Paradise Found - Ottawa Citizen - Grand Isle Resort & Spa

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Paradise Found - Ottawa Citizen - Grand Isle Resort & Spa

As a helpful visual someone has painted a line on the walkway down to the beach complete with

Tropic of Cancer lettering and the latitude and longitude particulars.

But beyond the catchy moniker, Tropic of Cancer Beach could quite possibly be the most

beautiful and peaceful find in the world.

We shuffled through the thick sand, marvelled at the colours of the water — think melted

gemstones from diamonds to the darkest sapphire — swam, lounged and gabbed about how

lucky we were to find this slice of paradise.

Which brings us to the protracted tale of just how difficult Tropic of Cancer Beach is to find.

First of all, guide books wax poetic about it, proclaiming it to be the prettiest beach in the

Exumas.

Therefore, you have to go. Anticipation builds and a day trip is planned entirely around time at

this must-see-and-experience place.

But no map of Exuma we have has the beach on it. So down we go to the front desk of Grand

Isles, the family-friendly luxury condominium resort where we are staying.

The clerk first tells us that there’s no sign on the main road identifying Tropic of Cancer Beach.

It keeps getting stolen. Seems everyone wants to have a sign with the famous Tropic of Cancer

name on it.

She tells us from the bridge that connects Great Exuma to Little Exuma go five miles and turn

onto the dirt road with the abandoned car seat at the corner.

We climb in the rental car and set off, I and my wife in the back seat, our friend driving and his

wife riding shotgun.

First stop, the Exuma Tourist Office in the capital of George Town to pick up a map that has

Tropic of Cancer Beach on it. No such luck.

But we’re tipped off that the turnoff also has a utility pole with a bunch of blue reflectors on it.

We set off again, over the bridge, counting the miles, looking for that abandoned car seat and the

utility pole with all the reflectors.

We only stop when we hit the end of the road, which is at the tip of the island, and can go no

further.

The car is turned around and we stop at the first place we can for directions — Santana’s Grill

Pit — a roadside shack restaurant with signs for cold Kalik (Bahamas’ national beer) and the best

cracked conch (the national dish).

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