negotiations are quite a complicated process.

Five sector bodies are created, each representing

an industry sector, being electricity, built environment,

mobility, industry and agriculture and land

use. But there are also at least fifty sub-bodies and

sub-sub-bodies plus an overarching climate board,

headed by Ed Nijpels.

The companies that are involved in making our

energy system more sustainable are represented

by the Dutch Renewable Energy Foundation

(NVDE). Over a thousand companies have joined

the NVDE to work toward 100% renewable energy.

Among its members are companies in the electricity

sector such as Eneco, Siemens, transmission

system operator TenneT, Tesla and fast charge

network Fastned, but also heating companies such

as suppliers of biomass boilers. NVDE director Olof

van der Gaag will be seated at many of the different

‘table’ discussions.

WHAT CAN WE EXPECT FROM THE

KLIMAATAKKOORD? ARE WE STILL IN TIME?

“There are two sides really. Climate change can no

longer be relegated to our grandchildren’s generation.

It’s here now and it is our responsibility.

Heavy rainfall and flooding occur more frequently.

We should have been doing this twenty years

earlier, because now we have to force an unnatural

rate of change. Take for instance natural

gas-free houses. Until last year, it was

normal procedure to annually add 50 to

60 thousand houses that are connected

to natural gas. This means we would now

start to get houses off natural gas at a rate

of a thousand houses each day up to 2050.

It would have been very nice if those numbers

weren’t quite as high.

But then again, there’s more support than

ever for really doing something about it.

Increasing the share of renewable energy

from 4 percent to 16 percent in just ten

years isn’t enough by a long shot, but at

least something is happening. The fact

that, as a result of the Energieakkoord,

five coal plants were shut down and replaced by

wind farms, is really showing in the statistics. If

we actually manage to cut our carbon emissions by

half by 2030, then it is another step forward. Yet it

is still a long time away. Last year carbon emissions

increased again and another five coal plants remain

operational. Those should be shut down within the

next ten years.”

IS THE SENSE OF URGENCY SHARED BY THE

GOVERNMENT AND OTHER PARTIES IN THE

KLIMAATAKKOORD?

“The mood has really changed from what it was

ten years ago. Back then nobody really cared, and

now everyone is aware something should be done

now. It will get more tense though, I think, once the

bill is presented. We’ll get to that phase in a week

or two. Even if the costs for many solutions are

coming down, on average it’s still more expensive

to switch to renewable energy instead of just continue

burning fossil fuels. Opinions differ, of course,

on how those expenditures should be distributed.

The minister for Economic Affairs and Climate, Eric

Wiebes, has told each sector how many megatons

carbon dioxide they should reduce. The industry

in principle is fine with everything as long as it is

subsidized by the government. However, the government

thinks ‘we have to be able to explain this to

the tax payer, so they should pay for it themselves’.

And it’s a couple of billion Euros a year, not something

one can spirit away.”

THE NETHERLANDS ISN’T QUITE THE IDEAL PLACE

FOR ALTERNATIVE FORMS OF ENERGY. THERE ARE NO

RESERVOIRS, AND IN WINTER SOLAR PANELS ARE

NOT OF MUCH USE. IS OFFSHORE WIND THE ONLY

REAL OPTION FOR OUR COUNTRY TO GENERATE

RENEWABLE ENERGY?

“On the score of wind power at sea, the Energieakkoord

has caused quite a breakthrough. Many new

wind turbines are being added, even without subsidies.

The Netherlands wasn’t given all that many

gifts by Mother Earth, but the North Sea sure is one

of them. The sea floor is very shallow, so it’s easy to

drive in piles, and the winds are quite strong. >>

16 2-2018 WindEnergy

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INTERVIEW

WINDDAYS 2018

I notice a lot of enthusiasm to continue that flagship

of the Energieakkoord, many parties are in

favour. To large utilities offshore wind farms are

a comfortable scale of thinking, because they are

large, centralized projects which power a million

households in one go. Some parts of the energy

transition are a challenge for the old economy, all

that mucking about with decentralized citizens

who generate power themselves, but wind at sea

still fits the large scale logic of the old energy

supply.”

IF WE HAVE TO GET OFF FOSSIL FUELS THAT FAST,

SHOULDN’T WE BUILD OFFSHORE WIND FARMS

MORE QUICKLY AND ALSO MUCH LARGER?

“The Government wants wind power to increase by

1 gigawatts per year. For the Netherlands, that’s an

unprecedented revolution. There is even discussion

whether we can do even more. I do think there’s

room for more, 2 gigawatts per year would be possible

too if you ask me. But I don’t think the wind

farm areas should be larger. A 700 megawatt area

for instance already involves an investment of a

couple of billion Euros. Suppose we start making 5

gigawatt lots, then you may be talking about twenty

billion. If you consider the companies that can

handle that level of investments, then maybe the

only competitors will be Shell, Shell or Shell. That’s

not much of a competition. I think it is important

that even smaller companies can fully participate.”

IS A MIX OF ONLY RENEWABLE ENERGY POSSIBLE,

ONE THAT DOES NOT REQUIRE FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

AS BACKUP AT ALL?

“The goal of our organization is 100 percent

renewable energy, not just for electricity but also

heating and transport. I think that’s achievable.

Electricity is the easiest part, because wind and

solar already get us quite far. The only thing that

will still have to be taken care of is peak power, to

have a backup which can be activated at the press

of a button. In the short term this can only be

achieved sustainably by biomass, but that has its

downsides. For now peak power will have to come

from gas plants. Coal plants have to go, obviously.

Gas plants are also easier to switch on than coal

plants. It takes a coal power plant at least four

hours to really get fired up, while a gas plant works

just like your burner at home: light it and it works.

Batteries are even faster. Tesla just built a backup

facility in Australia using batteries. I expect we’ll

see that here too.”

BUT THE TALKING AND CONSULTING AT ALL THESE

TABLES, DO WE REALLY HAVE TIME FOR ALL THAT?

SHOULDN’T WE JUST ACT NOW IF WE ARE TO

ACHIEVE THOSE TARGETS?

“By nature I am not terribly patient myself, but this

kind of societal transformation cannot be forced on

a country. That’s not how the Netherlands works.

It’s one thing to say ‘do something instead of talking’,

but really, what then? We don’t have a Great

Beloved Leader who can make all decisions, and

that’s for the best. Jan Rotmans for instance [professor

in sustainability and transitions] often says

things like that, by which he means ‘you should do

what I want’. But he is not our Kim Jong-un. We all

have to agree on this.

We started in March, and the last meeting is on July

6. It really is an unprecedented change, halving

carbon emissions in the Netherlands with a price

tag of about four billion per year. If an agreement

can be reached on that within four months, I think

Ed Nijpels and Eric Wiebes can be quite pleased.”

CV

Olof van der Gaag is director of the Dutch Renewable

Energy Foundation (NVDE), which

unites over a thousand companies in the goal

to achieve 100% renewable energy. Before

2016 Van der Gaag was head of campaigns

for environmental NGO Natuur en Milieu.

Between 1998 and 2007 he was political

adviser to the Dutch green party’s fraction

in parliament. Van der Gaag studied cultural

anthropology.

TECHNICIANS NEEDED

“The Netherlands will have to start cherishing

their technicians. Certainly at the level of

vocational education a lot more technicians

are needed, and we are not seeing more influx

at all. That could turn out to be one of the

biggest hurdles in the energy transition.

We need to show young people that a technical

profession is very interesting and

rewarding. Engineering talents tell me that

new forms of energy to them are a lot more

exciting and challenging. Drilling pipes into

the ground is complex as well, but we have

been doing that for ages, while here a lot of

new problems need to be solved.”

WINDDAYS 2018

13 & 14 JUNE

WTC ROTTERDAM

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interview

WINDDAYS 2018

WindDays 2018 is the place to be if you wish to position yourself in the wind energy. ‘You receive

inside information about everything that is going on in this field. From the latest scientific

developments and information on technical innovations in the area of, for example, turbines,

foundations, the installation process and by now also on the decommissioning of the first

generations of wind turbines,” says Anouk Stortenbeker, communications manager at TKI (Top

Consortia Knowledge and Innovation). TKI was set up under the auspices of the Energy Top Sector.

ANTOON OOSTING

LEARN ABOUT

THE LATEST

DEVELOPMENTS IN

THE WIND INDUSTRY

Together with Erik van Diest, communications

and events employee at the Dutch Wind Energy

Association (NWEA), she is responsible for the

conference programme at this two-day event. What

started in 2007 as a one-day conference for the

members of the NWEA only, has now grown into a

busy two-day event with some thirty two sessions

in which experts and market parties exchange the

most up-to-date knowledge with visitors from

home and abroad.

The growth of the event is thereby in line with

the development of the wind energy sector in the

Netherlands. Actually, it is growing so fast that the

sector is now starting to be seriously concerned

about the expected labour shortage in the sector.

“The current 10,000 workplaces in the wind industry

are expected to potentially grow to 20,000 by

2020, increasing to 50,000 by 2050,” says Stortenbeker.

And these only concern the direct jobs, the

indirect jobs have not even been included.

Stortenbeker: “These will be filled by both practically

and theoretically trained people who often

still have to get trained for this. This is quite a

challenge, but it also offers positive news for those

employees who have seen their jobs in the offshore

oil and gas sector disappear in recent years.

“It is expected that they will need relatively little

training to start working in the wind sector,” says

Stortenbeker.

After an initially rather slow start, the sector is

now going through a considerable acceleration.

Danish energy company Ørsted is busy preparing

for the construction of the Borssele I and II wind

farms, which will commence at the end of 2019. In

December 2016, a consortium of Shell, Eneco, Van

Oord and Mitsubishi won the tender for Borssele

II and IV. On Friday, 6 April, Minister Wiebes for

Economic Affairs and Climate announced that Two

Towers B.V., a company owned by Van Oord Renewable

Finance, Investri Offshore and Green Giraffe

Holding, is the winner of the tender Borssele Innovatiekavel

V. Two experimental wind turbines will

be realised in this tender.

Stortenbeker: “As TKI Wind at Sea, we find this very

important. Wind farms involve enormous investments

where investors are looking to keep their

risks to a minimum. Continuous innovations are

of great importance in order to increase efficiency.

However, in order to keep the risks manageable, it

is very important to be able to test and prove them

before applying them. In this respect, TKI Wind op

Zee would also like to see innovation plots included

in the permits for future wind farm sites off the

coast of Holland.

In the meantime, lots I and II of the wind farm Hollandse

Kust Zuid (740 MW) have also been granted

(to Chinook, subsidiary of Nuon/Vattenfall) and

Hollandse Kust Noord, lot V (700 MW) will follow

next year. The concession for the Hollandse Kust

West (1,400 MW) is scheduled to be issued in 2021.

“The growth of offshore wind makes it that we

need to go into serious talks with all other users of

the North Sea. Stortenbeker: “How can the different

roles mutually enforce each other. For example, a

start has been made on pilot projects for innovative

oyster beds within the boundaries of offshore wind

farms. The wind energy sector is seeking those

types of cooperation.

DISCUSSING THE FUTURE GRID

All these aspects of the realisation of offshore wind

farms are discussed in no less than 32 sessions

spread over the two-day WindDays event. The

issues of integrating and distributing wind energy

in the national grids, for example, are high on

the agenda. After all, how do you get the energy

generated at sea to the customer in the hinterland?

“How do we bring the generation of the electricity

and the consumption together in a network. This

will be a major challenge for the future. Solutions

to these kind of problems will be discussed at the

conference,” says Erik van Diest. I am sure that we

will also discuss the European Commission’s plan

to develop a grid for all the wind farms to be built

in the North Sea. By interconnecting them, the electricity

can be better distributed across the North

Sea countries and parts of the country where it is

needed at that moment.

>>

20 2-2018 WindEnergy

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interview

But perhaps another much better solution would

be not to transport the energy generated at sea to

the mainland, but to convert it into clean hydrogen

at sea. For this purpose, old drilling rigs for

pumping up oil and gas could perhaps fulfil a new

role. Or perhaps it will require a new island on the

Dogger Bank for which network manager TenneT

has developed a plan.

OFFSHORE WILL BE SURPASSING ONSHORE

Wind energy at sea is actually still a very young

technology, so there are still many areas for improvement.

And this is necessary, because offshore

wind is simply becoming a very big player, Erik

van Diest observes. We currently have 4.2 MW of

installed onshore capacity and 957 MW offshore.

From 2020 onwards, 700 MW will be added annually

offshore and from 2023, another 1 GW per

year will be added. Ultimately, it will have a greater

capacity than onshore wind. This growth in wind

energy must ensure that the Netherlands reduces

its greenhouse gas emissions of CO 2

by 49% by

2030.

While the sector grows, so are the WindDays. Van

Diest: “This year we have sixty exhibitors and we

expect 2,500 visitors. In 2016, there were 2,000. As

the sector grows, so does the competition. According

to Van Diest, the programme for the WindDays

has been set up ‘for and by’ the industry. And this

industry is quite large in the Netherlands. When

it comes to turbine manufacturers we currently

only have one, Lagerweij, but the Dutch industry is

big in the supply, maintenance and application of

measuring equipment. And in the installation work

Dutch companies such as Van Oord, Boskalis, Seaway

Heavy Lifting and Heerema Marine contractors

(HMC) are even very large. “All turbine manufacturers

are there,” Van Diest assures us; “In addition,

we have a great many SME’s, from software

developers, to project managers in maintenance,

safety, monitoring and adjustment. Van Diest: “New

this year is a Startup-Zone in which five startups

will be able to present themselves to the sector.

One of them has a vertical turbine that causes less

nuisance and a number of small ones that are still

completely new.

In recent years, offshore wind energy has rapidly

become cheaper. “This offers opportunities for

upscaling. However, this is something for which

we are dependent on the scope that the government

provides us. We, as a sector, can in any case

offer more projects if the space is made available,”

says Van Diest. The sector is not dissatisfied with

the government’s cooperation. Van Diest: “The

Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate has now

considerably expanded its offshore wind team in

order to be able to roll out wind at sea further in

the coming years. It may take a little more time to

carefully go through all the procedures. But as a

sector we are not dissatisfied with the progress.

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22 2-2018 WindEnergy


EUROPEAN MARKET OUTLOOK

WINDDAYS 2018

GILES DICKSON,

CEO WINDEUROPE

‘STABILIZING

REVENUE FROM

WIND IS ESSENTIAL’

The Netherlands and other countries must resist the temptation to invest only in the most sexy

innovative technologies for wind energy, according to Giles Dickson, ceo of WindEurope, who will

be one of the speakers at this year’s Dutch WindDays. There is still a lot of scope for enhancing

existing technologies, which is just as important.

CHRISTIAN JONGENEEL

energy development. Governments are moving

from subsidies to auctions to drive down costs.

Recently we have seen auctions where no subsidy

was required at all. That was certainly spectacular,

but it is important to note that zero cannot be the

norm. Only some developers in some countries

can afford this, specifically in Germany and The

Netherlands, because of their low capital costs and

stable regulation.’

In other words, government spending on wind

energy infrastructure is not about to dwindle

down. It will lower by itself, in any case, because a

lot of money still goes to older facilities, that required

higher subsidies. When these are phased out

the effective subsidy per GW naturally diminishes.

Actually, WindEurope’s annual report already

shows this trend of lowering costs. Although 2017

was a record breaking year for investments that

were announced in terms of capacity for future

projects (11.5 GW) the total investment was

19% lower than in the previous year,

when 10.3 GW reached its final investment

decision. Striking, too, was the

60% drop in investments in offshore

wind, which had been rising for five

years in a row. In contrast, onshore

wind rebounded from a slowdown

the year before.

installing ever larger facilities in the North Sea,

moreover, sparks the imagination. ‘We certainly

will need even larger turbines that can cope

with higher wind speeds’, Dickson acknowledges.

‘Floating offshore wind farms are an interesting

development, and everything that has to do with

storage deserves attention. However, we must resist

the temptation to invest only in the most sexy

Wind energy will remain the

dominant sustainable power

source of the future

innovative technologies for wind energy. There is

a lot of existing technology that deserves attention,

such as better components for wind turbines,

which should lead to lower maintenance cost.’

Even with these caveats the prospects

for wind energy are sunny. As

governments realise that

wind turbines are cheaper

than for instance pv installations,

wind energy

will remain the dominant

sustainable power

source of the future.

The installed base of wind energy is growing at an

unprecedented pace in Europe. By 2030 it is expected

to have surpassed gas powered plants as the

major source of electricity, supplying up to a quarter

of demand. So, there is reason to be optimistic

about the sector. At the same time it is important

not to get carried away by the thrills of success.

There is still a lot of work to do – and nothing will

happen by itself.

‘A binding EU wide target is on its way’, Giles Dickson

says. ‘This will force countries to articulate their

plans. It really is a key moment. Some countries are

underperforming. Eleven countries don’t invest at

all, even though the potential is huge.’

We must resist the temptation

to invest only in the most sexy

innovative technologies for

wind energy

adjusting demand to production will be more and

more common. Still, response capacity will need

to rise from 20 GW nowadays to 100 GW in 2030,

Dickson reckons.

According to WindEurope’s report

on 2017 a record of 15.6 GW in new

wind power installations came into

operation in that year. This brings the

installed base to 168.7 GW, almost one

third of which is Germany’s. Although

it is not among the eleven laggards, The

Netherlands are not a front runner when it

comes to wind energy. The country only contributed

0.5% of European capacity growth in 2017.

Cumulative it is 2.5%, putting The Netherlands in

the tenth position of total installed capacity. When

relating generating capacity to power consumption

The Netherlands drops one place, leaving it below

the European average. Denmark tops that scale

with 44.4% of annual electricity demand covered

by wind.

INNOVATION

‘People, especially in The Netherlands,

are inclined to look mainly at

offshore wind for growth’, Dickson

comments. ‘However, most growth is

onshore and this will remain so. Witness

for instance the recent commitments Akzo,

Philips and Google amongst others made in The

Netherlands to onshore wind for powering

their operations.’

Nevertheless, a focus on offshore wind

is understandable in a country with

a high population density, resulting

in frequent protests against new

projects. The challenges of

This matters, because capacity and distribution

play an important role in integrating wind energy

into the grid. Locally, the availability of wind

energy may be volatile, but there’s always wind

somewhere. With trading capacity moving closer

to the time of production – up to fifteen minutes –

COSTS

One of the factors that needs to be addressed in

order to sustain growth is to offer a steady

financial outlook to investors, Dickson says:

‘It is absolutely essential to stabilize

revenue from wind

Photo by WindEurope / Bickley

24 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 25


CONFERENCE PROGRAMME WINDDAYS 2018

go to www.winddays.nl for the most up-to-date programme

26 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 27


Floorplan WINDDAYS 2018

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WindEnergy 2-2018 29


STARTUPS IN WIND WINDDAYS 2018

The Netherlands is known for its innovative and explorative business culture. Many technological advances have

originated in the Netherlands or from Dutch inventors. This is also the case for the wind industry. Manufacturing,

installation and maintenance techniques, amongst others, have improved rapidly over the years and will do so in

the years to come. While many of these improvements are announced by the larger, well-known players, behind

the scene, there are also many small players working very hard on their innovative concept or service offering.

The WindDays event has provided startups a platform to introduce their services or product to a wider audience.

WindEnergy magazine spoke to 5 startups that will be exhibiting at WindDays.

TULYP WIND

Tulyp Wind is a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) that can provide

a boost to onshore wind. Developer of the turbine is Arkom

Windpower. Eric Pieterse, Project Manager

VERITEQ

VeriteQ is a specialist in Power Quality. So far they

haven’t worked for the wind energy industry, but

that should change. ‘We can find fault causes that

others do not see’, says Jan Verploegen of VeriteQ.

WHAT DO YOU HAVE TO OFFER TO THE WIND

INDUSTRY?

‘VeriteQ is a specialist in the field of PQ (Power

Quality) - fault analysis. With our experience and

our PQ failure analyzers we can find PQ failure

causes that others do not ‘see’. The dynamics in

the electricity grid will become much bigger in

the coming period. Coal-fired or a gas-fired power

stations use more or less the same generators and

deliver stable energy production. Wind turbines

and solar collectors work in a very different way. It

is all becoming more complex. If it gets cloudy or

the wind drops, the energy production suddenly

decreases. There’s a lot happening on the grid.

Sometimes failures are only short-lived, and with

wrong analyzers and lack of in-depth knowledge

you miss them. We use PQanalyzers from Outram

research. They already have a lot of experience

with the use of these analyzers in offshore wind.

Knowledge is also very important, a malfunction

can be short-lived, but exists still latent on the net.

A wind turbine fault is shown. The malfunction had already

occurred several times, resulting in production loss. With the PQ

failure analysis it was possible to determine what the cause was

and how to

solve this.

WHAT MAKES YOUR COMPANY DIFFERENT FROM

OTHER COMPANIES?

VeriteQ focuses on PQ failure analysis only, while

larger companies aren’t that specialized. Outram

research, the company we do business with, is

already working in PQ since 1980, so we have very

competent support.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE FOR THE DUTCH

WIND SECTOR?

Professor Cobben of the Eindhoven University of

Technology told that PQ disturbances will increase

due to the increase in alternative energies.

DOES YOUR OFFER LOWER THE KWH PRICE OF WIND

ENERGY?

That is hard to say. Having to stop a wind turbine

due to faults is of course very expensive. We help

resolving or preventing malfunctions. Politician Ed

Nijpels has said that there will be a rabbit pulled

out of the hat in terms of the costs of climate

measures. The question remains whether the KWh

price will go down.

IN FIVE YEARS, WHERE DO YOU STAND AS A COMPANY?

We have been active for 8 years now, and we are

slowly improving. I am convinced that PQ will become

an increasingly important issue and therefor

work will grow.

CAN YOU SPECIFY YOUR INNOVATION?

A vertical axis wind turbine that is more suitable

for the built environment. It produces less noise,

is less high and has a smaller risk contour, about

a quarter of a standard onshore wind turbine.

This means that the Tulyp Wind turbine is allowed

to be installed in closer proximity of houses

and buildings. It can be better integrated into the

landscape, in port, industrial and urban areas. The

turbine has fixed blades that do not rotate, therefor

minimizing the risk of damage. This means less and

cheaper maintenance.

WHAT IS THE ADVANTAGE OVER LARGER ONSHORE

TURBINES?

If you want to use a large wind turbine, please do

so, but many projects fail because the wind turbine

cannot be fitted in the environment. Considering

our turbine produces enough electricity to power

at least 200 households, this is better than no

turbine at al. By comparison, you would need an

area the size of a football field full of solar panels to

produce the equivalent of a Tulyp Wind turbine.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE FOR THE DUTCH

WIND SECTOR?

Improving acceptance for wind energy on land.

The industry is focussing on offshore wind and

that’s fine, but it is also important to proceed with

onshore wind. The Tulyps could play an important

role in making large infrastructure projects, such

as tunnels or the Afsluitdijk, more sustainable.

IN FIVE YEARS, WHERE DO YOU STAND AS A

COMPANY?

We will have succeeded and the Tulyp is manufactured

on large scale. We will be working on

new applications, for example floating turbines or

turbines that can be fitted on vessels. We will also

be producing different sizes of the Tulyp, a smaller,

backyard-sized version and a larger version of 80

meters that produces 1 MW.

www.tulypwind.com

DOES THE TULYP EFFECT THE KWH PRICE OF WIND

ENERGY?

That is hard to say. The Tulyp makes it possible to

install a wind turbine in areas where normal sized

onshore turbines are not allowed. We calculated

that the Tulyp costs 5 to 7 cents per produced

KWh. This is cheaper than Dutch solar energy, so it

is a good addition to the sustainable energy mix.

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

• 300kW direct drive generator

• Aerodynamic tulip-shaped foils

• Hub height: 30m

• Tip height: 60m

• Blade span: 28m

30 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 31


STARTUPS IN WIND WINDDAYS 2018

CIRCULAR ENERGY

QLAYERS

Circular Energy plans to build an offshore installation that

produces electricity directly from a gas field and supplies it

via the electricity network at sea, where it can absorb the

fluctuations in the production of wind energy. The CO 2

that is

released, is captured and stored in the gas field. Arnold Groot,

CEO of Circular Energy:

CAN YOU EXPLAIN YOUR TECHNOLOGY?

We intend to supply flexible, CO 2

-free electricity

from natural gas via the electricity network at sea.

This way the offshore electricity network is always

used optimally and stable and fluctuations during

periods of little wind can be absorbed properly, resulting

in a balanced offshore grid. We achieve this

by using an offshore gas-fired power station with

CO 2

capture and storage facility. In concrete terms:

we are building an offshore platform with a gas

extraction installation, a gas-fired power station

and a CO 2

-capture installation on top. The captured

CO 2

is stored in the gas field.

WHAT MAKES YOUR IDEA DIFFERENT FROM OTHER

COMPANIES WHO HAVE TRIED THE SAME?

We do things slightly different and better. Firstly,

Circular Energy properly cleans up the mess, that

is CO 2

, itself. Secondly, we are willing to wait a little

longer for our Return on Investment. By integrating

CO 2

capture and storage into our business model

and by doing everything at sea, our approach

is slightly more expensive. However, we think we

can develop a cost-effective method. Thirdly, we

add value to small gas fields that would otherwise

probably not be exploited.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE FOR THE DUTCH

WIND SECTOR?

In our view, the biggest challenge lies in providing

security of supply. Wind energy alone can’t offer

it. The technology of Circular Energy makes it

possible to offer flexible and yet very stable clean

energy.

DOES YOUR OFFER LOWER THE KWH PRICE OF WIND

ENERGY?

The average price for a kWh is not reduced by our

plan, but we prevent the price on wind-poor days

from increasing enormously.

Qlayers, a startup from Delft, develops a robot printer for the automatic

application of sharkskin coating, which makes wind turbines work more

efficiently. Josefien Groot, Head of Business Development at Qlayers:

WHAT IS YOUR INNOVATION?

The automated application of a coating with microstructures,

suitable for aircraft and wind turbines.

We are working on the development of a sharkskin

coating which ensures less frictional resistance.

After that, we want to continue with self-cleaning,

self-healing and anti-icing coatings.

WHAT MAKES YOUR PRODUCT DIFFERENT FROM

COMPETITORS?

We actually only have one competitor, Fraunhofer,

a big company. However, their way of applying coatings

differs from how we do it. They use templates,

a kind of rollers. We use a way of 3-D printing

which is much more favourable for complex shapes

such as airplanes and wind turbines. We receive a

lot of interest for our product and we would now

like to enter into a partnership with a wind turbine

manufacturer so that we can test the lifespan of the

coating offshore, for example.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE IN WIND ENERGY?

Maintenance will become very important in the

coming period. Installation is now in full swing and

the bill for maintenance will soon come up. For

offshore this will be a hefty bill. I think that is the

biggest challenge until 2030.

WILL YOUR PRODUCT CONTRIBUTE TO REDUCING

THE PRICE PER KWH OF WIND ENERGY?

Yes, by applying a sharkskin microstructure to a

2-megawatt wind turbine, the energy efficiency

can be increased by 6 percent, which results in an

increase in the efficiency of 264,000 kWh per year

(per wind turbine). When applied to larger turbines

the results are even higher. By automating the

coating process, repairs can be carried out more

safely and overspray can be reduced. Currently the

coating is done by hand and sometimes twice as

much paint is used than needed.

IN FIVE YEARS WHERE DO YOU STAND AS A

COMPANY?

Qlayers will be the market leader in the application

of functional coatings. By then we have automated

the coating process for storage tanks, wind turbines

and airplanes. In addition, we will have started

with the application of the shark skin structure on

aircrafts, ships and high-speed trains. Developing

technology takes a lot of time, and our goals are

ambitious but I think these are within reach.

www.qlayers.com

Design of the offshore gas- fired power station

with CO 2

capture and storage facility

IN 5 YEARS, WHERE DO YOU STAND AS A COMPANY?

In five years’ time, our installation will supply

200.000 households with CO 2

-free electricity from

Dutch natural gas. The amount of CO 2

that we

collect annually is roughly equivalent to removing

100,000 cars from the road.

www.circular-energy.nl

32 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 33


STARTUPS IN WIND

ORA OFFSHORE

CUSTOMS

CONSULTANCY

Hadassah Vorm of ORA Offshore Customs Consultancy offers specialized customs

advice to offshore companies, including offshore wind.

WHAT SERVICE DO YOU OFFER THE OFFSHORE WIND

INDUSTRY?

We provide customs advice and arrange customs

documents for the offshore industry. Nowadays

a lot is coming from the offshore wind industry.

Other customs agents also draw up customs documents,

but we go a step further. We give specialized

advice, I hold years of experience in the sector, so

I know all the do’s and don’ts. In many companies,

arranging customs documents is neglected, they

do it at the last moment or leave it to the logistics

service provider. Whereas it can save you a lot of

money if you do manage it properly. For example,

if you built wind turbines in Schiedam that will go

offshore, you’ll have to arrange it so that there will

be zero percent VAT on them.’

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE FOR THE DUTCH

WIND SECTOR?

I find that difficult to answer. As far as customs

processing is concerned, it would be a good thing if

all parties at customs are facing the same direction.

In practice you see differences in attitude between

the different offices. Rotterdam, Vlissingen and

Eemshaven are good examples of how things can

be organized correctly, they facilitate the offshore

sector very well. I always pay attention to this in

meetings between customs and the industry.

DOES YOUR OFFER LOWER THE KWH PRICE OF WIND

ENERGY? HOW MUCH?

No idea, but properly prepared customs documents

simply save money.

COST

REDUCTIONS

BY INTEGRAL

APPROACH

PETER EECEN,

Programme Development Manager Wind Energy

at ECN part of TNO

column

There is less and less debate on the urgency to act on behalf of the climate

and to develop a future CO 2

-free energy system. Such system requires

significant energy savings and massive amounts of renewable energy

such as wind power. The energy transition will have significant impact

on households, industry and society. However, the urgency to make fast

progress is felt by many.

The Dutch climate agreement that is a follow-up of the energy agreement

shows this ambition. The urgency to make large steps in the

energy transition is demonstrated by the ambitious goals to reduce CO 2

emissions by 49% in 2030.

To realize such large reductions within a relatively short period of time

requires bold and ambitious implementation plans. Therefore, the main

priority is to implement, for example, energy savings, gas-free houses

and large wind and solar power plants.

The energy transition is an enormous effort and will take several

decades and requires continuous innovation. Not only does it require

an energy system based on investments in fluctuating sources in the system,

such as conversion to carriers like hydrogen, storage, interconnection,

etc., but the transition after 2030 also requires innovations and new

solutions. An ambitious innovation agenda and a strong implementation

agenda are needed to achieve those ambitious plans.

The energy research activities of the Energy research Centre of the

Netherlands, ECN, have been merged with TNO to create the institute

“ECN part of TNO”. From April 1st, this new institute within the TNO

organization is dedicated to energy-innovation. In the vision of ECN and

TNO the optimal solutions are found by an integral approach. Therefore,

combining the multidisciplinary knowledge and expertise of both organisations

into a new institute ‘ECN part of TNO’ will enable the development

of essential innovations required for the energy transition that will

benefit the CO₂ reduction as well as the Dutch economy.

WHAT DO YOU DO DIFFERENTLY THAN THE BIG

COMPANIES?

The personal approach. I always meet my clients

face to face so I can properly determine what they

need, where there are challenges and how I can

solve these for them. I am 24/7 available. If a vessel

arrives or leaves with goods, I will be available, that

is absolutely a requirement in this sector.

IN FIVE YEARS, WHERE DO YOU STAND AS A

COMPANY?

I am busy scaling up my team with more professionals.

My mission is to have more women working

in the port, so also more women in our company.

Recent tenders for Dutch offshore wind farms have shown amazing

cost reductions; the conditions at the designated sites were so favourable

that a subsidy-free offer has been made and accepted (excluding

grid connection). To enable the shown cost reductions, everywhere in

the supply chain costs will need to be reduced drastically. An effective

measure is the increase in size of wind turbines and the rotors in combination

with substantially higher nominal power: every turbine produces

more and more power. Although these larger wind turbines look similar

from the outside, important technology developments are essential to

realize these larger and larger turbines at lower cost per MW and MWh.

To minimise the risk and maximise the reliability, more accurate design

tools are required because the design limits are approached. In addition,

innovations are required to beat the so called square-cube law. ECN

part of TNO is an attractive partner to assist the development of 10+MW

wind turbines and is involved in prototype development. In-depth knowledge

of aerodynamics for large blades, combined with integral design

capabilities for large, offshore turbine design is key.

A commercially attractive turbine is the result of an integral design

approach. Turbine and wind farm design optimization should take into

account (apart from costs and production) impact on installation, connection

to the grid and operation and maintenance. The turbine should

be designed to minimize the associated costs and maximise the value of

the yield. The combined knowledge of Dutch R&D centres into ‘ECN part

of TNO’ is essential for the integral design optimization.

34 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 35


OFFSHORE NEWS

OFFSHORE NEWS

PONDERA AND ARCADIS TO

INVESTIGATE MOST EFFICIENT

TRANSPORT METHODS FOR

FUTURE OFFSHORE WIND FARMS

By 2030 offshore wind is estimated

to provide up to 40% of the national

power consumption. The Dutch Government

has recently ordered consultancy

companies Pondera and Arcadis

to conduct a strategical study on the

best possible methods to transport

energy from future large-scale offshore

wind farms to the Dutch mainland. The

companies will perform the study in

collaboration with TSO TenneT. In the

study several elements are taken into

consideration, such as environmental

effects, costs and technical feasibility

but also the different possible ways

of relieving the energy grid in case of

high wind peaks offshore and whether

each option is futureproof. The study

will be performed by means of setting

up an assessment framework and

an environmental impact study. The

outcome of the study will contribute

to future assessments of offshore wind

grid connections.

VAN OORD ADDS 3RD SRI

VESSEL TO ITS FLEET

On May 21, Van Oord christened its

new Subsea Rock Installation vessel

Bravenes at the Wilhelminakade in

Rotterdam. The vessel was baptized by

the wife of CEO Pieter van Oord. The

ceremony also resembled the start of a

2-day celebration marking the company’s

150th anniversary.

Bravenes is the third SRI vessel for Van

Oord. They are used for stabilizing and

protecting subsea pipelines, cables and

other constructions at water depths up

to 1,500 metres. A unique feature of

the Bravenes, in its class, is its ability

to install rocks in three different ways;

using the traditional way via a fallpipe

inserted through the moonpool, via

a fallpipe over the side or through a

tremie pipe over the side. This enables

the vessel to install rocks more closely

to the offshore platforms. Another

feature is its ability to install large and

heavy rocks, making it especially suitable

for the offshore wind and cable

industry. The first project will be in

Norway, serving at several projects in

the North Sea.

Photo: Van Oord

NEW TRENCHER DIG-IT

Earlier that month, Van Oord also

announced its new trencher, the Dig-

It. This tracked Remotely Operated

Vehicle (TROV), also known as the Q

Trencher 1600, is used for burying

cables in the seabed at depths up to

3 metres, depending on the configuration

and soil characteristics. It can

be operated in two modes, jetting and

chain cutting, and uses its tracks as

primary way of propulsion. With a total

installed power of 1,200 kW, the Dig-It

is the most powerful in the Q-trencher

series and expands the company’s

cable laying and burial capabilities and

the ability to offer its offshore wind

clients a complete service package.

The Dig-It has now started on its first

project, in the German offshore wind

farm Borkum Riffgrund 2, where it

is mobilised on the offshore support

vessel Rem Saltire. Van Oord’s cable

laying vessel Nexus is doing the installation

work. Cable laying activities are

expected to be completed in July. Van

Oord was awarded the contract from

Ørsted in 2016.

KEEL-LAYING CEREMONY FOR

DAMEN’S 2ND SOV

On 8 May, a keel-laying ceremony

for Damen Shipyards’ second purpose-built

SOV (Service Operations

Vessel) 9020 took place at Damen

Shipyards Galati, in Romania. It is also

the second SOV 9020 for Bibby Marine

Services who received the first one, the

Bibby Wavemaster 1, only last year.

The second Service Operation Vessel

with Walk-to-Work capability only

differs slightly from its sister vessel,

being some changes to the warehousing

layout, removal from the sauna for

more gym space, reconfiguration of the

bridge and a different gangway package

and crane, this time from SMST.

The new vessel is due for delivery in

August 2019 and has been contracted

by Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy

and EnBW for maintenance operations

on two wind farms in German waters;

Hohe See and Albatros. The final name

will be announced later.

FCS 2710

Earlier that month, Damen announced

the introduction of a new model to

its Fast Crew Supplier range, the FCS

2710. It retains much of the fundamen-

Photo: Damen

tal design of the successful FCS 2610

that was introduced by the company in

2011, but has been adapted to current

requirements in the offshore energy

industry. For the design of the vessel,

Damen listened to feedback from

several clients and end-users. This

resulted in a vessel that delivers more

flexibility, more tank capacity, greater

deck space, increased comfort and

more accommodation.

The FCS 2710 design retains the twin

hull and axe bow but is one metre longer

and one metre higher than the FCS

2610 and, as a consequence, increased

hull volume and performance ability in

wave heights of above two metres. By

changing the deck layout from a stepped

layout to a levelled one, without

losing desk space for cargo, more passengers

can be fitted, 26 in its standard

configuration. There is also a choice of

propulsion systems with conventional

shafts, water jets, IPS and Voith Linear

Drives available as options.

The first vessel is currently being built

at Damen Shipyards Antalya for its

future owner High Speed Transfers Ltd.

It is due for delivery in July and will

be shown to the public at the Seawork

International event in Southampton

that same month.

ACTA AURIGA STARTS ON

FIRST OFFSHORE WIND

PROJECT

In March Acta Marine welcomed its

new Walk To Work service vessel Acta

Auriga. This latest addition to its fleet

is now working on its first project, at

the 400 MW German wind farm BARD

Offshore 1, located approximately 100

km north of the isle of Borkum in the

German North Sea. It has been chartered

by the wind farm’s owner and

operator Ocean Breeze Energy GmbH

& Co. KG on a two-year contract.

Ocean Breeze Energy will use the Acta

Auriga, via service company REETEC,

for maintenance activities on the wind

farm, which is Germany’s first commercial

offshore wind farm. Since 2015

support vessels are used for maintenance

work on BARD Offshore 1 and

this new vessel is expected to further

optimize the logistics concept. The

new design by Acta Marine and Norwegian

shipyard Ulstein should allow

for more productivity of the personnel,

under safe circumstances. This should

contribute in turn to ensuring and

increasing the technical availability of

the turbines.

The Acta Auriga features a SMST

3D-compensated gangway and 3D-crane

and the special Ulstein X-BOW and

X-STERN hull design. These allow for

safe transfer cargo and personnel at

significant wave heights of up to three

metres. The state-of-art hotel facilities

can accommodate up to 120 persons.

Photo: Acta Marine

BLIX TO PROVIDE EXPERT

SUPPORT FOR SOLI

INVESTIGATIONS ON HOLLANDSE

KUST WEST

In May, the RVO awarded BLIX and

partners an assignment for expert

support for soil investigations for the

offshore wind farm zone Hollandse

Kust West. Along with partners

Reynolds International, Wind Support,

RPS, Periplus and Marine Geological

Advice, BLIX will manage the geophysical

and geotechnical surveys, the

morphodynamical study and perform

the quality check of the soil investigations.

The collected data of the soil,

water and wind conditions in the zones

will be used as information package for

those planning to tender for the wind

site.

US OFFSHORE WIND:

OPPORTUNITIES &

CHALLENGES

During the ‘US Offshore Wind Strategy’

meeting on 16 May interested parties

were informed on the possibilities and

challenges for participation in the US

offshore wind developments. The export

platform meeting was organised

by the IRO, NWEA and HHWE. Invited

speakers were Arjen Schutten (HHWE),

Matthew (Mac) Bernstein (Partner at

DLA Piper LLP (US), Chris van Beek

and Albert Ploeg (Deepwater Wind).

The US had a rough start with the Cape

Wind project which failed in the end

but has learned from its lessons. At

the moment Block Island is the only

operating offshore wind farm but the

prospect for offshore wind is looking

good.

The North East Coast region offers the

best opportunities for offshore wind

due to growing energy demand from

its dense and growing populated areas,

good winds and relatively shallow waters.

Existing facilities are old and will

have to be replaced in the near future

and there is a broad political support

for renewable energy. Massachusetts

requires 1,600 MW form offshore

wind by 2017, New Jersey has set a

goal of 3,500 MW from offshore wind

by 2030, New York seeks 2,400 from

wind energy and Rhode Island has set

a goal of 1,000 MW from clean energy

by 2020.

However, Dutch companies interested

in getting involved in US offshore wind

developments do face some challenges

which they need to take into consideration.

Firstly the supply chain is not

fully in place and the development of

a local industry remains an important

factor. Secondly, the Jones Act offers

limitations for international vessels

operating in US coastal waters. Other

challenges involve available infrastructure,

permitting and Easements and

environmental concerns.

36 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 37


ONSHORE NEWS

GENERAL NEWS

WINDPARK WESTFRISIA REACHES

FINANCIAL CLOSE

Windpark Westfrisia, a project by

Westfriese Windmolencooperatie, will

be located along the Westfrisiaweg

near Zwaagdijk, in the province of

Medemblik. The wind farm consists of

5 turbines which will be delivered and

installed by Enercon. Each turbine, type

E92, has a capacity of 2.3 MW. KWS and

Visser & Smit Hanab are responsible

for the local infrastructure and connection

to a yet to be built power station.

The environmental permit was received

in September last year. The first

construction activities have already

started and the wind farm is expected

to be completed by mid-2019. Windpark

Westfrisia has awarded BLIX with

the construction management scope.

BLIX was already responsible for the

tendering and contract negotiations of

the turbines, civil and electrical works

and the grid connection.

GREEN LIGHT FOR WINDPARK

INDUSTRIETERREIN MOERDIJK

Nuon can start building the wind farm

in Moerdijk. In May, Windpark industrieterrein

Moerdijk got the go-ahead

when the Administrative Jurisdiction

Division of the Council of State declared

all issued appeals against the zoning

plan unfounded. It is not possible to

appeal against the decision. According

to the plan, seven turbines will

be installed along the Westelijke and

Zuidelijke Randweg in the west and

southeast sections of the Zeehaven- en

Industrieterrein Moerdijk. Depending

on the turbine type selection, the wind

farm could have a capacity ranging

from 21 to 35 MW. This is enough to

power at least 24,000 households. Construction

is expected to start in 2019.

The wind farm could become operational

in 2020.

type E-126-EP4 turbines. Each 4.2 MW

turbine has a height of 135 metres and

a rotor diameter of 127 metres. The

project is financed by a consortium

of ABN AMRO Bank, Rabobank and

Sumitomo Mitsui Banking Corporation.

Once fully operational, the wind farm

could provide electricity to over 24,000

households. A 16-year PPA was signed

with Eneco Group. The two companies

worked together on wind projects in

the Netherland before.

PROVINCE OF SOUTH HOLLAND

INTRODUCES INTERACTIVE WIND

MAP

The province of South Holland has set

a target to install 735.5 MW of onshore

wind up to 2020. At the moment it has

realised about half of its ambitions.

In the next few years, existing, old

turbines are replaced and new turbines

are added. For interested parties the

Province has now developed an interactive

wind map detailing the locations

of existing and planned wind farms and

the project developers.

MINI TURBINE INSTALLED ON

NOISE BARRIER

so-called ‘Energy Wall’ should consists

of replaceable panels that each hold a

different function, such as generating

energy from wind or solar or filtering

particulate matter. During a year it

will be investigated what the options

are for integrating wind energy in the

noise barrier. Measurement equipment

were already fitted to the existing noise

barrier to investigate the main wind

directions and forces.

Based on the results from those

measurements, a mini wind turbine, the

Windleaf, was selected to be installed

on the existing noise barrier. It will be

tested for a maximum of 3 months to

measure the level of noise production

and how much energy is produced.

Part of the test is to see whether wind

against the noise barrier is pushed up,

producing higher wind speeds on top

of the barrier. The outcome should help

define whether installing a small wind

turbine is an effective solution, technically,

economically and socially. A second

Windleaf is installed in a meadow

nearby to compare results.

Photo: Province of South Holland

will strive to announce the winners

before the summer.

10 MW WIND TURBINE TO BE

INSTALLED ON TWEEDE MAAS-

VLAKTE

The city council of Rotterdam, in its

attempt to stimulate the development

of wind in the region, is planning to

build a 10 MW wind turbine on the

Tweede Maasvlakte. The turbine should

be able to provide electricity to around

8,000 households. The Council is now

investigating if the location is suitable

for the installation of such a big

turbine. It expects that the construction

of the turbine could be completed next

year, provided the permits are in place

shortly. The first two years will be used

to test the turbine. After that, it can

be fully implemented in the grid. The

name of the turbine manufacturer has

not been released by the Council.

SUBSIDY SCHEMES FOR ENERGY &

CLIMATE TO OPEN ON JULY 2

On July 2nd several subsidy schemes

for energy and climate innovation will

open. The schemes are initiated to

make the Netherlands more clean and

economically stronger. The scheme

round is divided in several areas:

chemical recycling of plastics, MVI (Socially

responsible innovating) Energy,

Geo-energy, hydrogen, CCUS (Carbon

Capture, Utilisation and Storage) and

system integration on the North Sea.

For the latter it concerns the integration

of large quantities of offshore wind

energy into the national grid at socially

acceptable prices. Related themes are

ways of transport, energy storage and

tuning of supply and demand.

The scheme is administrated by

the RVO, by order of the Ministry of

Economic Affairs and Climate and the

Ministry of Infrastructure and Water

Management.

RUUD SONDAG NEW CEO ENECO

GROUP

On 25 May Eneco announced the

official appointment of Ruud Sondag as

new CEO of Eneco Groep NV. He will be

replacing Jeroen de Haas as of immediately.

In the press release Sondag

stated that his highest priorities are to

continue the Group’s leading position

in the energy transition, and the

privatisation process. Sondag was CEO

of waste processing company Van Gansewinkel

Group for eleven years and

was shareholder at recycling company

Scherpenzeel. In addition, he holds

several supervisory board positions,

at, amongst others, ProRail and Faber

Halbertsma Group.

Photo: Eneco Group

FINANCIAL CLOSE FOR WINDPARK

SPUI

On May 2, Japanese Eurus Energy

Group and developer YARD ENERGY

announced that financial close was

reached for the 21 MW Windpark

Spui. The onshore wind farm is located

along the Spui between the cities of

Nieuw-Beijerland and Piershil, in the

municipality of Korendijk in South

Holland. It will consist of five Enercon,

At the end of 2018 maintenance works

will take place on the N470, in the

province of South Holland. Part of the

works is replacing the existing noise

barrier between the entranceway A13

and the residential area Emerald with

a new one. It is here where the Province

wants to explore whether the new

barrier could not only reduce noise

but also produce energy, as part of a

project called ‘N470 Geeft Energie’. The

LATEST SDE ROUND NOT FULLY

USED

In total, around 5.3 of the 6 billion

available was applied for. With the exception

of the applications for solar PV,

the applications per technology were

significant lower, especially for onshore

wind. For onshore wind, 47 applications

for a combined total of 68 MW

were received, resembling a subsidy

amount of 150 million euro. The RVO

38 2-2018 WindEnergy

WindEnergy 2-2018 39


Smart Maritime Technology 2018

Disruptive Technology in the Maritime Sector

windcijfers

2005

2010

2018

Wind energy installed power in the Netherlands

VNAB

Rotterdam

14 June 2018

WIND ENERGY

Q4-17 & Q1-18

ONSHORE

3.292MW

2.017 wind turbines

Commissioned in Q4 2017 and Q1 2018

!( 3 MW

!( 4,2 MW

Decommissoned in Q4 2017 and Q1 2018

.D


agenda

13 & 14 JUNE, ROTTERDAM

WindDays 2018

www.winddays.nl

19 & 20 JUNE, MANCHESTER, UK

Global Offshore Wind

events.renewableuk.com

25 & 26 JUNE, NANTES, FR

Eole Industrie 2018

www.eole-industrie.fr

28 JUNE, KOUDEKERKE

North Sea Offshore Ports

www.northseaoffshoreports.com

3 - 5 JULY, SOUTHAMPTON, UK

Seawork International

www.seawork.com

21 - 23 AUGUST, BREMEN, DE

Offshore Substations 2018

www.offshore-windpower-substations.iqpc.

de

25 - 28 SEPTEMBER, HAMBURG, DE

WindEnergy Hamburg

www.windenergyhamburg.com

4 OCTOBER, ROTTERDAM

Innovation Expo

www.innovatie-estafette.nl

16 & 17 OCTOBER, WASHINGTON, USA

Offshore WINDPOWER

www.awea.org

22 - 24 OCTOBER, AMSTERDAM

Offshore Energy

www.offshore-energy.biz

30 OCTOBER, ABERDEEN, UK

Floating Offshore Wind 2018

www.renewableuk.com

31 OCTOBER, ABERDEEN, UK

Cables 2018

www.renewableuk.com

27 NOVEMBER, EDINBURGH, UK

Onshore Wind Energy 2018

www.renewableuk.com

MORE INFORMATION ON

WWW.WINDENERGIE-MAGAZINE.NL

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