iRun - Issue 6 October 2016

techwood

YOU

CHANGED

HIS

LIFE.

NOW

LET’S

SPREAD

THE

LOVE.

THE

CHARITY

ISSUE.

12,000 Team D

participants have

raised over $35M

in support of the

Canadian Diabetes

Association.

By getting active

you’re inspiring those

around you, so that

we can collectively

prevent and manage

diabetes.

iRun.ca ISSUE 06 2016

Every dollar

raised is one

step closer to

a cure.


BE HERE.

RUN HERE.

MARATHON • 1/2 MARATHON • 10K • 5K • 2K • KIDS MARATHON

MAY

27 - 28

2017

Join 50,000 runners as we celebrate Canada’s 150th year at Canada’s

biggest marathon and North America’s only double IAAF Gold event.

Races sell out fast. Register today!

#runottawa2017 runottawa.com


Let’s Go Toronto!

2017 Registration Opens November 21 st !

STWM.ca

Connect with the running community:

#STWM #runScotia

October 22, 2017

2017 National Marathon

Championships


iRun.ca ISSUE 06 2016

12,000 Team D

participants have

raised over $35M

in support of the

Canadian Diabetes

Association.

By getting active

you’re inspiring those

around you, so that

we can collectively

prevent and manage

diabetes.

Every dollar

raised is one

step closer to

a cure.

CONTENTS

FOUNDER

Mark Sutcliffe

mark@marksutcliffe.com

GENERAL MANAGER

Ben Kaplan

ben@iRun.ca

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Sabrina Young

sabrina@iRun.ca

MANAGING EDITOR

Anna Lee Boschetto

annalee@iRun.ca

EDITOR AT LARGE

Karen Kwan

RUNNER IN CHIEF

Ray Zahab

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Priya Ramanujam

COMMUNITY MANAGER

Megan Black

STAFF WRITER

Ravi Singh

CONTRIBUTORS

Robyn Baldwin, Jean-Paul Bedard,

Andrew Chak, Stefan Danis,

Krista DuChene, Rick Hellard,

Karen Karnis, Patience Lister,

Joanne Richard, Erin Valois

CREATIVE DIRECTOR & DESIGN

Geneviève Biloski, Becky Guthrie

iRUN

CHARITY

CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER

Kevin Van Paassen

ISSUE

ILLUSTRATOR

Chloe Cushman

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Colin Medley

iRun is a publication of Sportstats World

CEO

Marc Roy

Canada Post Publications

PM42950018

Sportstats

155 Colonnade Rd. #18

Ottawa, ON K2E 7K1 (Canada)

613.260.0994

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pair of

lucky shorts

3

MEC races

and counting

Join us at mec.ca

1

really sore

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YOU

CHANGED

HIS

LIFE.

NOW

LET’S

SPREAD

THE

LOVE.

THE

CHARITY

ISSUE.

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“IF I EVER SAW SOMEONE RUNNING FOR A CAUSE I’D RUN OVER TO THEM AND GIVE THEM A HUGE HUG.”

THE VAILLANCOURTS, ELEA, 7, AND THOMAS, 11, HAVE A FEW WORDS FOR THE RUNNING COMMUNITY. PAGE 15

PHOTOS BY KEVIN PAN PAASSEN


EVERUN and

feel like you

could run

forever?

Triumph IS03

*Results reflect EVERUN material compared to traditional EVA. Data based on third party testing results.

LEGENDS OF THE FALL

The best of the very best gadgets, gear and accessories to get you across your next finish line

1

STARTLINE

4 7 10

2

5 8

11

3

6 9

12

Breakthrough

cushioning that’s

closer to the foot

Gives an 83%*

energy return

Helps you run

stronger longer

1. Neutral. Light. Fast. The Saucony

Ride 9 is sturdy and dependable. All

you need.

2. Fitbit Charge 2 is easy to use, priced

right, does everything, looks good and

has a fun interactive interface. An easy

choice.

3. Paired with shorts, the New Balance

Kairosport jacket — light, handsome

and smart design — is an October runner’s

dream. Can more products adapt

the kangaroo pocket, please?

4. The Under Armour Run Streaker

t-shirt, bliss.

5. We once had Christa Davidson test

15 sports bras. Nike’s Pro Bra was her

favourite. By a long shot. Get protected.

6. There’s a lot of great races in

Canada. But the Scotiabank Toronto

Waterfront Marathon is home.

7. If you ever wanted your own hockey

card, but of your races, a Sportstats

membership lets you live out your

dreams. And it’s free. And you can follow

your friends. And win things. Why not?

8. Skechers GoTrail sneakers are built

for Canada. Keep your socks dry as you

battle the elements.

9. Easy to digest, ingest and suggest,

Tropical Punch BLOKS from Clif Bar are

race day lifesavers, enjoy.

10. At the Army Run, Ottawa Marathon

and SeaWheeze, Nuun Active hydrated

runners and these thirst-quenchers

with a Canadian CEO give Canadian runners

a new brand to love.

11. MEC Sanctuary tights are lattering,

colourful, cozy, sturdy and long-lasting.

The best.

12. Mark Sutcliffe, founder of iRun,

can write. Long Road to Boston, his

latest book, is inspiring, fast-paced and

fun — exactly alike having a best friend

with you on a run.

8 2016 ISSUE 06 iRun because lorem ipsum something goes here tktk. — Name Name, Province

iRun for Don who’s 80 and still running strong! — Allie Gocan, Ottawa

iRun.ca 9


TRAINING

ANATOMY OF

RUNNING

DR. LOWELL GREIB IS AN EXPERT IN BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY AND CEO OF

THE SPORTLAB, A HIGH-END SPORT THERAPY CLINIC IN HUNTSVILLE. WORKING AS AN EXPERT

ON RUNNERS’ FORM, HE FINDS TOO OFTEN THAT RUNNERS ARE SHOOTING THEMSELVES IN

THE FEET. “WE DO ALL THAT TRAINING AND RUNNING, BUT NEVER STOP TO THINK — ARE WE

DOING IT RIGHT?” THERE IS NO ONE PERFECT WAY FOR EVERY ATHLETE TO RUN, BUT PLEASE

CONSIDER THESE FUNDAMENTALS AS HELPFUL TO HELP STAVE OFF INJURY, DECREASE TIMES,

INCREASE ENDURANCE, AND SPEND A LONGER, HAPPIER TIME AT THE RACES. YOU’LL BE

THANKING DR. GREIB THAT YOU DID. ILLUSTRATION BY CHLOE CUSHMAN

4

5

1

As a runner staying relaxed, mentally

and physically, is very important to

ensure eficiency. Some common

areas of tension are shoulders, hands

and jaw. CUE: Before you take your

irst stride, close your eyes and be a

‘wet noodle.’

2

Drive your elbow backward, maintaining

90 degrees. Lead with your knee

allowing your foot to fold beneath

the knee. CUE: Forcefully drive your

hand toward your back pocket. Allow

your leg to ‘sling shot’ forward.

3

Eighty per cent of runners land on

the heel. That’s ine. Your foot will be

positioned behind your knee so that

it lands under you. CUE: Like the

wind rustling leaves, your landing will

be soft and quiet.

The Stance Phase starts when your

lead foot contacts the ground. Your

head should be up with your gaze

on the horizon. Keep a slight lean forward

from the ankle. CUE: Envision

yourself as a marionette with a string

pulling your head to the sky.

Push backward from the ball of the

lead foot and drive the hip forward

on the same side. This is where

the most power is generated.

CUE: Aggressively scrape gum

from the bottom of your shoe.

6

The elbow passively moves forward

but should not pass the midline

of the body. Allow the lead hip to

extend. CUE: Kick like a donkey to

close a door behind you.

7

As you push off, your hip becomes

fully extended and your foot leaves

the ground. This is the beginning

of the Swing Phase. CUE: Keep the

horizon from moving up and down. 8

Elbows stay tight to the torso to

avoid rotation of your trunk. All your

energy should drive straight forward.

CUE: Run through a narrow doorway.

10 2016 ISSUE 06 iRun to support our soldiers and their families at the Army Run. — Mike Motyl, Ottawa

iRun because I am very energetic and because Bruce, a.k.a Coach, makes me.. — Jaden Scrivens, Ottawa

iRun.ca 11


MARATHON MOM

KRISTA DUCHENE, COLUMNIST

HOW DO

YOU SOLVE

A PROBLEM

LIKE RIO?

Krista DuChene takes a long hard look in the mirror after racing

an Olympic marathon and approaching 40 and reaches a bold

conclusion: the best is yet to come.

n preparing for the 2016 Olympic Games

I did not allow myself a backup plan. I was

going to approach what would likely be my

only Olympic experience with no alternative

in mind; I was not going to let a planned fall

marathon allow me have a sub-par Olympic

marathon. If the going got tough, I was not

going to mentally check myself out of the race

because I had another one lined up.

Then I had a great Olympic marathon. My

heat and humidity-focused training allowed

me to successfully execute my race plan; to

start conservatively and move my way up the

ield to place above my ranking. I was elated,

particularly when I ran into the arms of my

loved ones immediately upon inishing. A

dream come true. Becoming an Olympian was

incredible and something that can never be

taken away from me.

Back to thoughts of a fall marathon, I must

be honest. During my Olympic training, I did

have the idea in the back of my mind. I just

didn’t say anything to anyone nor allow myself

to think much about it. So once I felt recovered

from my OIympic marathon, I started jogging

and swimming in the village while continuing

to enjoy the sweets I had gone without for

weeks. I spoke with Coach Rick and expressed

my desire to compete with Scotiabank Toronto

Waterfront Marathon (STWM) Race Director,

Alan Brookes. I’d be racing in another

STWM! Then, like every other return to

training, the novelty of the sweets wore off as

the hunger for competitive racing returned. My

over-indulgence in my aunt’s butter tarts solidiied

the desire to resume my routine — time to

get serious again.

I transitioned from recovery to full-time

training for my two marathons that would

be nine weeks apart. I’ve always believed that

one can run two quality marathons per year

so a fall marathon made sense since my last

marathon, my Olympic-qualifying marathon,

was in April 2015.

Many of the marathoners who had to compete

in 2016 marathons called it a season. That

wasn’t the case for me.

In preparing for Rio, we took very little risk

so I was happy to change things up by committing

to race the STWM, my favourite race

in the world. The opportunity to run a faster

race between two championship races, 2016

Olympics and 2017 Worlds, made sense. I had

nothing to lose. I was an Olympian. Once the

kids were in school full-time, I’d have six weeks

to log serious kilometres and tidy up my diet.

Many athletes are asked their post-Olympic

plans, sometimes even immediately upon completing

their event, good or bad. When I was

in Rio amongst other Olympians having these

conversations it revealed a set of mixed emotions.

Some knew they were done. They had

been at it a long time, needed to focus more

on family or establishing a career, or had given

everything possible to achieve their goals.

Others knew they’d target Tokyo, 2020. Then

there were those of us somewhere in between.

At 39, and with three children and a history of

signiicant injuries, one would easily conclude

that Rio was my one and only Olympic experience.

While this may be true, I’m not retiring

DAVID JACKSON

any time soon — nor ruling out Tokyo.

There are reasons for this:

1. I have only had one year of training with all

of our children in school full-time.

2. I have only been competing at this level for

six years.

3. I have already established my other professional

career as a Registered Dietitian, which is

less fun than marathoning!

There are athletes with running careers

well into their 40s. I’m still going to bed and

waking up with energy and motivation to train

and compete.

I’ve never done the research to determine

the odds that I’ve already likely had my fastest

marathon. Likely, they’d say I have. But so far

I’ve beaten the odds in so many ways that I

refuse to stop reaching high and aiming to run

another personal best. There are things we

haven’t tried in my training and now’s the time

to try. So I continue to press on and make the

sky the limit. Here are some future possibilities:

1. Championship races: 2017 Worlds in London,

England, 2018 Commonwealth Games

in Gold Coast City, Australia, 2019 Worlds

in Doha, Qatar and 2020 Olympic Games in

Tokyo, Japan.

2. Masters records of various distances. I’ll be

40 in January 2017!

3. World majors: Tokyo, London, Berlin,

Chicago, New York. I completed Boston in 2005.

4. Travel to each continent for training or racing.

I’ve been to Asia, South America, Europe

and obviously North America. I’ll likely omit

Antarctica (but who knows!); only Africa and

Australia remain.

I’ve always said to set the bar high and make

your ceiling your loor. There’s no stopping me.

Krista DuChene holds the second fastest female

marathon time in Canadian history. Racing the

Canadian Half Marathon Championships, DuChene

inished the course on a broken leg. She took

second. Her website is KristaDuChenerunning.

blogspot.com.

12 2016 ISSUE 06 iRun because it makes me feel like a winner. I’m nine years old. — Kali Sevier, Montreal

iRun because it’s empowering. — Shannon Lipson, Toronto

iRun.ca 13


FROM RED DEER TO ROME,

WE’VE GOT PLACES TO RUN.

Combine your love of running and travel at the

Rome Marathon – one of the most historic routes

you’ll ever experience! We can get you there!

FIND YOUR NEXT ADVENTURE AT

teamdiabetes.ca

iRUN’S

LET’S MAKE A

DIFFERENCE

IN THE WORLD

CHANGE A LIFE

HELP EACH OTHER OUT

DONATE

TIME, ADVICE, MONEY

TO HELP

ISSUE

THOMAS VAILLANCOURT

FOR THE CANADIAN DIABETES ASSOCIATION

It’s been five years since I was diagnosed. When I was told I had

Type 1 Diabetes, I didn’t know what it meant. They told me there

wasn’t a cure. I was scared. Even worse. I was scared of needles. I

stopped eating, and while in the hospital, I stayed on an IV drip

for four straight days. My reasoning was simple: no food meant

no needle. Nowadays taking my blood sugar isn’t a big fuss. It’s

my new normal. Prick. Eat. Repeat. If this system fails … so does

my body. But that doesn’t keep me on the sidelines. I want to

run for and say thanks to the Canadian Diabetes Association.

Whenever I hear of people raising money for our cause or for

any others, I feel thankful. Thank you for doing this. I’m grateful.

iRun.ca 15


LORI CHRISTOPHER FOR TNT

I started running with TNT in 2013 after

my nephew died from leukemia. I had to do

something because there was nothing to do.

Fundraising gave my running a purpose other

than just running for myself. In 2014, I got

diagnosed with leukemia. When I got my

cancer diagnosis, I knew exactly who to call.

It was time to link up with TNT again and

do another race. Fundraising helped get me

through treatments — it gave me something

good to focus on.

With leukemia, you don’t ever get a cure. You

hope for long-term remission. And in the meantime,

I’m scoping out my next race.

I do better when I train. I feel better mentally.

I feel better physically. I ran a whole pile

of races through chemo because that’s just me.

My doctor said I’m probably the healthiest

chemo patient he knows, and that he knows

plenty of people not in chemo who aren’t as

healthy as you. Running is my outlet for everything.

It’s how I sort everything out. Put

your running shoes on and work out all life’s

stresses, just run.

In 2014, my mom died from complications

of Alzheimers. I work full-time and have

three kids and run a house — running saved

my sanity. I could not survive my mother’s

diagnosis and her being sick without it. My

best races came after my life’s most traumatic

things. There’s not many finish lines I cross

where I’m not crying.

I think when you’re running for something

other than yourself the running means more.

It’s morphed into something special for me. I’m

running for all those people who can’t run. And

to the runners reading this, reading my story —

I know fundraising is daunting. But this is our

time. Let’s band together — as runners — and

help those who need it, because we can.

AT LAVAMAN IN HAWAII, PARTICIPATING WITH TEAM IN TRAINING. PHOTO COURTESY OF LORI CHRISTOPHER. RIGHT: KEVIN VAN PAASSEN

WHAT DOES

VISION IMPAIRED

LOOK LIKE?

IT’S IMPORTANT

TO CREATE

AWARENESS.

RHONDA MARIE-AVERY

FOR ACHILLES CANADA

You come to a place in your life where you know

in order to care about someone else’s needs intensely,

you have to take care of yourself. The

only way to calm my youngest boy down, who

has ADHD, was put him in the jogging stroller.

I was diagnosed legally blind when I was three.

Before that, I was told to stop misbehaving, instead

of being led by someone across the playground

to the slide. I hooked up with Achilles

Canada, a non-profit that encourages people

with disabilities to run, and they taught me how

to be brave enough to accelerate knowing that

there’s the potential of hitting a car.

My son continued needing me in a way

that I had to be super focussed and so I began

running and it helped me be my best me,

to help him.

The culture doesn’t even know it discriminates

against people with disabilities and so

I think my visibility helps in order to have

conversations. “People with disabilities can’t

do that,” is a lot of people’s viewpoints and

it’s one of the reasons I run: what does visionimpaired

look like? A vision-impaired mother

just ran the Bruce Trail! It’s important to create

awareness. It’s one thing to have values

and speak about them, but if you’re not willing

to get on the front lines and work, you

should stop talking: you can’t stand up for

change sitting down.

People tell me stories of their uncle who

lost their vision and how they struggle losing

their independence. It doesn’t have to be that

way! Other disabled people who aren’t athletes

are saying things like, ‘If you’re running in the

mountains, I don’t have to be afraid to go to

the grocery store.’ See, my every

day isn’t this big adventure. Can

I make it to the bus stop without

getting run over? Can I pick my

son up from high school?

We don’t know how as a society

to help people fit in like that

and we need to talk about that

more.

There’s a place for people with

disabilities. And it’s definitely not

on the sidelines where we’re put.

CHARITYISSUE

16 2015 ISSUE 06 iRun to lorem ipsum something goes here tktktktk. — Name Name, Province

iRun.ca 17


CHARITYISSUE

HOW THE SPORTING LIFE 10K HAS

OPENED THE WORLD UP TO CHILDREN

WITH CANCER BY ANDREW CHAK

It was my first race and I was scared. I’d never run

the full distance of a 10K before. But five years

ago, I participated in the Sporting Life 10K and

overcame the fear of not knowing what my body

could do. I ran, walked, ran again, and finished to

medals, cheers and bagels. The race was a personal

victory for me, but I learned that this race

meant so much more.

The Sporting Life 10K has raised $12.5-million

for Camp Ooch, which runs year-round

programs for kids with cancer in Muskoka, The

Hospital for Sick Children and at Ooch Downtown.

Jean Paul Corbeil, director of marketing

for Sporting Life says, “Since the beginning, it

has meant the world to us. The idea of children

affected by this dreaded disease would have an

opportunity to go to a camp where they could

receive on-site medical care and enjoy the simple

traits of camp is an incredible vision.”

Recent economic challenges,

however, have put a damper on

fundraising efforts says David

Hessekiel, president of Cause

Marketing Forum. In 2015, fundraising

amongst Canada’s 30

largest peer-to-peer fundraising

programs, which include many

running events, saw an 8.6%

year-over-year decline in fundraising

revenues. “A very low

percentage of participants in

these types of races actually fundraise,” says Hessekiel.

“Most are there to run, not to fundraise.”

Camp Ooch, however, slightly bucks the

trend. “With most races, 5% of the participants

fundraise; with the Sporting Life 10K, we’ve seen

8%,” says Cory Freedman, race director for the

Sporting Life 10K. “Last year, we lowered our

registration cap to 23,000 participants and we

were able to raise more money with less people.”

One of the largest individual running events

in Canada, the Sporting Life 10K aspires to be

the race that provides the largest net proceeds to

charity. Organizers also find ways to introduce

Camp Ooch’s children to runners.

“Our medals are given out by Ooch campers

and their family members as a way of saying

thank you,” Freedman says. “Our 10K has become

a celebration.”

I QUICKLY

LEARNED THAT

THIS RACE

REPRESENTS

A VICTORY OVER

SO MUCH MORE.

5,373

Amount raised

worldwide

from the

Terry Fox Run

KILOMETRES TERRY FOX RAN

331

1,400

Communities raised

$33 million for the

Canadian Cancer

Society’s Relay for

Life in 2105

83

Percentage of

children who

now survive at

least ive years

after their cancer

diagnosis, thanks

to fundraising

efforts of

Canadian Cancer

Society and

Relay for Life.

RESEARCH PROJECTS HAVE BEEN FUNDED THROUGH

RUN FOR THE CURE AND THE CANADIAN BREAST

CANCER FOUNDATION SINCE 1986.

Participating

charities involved

with the Scotiabank

Ottawa Marathon

Charity Challenge.

60+

1 IN 8 CANADIAN MEN WILL FACE

PROSTATE CANCER IN THEIR LIFETIME

$373,641

46mil.

RAISED BY SIX SCOTIABANK SPONSORED CANADIAN MARATHONS OVER 14 YEARS

5KM

Distance runners go at

the Scotiabank Rat Race

which raised $400,000

for the United Way of

Greater Toronto

63

COMMUNITIES WHERE THE CIBC

RUN FOR THE CURE TAKES PLACE

ACROSS CANADA. IN 2015, THESE

COMMUNITIES RAISED $20 MILLION

BY THE NUMBERS With 81,000 registered charities in Canada in need of support, there are

plenty of reasons to run for a good cause. And runners across the nation are doing just that,

making an impact in communities from coast to coast.

$650

MILLION

+1.2bil.

Number, in US dollars, Running

USA estimates US road races brought

in for charity in 2013

Dollars raised in 2016

through Prostate

Cancer Canada’s Do It

for Dads Run Walk

33

Running clubs

across the

country

joining Sylvia

Ruegger

or child

education

with Start2Finish

15KM7KM5KM

DISTANCES FOR THE RBC RACE

FOR KIDS WHICH HAD 19, 880

RUNNERS IN 2016

CHARITYISSUE

18 2016 ISSUE 06

iRun for my family and for fun and for my health. — Tom Hawboldt, Orleans

iRun.ca 19


train where you are...

REP YOUR PROVINCE/TERRITORY AT

CANADA’S

MARATHON

IN 2017

Canada is celebrating a milestone and the

Scotiabank Calgary Marathon, Canada’s longest

running marathon, is throwing a party . . .

Join the Race & Celebration!

The Calgary Marathon is bringing a runner from every province/territory to Alberta

to be part of the race of the Sesquicentennial “150th Anniversary!”

13 runners will receive: Flight and Accommodation > Entry to the Marathon >

VIP Access on race day & VIP Party Invite > Shake out run with iRun General Manager

Ben Kaplan > Special swag > Carry your provincial/territorial lag at the Opening

Ceremonies on Race Day! > And so much more…

How can you be a 2017 Flagbearer?

Visit iRun.ca or CalgaryMarathon.com, click the Calgary Marathon box.

Fill out a simple questionnaire and tell us why we should pick YOU to rep

your province/territory at one of the country’s biggest events of all-time.

Showcase your diversity. Nominate your mother. Talk about yourself.

...finish strong, proud & free

50KM Ultra | 42.2KM | 21.1KM | 10KM | 5KM

150KM solo & relay in celebration of Canada’s 150th Anniversary

The Scotiabank Calgary Marathon and iRun magazine

are bringing together 13 disparate runners to Calgary from

across the country to celebrate Canada’s Marathon!

Train Where You Are, Finish Strong, Proud & Free at the

2017 Scotiabank Calgary Marathon, Canada’s Marathon

The Badlands


SECTION FRANÇAISE

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3 rd 2016

Join The Salvation Army and Running Room for the Santa

Shule 5K Fun Run and 1K Elf Walk. With 42 locations

across Canada, there’s bound to be a run near you!

This merry event helps The Salvation Army to assist families and

individuals in need during the Christmas season and throughout the year.

All participants will receive

a unique Santa Shuffle

finishers medal!

REGISTER Register on-line TODAY! @

www.santashuffle.ca

MARIE-EVE LESSARD

L’automne… ou l’entrée

en matière de l’hiver!

Comment se préparer à courir alors que la saison

froide est à nos portes? Par Marie-Eve Lessard

Les soirées fraîches nous rappellent que

l’été tire à sa fin. Tout comme la saison de

course. FAUX. L’automne est une excellente

saison pour se préparer à l’hiver. Tandis

que certaines personnes sont incapables de

courir à la chaleur, d’autres pensent qu’il est

impossible de courir lorsqu’il fait froid. Il y

a quelques années à peine, je faisais partie de

ces personnes. D’abord, il faut rester motivé.

Il y a des courses très intéressantes l’hiver,

comme la course du Père Noël, les Courses

gourmandes, etc. Lorsqu’on sait que l’on doit

continuer de s’entraîner pour une course qui

a lieu en décembre ou en février, c’est beaucoup

plus motivant. On peut aussi se joindre

à un groupe de course du quartier. Ou en

créer un, comme j’ai fait! Pour me garder

motivée en un début d’année glacial, j’ai invité

mes amis coureurs à se joindre à moi les

mardis soirs pour braver le froid et surtout,

s’amuser dans la neige. Ça a marché!

Il y a aussi l’habillement. Attention, plusieurs

coureurs font l’erreur de trop s’habiller

lorsque les températures baissent. Mon truc,

j’ajoute 10 degrés Celsius à la température

ressentie. Je ne m’habille pas pareil s’il fait

-5 ou s’il fait -20. Si vous avez trop chaud,

vous allez suer davantage et vous ne serez pas

confortable. Et le contraire est aussi bon, si

vous avez trop froid, vous n’aimerez pas courir.

L’automne est le meilleur moment pour faire

des tests. Allez-y graduellement. Oui, et je

mets quoi? Les chandails en tissu technique à

manche longue sont un très bon choix. Si vous

participez à la Course de l’Armée du Canada,

vous en obtenez un avec votre inscription, et

c’est parfait pour courir l’automne. Ensuite,

lorsqu’il fait plus froid, on peut y ajouter un

chandail à manches courtes, puis quand ça

continue de baisser (car oui, ça continue toujours

de baisser!) on ajoute un coupe-vent. On

peut porter 2-3 couches sur le haut du corps,

et 1-2 couches sur les jambes. Il est possible

de s’acheter des sous-vêtements en mérinos

pas trop chers dans un magasin-entrepôt bien

connu. Et on n’oublie pas les bas chauds, la

tuque et les mitaines.

Si vous êtes comme moi, quand la température

baisse, vous toussez lorsque vous courez

dehors. J’ai découvert que je fais de l’asthme

induit par l’air froid. J’ai réglé le problème en

mettant un foulard de type Buff devant ma

bouche. C’est une adaptation, car on se sent

un peu à l’étroit, mais après quelques sorties,

on s’habitue. Et c’est vraiment libérateur

lorsque le printemps arrive et que l’on peut

enfin l’enlever!

Pour vos pieds, vous pouvez courir avec

vos espadrilles d’été, ou vous acheter une paire

pour l’hiver ou une paire de souliers de trail.

Ça, c’est votre portefeuille qui le dicte! Il n’y

a pas de règle, mais soyez prudent. Car tout

comme les pneus, mieux on est chaussé, plus

c’est sécuritaire. En soulier d’été, vous devrez

adapter votre foulée lorsque les routes sont

enneigées, mais vous vous sentirez comme un

enfant dans la neige!

Pourquoi s’imposer de courir l’hiver?

D’un, parce que c’est vraiment drôle de voir

les regards jugeurs des automobilistes qui ne

peuvent pas croire qu’on peut courir à -28.

De deux, car vous arriverez au printemps en

superbe forme et vous n’aurez pas à recommencer

à zéro. Et de trois, pour vous amuser!

iRun Parce ce qu’il y a rien d’autre. — Guy Buller, Ottawa

iRun.ca 23


SECTION FRANÇAISE

Course Relais pour la vie, volet course à longueuil pour la Socièté canadienne du cancer.

La course

devient philanthrope

Courir pour soi, c’est génial. Courir pour les

autres sauve des vies. Par Chantal Crevier

Dans notre aire individualiste, les gens

concentre leur vie autour de leur carrière,

de leur famille, de leurs plaisirs, de leurs

désirs. Ils exploitent leur environnement

afin de satisfaire leurs besoins. Aujourd’hui,

tout le monde s’arrête pour regarder un post

Facebook mais passera tout droit devant un

sans-abri. Par contre, ils participeront à une

activité caritative avec humanité et avec défi.

La philanthropie est très individualiste.

Un peu comme la vie sociale à laquelle notre

siècle ce vit. Toutefois celle-ci se retrouve à

bénéficier des bienfaits montant de l’activité

physique. À travers le sport, une mobilisation

vis-à-vis l’entraide se fait sentir. On organise

des cyclosportives, des courses à pieds, des

courses à obstacles pour ramasser des fonds

pour une cause.

Tout autour d’un événement de levée de

fonds, on retrouve la générosité, l’empathie et

la sympathie de tous et chacun des participants.

Que ce soit, un 5 km ou un ultra-marathon,

la sensation de bien-être est palpable.

¨Nous participons au 160 Shaw Direct télé

satellite Bromont Ultra, avec une équipe

composé de coureur chevronnée et/ou peu

d’expérience. Notre motivation est de joindre

l’utile à l’agréable, de ramasser des fonds pour

notre cause ; la Fondation Rêves d’enfants.¨

de dire M. Philippe Sicotte, V.P. des opérations

satellites chez Shaw Direct.

Pour les sociètés philanthropiques, le

sport est une découverte avantageuse. Elles

organisent un événement sportif, tel qu’une

course à pied et peuvent atteindre leur objectif

plus facilement.

Élodie Berthelier, agente au développement

de la Société canadienne du cancer

parle de la course avec émotion. Leur activité

principale ramasser des fonds ; le Relais pour

la vie, consiste en une marche de 12 heures de

nuit. ¨Or, à Longueuil, nous avons depuis 3

ans créé un volet course à pied, puisque notre

porte-parole, M. Dominique Arpin en est

amoureux. Ce qui a augmenté le nombre de

participants à l’événement¨.

En parlant avec ces gens, je m’interroge

sur mon implication sportive face à une activité

sportive caritative. Moi, qui court pour

mon bien-être, j’ai souvent courue des courses

pour des causes sans jamais m’approprier la

cause. Selon Marc-Wayne Addison, ¨Chacun

fait entendre sa voix pour sa cause et par

son dépassement personnelle¨. J’ai raison

de penser que chacun des participants aux

courses philanthropiques, comme j’aime les

nommés, sont divisé en 2 groupes. Ceux qui

courent pour la cause, pour leur cause et ceux

qui courent pour le sport. Les premiers ont

un côté humanitaire très touchant, ils font des

collectes de fonds afin de ramasser l’argent

nécessaire pour participer et afin de donner le

maximum à la cause. Comme M. Sicotte, qui

depuis plusieurs années se fait un devoir de

ramasser assez d’argent pour devenir ¨Responsable

des rêves et pouvoir lui-même avec sa

femme livrer un rêve à un enfant malade.

Les autres courront la distance et ramasseront

les fonds sans toutefois voir au delà. Ils

en feront une raison pour faire une activité

physique. Ce qui en soit n’est pas négligeable

au niveau de la santé physique mais un peu

faible au niveau santé émotionnelle.

Est-ce que la course mobilise les gens à

s’impliquer dans une cause ou est-ce que la

cause se sert de la course pour la supporter ?

En conclusion, tout le monde coure pour

une raison et chacun coure pour sa cause.

COURSE RELAIS POUR LA VIE

COURTESY OF AUTHOR.

36 ans, Alana Bonner affiche plus de

À courses sur la plateforme Sportstats que

n’importe quel autre membre au Canada.

D’ailleurs, elle est suivie de loin par son rival

le plus proche, qui en cumule 193. Comment

fait-elle? Quel est son secret? Bonner, qui

habite près de Montréal et qui compétitionne

depuis août 2009, a répondu aux questions

de iRun.

iRUN: Qu’est-ce qui fait de vous une si

bonne athlète?

BONNER: Quand je m’emballe pour quelque

chose, je ne m’arrête plus.

iRUN: Votre feuille de route est incroyable.

BONNER: J’aime ça, c’est tout. J’adore la

perspective de la compétition : visiter différentes

villes, rencontrer toute sorte de

monde. L’atmosphère qui règne dans cette

formidable communauté me plaît beaucoup.

Plus je rencontre de gens au Canada et aux

États-Unis, plus j’ai envie de participer à des

compétitions. C’est comme ça en fait que j’ai

commencé à courir chaque week-end.

iRUN: Avez-vous le trac avant une course?

Bonner : Chaque fois.

iRUN: Sans blague?

BONNER: C’est toujours comme si c’était la

première fois et que je ne l’avais jamais fait

auparavant. Je veux faire de mon mieux et

je veux que ça se passe bien, mais je ne suis

jamais sûre de rien. C’est probablement pourquoi

ça m’énerve tant.

iRUN: Avez-vous déjà senti votre motivation

baisser, par exemple après la 150e course?

BONNER: Je n’ai pas besoin de motivation,

c’est juste qui je suis. Je cours, je participe à

des compétitions : ça fait partie de moi. Ça

fait partie de ma vie quotidienne et de mon

identité. Les annonceurs locaux me connaissent

tous, parce qu’ils me voient toutes les fins

de semaine.

iRUN: Que faites-vous pour célébrer, après une

course?

BONNER: Rien. Ma passion, c’est de trouver

des courses dans des villes que je ne connais

pas pour les rayer de ma liste.

iRUN: Quels sont les faits saillants de votre carrière

de coureuse?

Runner’s World Classic 21.1K, à North Andover, Massachusetts.

LE PLUS GRAND

NOMBRE DE

COURSES SUR

SPORTSTATS

L’enthousiasme et la passion,

deux ingrédients qui ont permis

à Alana Bonner d’atteindre

227 courses sur Sportstats

BONNER: Depuis deux ans, je suis championne

du circuit du grand Montréal pour le

groupe d’âge des 30 à 39 ans. Cela me fait

plaisir.

iRUN: Avez-vous déjà couru par très mauvais

temps?

BONNER: Je cours à longueur d’année sans

me préoccuper du temps qu’il fait. Ma

course la plus difficile à cet égard a été le

demi-marathon hypothermique, cette année

à Montréal. Il faisait moins 30, et avant

le début de la course, on nous a dit qu’on

nous donnerait le temps à 10 km, mais je

suis arrivée au bout des 21 km. Je portais un

masque et j’avais l’air d’un bandit, mais j’ai

couru jusqu’au bout.

iRUN: Avez-vous des coureurs préférés?

BONNER: Ed Whitlock. J’ai une photo de moi

avec Ed, en 2014, lors d’une course à Williamstown,

en Ontario. Et Mo Farrah. C’est

un champion olympique incroyable; et Meb

Keflezighi aussi.

iRUN: Avez-vous déjà eu un moment où vous

pensiez laisser tomber?

BONNER: Non. Jamais.

iRUN: Jamais?

BONNER: Parfois, pendant une course, quand

ça va mal, je me dis « jamais plus », mais dès

que je franchis la ligne d’arrivée, j’ai hâte de

m’inscrire à la prochaine course. Plus la course

est difficile, plus j’ai envie de continuer à

courir. C’est tout simplement ma façon d’être.

iRUN: Quels sont vos trois grands conseils

pour bien courir?

BONNER: Respecter le rythme qu’on s’est

donné. Quand ça devient difficile, croire que

ça va devenir plus facile. Il y a toujours un

moment, généralement peu après le coup

d’envoi, où ça va très mal, et puis on trouve

son rythme. Quand c’est vraiment dur, il suffit

de se dire que ça ira mieux.

Tout est une question d’efforts. Dans une

course, impossible de tricher. Si on n’y met

pas le travail qu’il faut, on n’a pas de résultats.

iRUN: Nous travaillons pour Sportstats. Donc,

pouvez-vous nous donner un commentaire sur

les événements chronométrés par Sportstats?

BONNER: Mes événements préférés sont

toujours ceux qui sont chronométrés par

Sportstats. Quand je suis à la recherche

d’événements, je visite le site de Sportstats

pour voir ce qui est annoncé. C’est une excellente

plateforme où je peux inscrire toutes

mes courses maintenant que je suis membre.

Sportstats a une très bonne réputation

à Montréal. Je suis allée à des événements

chronométrés par d’autres entreprises, et

c’était catastrophique. Sportstats est fiable, et

c’est ce dont on a besoin.

iRUN: Vous avez 227 événements à votre actif

sur Sportstats. Pensez-vous atteindre 500?

BONNER: Bien sûr.

iRUN: Mille?

BONNER: Je ne compte pas m’arrêter. J’ai trop

de plaisir pour ça.

24 2016 ISSUE 06 iRun Parce que je peux. — Charles Koyper, Victoria

iRun Pour rester saine dans ce monde fou. — Lucie Zimmer, Ottawa

iRun.ca 25


MUSIC

Clockwise from top left: Jon Hembrey, Jeremy Drury, Isabel Ritchie,

Simon Ward, David Ritter and Darryl James of The Strumbellas.

ings so it gives me some time to myself and I get to

explore all the cities that we visit. Sometimes it’s my

only chance to actually see the cities we’re playing in.

such an uplifting, phenomenal running song. Have

you ever tried running to it?

HEMBREY (LAUGHING): I don’t usually run to Spirits.

Maybe when we’re in the recording or mixing process

I might have thrown it on once or twice to give it

a bit of a critical listen while running.

“I GOT RUNS IN

MY HEAD AND

THEY WON’T GO,

SPIRITS IN MY

HEAD AND THEY

WON’T GO.”

The inside story of The Strumbellas

and how their guitarist — running with

his mom — co-wrote Spirits, his group’s

infectious, awesome-to-run-to hit song

By Ben Kaplan

Photography by Heather Pollock

IRUN: As your band gets more popular, does that make

you run more, or less?

JON HEMBREY: It might seem counter-intuitive, but

I’m actually running more these days. I’m not sure if

it’s just that I’m more into it right now or that we’re

so busy I ind myself having to take advantage of every

bit of free time I get. So if I’ve got some time in the

morning, I might as well just get out there and run.

Once I get in the mindset of just, “Go out there and

do it,” I ind I have more time than I think. So I end up

running more.

IRUN: Why do you think so many successful musicians

are runners? What does it do for you?

HEMBREY: I’m not really sure. It’s deinitely a challenge

to keep active on the road. You’re travelling so much

and don’t have a lot time for yourself. I like it because

it’s easy — all I need are some running shoes — and

you can do it anywhere. I usually go out in the morn-

IRUN: Can you give me a sense of your current running

routine? How often do you go out, how far?

HEMBREY: I usually run somewhere between ive and

seven kilometres two or three times a week.

IRUN: Your mom got you started, right?

HEMBREY: It’s kind of funny, but my mom got me into

both running and playing music. About ive years ago

I had been casually running for awhile, really casually

. . . like honestly once or twice a month. My mom had

gotten into it and signed up for the Sporting Life 10K

in Toronto. She asked me if I wanted to try it, so I did.

Signing up for it really made me commit to more of

a schedule because I wanted to inish the 10K. Ever

since then I’ve been a pretty consistent runner.

For music, I had just randomly said to her one day

in high school that I’d like to play guitar. The very next

day she told me she had booked lessons for the next

week. That’s very much her attitude when it comes to

trying new things. Just get out there and do it.

IRUN: She sounds awesome.

HEMBREY: My mom has always been very active

and she’s all about getting out there and trying new

things. She runs and kayaks and takes her dog Henry

for a walk in the woods behind her house all the time.

She’s always been a big inspiration for me.

IRUN: Do you have any ambitions to further your running?

Do you see yourself as a marathon guy?

HEMBREY: As I’ve started running more I’ve been

thinking I might try a half marathon. So that’s my

current goal. And then once you’re there, you might

as well try for the other half and just make a full marathon

so who knows!

IRUN: I got to tell you, I love “Spirits” so much. It’s

Jon Hembrey is a pop music nut and proud of it. Here, he shares his running playlist, plenty of upbeat tunes to get you

across your next inish line (and please see iRun.ca for the Spotify version of this, ready for you to rock on your run).

“First,” Cold War Kids

“Ship to Wreck,” Florence + the

Machine

“Juliette,” Hollerado

“Coming Home,” Leon Bridges

“Love Like Ghosts,” Lord Huron

“The House That Heaven Built,”

Japandroids

“Where I’m Going,” The Wild Reeds

“Demons,” Imagine Dragons

“Wake Me Up,” Avicii

“Renegades,” X Ambassadors

“Leather Jacket,” Arkells

“Hello,” Adele

“Wrecking Ball,” Miley Cyrus

“The Mother We Share,” CHVRCHES

IRUN: Can you give me a sense of the songwriting process.

Do you know you have gold in the studio?

HEMBREY: Simon is the primary writer. He’ll usually

send out a demo to the band and then the rest of us all

weigh in with suggestions and parts to ill it out. It’s a

fairly collaborative process.

Unfortunately there is no easy “gold test” in the

studio. You’re so invested in the songs, it’s hard to

take yourself out of the moment and really listen with

fresh ears. You’re in there making the music you want

to make and that’s what you’re mostly focused on.

I usually find myself falling into two extremes

while in the studio. It’s either, “I can’t believe how

amazing this sounds,” or, “This is total garbage.”

IRUN: What do you like running to and, as a followup,

how do you feel on a run? (For me personally,

“Graceland” is the perfect running song — uplifting,

not too heavy, helps me keep my pace).

HEMBREY: “Graceland” is an awesome song. That’s

going on my running mix for sure! I usually go for

something a little on the pop side of things. Singalong

choruses and a nice mid range tempo. If I hear

something on the radio or if we play with a really cool

band, I’ll usually throw them into my running mix for

a couple weeks.

Nothing too fast either. I tend to play the air

drums while I’m running. So I’ll lail my arms along

to parts of the song I love. I imagine it might look a

little weird.

IRUN: If you could run with any musician of all-time,

who would you run with and, if you could both listen

to the same song, what song would it be?

HEMBREY: If I could run with one musician, it’d have

to be Jimi Hendrix. I’d put on “Don’t Think Twice It’s

Alright” and geek out about Bob Dylan.

“Take Me to Church,” Hozier

“Fools,” Wild Child

“Woman,” Wolfmother

“Graceland,” Paul Simon (thanks!)

“Letterbox,” Pickwick

“That Western Skyline,” Dawes

“Miracle Mile,” Cold War Kids

“Shut Up and Dance,” Walk the Moon

26 2016 ISSUE 06 iRun to raise money and I’m eight years old. — Olive Marie, Ottawa

iRun for the “me” time to think. — Lisa Campbell, Quebec City

iRun.ca 27


WHY I RUN

MARK SUTCLIFFE, COLUMNIST

THE LONG RUN

Satisfaction isn’t something we fall upon. It’s something we work towards.

And the harder the work, the richer the rewards.

prevailing theme in

A our modern world is

the overnight success. You

have a killer business idea

and sell it to Google in your

irst month of operation.

You show up at a reality TV

audition and a few weeks

later you’re a recording

artist. You post a video on

YouTube and become an

Internet sensation.

There’s a litany of selfhelp

literature, ranging

from Get Rich Quick to

Lose Weight Fast, that

supports the fantasy that

big and wonderful things

can happen instantly. No

hard work required.

But real life is a lot like

running; it’s an incremental

game. Saving for your

retirement, losing twenty

pounds, building a bond

with your child, or completing

a half-marathon — they

all result from daily hard

work that, over time, adds

up to a positive result. You

can’t cram for any of them.

I just inished authoring

a book about the

history of the Boston

Marathon and my own

experience repeatedly

trying and failing to get in,

then eventually qualifying

in my 20th marathon.

Everything about the

experience of researching

and writing the book

reminded me that nothing

meaningful happens in an

instant. It took decades

of history for the Boston

Marathon to become

the most respected and

coveted race in the world.

It took years of training —

and some 12,000 kilometres

of running — for me

to qualify. It took months

of writing, starting with

a blank document and

adding a few hundred

words at a time, for me to

complete the book.

In every case, there were

no shortcuts. You can’t buy

a VIP pass and skip to the

front of the line. You start

with nothing and you do a

little bit. And then a little

more. Every day, you throw

a little more on the pile. In a

short time, you have something

more than nothing.

Eventually, if you keep it

up, you may have a lot. But

you never add more than a

modest amount to the pile

SPONSORED BY

on any day.

The same principle

applies to fundraising.

Like many of the stories

we’ve shared in this issue

of iRun, a runner on a

mission to raise hundreds

or thousands of dollars

starts at zero. Even

Terry Fox began with

an empty bucket. A little

bit at a time, the runner

gets commitments from

donors. Eventually she

hits her goal. Combine

that $500 or $1,500 with

the fundraising efforts

of thousands of other

runners and suddenly you

have millions for medical

research or some other

worthy cause.

At some point in this

incremental journey you

will start to wonder: Is it

the pile or the practice of

adding to it that provides

the greatest reward? When

you train for your irst

marathon, you think the

race itself is the attraction,

the experience from which

you will get the most

beneit. After a while, as

running etches itself into

your routine, you realize

that it’s the daily hard work

that may be the biggest

prize. The marathon is the

unapproachable classmate

you fantasized about in

high school. Training is

the devoted friend who

was by your side every day,

listening to you go on and

on about your dreams.

Likewise, while your

intentions are honourable

and philanthropic,

you also get some beneit

whenever someone supports

your fundraising

campaign. Just like the

feeling at the end of a good

run, there’s something

enormously satisfying and

validating about adding a

few hundred dollars to the

pot you’re handing over to

a good cause.

No matter what Hollywood

or self-help gurus

tell you, life isn’t about

big moments and grand

gestures. It’s about chipping

away at a challenge,

one day at a time. You

can’t jump to the inish

line or skip to the end of

the movie. And, you soon

realize, you wouldn’t want

to anyway.

Mark Sutcliffe is the founder of iRun

and the author of Long Road to Boston:

The Pursuit of the World’s Most

Coveted Marathon.

DOWNLOAD the iRun Podcasts: iRun.ca

LISTEN to iRun | The Running Show: TSN1200.ca

FOLLOW him on Twitter: @_marksutcliffe

SEE excerpts of his book: WhyIRun.ca

An absolute must read for anyone

who has run or aspires to run

the Boston Marathon.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Long Road to Boston combines the history of the

world’s most coveted marathon with the personal

journey of one ordinary runner who seeks to fulill

his ultimate amateur athletic quest. Tracing back to

the marathon’s roots in Greek mythology and sharing

the stories of the many colourful and inspiring

characters who have crossed Boston’s inish line,

the book explores why modern runners challenge

themselves with such ambitious goals and revels

in the reward of a lifelong dream fulilled.

“This book captures

exactly why Boston is

the most prestigious

and most cherished race

on the planet.”

Bart Yasso, Chief Running Oicer

of Runner’s World

“Finally! By intertwining stories

of the legendary runners and

greatest moments in Boston’s

history with accounts of his

personal journey to qualify,

Mark Sutcliffe has captured

the essence of what makes

Boston the world’s greatest

marathon and the inspiration for

generations of runners.”

Mark Sullivan, coach and 30-time

Boston Marathon inisher

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

iRun founder and columnist

Mark Sutclife has interviewed

hundreds of runners who

have chased Boston, and over

the course of more than ive

years and more than a dozen

marathons, he too closed in

on his qualifying time, failing

several times before inally

earning a spot in the 2015 race.

Book on sale October 2016 at Chapters and Indigo. Ebook now available on all platforms.

www.longroadtoboston.com

28 2016 ISSUE 06 iRun because someday maybe I won’t be able to. — Mark Lewtz, Ottawa

iRun to lorem ipsum something goes here tktktktk. — Name Name, Province

iRun.ca 29

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STYLE

LOOK

FAST

FEEL

FAST

BE

FAST

Story by Karen Kwan Photographs by

Colin Medley Styling by Aylin C. Abraham

If your hairstyle is not a consideration on race day, you’re missing

out on a way to rock not only those photos, but to excel in your run.

A cool style will help you feel your best, both when it comes to your

confidence and for helping to keep you at ease; hair whipping into your

sweaty face, laying on your back or frozen in the winter, is distracting

and uncomfortable. Simply sweeping it into a ponytail works well for

keeping it out of your face, but with a little more effort, you can rock

a look that’ll have you totally feeling yourself. Toronto-based hairstylist

and runner Aylin C. Abraham has long been putting her hair up

in braids for her workouts, so she’s figured out what works and what

doesn’t. For amazing race hair, all you need are bobby pins (“to secure

flyaways”), ouchless hair elastics (she suggests the type without any

metal), a flexible hold hairspray (her fave is Bumble and Bumble Does

It All Hairspray), and a wide-tooth comb to detangle your hair before

you let it air dry. Tip: Your hair will be easier to work into these hairstyles

if it’s a little damp. Here’s how to try a few styles.

1 BRAIDED CROWN Make a deeper, exaggerated part on the side of your

hair you usually part it on. Then start braiding similar to boxer braids,

except you’ll be working the braid around your head. Keep the braid as

close to the front of your head as you’d like it and keep working your

way around your head. When you have no more hair to add to the

braid, tie the end with a hair elastic. Wrap the remaining braid to the

top of your head and secure with bobby pins.

2 BRAIDED TOPKNOT Sit and lean over so that your hanging upside down.

Start a braid at the nape of your neck; Begin with three small strands

and cross the right strand over the middle, under the left. The strands

will have shifted slightly so add hair to the right strand and bring it over

the middle, and under the left. Work your way braiding up to the top

of your head and secure the end with a hair elastic. Create a ponytail

with it, and wrap the hair around the base and secure the topknot with

another hair tie.

3 HIGH PONYTAIL “This hairstyle is great for a quick 5K run, or yoga

class,” says Abraham. Brush your hair back into a high ponytail and

fasten it with a hair elastic. Work with your hair slightly damp so that

the ponytail can be held tightly.

4 DOUBLE BOXER BRAIDS Part your hair in two sections down the middle

of your head. You’ll be doing the same pattern over and over until the

very end. Starting on the right side, at the top of the head, grab three

small strands of hair and take the right strand, bring it under the middle

and over the left. Next, bring the strand on the left under the middle

and over on the right. Again on the right side, but adding a bit of hair

to the strand, cross it under the middle and over the left strand. Keep

adding hair as you braid down your head. Tie with a hair elastic. Repeat

on other half of your head.

1

2

RACHEL HANNAH

ON A LIFETIME OF

RACE HAIR

My strategy for the best

running hairdo is simplicity.

I keep it short and get it cut

a few weeks out from the

most serious races. It hasn’t

always been this way though,

I ind that I have liked shorter

hair over time. In high school

and most of university we

would French braid our hair

as a pre-race ritual: ribbons,

braids, fake tattoos, eloquent

team cheers ... all part of the

XC team ritual (not that I’m

superstitious or anything,

haha). After university I

decided to grow my hair

long again with the goal

of donating it to kids with

cancer. It was nice to be able

to use hair for charity and I

encourage others to do the

same at least once in their

life. It makes one feel good

that there is a purpose where

you can help others.

Now I prefer my short

hair style since it’s fast and

easy. I haven’t gone full

Sinead O’Connor yet though.

Whether your hair is shaved

or spiked or a perfect afro,

go with what makes you feel

conident. Getting the hair

looking sharp, just like for

any big day, also works great

to get ready to run. Feeling

great helps you perform.

3

4

32 2016 ISSUE 06 iRun because it’s my happy place. — Leslie Silbert, Orleans

iRun to spend time with good friends. — Julie Finkle, Ottawa

iRun.ca 33


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3 rd 2016

Join The Salvation Army and Running Room for the Santa

Shule 5K Fun Run and 1K Elf Walk. With 42 locations

across Canada, there’s bound to be a run near you!

This merry event helps The Salvation Army to assist families and

individuals in need during the Christmas season and throughout the year.

All participants will receive

a unique Santa Shuffle

finishers medal!

REGISTER Register on-line TODAY! @

www.santashuffle.ca


RACECALENDAR

The

2017

START

PLANNING

YOUR 2017

TEAM!

WALK. SPRINT. FUNDRAISE.

JOIN THE

MOVEMENT

TO END

BRAIN

TUMOURS

Join one of over 20 Brain

Tumour Walks across

Canada in 2017!

www.BrainTumourWalk.ca

[ WEST ]

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6

Live it Up 8K

Parksville, British Columbia

liveituprun.com

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3

Santa Shufle

Vancouver, British Columbia

santashufle.ca

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 31

Annual Resolution Run

Victoria, British Columbia

resolutionrun.ca

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 4

Hypothermic Half Marathon

Vancouver, British Columbia

hypothermichalf.com

SATURDAY, MAY 13

Shoppers Run for Women

Vancouver, British Columbia

runforwomen.ca

[ PRAIRIES ]

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22

Spruce Meadows Oktoberfest Run

Calgary, Alberta

sprucemeadows.com/runseries/

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3

Santa Shufle

Regina, Saskatchewan

santashufle.ca

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3

Santa Shufle

Calgary and Edmonton, Alberta

santashufle.ca

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11

Hypothermic Half Marathon

Calgary, Alberta

hypothermichalf.com

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12

Hypothermic Half Marathon

Edmonton, Alberta

hypothermichalf.com

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26

Hypothermic Half Marathon

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

hypothermichalf.com

SATURDAY, MAY 27

Shoppers Run for Women

Edmonton, Alberta

runforwomen.ca

[ ONTARIO ]

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22

Toronto Womens 8k-5k

Toronto, Ontario

towomensruns.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30

Niagara Falls International

Marathon

Niagara Falls, Ontario

niagarafallsmarathon.com

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 12

Tim Hortons Casablanca Classic

8K & 3K

Grimsby, Ontario

niagararunningseries.com/races/

casablanca/

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13

Downsview Airport 8K & 5K

Toronto, Ontario

downsviewrunning.com

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3

Santa Shufle

Barrie, Hamilton, Mississauga,

Kingston, Oakville, Ottawa, Toronto

santashufle.ca

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19

Grimsby Half Marathon, 10K, 3K

Grimsby, Ontario

niagararunningseries.com/races/

grimsby/

SUNDAY, MARCH 5

Chilly Half Marathon and Frosty 5K

Burlington, Ontario

chillyhalfmarathon.ca

SUNDAY, MARCH 26

Around the Bay Road Race

Hamilton, Ontario

bayrace.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 15

Jordan 5K and 1K

Jordan Station, Ontario

niagararunningseries.com/races/

jordan/

SUNDAY, APRIL 30

Shoppers Run for Women

Markham, Ontario

runforwomen.ca

SATURDAY, MAY 6

Confederation Park 5K and 1K

Stoney Creek, Ontario

niagararunningseries.com/races/

confederation/

SUNDAY, MAY 7

GoodLife Fitness Toronto Marathon

Toronto, Ontario

torontomarathon.com

SUNDAY, MAY 7

Mississauga Marathon

Mississauga, Ontario

mississaugamarathon.com

SATURDAY, MAY 13

Whole Health Mudcat Marathon

Dunnville, Ontario

mudcatmarathon.ca

SUNDAY, MAY 14

SudburyRocks Marathon

Sudbury, Ontario

sudburyrocksmarathon.com

SATURDAY, MAY 27

Shoppers Run For Women

Oakville, Ontario

runforwomen.ca

SUNDAY, MAY 28

Toronto Womens Half Marathon

and 5K

Toronto, Ontario

towomensruns.com

[ QUEBEC ]

SUNDAY OCTOBER 16

Cedars Run for Ovarian Cancer

Montreal, Quebec

cedars.ca/cedars/en/news_and_

calendar/calendar?eventid=693

SUNDAY OCTOBER 23

Marathon du Mont-Royal

Montreal, Quebec

tmrb.org

SUNDAY OCTOBER 30

Marathon de Magog

Magog, Quebec

courirenestrie.com/courses/

marathon-de-magog/

SUNDAY NOVEMBER 6

Cours Doka Race

Oka, Québec

marathons.ahotu.com/event/

course-d-oka

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 12

Hypothermic Half Marathon

Montreal, Quebec

hypothermichalf.com/

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 19

Demi-Marathon des Glaces

Ange-Gardien, Quebec

lescoursesgourmandes.ca/

SATURDAY MAY 6

Cours Pharmaprix Pour Les Femmes

Montreal, Quebec

runforwomen.ca

SATURDAY MAY 6

Wakeield Covered Bridge Run

Wakeield, Quebec

aegleevents.com/calendar/wakeieldcovered-bridge-run

SUNDAY MAY 28

Cours Pharmaprix Pours Les Femmes

Québec, Québec

runforwomen.ca

[ EAST ]

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16

PEI Marathon

Charlottetown, PEI

peimarathon.ca

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23

IGT Legs for Literacy

Moncton, New Brunswick

legsforliteracy.com

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3

Santa Shufle

Fredericton and Saint John, New

Brunswick

santashufle.ca

SUNDAY, JANUARY 1

Resolution Run

Charlottetown, PEI

resolutionrun.ca

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19

Hypothermic Half Marathon

Saint John, New Brunswick

hypothermichalf.com/

SUNDAY, APRIL 9

Lorneville Loop 13K

Saint John, New Brunswick

facebook.com/LornevilleLoop

SUNDAY, MAY 7

Shoppers Run for Women

Moncton, New Brunswick

runforwomen.ca

[ U.S. ]

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16

Ashworth Awards Baystate Marathon

Lowell, MA

baystatemarathon.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30

Marine Corps Marathon

Washington, DC

marinemarathon.com/events/marathon

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11

New York Marathon

New York, New York

tcsnycmarathon.org

SATURDAY, JANUARY 1

New Years Double Marathon

Allen, Texas

newyearsdouble.com

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18

Red Rock Canyon Marathon

Red Rock Canyon, Nevada

calicoracing.com/events/red-rockcanyon/

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19

Austin Marathon

Austin, Texas

youraustinmarathon.com

SUNDAY, MARCH 5

Little Rock Marathon

Little Rock, Arkansas

littlerockmarathon.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 15

All-Out Beat the Heat Marathon

Westminster, Colorado

alloutmultipro.com/beat-the-heat/

SUNDAY, MAY 7

Flying Pig Marathon

Cincinnati, Ohio

lyingpigmarathon.com

SATURDAY, MAY 13

The North Face Endurance

Challenge

Bear Mountain, New York

thenorthface.com/en_ca/get-outdoors/

endurance-challenge.html

[ INTERNATIONAL ]

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23

Venice Marathon

Venice, Italy

venicemarathon.it/en/

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13

Athens Marathon

Athens, Greece

athensauthenticmarathon.gr/index.

php?lang=en

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27

San Sebastian Marathon

San Sebastian, Spain

maratondonostia.com/english.asp

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18

Pisa Marathon

Pisa, Italy

maratonadipisa.com

FRIDAY, JANUARY 13

Egyptian International Marathon

Egypt, Luxor

egyptianmarathon.com

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12

Standard Chartered Hong Kong

Marathon

Hong Kong, China

hkmarathon.com

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26

Tokyo Marathon

Tokyo, Japan

marathon.tokyo/en/

SATURDAY, MARCH 4

Motatapu Off Road Marathon

Wanaka, New Zealand

motatapu.com

SUNDAY, MARCH 19

Seoul International Marathon

Seoul, South Korea

seoul-marathon.com/

SUNDAY, APRIL 2

Milano City Marathon

Milano, Italy

milanomarathon.it/en/marathon/

SUNDAY, APRIL 23

Vienna City Marathon

Vienna, Austria

vienna-marathon.com/

SUNDAY, APRIL 23

Rock ‘n’ Roll Madrid Marathon

Madrid, Spain

runrocknroll.com/madrid/en/

MONDAY, MAY 1

Deep RiverRock Belfast City Marathon

Belfast, United Kingdom

belfastcitymarathon.com

36 2016 ISSUE 06 iRun because I like to challenge myself. — Don Connaway, Halifax

iRun to relieve stress. — Lori Steacy, Ottawa

iRun.ca 37


FASTER. STRONGER. TOGETHER.

FROM YOUR FIRST MILE TO YOUR FASTEST,

GET THE EXPERT COACHING, GUIDANCE

AND MOTIVATION TO BE A BETTER RUNNER.

JOIN US FOR A RUN AT

NIKE.COM/NRC


Every Step Helps Build

Our Community

October 16, 2016

When you register to run in the Scotiabank Toronto Waterfront Marathon

and for the Scotiabank Charity Challenge, every kilometre makes a difference.

Just last year, the Challenge raised $8 million, strengthening communities

across the country.

Register for the race and the Scotiabank Charity Challenge,

at TorontoWaterfrontMarathon.com to start raising funds.

#STWM #runScotia

®

Registered trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia.

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