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Untitled - Sexey's School Moodle

Untitled - Sexey's School Moodle

Untitled - Sexey's School

  • Page 2 and 3: ABSTRACT This thesis examines the r
  • Page 4 and 5: TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgments 4
  • Page 6 and 7: INTRODUCTION If one looks at the mo
  • Page 8 and 9: …Achilles slit open his liver, th
  • Page 10 and 11: following centuries due to the chan
  • Page 12 and 13: favorably by its contemporaries on
  • Page 14 and 15: REVIEW OF SECONDARY SOURCES This in
  • Page 16 and 17: Whereas these historical accounts a
  • Page 18 and 19: a framework under which transgressi
  • Page 20 and 21: Chapter 1 CANON-FORMATION, TRANSGRE
  • Page 22 and 23: amongst so-called “minorities”
  • Page 24 and 25: elonged to—these works were at on
  • Page 26 and 27: that person “is driven over the g
  • Page 28 and 29: the third century. At Yavneh the sc
  • Page 30 and 31: especially at the dawn of the twent
  • Page 32 and 33: theater-goers (Stallybras et al. 84
  • Page 34 and 35: emergence of new genres in literatu
  • Page 36 and 37: have been produced to please the ma
  • Page 38 and 39: Literature remained a favored means
  • Page 40 and 41: poet lies in his powerful and beaut
  • Page 42 and 43: specifically, it rebelled against t
  • Page 44 and 45: according to Johnson, “discolored
  • Page 46 and 47: while at the same time, establishin
  • Page 48 and 49: There is no reason to assume that t
  • Page 50 and 51: isolated case in the reception of l
  • Page 52 and 53:

    During the period of revision of th

  • Page 54 and 55:

    Henry Louis Gates Jr. It is only by

  • Page 56 and 57:

    that remain canonical throughout th

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    academia, and thus participate acti

  • Page 60 and 61:

    Chapter 2 SHOCK, SCANDAL, AND SUBVE

  • Page 62 and 63:

    As is the case with canonical disco

  • Page 64 and 65:

    Although in this excerpt Foucault

  • Page 66 and 67:

    eplaces language, where language be

  • Page 68 and 69:

    that one distinguishable characteri

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    Enlightenment period. In the case o

  • Page 72 and 73:

    transgressive artworks and their re

  • Page 74 and 75:

    sport of them. Nevertheless, it mai

  • Page 76 and 77:

    a practice or belief, or a set ther

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    epressed instinctual drives stored

  • Page 80 and 81:

    Within the perspective enunciated a

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    and high culture as did the Marquis

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    “interrogators,” those who subv

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    (sometimes, of the state itself),

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    taking action. In other words, by b

  • Page 90 and 91:

    consequently, loses its transgressi

  • Page 92 and 93:

    Chapter 3 WORLDS COLLIDE: CULTURAL

  • Page 94 and 95:

    sub-genre of literature that was co

  • Page 96 and 97:

    case of the late eighteenth century

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    As a reaction to this “democratiz

  • Page 100 and 101:

    To a certain extent, the Gothic is

  • Page 102 and 103:

    101 To understand the controversy s

  • Page 104 and 105:

    historical value was intensively sc

  • Page 106 and 107:

    “dialogue,” rather a unilateral

  • Page 108 and 109:

    egarding cultural and political ide

  • Page 110 and 111:

    Watt argues that the latter conside

  • Page 112 and 113:

    and the name of its author was reve

  • Page 114 and 115:

    contextualization of their work and

  • Page 116 and 117:

    critical acclaim by following the p

  • Page 118 and 119:

    Radcliffe’s novels (245), a trans

  • Page 120 and 121:

    efficiency of the legal system. As

  • Page 122 and 123:

    controversy is finally dispelled, t

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    123 The distinction between Radclif

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    125 Even though The Monk was immens

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    ejection of inherited dogma. This i

  • Page 130 and 131:

    that with regard to such material a

  • Page 132 and 133:

    they represented wanted to diffuse

  • Page 134 and 135:

    different generations of readers th

  • Page 136 and 137:

    elements—and its Preface, where t

  • Page 138 and 139:

    the unfavorable conditions under wh

  • Page 140 and 141:

    addition, following Michelle A. Mas

  • Page 142 and 143:

    suppress his passionate nature resu

  • Page 144 and 145:

    its tenure as a work of transgressi

  • Page 146 and 147:

    145 In recent history, no book has

  • Page 148 and 149:

    147 Bret Easton Ellis’ American P

  • Page 150 and 151:

    depend on the individual, on his or

  • Page 152 and 153:

    transgressions. Ironically, even th

  • Page 154 and 155:

    While this episode can be perceived

  • Page 156 and 157:

    which he/she participates as well.

  • Page 158 and 159:

    In American Psycho, Ellis makes sim

  • Page 160 and 161:

    are responsible for provoking the m

  • Page 162 and 163:

    161 Even so, as outlined earlier, t

  • Page 164 and 165:

    ecome inescapably appealing. The st

  • Page 166 and 167:

    overwhelming, or, in more extreme c

  • Page 168 and 169:

    Although Murphet’s appraisal of t

  • Page 170 and 171:

    argued above, the latter produces q

  • Page 172 and 173:

    “civilized” man is indeed no st

  • Page 174 and 175:

    males 25 . Such interrogations only

  • Page 176 and 177:

    liberal capitalism, two trends that

  • Page 178 and 179:

    type of laughter that would lead ho

  • Page 180 and 181:

    outburst that characterized the rel

  • Page 182 and 183:

    she chooses to be atypical by censu

  • Page 184 and 185:

    consumption, no matter how perverte

  • Page 186 and 187:

    asic material satisfaction but for

  • Page 188 and 189:

    to be “committed.” The question

  • Page 190 and 191:

    “serious” literature as prescri

  • Page 192 and 193:

    191 As a satire, American Psycho do

  • Page 194 and 195:

    Batailles, Georges. Le Bleu du ciel

  • Page 196 and 197:

    Fortier, Frances. “L’esthétiqu

  • Page 198 and 199:

    Johnson, Samuel. “From Lives of t

  • Page 200 and 201:

    Poe, Edgar Allan. “The Philosophy

  • Page 202 and 203:

    Thoré. Théophile. “New Tendenci