Dirt and Trail September 2019

RobRidefast

SA's adventure magazine

L O C A L C U S T O M B U I L D

KLR DESERT EAGLE

A mate of ours told us about an amazing

KLR that he had seen up north and

suggested that we have a look at it, find

out who built it – and given the fact that

there are still lots of them still running

around, maybe do a feature on the build.

The KLR was one of Kawasaki’s best

selling bikes ever – and sadly, it was

discontinued locally a few years ago. We

figured that this was well worth a feature,

so we tracked down the owner Collin

and the guy who built it, Rory – and got

down to the nitty gritty.

What a cool build!

We hope that it gives you lot some ideas.

Building the Hybrid: “Desert Eagle”

By Rory Lawson.

Creative Motorcycle Worx, Hoedspruit.

071 687 8545

This is the story behind this

build. One of my work colleagues,

Collin Rudman has been on my

case about building a KLR like

mine for him. There are many major

modifications on my KLR on top of

all the normal KLR Farkles. It has

made my KLR (Sarge) a force to be

reckoned with when off-road.

I suggested that we get a KLR

that is in a poor state and build

from there. As you might know the

2 main models of KLR to choose

from are the Gen1, 1998-2007 and

the Gen2, 2008 -2018. The general

feeling from our group of KLR riders

here in Hoedspruit is that the Gen1

seems to handle better off-road

whereas the Gen2 is more refined

and better on the tar. A Gen2 came

up for sale at a good price due to

the engine not wanting to start and

then seizing. Collin really wanted

a Gen1 as he likes the sleek look

and wants to do more off-road.

One of my Gen1 KLRs was about

to be decommissioned due to the

crank system being totally worn

after 230000kms of hard dirt riding.

I suggested to Collin that we take

the Gen2 and then make a Hybrid

between the two using the best

parts from both.

This was then agreed upon and

the build started.

We bought a badly damaged

2010 KLR for R9000. The licence

was in good order which was the

only plus point that we were going

to find.

The reason behind the engine

damage was apparent right away

when I opened up the engine. The

cam chain had stretched so badly

that exhaust cam had gone out of

sync with the crank causing the

exhaust cams to impact the piston.

The result was both valve heads

breaking off and dropping onto the

top of the piston. The owner, having

38 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER 2019

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