UNDSS+Newsletter+2016+October

undss

UNDSS

newsletter

Issue 12 | October 2016 | UNDSS Internal Newsletter

USG OFFICE

NEWS

DELIVERY

Message from USG Drennan

Key Events

Integration

Internal News

Activities from Thailand, NY,

Panama, Jamaica, Colombia,

Vienna, Timor Leste, Pakistan

SUPPORT

STAFF

Policy, Physical Security

Staff moves, Q&A

PROTECTING PEOPLE WHO WORK FOR A BETTER WORLD

United Nations Department of Safety and Security

Your Safety, Your Security, Our Priority


UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Contents

USG Office

News

Delivery

Support

Staff

03 Message from the USG

04 Key Events

05 Integration Project: Making Integration Work in the DRC

06 UNDSS Internal News

07 A Day with... Peter Marshall

07 Gender & Diversity

08 Panama: HIM Training

08 Colombia: Implementation of Gender Considerations

08 Thailand: Personnel and Facility Security Course

08 Timor Leste: Back to Dili

09 Pakistan: Safety and Security for Women

09 Jamaica: Active Shooter Training

09 Vienna: Evacuation Exercise

10 New York: 71 th United Nations General Assembly

11 Policy: Resources on Security Policies

11 SRM: SRM Going Digital

11 Physical Security: A New App for Assessment

12 Staff Questions & Answers

13 Staff Highlights

14 In Memoriam

15 Staff Mobility

16 HQ contacts

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UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

USG Offi ce

MES S AGE FROM USG PETER DRENNAN

It is time for the quarterly newsletter and a good opportunity for me to catch up with you on some key issues, so welcome

to the October 2016 newsletter!

The security environment continues to be highly volatile and challenging, making the work of the Department and its

staff even more relevant and critical. This makes it timely for us to reflect on some of the implications of these security

challenges on our staff and the delivery of UN programmes.

In August, we held a ceremony to remember our twenty fallen colleagues during the thirteenth anniversary of the

Canal Hotel bombing in Iraq. This is a strong reminder for us on how these attacks aim to force the UN and its staff to

leave countries and people in crises, and of how important it is for us to “stay and deliver”. At the same time, we need

to recognize the good work of our staff in field who are key to enabling the delivery of UN programmes. I have always

been, and will remain to be, highly appreciative of all UNDSS staff who are the forefront of our efforts in helping the

UN deliver on its priorities. It’s thanks to our efforts and dedication that humanitarian programmes are delivered in

countries like Syria, South Sudan, Yemen, Iraq and Somalia, to name a few.

Related to this, I would like to mention that the Department recently finalized the Secretary-General’s report on safety

and security of humanitarian personnel and the protection of UN personnel. The report, which will be published in

October, includes an analysis of emerging security trends and implications for staff as well as the additional requirements

needed for the UN to be able to respond to the rising demand for security services.

The expectations of what UN security can do and deliver is continuously increasing. I’m fully aware of the challenges

and demands placed on the Department to enable the UN to do its important work. These cause us to reflect on why the

Department exists and the importance of our Vision (protecting the people who work for a better world) and our Mission

(provide professional safety and security services to enable the United Nations to deliver its programmes globally). We

also need to remember those things that are important to us: being effective, efficient, excellent and ethical in our work;

focusing on solutions and being innovative; developing a culture that values security; ensuring we are value-driven;

responding to our clients and stakeholders needs; continual learning; communicating effectively and valuing gender and

diversity in our workforce.

I also want to update you on the steady progress we are making on the UN Secretariat Safety and Security Integration

Project (UNSSSIP). In this newsletter there is an interesting article by Paul Farrell (Chief Project Officer of UNSSSIP) on

“Making Integration Work in the DRC”, that provides insights into the practical application of Integration in the field.

We’re going to share more communications on the UNSSSIP in the coming months and I encourage you to read these

articles.

Another key priority of the Department, on which we’ve made good progress, is the Human Resources’ Strategy to guide

the career development of all DSS staff. I will share this Human Resources’ Strategy with you in the coming months.

Last but not least, during the week of the 71st General Assembly at UN HQ in New York, I took the opportunity to

meet many Special Envoys, SRSGs and Senior Officials to highlight the important work of the Department and the key

priorities that we continue to pursue. These senior officials consistently praised the excellent work done by UNDSS. This

is a great source of pride for me and us all.

Overall, the work of the Department remains very much on track. This is clearly recognized and commended by other

UN Departments and entities with whom I meet regularly. It is our commitment and dedication in protecting the

people who work for a better world and help the UN deliver its programmes that makes DSS a strong and respected

Department. I thank all of you for your sustained hard work and your efforts in making this Department the success it

is today.

Sincerely,

Peter

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UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Key Events

Latin America & the Caribbean (LAC)

LAC Workshop takes place in Bogota.

A LAC workshop was held in Bogota, Colombia, from 18-20 May. Like other

recent DRO workshops, it was conducted in a new format involving not only

CSAs and SAs, but also DOs and observers from UNSMS organizations. Over

50 participants attended the workshop.

Core issues of leadership in security, decision making, working with

Security Management Teams, the roles of senior security personnel and

crisis management were addressed through open and frank discussions.

Additionally, programme criticality and the implementation of new UNSMS

policies, including the Security Risk Management process, and Residential

Security Measures, were discussed.

UNDSS will summarize recommendations from all workshops being held in

2016 and develop an action plan that will be further addressed and discussed

at the conference of all UNDSS CSAs and SAs in November 2016.

.

Chiefs & Directors of Mission Support (C/DMS)

USG Drennan took part in a DMS/CMS conference in New York on 20 July.

In his address to attendees, he discussed the global security environment, how

terrorism and conflict affect the UN, risk mitigation and how UNDSS priorities

are addressing the threats being faced. He also gave an update on the progress

being made in the Integration project, as well as answering a wide range of

questions from participants.

Town Hall Meeting 14 September 2016

The third Town Hall meeting was attended by

approximately 70 staff in NY, 12 Duty stations were

connected via VTC and colleagues in the field were

able to watch the meeting on the webcast

On 14 September USG

Drennan and his senior

managers, including newly

appointed DRO Director,

Mike Croll ,updated all staff

on a wide range of issues,

including the security

environment, budgetary

issues, and Integration.

Watch or re-watch the

event on UNSMIN.

Road Safety

IASMN Working Group on Road Safety Strategy

More than 20 participants from 12 UNSMS organizations met during a twoday

session held in New York, in parallel to the opening of the 71st Session

of the General Assembly. The Special Envoy for Road Safety, Mr. Jean Todt,

recommended a strong commitment within the UN system and buy-in from

UN senior management for a comprehensive road safety strategy, since road

safety is included in two of the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Mr. Todt suggested the UN system lead by example and look at staff behaviour,

as UN personnel need to be role models within the local communities they are

living and serving in. “If there is a UN system-wide policy and it trickles down

to all the UN country offices, I am optimistic it would achieve a lot and the UN

would see reductions in traffic accidents and fatalities,” he said. Appointed in

2015 as the Special Envoy, Mr. Todt mobilizes sustained political commitment

to road safety and raises awareness on the United Nations road safety legal

instruments and road safety best practices.

Representatives from the private sector and non-profit organisations with

highly developed road safety cultures, such as FedEx, Vision Zero, Network

of Employers for Traffic Safety (NETS), and the FIA Foundation, contributed

to discussions on a UN system road safety strategy with a focus on cementing

commitment from senior leadership, robust data management with accurate

and complete incident reporting, and resource mobilization for organisational

investment in addressing road safety.

The Working Group recognized the need for a road safety strategy based on

five pillars: road safety management, policy, data collection, vehicle safety,

and a road safety culture including training, awareness, and communications.

It was agreed that the strategy should also have a balance between being

aspirational and offering prescriptive measures.

The Working Group will continue to work on data analysis and look at the root

causes of traffic accidents. They noted there has to be more communication

within the UN system on the real cost of road traffic accidents and the significant

consequences it has to reputational risk, programme delivery, and the

impact on local communities.

Established by the IASMN in February 2015, the Working Group on Road

Safety Strategy has been chaired by UNDSS since April 2016.

Mr. Thomas Lopez, Managing

Director of Corporate

Safety, Health & Fire

Prevention for FedEx, presenting

Fedex's approach to

Road Safety.

Special Envoy for

Road safety, Mr.

Jean Todt shared

his vision and

commitment to the

working group.

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UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

USG Offi ce

UNITED NATIONS SECRETARIAT SAFETY & SECURITY INTEGRATION PROJECT

Making

Integration

Work in the DRC

Paul Farrell recently joined the United

Nations Secretariat Safety and Security

Integration Project (UNSSSIP) as Chief Project

Officer. Before joining the UNSSSIP team, Paul

was the Principal Security Adviser (PSA) in the

DRC, where integration was a big part of his

work. Paul shared his thoughts on integration

with the UNDSS communications team.

When Paul Farrell arrived in the Democratic

Republic of Congo in July 2014 as PSA, he knew

overseeing UN security in a country the size of

Western Europe would not be easy. On top of the

challenges that operating in the DRC presented, it

soon became clear that there were two distinct UN

security structures in place in the country: a large

MONUSCO team, and a far smaller UNDSS team.

“The division meant security was not as effective as

it should have been”, he said.

Problems with non-integration

Having two security teams working relatively

independently of each other for the same

organisation caused significant problems. It was

confusing for clients and for security staff. It

caused overlaps and wasted resources. Paul gave

an example: “There were two radio rooms being

operated in various locations in the country – one

run by MONUSCO, and another by UNDSS. It

didn’t make any sense.”

Security staff needed to be moved around the vast

country to ensure maximum security coverage, but

Paul did not have any official operational command

over MONUSCO security staff to move them.

Because of these problems, structured threat

assessments, MOSS, and security plans were out of

date and the service provided to clients was less than

optimal. “This wasn’t because staff were not trying.

It was because personnel were not being used in the

most efficient and effective way”, he noted.

Achieving functional integration

Paul did not have the policy tools to bring UNDSS

and MONUSCO teams together, so he set to work

to achieve “functional integration” of MONUSCO

and UNDSS security staff and assets in the

country. He created a document, co-signed by the

SRSG and the Mission Chief of Staff, creating the

“UN Integrated Security Section – DRC”, which

effectively established PSA authority over all

MONUSCO security staff.

Clients noticed the benefits. Rein Paulson,

OCHA DRC Head of Office notes, “The benefits

of integration were immediate and obvious. The

depth and quality of analysis carried out within

the SMT was improved and Security became

more responsive due to consolidated capacity and

reduction of duplication. Even support to NGOs

through "Saving Lives

Together" was improved.

UNDSS Staff

Rein Paulson saw the

7,000

positive effect in the

DRC.

3,000

After Integration

Before Integration

“I wonder why

integration would not

always be adopted as

a default approach to

security management.”

—Rein Paulson, OCHA

Paul’s situation in the

DRC was not unique.

Many other duty stations

have achieved so-called

“functional integration”

through various means,

which has resulted in better work practices, team

cohesion, and better security delivery. However

it is clear that integration is needed at a global,

standardised level to meet the global security

needs and challenges of today.

“To be most effective at our jobs, it makes sense to be

under one roof.”

—Paul Farrell

Going global

Paul is passionate about integration. “To be most

effective at our jobs, it makes sense to be under

one roof. UNDSS gains a great deal from the deep

knowledge and experience of our DPKO colleagues.

UNDSS and Mission staff bring different skills and

experience to the table. We need one workforce, one

family, to fully benefit from this wealth of skills and

experience”.

Achieving integration in the DRC has given Paul

a realistic, on-the-ground perspective of what is

needed to make integration work. The problems

solved locally in the DRC are now being tackled at

a global level through the Integration project. HR

questions, such as the type of contracts staff will

have post-Integration, and thorny finance issues

such as funding models for integration are currently

being worked through. “This work is ongoing and

complex, but on-track,” he noted.

What integration means for security staff

UNSSSIP has a target of December 2017 to establish

integration worldwide. What does this mean for

security staff globally? Security staff from Missions

will come under the UNDSS umbrella, so the

number of staff that UNDSS oversees will increase

by 126% to a total of over 6,900 staff members

globally.

Every one of those staff members will come under

the management authority of the Under-Secretary-

General (USG) for Safety and Security, Peter

Drennan.

“Our clients will be far more effectively served by

having the right security personnel, with the right

skills, in the right place, at the right time. This is what

integration offers us.” — USG Drennan

Security Staff will benefit. There will be greater

mobility and career development opportunities,

both in the field and at headquarters. In addition to

greater mobility, recruitment and training practices

will be standardised and staff will have equal

opportunities and training.

Paul summarised, “At a policy level, the UN is a

global leader in safety and security. Member States’

security services often look to the UN as a good

example of clear, rational and accountable security

management. Integration will make it even better.

My experience in the DRC showed me how this can

work, how it can benefit all clients, and this is why I

believe in Integration”.

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UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

COMMUNICATION

UNDSS Newsletter

News

NUMBERS

UNITED NATIONS SECRETARIAT SAFETY & SECURITY INTEGRATION PROJECT

The UNDSS Newsleer is published four mes a

year (October, April, July, December). The quality

of the newsleer is greatly linked to the quality

and quanty of contribuons. Do not hesitate

to contribute by sending input or feedback, and

suggesons for topics.

UN Personnel affected by security incidents

Personnel who:

Lost their lives as a result of acts of violence

Lost their lives as a result of safety incidents

Were injured as a result of acts of violence

Were injured as a result of safety incidents

Aacks on United Naons premises

Aacks on United vehicles

Intrusion of United premises

23

16

99

130

35

155

109

POLICY FORUM

Understanding our Policies

PPCU organises a policy forum the last Wednesday

of each month in HQ on topics of interest. All

materials are posted on UNSMIN so colleagues in

duty staons and missions can access them.

LANGUAGE

UNDSS communicaon products are translated

into the six official UN languages: Arabic, Chinese,

English, French, Russian and Spanish. Check out the

communicaon secon on SharePoint to access our

logos, templates, banners in various languages.

Geographic Information System

UNDSS GIS Officer Hwa Saup Lee has returned

from his assignment to the United Naons Global

Service Center. Hwa Saup will now provide the

Department with geo-spaal data, tools, and

services. Quesons? Need GIS support? Contact

Hwa Saup at lee53@un.org.

AVIATION

ARMO

ARMO is set to launch a new online Air Travel Focal

point (ATFP) Policy Awareness training course on 3

October 2016. This course is designed to provide

clear guidance to those assigned as ATFPs on their

role in implemenng the UNSMS Air Travel Policy.

There are currently 108 ATFPs who will be enrolled

in this course.

TRAINING

I KNOW GENDER

The "I Know Gender" online course aims to develop

and strengthen awareness and understanding of

gender equality and women’s empowerment as a first

step toward behavioural change and the integraon

of a gender perspecve into everyday work for all

UN staff. It provides an introducon to the concepts,

internaonal framework, and methods for working

toward gender equality and women’s empowerment.

The course takes approximately two hours to complete

and is mandatory for all UNDSS staff.

RECOMMENDATION

HUMANITY & SECURITY

Filmmaker Yann Arthus-Bertrand spent three years

collecng real-life stories from 2,000 people in 60

countries. The movie captures personal accounts

of topics that unite us: struggles with poverty, war,

homophobia, and the future of our planet. Launched

at the UN last year, it emphasises the core values of the

United Naons. See: hp://www.human-themovie.org/

The movie has three volumes available on YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShttAt5xtto

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w0653vsLSqE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdb4XGVTHkE

71 st General Assembly

AFRICA Workshop

Nairobi

Global DRO Workshop

Glen Cove, NY

UNSSSNET, New York

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

UNDSS Town Hall Meeting

Asia & Pacific Workshop

Bangkok

IASMN Steering Group

Valencia

UNDSS Town Hall Meeting

POSS Workshop

Valencia

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UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

News

Interested in contribung to this secon? Contact

Communicaon Officer Helen Bray (bray@un.org)

A day with...

Peter Marshall

08:30

09:00

09:30

10:00

12:30

14:00

15:00

16:15

17:00

Review emails

Standing meeting with UNDSS senior management team

Meeting with the DO/DG, UNON

Chair Security Cell meeting

Working lunch with Director, DAS, UNON

UNEP Chief of Staff and Director, DCPI

Director, UNOPS

VTC with Director, DHSSS

Reception at the Japanese Embassy on the occasion of

the Japan Self-Defense Forces day

Peter Marshall is the

Principal Security Adviser

for Kenya & Eritrea, and

Chief of Security & Safety

Services in Nairobi.

G e n d e r & Diversity

GENDER UPDATES

The Gender Coordinaon

Team has been very acve

over the summer. A parity

plan is underway, a gender

survey has been launched, a

series of brown bag lunches

to promote dialogue

have been iniated, and

stascal trends are being

compiled as well.

Brown Bag Lunch

On 25 July, the first brown bag lunch

was launched under the leadership of

ASG Gwaradzimba. Parcipants watched

and discussed a gender-related video.

The discussion highlighted various

opinions and was moderated by Ms.

Randi Davis, Gender Expert at UNDP. The

HQ brown bag lunch is now a series and

the next one will be held later in October.

Replicate the idea at your duty staon!

GENDER SURVEY

UNDSS staff were invited to be part of a large survey on gender. The

stakes are high: as 78% of our staff are male; UNDSS is at the boom

of the list regarding gender parity. Can we change this trend? Is

gender important for our acvies? Do we need more training? Do

we need more work-life balance provisions? Tell us what you think.

We will establish a baseline and monitor carefully our progress.

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UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Panama

Hostage Incident Management (HIM) Training in Panama

Delivery

Colombia

UNDSS Colombia is Making Gender Considerations a Priority

On 21 September, UNDSS Panama organized the first HIM

training for the WHO Latin America and the Caribbean

Team responsible for responding to natural disasters and

other emergencies in the region. 50 WHO staff members

attended the training. Hostage incidents in some Latin

American and Caribbean countries represent a significant

threat to the UN. The training focused on hostage survival

techniques and related UN HIM policies.

UNDSS Colombia is committed to ensuring that gender considerations are fully integrated into

security management and has developed various activities to achieve this goal.

The implementation of the Women Security Awareness Training (WSAT) is key to this strategy,

and has been provided in Bogotá and in five regions with a UNDSS presence (FSCOs). The

course includes modules on violence against women as well as on general security for women.

UNDSS is planning to organize a WSAT Training of Trainers Course in October 2016. Belen

Sanz, DO for Colombia and UN Women Representative, is fully supportive of and promotes

this training.

UNDSS has also added a gender approach to the SSAFE training. Over 400 military observers

who will join the UN mission in Colombia are expected to attend the SSAFE training with

gender components such as inclusive language, cultural awareness, statistics on sexual violence

in armed conflict, hostage survival, and mine awareness, among others. Specific scenarios of

hostage taking, where gender violence occurs, and how to prevent and mitigate such threats

will be discussed. Based on statistics and analysis, the Mine Awareness module covers the

differentiated impact on gender and how to prevent it.

Furthermore, UNDSS Colombia has included a gender-related violence case study in its SRM,

which is to be further analysed by the participants.

Thailand

Personnel and Facility Security Course

Insp. Saranya Chuenvichitr and Lt. Ekarat Onlamoon of

UNDSS/SSS Bangkok attended the Personnel and Facility

Security (PFS) course organized by the International Law Enforcement

Academy (ILEA) from 1-12 August 2016 in Bangkok.

The course was delivered by instructors from the US Department

of State and Diplomatic Security Service, and was

attended by forty-two law enforcement officers from eight

countries in Asia.

The course provided participants with an understanding of

the best practices currently used to deter, prevent and respond

to attacks on personnel and facilities. At the conclusion of the

course, Insp. Chuenvichitr was nominated as the Class Speaker

and delivered a speech to ILEA executives and guests at the

closing ceremony.

Timor Leste

Back to Dili

UN Security and UNDSS in Timor-Leste (formerly known as East Timor) have gone through

several changes over the years since the first UN security officers arrived in May 1999. Lars

Siefert was privileged to be one of the first to arrive in UNAMET/Dili in June 1999, months

before the referendum that eventually led to creation of a new nation: Timor-Leste. Lars left

Timor in 2001 and returned in July 2013, this time as DSA for UNDSS.

Since UNAMET was established in 1999, Timor-Leste has hosted a number of UN DPKO

missions including: UNAMET, UNTAET, UNMISET, UNOTIL, and UNMIT. The final

mission completed its mandate in December 2012, and the security presence went from over

fifty international security officers to UNDSS operating with just two international security

professionals (SA and DSA), supported by three UNDSS national staff and a 24/7 Radio Room.

Hundreds of security colleagues served in Timor-Leste during the mission years. Today’s

UNDSS office is still located in the old DPKO compound, Obrigado Barracks.

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UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Delivery

Pakistan

UNDSS Pakistan: Making a difference in Safety and Security for Women

In July 2015, Lorna Wilson Morgan and Maryam Siyal were appointed as Women Security Focal

Points (WSFPs) for Pakistan. They quickly identified many ways they could help and support

female colleagues, starting simply by reaching out to them and building trust, confidentiality,

and respect through dialogue along the way.

Since the start of 2016, they have conducted two Women Security Awareness training (WSAT)

courses and disseminated information pertinent to the safety and security of female personnel.

They are pleased to report increased levels of contact from staff, who get in touch to report

incidents affecting female personnel, as well as an increase of those seeking advice for relatives

of staff encountering acts which threatened their safety and security, all of which is kept in the

strictest confidence.

Their work is grounded in a strong policy framework, most notably the policy on Gender

Considerations in Security Management, Annex A: Immediate Response to Gender-based

Security Incidents.

Jamaica

Active Shooter Training

Active shooter incidents are being reported around the world, and are rapidly becoming the top

threat scenario in many countries. The availability of small arms and light weapons along with

the relative accessibility of populated areas has led to an increase in both the frequency of violent

incidents and the number of victims killed or injured in each incident.

UNDSS Jamaica conducted its first Active Shooter training recently with the participation of

52 UN personnel, other international organizations, and guests from the Japanese, Colombian,

and U.S. Embassies. The training went beyond purely practical exercises, striving also to provide

insights on the motivations that lead people to engage in actions that will result in the loss of

human lives, including their own.

The session aimed to change inaccurate perceptions and participants actively engaged in group

discussions and exercises on profiling the drivers, triggers, and recognizing signs of potential

violent behaviour at different scenarios. The course included recognizing sounds of gun shots,

best practices on how to respond, what to do when law enforcement arrives, and how to cope

with post-stress incident.

Vienna

UNOV SSS Conducts Major Evacuation Exercise in Vienna International Centre

At 09:48 AM on Wednesday 3 August, Chief O’Hanlon gave the order: “Attention,

all personnel are to immediately evacuate the Vienna International Centre”. As

alarms and speakers rang loudly, all available security officers, medical personnel,

and wardens rushed to their positions. While only an exercise, the unseen planning

and limited forewarning of the event added to its realism. Some 3000 personnel

calmly left their workspaces and conference rooms, making their way to designated

assembly points. The entire exercise was completed within 90 minutes, with

minimal disruption to client services. Managers, supervisors, and representatives of

the Vienna Emergency Services joined a debriefing after the event to draw lessons

learned.

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UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Delivery

71 th United Nations General Assembly

SSS officers on duty in the General Assembly Hall

A security officer keeps watch from the roof of the General Assembly Building

ID cards being checked by SSS officers

USG Drennan being briefed at the Joint Operations Center

Secretary-General with H.E Abdel Fattah el-Sisi

A SSS officer on duty during the speech of H.E Barak Obama

A SSS officer on duty in the General Assembly Hall

-10


UNDSSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Support

FOR THE RECORD

RESOURCES ON SECURITY POLICIES

Security Management System

SRM Going Digital

UNSMIN

SECURITY

POLICY

MANUAL

POLICY

PRESENTATION

VIDEO

COMMUNIQUE

SRM, SSIRS,

WEAPONS

MANUALS

SECURITY

MANAGEMENT

OPERATIONS

MANUAL

WEBEX MEETINGS (Field)

DRO WORKSHOP

MONTHLY POLICY FORUMS

BRIEFING UPON REQUEST

QUESTIONS:

undss.policy@un.org

LIVE

The roll out of the new SRM process and platform is continuing, with a

planned completion date of 31 December 2016.

The introduction of a revised methodology for risk assessment, and its

supporting online 'SRM tool', alongside the existing policy on Programme

Criticality, will enable the shift of core UN Security risk management

functions away from paper towards a new data-based approach, that will

allow for more dynamic and responsive risk management decisions. The

tool will also improve accountability within the UN Security Management

System with the advent of 'implementation monitoring' for approved

security prevention and mitigation measures.

Moreover, the data collected will reveal important trends and patterns on

the effectiveness of UN risk management on a local, as well as a global,

level. Public reaction to the system so far has been positive, but it is also

clear that the new digital platform will, at times, ask UN decision makers

and security professionals to adjust their risk security management

approaches to make best use of the technology. For example, SRM

measures must be crafted in accordance with SMART criteria. In other

words, they should be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time

bound in their realisation.

For more on this users can contact the designated focal point within

UNDSS DRO for responding to queries on SRM implementation, George

Bloch (bloch@un.org).

Physical Security

Physical Security Assessment Application

The Division of Headquarters Security and Safety Services’ Physical

Security Unit (PSU) is working alongside the Crisis Management

Information Support Section (CMISS), to develop a Physical Security

Assessment App that will provide security practitioners from UNDSS

and AFPs with a means to collect and analyse data on premises in order

to identify vulnerabilities and appropriate mitigating measures, in line

with the SRM methodology.

The app can collect data while offline at a site, such

as premises characteristics, existing mitigating

measures, occupancy and location. The tool will

also be capable of importing and exporting data

to and from other existing UNSMS tools and

datasets, including the SRM E-tool, the Premises

database and SSIRS. All of the relevant collected

information can then sync with the desktop

component to develop a premises vulnerability

assessment and provide a comprehensive list of

possible mitigation measures to be implemented.

DHSSS anticipates field testing the app in early

2017.

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UNDSSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Staff

F R E Q U E N T L Y A S K E D QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

What you should know

about MAIP & UNDSS?

The United Nations Malicious Acts

Insurance Policy (MAIP) has been in

place for United Nations staff since

1990. The purpose of the policy is

to compensate staff for damages

suffered as a result of malicious acts

while serving for the United Nations.

The Policy covers death or permanent disability – including Post Traumatic

Stress Disorder - caused directly or indirectly by War or a Malicious Act.

MAIP applies on a 24 hour basis, worldwide for staff and other eligible

individuals of the UN and UN Participating Organizations. As of 2008, the UN

and more than 20 other UN Participating Organizations participate in the MAIP.

Participation in the UN MAIP is voluntary for the various UN organizations.

However some UN organizations that do not participate maintain similar

programs. Staff members should be directed to their organization’s personnel

division for specific information on the applicability of the policy, and how to

make claims.

UNDSS has a specific role in the issuance of MAIP. It is a condition under the

policy that each claim must include a UNDSS certification that the claimant

was compliant with prevailing security guidelines and procedures. In the case

of non-compliance, UNDSS may certify that non-compliance was inadvertent.

UNDSS NY will decide on the certification in consultation with the affected

UNSMS organization and UNDSS field office.

The Policy is administered by the Insurance and Disbursement Service (IDS) in

the Accounts Division, Office of Programme Planning, Budget and Accounts

(OPPBA), United Nations. For further questions please contact: MAIPquestions_UNHQ@un.org

Did you know? The MAIP was initially limited to those duty stations designated as

‘Hazardous’ by UNSECOORD. On 1 January 2004 coverage was expanded to include

all countries, except the 10 countries where the participating organizations have

their HQ. Effective 1 January 2006, coverage was expanded to these 10 countries as

well, so coverage is now worldwide.

What is the status of the HR Strategy?

Work on the UNDSS Human Resources Strategy is progressing well, with

the draft document currently under review by the Department's senior

management. It is expected that the final document will be disseminated

before the end of the year. Prior to that, the draft Strategy will be shared

with UNDSS Directors and with the Office of Human Resources Management

(OHRM) for comments. The USG of UNDSS will give the final approval

once all the consultations have been completed. The Strategy will provide

the vision, objectives and a set of principles for the management of human

resources in UNDSS for the coming years. Therefore, it is very important that

these consultations take place in order to ensure the quality, value and relevance

of the final document.

Why shouldn't I play Pokemon Go

on my phone?

You may have been tempted or your children may have

downloaded it to their phone but have you read the “fine

print”? Many people who download apps fail to read the

fine print.

The fine print that states that you, the user, agree to provide

access to any and all data on your device: emails, address book,

location and other very private personal info, even driving data.

When linked with other social media accounts, like Facebook and

Twitter, your "anonymity" vanishes.

Not only are you sharing your personal data with the app provider

by clicking "I agree" on the apps' Terms and Conditions, you are

also agreeing to allow others, third parties, to access your content,

your contacts and all your private information. This occurs on

your mobile phone, tablet and now on wearable devices. You are

giving permission to be tracked and for your personal info to be

shared/sold. In other words, you are relinquishing all rights to

privacy and facilitating a potential security intrusion. "Pokemon

Go" is just the latest app to take advantage of "data access."

Companies want your information to share (more accurately to

sell) with third parties to "provide better products and services"

— for instance, to provide targeted, contextually relevant

advertising based on your interests, behaviors, location and

preferences. That is the "good guy" model. Facebook, Apple and

Google are just three of the many companies generating billions

of ad dollars this way from your private information.

But what about all the information you are unwittingly making

available to the "bad guys"? To demonstrate the data you are

routinely sharing, walk through these next steps. If you are an

iPhone user, here's how you can easily see if you are vulnerable

to a data hack:

Go to Settings. - Tap Privacy - Tap Location Services - Scroll down and

tap on Systems Services -Scroll down to Frequent Locations (if Off,

your privacy is intact). - If ON, tap on Frequent Locations - Tap on any

of the History details.

Here, you can see the last six weeks of your whereabouts,

including frequency, time of day and amount of time spent at

each location! This is not limited to iPhone users.

This information can be mirrored, hacked or used by others for

nefarious purposes. Another question to consider is where your

previous locations prior to the last six weeks are being stored.

Who has access to that, and is it secure?

Therefore, read the fine print. Understand your rights and what

personal information is being provided to others. Understand

what and how it will be used and how it is being safeguarded.

These days, the password on your smartphone is about as secure

as locking your front door and leaving the windows wide open.

The use of a smartphone is a challenge when performing security

duties. Be aware before capturing Pokemons!

-12


UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Staff

S T A F F H I G H L I G H T S

Mike Croll

Fiona Beine

Djeneba

Coulibaly

Mike Croll joins us as Director, Division of Regional

Operations from the British Diplomatic Service. Until

recently he was seconded to the European Union’s

External Action Service where he was responsible for

the security of the EU's diplomatic service covering 135

countries. Other appointments include Deputy Director

for Security at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office

(FCO) with responsibility for the security of diplomats

at 240 embassies and consulates, Head of the FCO

Crisis Management Team and Head of the FCO 24/7

Global Response Centre. He has also held diplomatic

appointments in Africa and South East Asia.

His field experience includes working for an NGO in

Cambodia, Afghanistan and the Balkans and for UNMAS

in Mozambique. He served in the British Army as a bomb

disposal officer and has been on active service in the

Middle East.

Mike holds a BSc (Hons) in Geography from University

College London, a MSc in Emergency Management

from the University of Hertfordshire, an International

Diploma in Risk Management and he is an ASIS CPP.

Fiona Beine joins UNDSS as the Field Security

Coordination Officer (FSCO) in Freetown, Sierra Leone.

She is a Ugandan National and a former Police Officer

with the Uganda Police Force. Her previous experience

in the field of safety and security was as a Local Security

Assistant with UNDSS Uganda and in Peacekeeping

Missions (UNAMID, UNAMI, UNMISS and MONUSCO)

where she served in Information Analyst and Regional

Security Officer roles.

Fiona holds a MSc in Security and Risk Management,

and a Post Graduate Diploma in Public Administration

and Management.

Djeneba Coulibaly joins CISMU as the Regional Stress

Counsellor for the West Africa Region. Prior to joining

CISMU, Djeneba was the Senior Staff Counsellor in

MIMUSMA from April 2014 to June 2016. She was

responsible for the Staff Counselling Welfare Unit as

well as coordinating and monitoring the psychosocial

services provided to staff in MINUSMA. Before joining

MINUSMA, she worked under CISMU for five years as a

National Counsellor in Côte d'Ivoire. Djeneba was also

appointed temporary Regional Counsellor in CISMU for

West Africa in New York from November 2013 to March

2014. Her vast field experiences includes organization

of the psychological support response to UN Staff in

critical situations in West and Central Africa (Chad, CAR,

Congo Brazzaville, Mali, and Côte d'Ivoire). She has also

worked for UNICEF (Rwanda, Chad, DRC), for UNWOMEN

(Mali), and for UNDP (CAR).

Djeneba is a Medical doctor specialized in psychiatry

(diploma from Abidjan University) and child psychiatry

(Diploma from University Descartes in Paris).

Mahsa

Jafari

Han Soe

Aung

Ramesh

Lutchman

Mahsa Jafari joined the office of the USG at

the end of July 2016 as the Special Assistant to

the USG. Prior to joining UNDSS, Mahsa Jafari

was a Thematic Team Leader in the World

Humanitarian Summit secretariat of OCHA.

She has worked in coordination and advisory

roles in the United Nations for over eleven

years and has previously held positions as

a Policy Specialist (Crisis/Post-Crisis) in the

United Nations Development Group and

as a Coordination Officer in the Integrated

Office of the DSRSG/RC/HC/UNDP RR in the

Democratic Republic of Congo. She holds a

MSc in International Business Management

from the Royal Holloway University, and a BSc

in International Relations from the London

School of Economics and Political Science.

Han Soe Aung joins as a Local Security

Assistant in Yangon, Myanmar, with

country-wide responsibilities. Han brings

with him a wealth of security experience,

having served for ten years as a Myanmar

Police Officer in various capacities, including

as a liaison officer with international

organisations at the Office of the Ministry

of Home Affairs and as an Investigation Officer

in Yangon.

More recently, and since his retirement

from the Myanmar Police Force, Han

worked as the Project Liaison Officer for

The Warnath Group, an INGO working on

counter-trafficking issues and capacity

building programmes.

Han holds a Bachelor’s Degree of Science

in Mathematics from the Yangon University.

Han is married and has two children.

Ramesh Lutchman is from San Juan,

Trinidad and Tobago and was a Police

Officer from the Trinidad and Tobago

Police Service. His admiration for the

UN led him to join SSS New York. After

several years, his desire to be on the

frontline led him to serve as FSCO in

Hiiran and Mogadishu, Somalia. He

would later separate from UNDSS and

join UNSOM where he continued to

serve as a Security Officer. In Somalia

he adopted numerous roles including

Security Information Analyst with

UNDSS SIOC and a Security Training

Officer. Ramesh holds a degree in

Forensic Psychology. He is married and

-13


UNDSSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Staff

I N M E M O R I A M

Laurent Bourgeois

1965-2016

Officier de Sécurité

MINUSMA - Tombouctou

In Memoriam

Né le 11 janvier 1965, Laurent Bourgeois a débuté sa vie professionnelle en tant que militaire dans la Gendarmerie Française en 1984.

Après une brillante carrière en Gendarmerie, ponctuée par une mission des Nations Unies dans la composante UNPOL en Haïti, il décide en

juin 2001 de s'établir au Canada dans le cadre du rapprochement familial.

En 2008, il entame une nouvelle expérience dans la vie civile au sein des Nations Unies en rejoignant la MINURCAT, au Tchad et alterne les

fonctions d’enquêteur et d’officier de sécurité. En 2011, il quitte le Tchad pour servir à la MONUSCO en RDC à Kinshasa.

Dans sa quête perpétuelle pour de nouvelles expériences, Laurent rejoint la MINUSMA au Mali en 2013. Personne remarquable, Laurent fait partie

des pionniers de cette mission et de la section de la sécurité, assumant le premier le poste de Chef du Bureau Sécurité à Tombouctou.

Courageux et aux qualités humaines exceptionnelles, il avait réussi à faire l’unanimité autour de lui pour sa gentillesse, son professionnalisme, et

surtout son humanité avec son désir d’aider toujours les autres, incarnant les valeurs fondamentales des Nations Unies.

Toujours disponible, il a su devenir une référence au sein de son unité et au-delà. Attaché au don de soi, il a su être un mentor pour le personnel

malien de l’unité et un frère d’arme pour ses collègues officiers de sécurité.

Marié et père d’un enfant, il nous a quittés le 12 septembre 2016.

Premier officier de sécurité de la section décédé en service, Laurent laisse derrière lui l’image d’un homme intègre, profondément attaché aux valeurs

humaines. Loyal et courageux, son exemple restera gravé a jamais dans nos cœurs et nos mémoires .

Shakespeare fait dire au roi LEAR : « Celui qui souffre seul, souffre surtout par imagination ; mais l'âme dompte aisément la souffrance, quand sa

douleur a des camarades d'épreuve. Entouré de tes camarades et frères d’armes présents autour de toi nous ne pouvions te laisser partir sans un dernier

hommage, sans un dernier Adieu. Notre résurrection n'est pas tout entière dans le futur, elle est aussi en nous, elle commence, elle a déjà commencé. »

Adieu Laurent, Adieu Camarade. Adieu notre Frère Repose en paix.

Bruno Denais, Chef du bureau de la sécurité

MINUSMA rend hommage

à Laurent Bourgeois

Le 16 Septembre, MINUSMA a rendu

un dernier hommage à leur collègue

Laurent Bourgeois en présence de nombreuses

personalités dont l'Ambassadeur

Canadien, le SRSG, le 1er Conseiller

de l'Ambassade de France, et les hauts

fonctionnaires de la Mission. Après

l'eloge funèbre de Bruno Denais, SRSG

Saleh a ajouté ses propres remarques.

L'émouvante cérémonie se termina par

les hymnes nationaux canadiens et francais.

UNDSS présente ses condoleances

à la famille et aux amis de Laurent.

-14


UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Staff

S T A F F M O B I L I T Y

Staff moves since the last newsletter:

July 2016 to September 2016

Arrival to UNDSS

Name

Position

Remarks

COULIBALY, Djeneba Stress Counsellor Transfer from MINUSMA

CROLL, Mike Director, DRO Appointment

GARCIA, Paul Staff Asst. OUSG Appointment (T)

JAFARI, Mahsa Special Asst., USG Appointment (T)

LOIFERMAN, Mirna Team Asst., PIDU/SSS Appointment (T)

LUTCHMAN, Ramesh Sec. Off., DHSSS/SSS Assignment (T)

MATTA, Micheline Assoc. Adm Off., SSS Adm Unit Transfer from ESCWA

MWANGI, Margaret Ops Asst., Comscen Return from Assignment

O'DONOVAN, Diarmuid SCO, APAC/DRO Return from Assignment

SOBRON, Jose Miguel SCO, MENA/DRO Return from Assignment

WATERS, Denise Prog. Mgmt Off. ARMO/FSS Appointment (T)

Departure from UNDSS

Name Position Remarks

AUNG, Mar Mar Assoc. Adm Off., SSS Adm Unit End of Assignment

COLAVITO, Francesco Security Officer Rerement

CULLEY, Marcus CSA, Somalia Separaon

FARRIA, Dewaine DSA, I/WB/Gaza Separaon

GE, Shengsheng HRA, EO - NY Assignment to UNHABITAT

GOMES, Illidia Training Off., TDS Separaon

HUREZ, Magalie Stress Counsellor Separaon

JIANG, Nan SCO End of Assignment

KUNZWA, Charles SA, Uganda Secondment to UNFPA

LEERS, Remon DSA, Lebanon Secondment to UNICEF

LOIFERMAN, Mirna Assistant, PIDU/SSS Separaon

MARCELLE, Clint Sec. Training Instructor, SSS/TDU Separaon

MILLER, Ian CSA, Liberia Separaon

PATTERSON, Donald Security Officer Rerement

SCHWENGER, Ulrich Snr Ops SIOC, Somalia Rerement

ZAKOUR, Shaden Ops Asst., Comscen End of Assignment

Reassignment within UNDSS

Name

Position

Remarks

ALOKABANDARA, Ananda SA, Egypt Reassignment

BARRY, Abdoulaye SA, Madagascar Reassignment

CENGIC, Suad Chief SIOC, Somalia Reassignment

CHLEBOWSKI, Andrzej FSCO, Kyrgystan Reassignment

DEMARS, Charloe SIA, Nairobi SLWOP

EDU, James Snr Ops Off., Somalia Reassignment

DOUBOGRAI, Yuri DSA, Liberia Reassignment

GIDUDU, Andrew FSCO, Darfur Reassignment

HABIB, Sheikh FSCO, Indonesia Reassignment

KULAWAT, Suchada SCO, PPCU Return from Assignment

MAHBOOB, Saleh DSA, Libya Reassignment

SCHOT, John FSCO, Philippines Secondment to Field

SHAH, Bijay SA, PNG Reassignment

SOULEY, Oumarou FSCO, Mali Reassignment

THOMAS, Jamal Staff Asst, CEMS Reassignment

FRIEDRICHS, Chrisan SA, Tanzania Reassignment

GALLARDO, Diosdado Chief SIOC, Pakistan Reassignment

GERSBACH, Michelle SA, Mozambique Secondment to Field

GUMUNYU, Martha DSA, Darfur Reassignment

JACOBS, Johannes CSA, Yemen Promoon

KHAFAGI, Mohamed CSA, Jordan Return from Secondment

KUFE, Senyo CSA, Liberia Promoon

LAUKKANEN, Ilkka SA, Turkey Reassignment

MANNING, Romina FSCO, Kenya Reassignment

MEKONNEN, Addisu FSCO, I/WB/G Reassignment

MOHAMED, Batel DSA, Senegal Reassignment

NADOLSKI, Jan SA, Macedonia Reassignment

OFORI, Alexander DSA, Burundi Reassignment

PETERSON, Lee DSA, Somalia Reassignment

POMPEY, Andrew DSA, Kenya Reassignment

ROYSTER, Dwayne Team Asst, MENA Appointment (T)

SIDLAUSKAS, Vygintas DSA, Sri Lanka Reassignment

SOROKOVYI, Oleh DSA, Zimbabwe Reassignment

TABAREZ, Fernando FSCO, Afghanistan Reassignment

-15


UNDSSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

Staff

U N D S S H E A D Q U A R T E R S C O N T A C T S

|OFFICE OF THE USG | | UNSSSIP |

Under-Secretary-General

Peter Drennan

drennan@un.org

+1.917.367.3158

Assistant Secretary-General

Fadzai Gwaradzimba

gwaradzimba@un.org

+1.917.367.6962

Director

Mike Croll

croll@un.org

+1.212.963.4377

Deputy Director

OIC Africa Desk

Igor Mitrokhin

mitrokhin@un.org

Director

David Bongi

bongi@un.org

+1.917.367.9520

Chief, SSS NY

Mick Browne

browne2@un.org

+1.212.963.9211

Communication

Hélène Bray

bray@un.org

+1.212.963.4986

Chief FSS

Harriet Solloway

solloway@un.org

+1.212.963.3367

Stress Mgmt.

Moussa Ba

ba2@un.org

+1.917.367.4089

+1.212.963.9038 Chief of Unit

Training, a.i.

Compliance

Rodrigo V. Da Paixão

Enrique Oribe

Threat & Risk

Mohamed Ragaey

victordapaixao@un.org

oribe@un.org

+1.212.963.7770

+1.917.367.3319

ragaey@un.org

+1.917.367.6307

Conference Mgmt.

Information Mgmt

Viktoriya Tymoshenko

André Dehondt

Asia and Pacific

Pae Pae Wiki

Tymoshenko@un.org

dehondt@un.org

wiki@un.org

+1.917.367.5196

+1.212.963.9027

+1.917.367.3042

Protection Coord. Unit

Aviation

Europe & Americas

Phillip Mclnerney

Lisa Spencer

André Bouchard

Mclnerney@un.org

spencer@un.org

+1.212.963.6388

+1.917.367.4813

bouchard@un.org

+1.917.367.6327

MENA (a.i.)

Valentin Aldea

aldea@un.org

+1.917.367.8509

POSS

Ken Payumo

payumo@un.org

+1.917.367.9181

ComsCen

Karen Duncan

Duncank@un.org

+1.212.963.0046

Special Asst. to USG

Mahsa Jafari

jafari@un.org

+1.917.367.4820

Prog. Mgmt. Officer

Special Asst. to ASG

Laragh McAuley

mcauleyl@un.org

+1.212.963.3434

Prog. Mgmt. Officer

Margherita Zuin

zuinm@un.org

+1.917.367.5055

| REGIONAL OPERATIONS | | HQ SECURITY SAFETY SERVICES | | FIELD SUPPORT SERVICE |

Chief Project Officer

Paul Farrell

farrellp@un.org

+1.212.963.1525

|EXECUTIVE OFFICE |

Executive Officer

Menada Wind-Andersen

wind-andersen@un.org

+1.212.963.5500

POLICY COMPLIANCE

COORDINATION SERVICE

Chief, PCCS

Craig Harrison

harrisonc@un.org

+1.212.963.1525

Policy (a.i.)

Florence Poussin

poussin@un.org

+1.917.367.2980

Daniel Igartua

igartua@un.org

+1.212.963.6525

-16


UNDSS

YOUR SAFETY, YOUR SECURITY, OUR PRIORITY

PROTECTING PEOPLE WHO

WORK FOR A BETTER WORLD

O R G A N I S A T I O N A L C H A RT & IN-COUNTRY PRESENCE

Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola,Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia

and Herzegovina, Botswana,

Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central

African Republic, Chad,

China, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Democratic Republic

of, Congo, Repub-

lic of, Cote d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Dominican

Republic, Ecua- dor, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial

Guinea, Er- itrea, Ethiopia, Falkland Islands

(Ma lvinas),

Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia,

Ghana,

Guatemala, Guinea, Guin-

USG FOR SAFETY

AND SECURITY

ea-Bissau, EXECUTIVE

Guyana, Honduras,

India,

OFFICE

I n d o n e s i a ,

Iran, Is- lamic Rep of,

Iraq, Is- rael, West

B a n k and Gaza,

Jamai-

ca, Jordan,

P O L I C Y ,

K a - F I E L D

zakhstan,

COMPLIANCE &

Ken-

SUPPORT

COORDINATION

ya, Kuwait,

SERVICE

Kyrgyz

S E R V I C E

Republic,

L a o People

Dem-

ocratic Republic,

Lebanon

North,

Lesotho,

DIVISION OF

Liberia,

DIVISION OF

HEADQUARTERS

Libya, Macedonia,

For-

REGIONAL

SECURITY

mer Yugoslav

Republic

OPERATIONS

& SAFETY

of, Madagascar,

Malawi, Ma-

SERVICES

laysia, Mali,

Mauritania,

Mexico, Mongolia,

Mo-

rocco, Mozambique,

M y a n -

mar, Namibia, Nepal,

Nicaragua,

Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan,

Panama, Papua

New Guinea, Peru, Philippines,

Philippines, Russian Feder-

ation, Rwanda, Samoa, Saudi

Arabia, Senegal, Kosovo, Serbia, Sierra Leone,

Solomon Islands, Somalia, South

Africa, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Darfur,

Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan,

Tanzania, United Republic of, Thailand, Timor Leste, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmen-

POLICY, PLANNING &

COMPLIANCE, EVALUATION

& MONITORING SECTION

EUROPE & AMERICAS

I N T E G

COORDINATION UNIT

ASIA & PACIFIC

M E N A

R A

T I O N

COMMUNICATION

A F R I C A

25

istan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet Nam,

Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

P R O J E C

T

FRONT OFFICE

P O S S

THREAT & RISK

ASSESSMENT SERVICE

COMMUNICATION CENTER

FINANCE

SSS NY

SSS for OaHs

Geneva-Nairobi-Vienna

SSS for RCs

HUMAN

Santiago-Beirut-Addis-Bangkok

SSS for TRIBUNALS

RESOURCES

Arusha-The Hague-Phnom Penh

PHYSICAL

SECURITY UNIT

DEVELOPMENT SECTION

STRESS MGMT UNIT

PROTECTION

TRAINING &

CRITICAL INCIDENT

COORDINATION UNIT

CRISIS MGMT INFO

SUPPORT SECTION

MANAGEMENT OFFICE

SSS CONFERENCE

SECURITY COORDINATION

AVIATION RISK

-17

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