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CREW | Civically Re-Engaged Women

2020

SENECA FALLS

REVISITED

JULY 23 – 25

“THE VOTE”

C R

E W

T V

VIRTUAL CENTENNIAL EXPERIENCE

100th Anniversary of the 19th Amendment of Women’s Right to Vote | 1920 -2020


CREW STANDS WITH

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

SUBJECT | PAGE

Black Lives Matters, Photos: Courtesy-Doc Martin 2-5

Table of Contents 6

Centennial Statement 7-8

CREW | Civically Re-Engaged Women Contact 9

Declaration of Rights & Sentiments 10

The Team 11

Sponsors 12-13

Collaborators 14-15

The Program 16-21

Women of the Movement 22-29

Suffragists - Leading the way 30

Did You Know? | 2020 Seneca Falls Revisited Milestones (60) Important women 31-34

Time Capsule | 1840-2016 35-36

Blogs 37

Commercials. 38

FootPrint 39

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CENTENNIAL STATEMENT

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CENTENNIAL STATEMENT

Holding these truths to be self-evident...We are one nation, under

God, indivisible and striving for:

1. A world that embraces true Civil Rights/Social Justice

2. Women’s Advocacy & Passage of the ERA (Equal Rights Amendment)

3. Civic Engagement - In a world where more women are truly empowered!

One hundred years ago, on June 4, 1919, President Woodrow Wilson and the 65th Congress passed the

19th Amendment, “the right to vote” for American women. Interestingly enough, the proposal was made

during the post 1918 pandemic where tragic events had struck the nation’s citizenry. As mandated,

Congress then turned this new law over to the states to begin the ratification process. On August 18, 1920,

having received 2/3 approval of the states, the Ratified amendment came back to the 66th Congress and

adopted to the United States Constitution on August 26, 1920. To this day, this is the only provision that

recognizes women in our Constitution. We still feel the pain and struggle of those 72 years of battle!

Fast forward - the 1970’s, another time of unrest and agitation where we find ourselves at the beginning of

yet another feminist wave. Congresswoman Bella Abzug enters the storyline of change and does so with

excellence! Posthumously we also celebrate her 100th birthday this year on July 24th. “To whom much is

given, much is required”.

And here we are today, July 23, 2020 still seeking reparations and reconciliation in the heart of multiple

thriving movements yet in the midst of another epic pandemic! And, to make matters worse, the vote (so

precious as the beacon of our democracy) is now in serious danger of becoming “absentee!” We cannot

allow such setbacks. The winter of our discontent will be fast upon us. We will Stay strong! We will

Persevere!

Sincerely,

Sharon I. Nelson

CEO

Civically Re-Engaged Women

www.crewomen.org

www.crewomen.com

www.crewomen.tv

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CONNECT WITH US | CREW | Civically Re-Engaged Women

Webpage: www.crewomen.org

Facebook: CREW -

https://m.facebook.com/crewomen/

Pinterest: Pinterest.com/Crewomen

Instagram: @civicallyreengaged

Twitter: @crewomen

Tumblr: https://www.tumbral.com/blog/crewomen

All rights reserved. No part of this journal may be

reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any

means, electronic or

mechanical, including photocopying and recording, or

by any information or retrieval system, except as may

be expressly permitted by the copyright Act of 1976 or

in writing by the Publisher. Requests for permissions or

copies should be addressed to Sharon at

Sharon@crewomen.org

Souvenir Journal Design: Norma Krieger

9


The Declaration of Sentiments, also known as the Declaration of Rights and

Sentiments, is a document signed in 1848 by 68 women and 32 men at the

first women’s rights convention held in Seneca Falls, New York.

TABLE OF CONTENTABLE TS

DECLARATION OF RIGHTS & SENTIMENTS | 1848

The Declaration of Sentiments, also known as the Declaration of Rights and Sentiments,

is a document signed in 1848 by 68 women and 32 men at the first women’s rights convention held

in Seneca Falls, New York

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10


THE TEAM

Chair

New York State Advisor

Honorable Distinction

Legacy Co-Chairs

Gale A. Brewer, Manhattan Borough President

Honorable Ruth Hassell-Thompson

Special Advisor for Policy and Community Affairs of

NYS Homes and Community Renewal

Lt. Governor Kathy Hochul

NYS Deputy Comptroller Nancy Hernandez

Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. | Descendent of Frederick Douglass

Michele Jones Galvin | Descendent of Harriet Tubman

Executive Team - Civically Re-Engaged Women (CREW)

Sharon Nelson, CEO

Anthony L. Beauzile, President

Yves Calizaire, Comptroller

Norma Krieger, Chief Marketing Officer

Tim Wheatley, Director of Tech Services

Lisa Powell Graham, 2020 Women’s Candidate Training Instructor

Website powered by Icampaign

Henrietta Lyle, Executive Director, A NYS Virtual Centennial Celebration

of the 19th Amendment

Geraldine Carter, Deputy Director, A NYS Virtual Centennial Celebration

of the 19th Amendment

Collaborative Partners

Special Thanks

The National Archives Foundation

RepresentWomen

Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives

Catalysts for Innovation

Monumental Women

Rethinking Eve

WomenTies

Women on 20’s

WRANYS

Cynthia Richie Terrell, Executive Director, Represent Women

Linda Young, Former President, National Women’s Political Caucus (NWPC)

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SPONSORS

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COLLABORATORS

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THE PROGRAM

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PROGRAM

PROGRAM ORDER SUBJECT TO CHANGE

PROGRAM CHAIRS

CHAIR

Gale A. Brewer

Manhattan Borough President

NEW YORK STATE ADVISOR

Honorable Ruth Hassell-Thompson

Special Advisor for Policy and Community Affairs of

NYS Homes and Community Renewal

LEGACY CO-CHAIRS

Kenneth B. Morris, Jr. | Descendent of Frederick Douglass

Michele Jones Galvin | Descendent of Harriet Tubman

CHAPTER THEMES

The True Meaning of Sacrifice

Sisterhood with a Purpose

Coalition Building

Progress

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THE PROGRAM | DAY 1 | JULY 23

Kathy Hochul

Nancy R. Hernandez

Kenneth B. Morris, Jr.,

Bridie Farrell

Cynthia Coffman

Lieutenant Governor, New York State - Opening Remarks

Deputy Comptroller New York State - Presents a Proclamation

Legacy Co-Chair, Descendent of Frederick Douglass

President, Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives

Chapter Introduction - “The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

President & Chief Executive Officer, America Loves Kids

“The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

Former Colorado Attorney General - “Progress”

Judith Kasen-Windsor

Tribute to Edith “Edie” Windsor, LGBTQ Advocate

“The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Roma Torre

FIRESIDE CHAT

Roma Torre

Amanda Farinacci

Vivian Lee

Jeanine Ramirez

Kristen Shaughnessy

Anchor, Actor, Producer & Theatre Critic, NY1 Spectrum

Chapter Introduction – “Sisterhood with a Purpose”

Moderator | “Sisterhood with a Purpose”

TV Reporter, NY1 Spectrum

TV Reporter, NY1 Spectrum

TV Reporter, NY1 Spectrum

Anchor/Reporter, NY1 Spectrum

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Annette Ramos

Jo Anne Simon

Amy Grace Mercer

Linda Young

Executive Director, Rochester Latino Theatre Company

Performance - “I want to Vote”

Assemblywoman, New York City

“What does the Centennial of the “Vote” mean to me?”

Youth Voices - “Progress”

President Emeritus, National Women’s Political Caucus

Chair of the Partnership at Catalysts for Innovation, LLC

“Sisterhood with a Purpose”

Ruth Hassell-Thompson

Henrietta Lyle

Conference Advisor, Special Advisor for Policy and Community Affairs of

New York State Homes and Community Renewal

Chapter Introduction - “Coalition Building”

Conference Operations, Tribute to Katherine Johnson, NASA Mathematician

“The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

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THE PROGRAM | DAY 1 | JULY 23 Continued

Susan L. Harper

FIRESIDE CHAT

Susan L. Harper

Terry A. Mazur, Esq.

Founding Chair, New York State Bar Association’s Women

In Law Section (WILS), Chair, WILS’ Centennial Suffrage Initiative - “Coalition Building”

Moderator, “Influencers, associations and pivotal people who help propel Suffrage”

Chair, The Women in Law Section (WILS)

Margaret Sowah, Esq.

Treasurer, Women in Law Section, NYSBA

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Carol White Llewellyn | Linda Moroney

“Remembering Susan B. Anthony & Election Day 2016”, Filmmakers critique

Susanna Rich, PhD

Professor of English, Kean University, Performance “Poetry for Suffrage”

Consuelo Vanderbilt Costin

Pam Elam

“LIVE” VIRTUAL EXPERIENCE RECAP

Entrepreneur, Chapter Introduction – “Progress”

President, Monumental Women, “Progress”

Sharon Nelson, CEO, CREW

Pam Elam, President, Monumental Women

Henrietta Lyle, Conference Operations

DAY 2 | JULY 24

Kathy Hochul

Nancy R. Hernandez

Lieutenant Governor, NYS

Deputy Comptroller, NYS

Harold Holzer

Jonathan F. Fanton Director Roosevelt House Hunter College

“Tribute to Bella Abzug, Congresswoman, Women’s Rights Activist”–“Coalition Building”

Happy Posthumous Birthday Congresswoman Bella Abzug

Liz Abzug

Founder & Executive Director, Bella Abzug Leadership Institute – “Coalition Building”

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Donna Drake

FIRESIDE CHAT

Donna Drake

President, Drake Media Network, Creator & Host, The Donna Drake Show

“Coalition Building”

Moderator, “Nurturing Equality”

Kenneth B. Morris, Jr., Legacy Co-Chair

Descendant of Frederick Douglass, President, Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives

“Coalition Building”

Adrienne Smith

Cynthia Richie Terrell

Consuelo Vanderbilt Costin

Media Entrepreneur - “Coalition Building”

Executive Director, Represent Women - “Coalition Building”

Entrepreneur - “Coalition Building”

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THE PROGRAM | DAY 2 | JULY 24 Continued

Latrice Walker, Esq.

Darcel Clark, Esq.

Aura Vasquez

Gloria J. Browne-Marshall

Sally Roesch Wagner, PhD

Susanna Rich, PhD

Pete Sidley

Tiffany M. Gardner, Esq.

Vanessa Herman

Assemblywoman, New York City - “Coalition Building”

Bronx District Attorney - “The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

Former Commissioner, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

Environmental Activist - “The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

Professor, John Jay College - “Sisterhood with a Purpose”

Professor, Author, Lecturer, Activist & Executive Director,

Matilda Joslyn Gage Center for Social Justice - “Sisterhood with a Purpose”

Professor, Kean University, Performance “Lavinia Lloyd Dock”

“Tribute to Anne Wilson Schaef, PhD, Internationally Renowned Author & Feminist”

“The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

Chief Executive Officer, ReflectUS - “Coalition Building”

Assistant Vice President, Pace University, NYC, “Civic Engagement” and “Life as Lobbyist”

“Progress”

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bridie Farrell

FIRESIDE CHAT

Bridie Farrell

Linda B. Rosenthal

Victoria Steele

President & Chief Executive Officer, America Loves Kids

Moderator“ - “Coalition Building”

Assemblywoman, NYC

State Senator, Arizona

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Loida Lewis

Maxim Thorne, Esq.

“LIVE” VIRTUAL EXPERIENCE RE-CAP

Chair, TLC Beatrice Inc. Interviewed by Henrietta Lyle, Conference Operations

“Progress”

Managing Director, Andrew Goodman Foundation

“Voting Rights” & “Tribute to Andrew Goodman”

“Progress”

Sharon Nelson, CEO, CREW,

Onida Coward Mayers, VP, The MirRam Group,

Voter Education & Engagement, Legislative Advocacy & Policy Reform

DJ Doc Martin, Musical Celebration/Dance Party Challenge

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THE PROGRAM | DAY 3 | JULY 25

Kathy Hochul

Nancy R. Hernandez

Cynthia Richie Terrell

Lieutenant Governor, NYS

Deputy Comptroller, NYS

Executive Director, Represent Women

“Sisterhood with a Purpose”

Audrey Smaltz

Susan Goodier, PhD

Annette Ramos

Michele Jones Galvin

Susanna Rich, PhD

Carol White Llewellyn

Susan Goodier, PhD

Gale A. Brewer

Carol White Llewellyn

Vanessa Herman

Adrienne Smith

(Ret) CEO & Founder, The Ground Crew

“Sisterhood with a Purpose”

Professor, SUNY Oneonta College, Historian & Author

“Sisterhood with a Purpose”

Executive Director, Rochester Latino Theatre Company

Performance - “Wilimena Wildman Dorsett”

Legacy Co-Chair, Descendent of Harriet Tubman – “The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

Professor, Kean University, Performance “Alice Paul”

Filmmaker, Presents “Arvel Bird” - “The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

Professor, SUNY Oneonta College, Historian & Author, Interview by Christina Eliopoulos

Manhattan Borough President, Chair, Interview by Christina Eliopoulos

Filmmaker, Presents “The Holocaust” | “Careers for Women in Dance”

"The True Meaning of Sacrifice”

Assistant Vice President, Pace University, NYC, “Crisis Management & Covid-19””

“Progress”

Media & Sports Entrepreneur - “Progress”

Lisa Powell Graham

TEDX & Motivational Speaker - “Progress”

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

FIRESIDE CHAT

Susan L. Harper

Kristen Clarke, Esq.

Moderator, “Defending our Democracy”

President & Executive Director Lawyers, Committee For Civil Rights

“LIVE” VIRTUAL EXPERIENCE RECAP

Sharon Nelson. CEO, CREW with Guest Commentator(s)

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WOMEN OF THE MOVEMENT

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SPEAKERS

2020 SENECA FALLS REVISITED | VIRTUAL CENTENNIAL E

FINAL COUNTDOWN | SPECTACULAR 3-DAY FESTIVAL

peakers, Celebrities, Cultural icons, Music, Sports, Entertainment & MORE 10+ Sponsors, Collabo

Kristen Shaughnessy

Anchor/TV Reporter,

NY1 Spectrum

Vivian Lee

TV Reporter, NY1

Spectrum

Jeanine Ramirez

TV Reporter, NY1

Spectrum

SPEAKERS

Roma Torre

Anchor, Actor, Producer

& Theatre Critic,NY1

Spectrum

Amanda Farinacci

TV Reporter, NY1

Spectrum

C R

E W

T V

www.crewomen.com

www.crewomen.tv

APPEARING

JULY 23 - 25, 2020 On Demand

CREW|SENECA FALLS REVISITED VIRTUAL CENTENNIAL EXPERIENCE

Celebrate this 3 Day Festival:40+speakers, Celebrities, Cultural icons,

Music, Sports, Entertainment & MORE. 10+ Sponsors, Collaborators

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FESTIVAL TICKETS : INDIVIDUAL $59 | GROUP $500 | www.cre

Susan L. Harper

CREW-TV | TO SUBCRIBE | www.crewomen.tv

Founding Chair, New York State Kristen Clarke, Esq.

Margaret Sowah, Esq.

Treasurer, Women in Law Section

NYSBA

Bar Association’s Women In Law

Section (WILS), Chair, WILS’

Lawyers Committee for Civil

Annual subscription of $99 (just $7.99/month Rights + svc. fee)

Centennial Suffrage Initiative

President & Executive Director

Terry A. Mazur, Esq.

Chair, The Women in Law

Section (WILS)

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C R

E W

T V

APPEARING

JULY 23 - 25, 2020 On Demand


2020 SENECA FALLS REVISITED | VIRTUAL CENTENNIAL

FINAL COUNTDOWN | SPECTACULAR 3-DAY FESTIVAL

peakers, Celebrities, Cultural icons, Music, Sports, Entertainment & MORE 10+ Sponsors, Collabo

SPEAKERS

Susan Goodier, PhD.

Professor, SUNY Oneonta College

Gloria J. Browne-Marshall

Professor, Constitutional Law,

John Jay College

Sally Roesch Wagner, PhD.

Professor, Author, Lecturer, Activist

& Executive Director, The Matilda

Joslyn Gage Center For Social

Justice

Honorable Cynthia Coffman

Former Colorado Attorney General

C R

E W

T V

APPEARING

JULY 23 - 25, 2020 On Demand

CREW|SENECA FALLS REVISITED VIRTUAL CENTENNIAL EXPERIENCE

24


25


26


SPEAKERS

| 2020 SENECA FALLS REVISITED | VIRTUAL CENTENNIAL E

FINAL COUNTDOWN | SPECTACULAR 3-DAY FESTIVAL

+speakers, Celebrities, Vanessa Herman Cultural icons, Music, Honorable Sports, Latrice Entertainment Walker & MORE Honorable Jo 10+ Anne Simon Sponsors, Collabor

Assistant Vice President, PACE University

Assemblywoman

Assemblywoman

SPEAKERS

C R

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T V

www.crewomen.com

www.crewomen.tv

APPEARING

JULY 23 - 25, 2020 On Demand

CREW|SENECA FALLS REVISITED VIRTUAL CENTENNIAL EXPERIENCE

Celebrate this 3 Day Festival:40+speakers, Celebrities, Cultural icons,

Music, Sports, Entertainment & MORE. 10+ Sponsors, Collaborators

W!

FESTIVAL TICKETS : INDIVIDUAL $59 | GROUP $500 | www.crew

CREW-TV | TO SUBCRIBE | www.crewomen.tv

Audrey Smaltz

Retired CEO & Founder,

The Ground Crew

Consuelo Vanderbilt Costin

Darcel Clark

Entrepreneur

Annual subscription of $99 (just $7.99/month

Bronx District Attorney

+ svc. fee)

Susanna Rich, PhD

Poetry For Suffrage

27

C R

E W

T V

APPEARING

JULY 23 - 25, 2020 On Demand


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POSTHUMOUS TRIBUTES

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ALUMNI | CREW | Civically Re-Engaged Women

Candidate Training Course | Parity Politics & Leadership

Aura Vasquez | Class of 2015

Former Commissioner, Los Angeles

Department of Water and Power

Environmental Activist

Vanessa Aronson | Class of 2017

Former Democratic candidate for

District 4 New York City Council

in New York

SUFFRAGISTS

Leading the Way

Carlina Rivera | Class of 2015

Councilwoman, Lower East Side (NYC)

Shanequa E. Moore | Class of 2019

Founder, CEO, I,Raise, Bronx, NY

Aleida Castillo | Class of 2015

Diana Ayala | Class of 2015

Christine Parker | Class of 2018

Business Development

Councilwoman, East Harlem (NYC) Former candidate for District 35 Entrepreneur, Member

Kristin Richardson Jordan | Class of 2019

New York City Council in NYC

Mt. Vernon Zoning board Running for NYC Council

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representing District 9, Harlem, NYC


DID YOU

KNOW?

2020 Seneca Falls Revisited | MILESTONES (60) Important Women

Download E-book:

https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/read/63658951/60-seneca-falls-revisited-2020milestones

31


1776 | Abigail Adams | First Lady and Women’s

Advocate

Women's Advocacy in the White House

Abigail Adams was an outspoken women's

advocate and the country's second First Lady.

Adams played a double role as John Adams' wife

and political adviser; Adams supported her

husband in his career but never failed to express

her convictions that women should have the

same rights as men. Many of her ideas were ahead

of her time: she opposed slavery, stressed the

importance of education regardless of gender, and

believed it the responsibility

1848 | Elizabeth Cady Stanton | Organizer of the 1848

Seneca Falls Convention | The First Women’s Convention

The Seneca Falls Convention was held in Seneca Falls, New York

in 1848. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott organized the

meeting, which was the first women's convention to discuss the

oppression of women in sociopolitical, economic, and

religious life. Convinced that women had to help themselves

and take responsibility for improving their situation, they

prepared the Declaration of Sentiments, which included twelve

resolutions. The participants passed eleven resolutions, failing to

pass a resolution for women’s suffrage. Decades later, the

Declaration of Sentiments was used as a foundational document

for the women’s suffrage movement

1872 | Victoria Woodhull | Women’s Rights and

Suffrage Activist

In 1872, Victoria Woodhull, a women’s rights and

suffrage activist, became the first woman to run for

president. She was the nominee of the Equal

Rights Party. Woodhull, a resident of New York, was

unable to vote for herself on Election Day, as at that

time the state restricted voting to men. However, as

she had been jailed a few days prior to Election

Day for a story she had published in her

newspaper Woodhull & Chaflin’s Weekly, her

inability to vote was of little consequence.

1894 | Carrie C. Holly | Colorado State Legislator

First Women State Legislators

The State of Colorado pioneered women’s participation in

politics. Though the first attempts to establish women’s

suffrage failed in 1877, Colorado became the second state

to give women the right to vote in 1893. Clara

Cressingham, Frances Klock, and Carrie C. Holly of

Colorado were the first women elected to a state

legislature, the Colorado House of Representatives. These

women focused on social welfare, championing reforms for

child labor laws, relief subsidies, and t he 8-hour workday

1916 | Jeannette Rankin | Montana

Congresswoman | First Congresswoman

In 1916, Jeannette Rankin was the first woman to be

elected to the House of Representatives. She was a

Republican from Montana, who served from 1917-

1919, and again from 1941-1943. Rankin was a

supporter of women's suffrage who lobbied

Congress for the National American Woman Suffrage

Association. As a progressive congresswoman,

Rankin advocated a constitutional women’s suffrage

amendment and focused on social welfare issues.

1924 | Nellie Tayloe Ross | Wyoming Governor

First Woman Governor

In 1924, women’s involvement in American politics took

a leap forward when Wyoming and Texas elected female

governors. Nellie Tayloe Ross and Miriam A. “Ma”

Ferguson, both Democrats, succeeded their husbands in

office. Ross became the governor of Wyoming in a

special election, after her husband died. Miriam

Ferguson succeeded her husband James Ferguson

after he was impeached.

1932 | Hattie Wyatt Caraway |

Arkansas Senator

In 1931, Hattie Wyatt Caraway was the first

woman to serve as a U.S. Senator for more

than a day. She was appointed after the death of

her husband Thaddeus H. Caraway, an Arkansas

Senator. After finishing her husband's term,

Caraway was re-elected and served in the

Senate until 1945. Her major policy focuses

were farm relief and flood control. She was also

wary of America's involvement in World War II

and the influence of lobbyists.

1933 | Frances Perkins | Commissioner of Labor

First Woman Cabinet Member

Frances Perkins was a well-educated and engaging woman,

who graduated from Columbia University and Wharton

College. Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed her as

Commissioner of Labor when he was Governor of New York.

Impressed by her work, Roosevelt appointed Perkins as

Secretary of Labor in 1932. She was the first female cabinet

member, serving 12 years during the Great Depression.

Perkins labored to create back-to-work programs for the

struggling workforce.

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1948 | Margaret Chase Smith | Maine Congresswoman

| First Woman Elected to Both the House and Senate

Margaret Chase Smith’s political career started in 1940

when she succeeded her husband as a member of the

U.S. House of Representatives from Maine. She served

four terms in the House before being elected to the

Senate in 1948, where she stayed for another 24

years. In 1964, Smith became the first woman to run for

president and win primary delegates. Smith was on the

ballot in several states across the country, including

Illinois, where she received 25% of the vote. She

eventually lost the nomination to Senator Barry

Goldwater.

1964 | Patsy Mink | Hawaii Congressman

First Congresswoman of Color

In 1964, Patsy Mink became the first woman of color and the

first Asian American woman elected to the U.S. House of

Representatives. She went on to serve for a total of twelve

terms. Mink is most well known for being one of the principal

authors of Title IX, as well as the first comprehensive Early

Childhood Education Act and the Women's Educational

Equity Act. Mink also served as Assistant Secretary of State

for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific

Affairs after her first three terms in Congress.

1968 | Shirley Chisholm | New York Congresswoman

First African American Congresswoman

Chisholm successfully ran for Congress in 1969,

becoming the first black congresswoman, and served as

a Democratic representative for New York for seven

terms. Chisholm was also a founding member of the

Congressional Black Caucus. Chisholm went on to be

the first woman of color to run for the Democratic

presidential nomination (1972). She participated in

12 primaries and went all the way to the Democratic

National Convention where she won 152 delegates but

lost to George McGovern. The New York Times

remembered her as an “outspoken politician who

shattered racial and gender barriers as she became a

national symbol of liberal politics.”

1968 | Charlene Mitchell

First African American Woman to run for President

Charlene Mitchell ran for president of the United States as

the candidate for the Communist Party. Although only

included on the ballot in two states, Mitchell became the

first Black woman to run for President.

1981 | Sandra Day O’Connor

First Woman Supreme Court Justice

In 1981, President Reagan nominated Sandra Day

O'Connor to replace Potter Stewart as Associate

Justice of the Supreme Court. Although her

nomination was originally opposed by pro-life and

religious groups, who worried she should not rule in

favor of overturning Roe vs. Wade (1973), she was

eventually confirmed by a 99-0 vote in the Senate.

While she was a conservative jurist, siding with the

conservative justices in the majority of cases before

her, many of her decisions were praised for being

both narrow and moderate. She retired in 2006.

1984 | Geraldine Ferraro | Vice Presidential Nominee

First Woman Vice Presidential Nominee

In 1984, Rep. Geraldine Ferraro became the first woman

vice presidential nominee of a major party. Her running

mate was Walter F. Mondale, who ran against incumbent

Ronald Reagan. Ferraro graduated with a degree in

English from Marymount College and received a law

degree from Fordham Law School in 1960. Before being

elected to Congress, Ferraro worked for the Queens

County Women’s Bar Association and was a Queen’s

criminal prosecutor. She served three terms in Congress.

1988 | Ileana Ros-Lehtinen | Florida

Congresswoman | First Latina Congresswoman

In 1988, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen became the first Latina

and first Cuban-American to be elected to Congress.

She is currently the most senior Republican woman in

the U.S. House of Representatives. Before becoming

involved in politics, Ros-Lehtinen was a teacher,

having graduated with a B.A. in education and M.A. in

educational leadership from Florida International

University, followed by a Ph.D. in Higher Education

from Miami University. In Congress, Ros-Lehtinen

served a term as the chair of the Committee on

Foreign Affairs.

1992 | Carol Moseley-Braun | Illinois Senator

First Woman of Color in the Senate

Carol Moseley-Braun was the first African-American woman

elected to the Senate, the first female Senator from Illinois, and

the first African-American Democratic senator. In 1991,

Moseley-Braun challenged incumbent Alan Dixon in the state’s

Democratic primary, winning the nomination. Though she lost

her re-election bid in 1998, Moseley-Braun continued a career

in politics as President Clinton's ambassador to New Zealand,

Samoa, the Cook Islands, and Antarctica.

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1996 | Madeleine Albright | Secretary of State

First Woman Secretary of State

In 1996, President Bill Clinton nominated Madeleine

Albright to become the first female Secretary of State. She

was confirmed in January 1997 by a unanimous 99-0 vote.

Before becoming Secretary of State, Albright served as the

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations from 1993-1997. In

2012, Albright received the Presidential Medal of Freedom

by President Obama. Currently, Albright serves as chair of

Albright Stonebridge Group, as a professor at Georgetown

University's School of Foreign Service, and as a director on

the board of the Council on Foreign Relations.

2007 | Nancy Pelosi | Speaker of the House

First Woman Speaker of the House

In 2007, Nancy Pelosi was elected America’s first female

speaker of the House of Representatives. She first ran for

office in 1987, winning a special election in California's 8th

District. Pelosi is a strong supporter of health research, health

care, and housing programs; she also advocates human

rights and environment protection. In 2002, Pelosi was

chosen as the Democratic Leader of the House. She became

the Speaker of the House in 2008 when the Democrats took

control of Congress.

2008 | Sarah Palin | Alaskan Governor, Vice Presidential

Nominee | First Republican Woman Vice Presidential

Nominee

Sarah Palin became the first Republican woman vice

presidential nominee in 2008. At the time of her

nomination, she was serving as Alaska’s first female

governor and had previously served as Mayor of Wasilla.

Since her vice-presidential bid, she has endorsed other

Republican women candidates for various levels of office.

Although she was considered a potential candidate in the

2012 presidential elections, she declined to run.

2009 | Sonia Sotomayor | Supreme Court Justice

First Woman of Color Supreme Court Justice

The U.S. Senate confirmed Sonia Sotomayor as a

Supreme Court justice in 2009 to replace retired justice

David Souter. Previously, Sotomayor served as a district

court judge in New York and on the U.S. Court of

Appeals for the Second Circuit. She was born in the

Bronx to Puerto Rican parents. She was the third woman

and first Latinx justice to serve on the Supreme Court.

2010 | Susana Martinez | New Mexico Governor

First Latina Governor

Susana Martinez was elected Governor of New Mexico

in 2010. She is the first Latina woman to serve as

governor of a U.S. state (Sila Calerdón had already

served as Governor of Puerto Rico from 2001 to 2005).

.

2010 | Nikki Haley | South Carolina Governor

First Asian American Woman Governor

Nikki Haley was elected as the first woman Governor of

South Carolina in 2010. She is the first Asian American

and Indian American woman to serve as governor, and

is also, at the age of 41, the youngest current governor

in the nation. Prior to her governorship, Haley was

elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives

in 2004 after defeating Larry Koon in the Republican

primary, who was then the longest-serving member of

the South Carolina House.

2012 | Tammy Baldwin | Wisconsin Senator

First Openly Gay Senator

In 2012, Tammy Baldwin became the first women to be

elected to the U.S. Senate from Wisconsin. She is also

the first and only openly gay U.S. Senator. Prior to her

election to the Senate, Baldwin had served in the U.S.

House since 1999. She has been a staunch advocate for

progressive policies during her 14- year tenure in

Congress.

2012 | Mazie Keiko Hirono | Hawaii Senator

First Asian-American Woman Senator

In 2012, Mazie Keiko Hirono became the first woman elected to

the U.S. Senate from Hawaii, defeating Republican Linda Lingle.

Hirono is the first Asian-American woman elected to the

U.S. Senate, the first U.S. Senator born in Japan, and the

nation’s first Buddhist Senator. Until 2016, Hirono was the only

person of Asian descent in the U.S. Senate. Before becoming

Senator, Hirono was a U.S. Congresswoman, Democratic

nominee for Governor of Hawaii, Lieutenant Governor of

Hawaii, and a member of the Hawaii House of Representatives.

34


TIME

CAPSULE

1848-2016

35


TIME CAPSULE | 1848 - 2016

1848: Seneca Falls, NY Women's Rights Convention.

1866: American Equal Suffrage Association founded.

1869: Suffrage Convention in Saratoga Springs, NY. Harvard University starts accepting women as students.

1869: American Equal Suffrage Association dissolved. National Woman Suffrage Association and American Woman Suffrage

Association founded.

May 1884: Ida B. Wells, journalist, having purchased a first-class ticket on the railroad sued when she was moved to the car for African

Americans. This led to her creating an anti-lynching campaign in 1892.

Late 1880s: Sarah Tompkins founded the Colored Women’s Equal Suffrage League of Brooklyn.

1890: Merger of the American Woman Suffrage Association and National Woman Suffrage Association -- became the National

American Woman Suffrage Association.

1896: Mary Church Terrell, Ida B. Wells-Barnett and former slave Harriet Tubman form the National Association of Colored Women.

1914: World War 1 - women take over jobs for men going to war.

October 1916: Margaret Sanger opens first birth control clinic in the United States.

1917: Jeanette Rankin of Montana sworn in as first American woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.

2/14/1920: Carrie Chapman Catt starts the League of Women Voters. The 19th Amendment is passed on 8/26/1920.

1923: Alice Paul and Crystal Eastman proposed Equal Rights Amendment.

1924: Native Americans allowed to become citizens of the US.

1926: Zitkala Sa (Sioux) founded the National Council of American Indians.

1929: Did the Fall of the stock market into the Great Depression have a Landmark effect on women? (I am not sure it was dramatically

different for women -- women lost jobs in favor of men, blacks lost jobs in favor of whites)

1950: Did the invention of Television have impact on women? (shows featuring women, often as housewives; Lucille Ball challenges the

dominant narrative in several ways)

1955: Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat on a bus.

May 1960: FDA approves first commercially available birth control pill for women.

1963: Kennedy signs Equal Pay Act.

1965: Voting Rights Act - Black women achieved the right to vote.

1968: Shirley Chisolm became first black woman elected to the United States Congress (served seven terms)

1972: Title IX.

1973: Roe v. Wade goes into effect. Almost passage of era/second wave feminism.

1977: Death of Alice Paul

1981: Sandra Day O’Connor first woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court

2016: Hillary Clinton first woman nominated for president by major political party.

36


BLOGS

VIRTUAL CENTENNIAL EXPERIENCE (Click on links)

Blogs by Maura Reilly

Cynthia Terrell Weekly Blog: May 1 st – Launch | Seneca Falls and the Suffrage Centennial

https://medium.com/@representwomen/seneca-falls-and-the-suffrage-centennial-b28682dd8666

Cynthia Terrell Weekly Blog: May 8 th - Mothers of Suffrage Blog

https://link.medium.com/EgyRY3HFq6

Cynthia Terrell Weekly Blog: May 15 th - Patsy Mink and the Fight for Equality

https://medium.com/@representwomen/patsy-mink-and-the-fight-for-equality-34c7290f668

Cynthia Terrell Weekly Blog: May 22nd - Alice Paul and the Fight for Equal Rights

https://medium.com/@representwomen/alice-paul-and-the-fight-for-equal-rights-e56d42c07f64

Cynthia Terrell Weekly Blog: May 29 th | Michele Jones Galvin and the Legacy of Harriet Tubman

https://medium.com/@representwomen/michele-jones-galvin-and-the-legacy-of-harriet-tubman-4b6481ff4ede

The Impact of Title IX and Structural Reform

ttps://medium.com/@representwomen/the-impact-of-title-ix-and-structural-reform-4091fc57b276

The Declaration of Sentiments: a Framework for Women’s Equality

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1jEN_URJDyIStV_fk6b7CayICYC1R_WvLyxCzHXb8IQ8/edit

Virtual Experience Countdown: 21 Days!

https://medium.com/@representwomen/virtual-experience-countdown-21-days-321c943a6c5

Juneteenth, and the Need for National Recognition

https://medium.com/@representwomen/juneteenth-and-the-need-for-national-recognition-e9b594d2f909

Virtual Experience Countdown: 35 Days!

https://medium.com/@representwomen/virtual-experience-countdown-35-days-83b74d4e37

The Underrepresentation of Women of Color

https://medium.com/@representwomen/the-underrepresentation-of-women-of-color-b7b0987c6acd

Seneca Falls Conference Countdown: 41 Days!

https://medium.com/@representwomen/seneca-falls-conference-countdown-41-days-8224a1f0aaa2

The Haudenosaunee Matriarchy and Their Influence on Women’s Suffrage

https://medium.com/@representwomen/the-haudenosaunee-matriarchy-and-their-influence-on-womens-suffrageeb758e2773e5

FINAL COUNTDOWN! “2020 SENECA FALLS REVISITED VIRTUAL CENTENNIAL EXPERIENCE

https://medium.com/@representwomen/seneca-falls-conference-countdown-41-days-8224a1f0aaa2

Charlene Mitchell and the History of Women Running for President

https://medium.com/@representwomen/charlene-mitchell-and-the-history-of-women-running-for-president-a2af4ddb8233

37


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38


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Civically Re-Engaged Women

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