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Vol. XX. No. 1 Aran., 1926<br />

BULLETIN<br />

©fje <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> t©tUiam anb M&V<br />

<strong>in</strong> t^trgtma<br />

Two Hundred <strong>and</strong> Thirty-third Year<br />

CATALOGUE 1925-1926<br />

Announcements 1926-1927<br />

(Entered at <strong>the</strong> Post-Office at <strong>William</strong>sburg as second-class matter)<br />

Issued January, February, April, June, August, November.<br />

\


Digitized by <strong>the</strong> Internet Archive<br />

<strong>in</strong> 2011 with fund<strong>in</strong>g from<br />

LYRASIS Members <strong>and</strong> Sloan Foundation<br />

http://www.archive.org/details/bullet<strong>in</strong><strong>of</strong>colleg201coll


Vol. XX. No. 1 April, 1926<br />

BULLETIN<br />

Gtfje <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> DMtam anb M^V<br />

<strong>in</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia<br />

Two Hundred <strong>and</strong> Thirty-third Year<br />

CATALOGUE 1925-1926<br />

Announcements 1926-1927<br />

(Entered at <strong>the</strong> Post-Office at <strong>William</strong>sburg as second-class matter)<br />

Issued January, February. April, June, August, November.


CONTENTS page<br />

Calendar 3<br />

<strong>College</strong> Calendar 4<br />

Officers <strong>of</strong> Instruction 7-24<br />

Officers <strong>of</strong> Adm<strong>in</strong>istration 25<br />

History <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> 27<br />

Build<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> Grounds 32<br />

Government <strong>and</strong> Adm<strong>in</strong>istration 33<br />

Expenses 43<br />

Dormitories, Reservation <strong>of</strong> Rooms <strong>in</strong> 45<br />

Special Fees <strong>and</strong> Expenses 46<br />

Scholarships <strong>and</strong> Loan Funds 49-56<br />

Admission 57<br />

Degree Requirements 62<br />

Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction - 69<br />

Freshman Courses 133<br />

Special Courses 137<br />

Courses Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g 137<br />

Course Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Forestry 140<br />

Course <strong>in</strong> Home Economics 142<br />

Pharmacy Course 149<br />

Physical Education Course 151<br />

Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry Course 149<br />

Pre-Dental Course 144<br />

Pre-Medical Course 145<br />

School <strong>of</strong> Social Work <strong>and</strong> Public Health 153<br />

School <strong>of</strong> Education 167<br />

Economics <strong>and</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration, School <strong>of</strong>.. 176<br />

Marshall-Wy<strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Government <strong>and</strong> Citizenship 194<br />

Jurisprudence, School <strong>of</strong> 202<br />

Athletics 218<br />

<strong>College</strong> Societies <strong>and</strong> Publications 222<br />

Phi Beta Kappa Society 222<br />

Student Publications 222<br />

<strong>College</strong> Publications 223<br />

Student Activities 223<br />

Summer Quarter 226<br />

Extension Division 233<br />

Degrees <strong>and</strong> Scholarships Granted 236<br />

Register <strong>of</strong> Students 242<br />

Alumni Association 267<br />

Appendix 268<br />

Index<br />

286


CALENDAR<br />

1926 1927 1928<br />

JANUARY JULY JANUARY JULY JANUARY<br />

s M T W T F<br />

1<br />

s<br />

2<br />

s M T w T<br />

1<br />

F<br />

2<br />

s<br />

3<br />

s M T w T F s<br />

1<br />

s M T w T F<br />

1<br />

8<br />

2<br />

s M T W T F fi<br />

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7<br />

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 8 9 10 11 12 13 14<br />

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 15 16 17 18 19 20 21<br />

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 22 23 24 25 26 27 28<br />

31 30 31 31 29 30 31<br />

FEBRUARY AUGUST FEBRUARY AUGUST FEBRUARY<br />

1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4<br />

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 6 7 S 9 10 11 12 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 5 6 7 S 9 10 11<br />

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 15 16 17 IS 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 14 15 16 17 IS 19 20 12 13 14 15 16 17 18<br />

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22 23 24 25<br />

28 29 30 31 27 28 28 29 30 31 26 27 28 29<br />

MARCH SEPTEMBER MARCH SEPTEMBER MARCH<br />

1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 1 2 3<br />

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 5 6 7 8 9 10 4 5 6 7 8 9 10<br />

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 11 12 13 14 15 16 17<br />

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 IS 19 20 21 22 23 24<br />

28 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 30 27 28 29 30 31 25 26 27 28 29 30 25 26<br />

.'7 28 29 30 31<br />

APRIL OCTOBER APRIL OCTOBER APRIL<br />

1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1<br />

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7<br />

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 8 9 10 11 12 13 14<br />

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 15 16 17 18 19 20 21<br />

25 26 27 28 29 30 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 22 23 24 25 26 27 28<br />

•)<br />

31<br />

30 31<br />

29 30<br />

MAY NOVEMBER MAY NOVEMBER MAY<br />

3 4 5 6 7<br />

1<br />

8 1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5<br />

g 10 11 12 13 14 15 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 6 7 8 9 10 11 12<br />

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 18 19<br />

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 25 26<br />

30 31 28 29 30 29 30 31 27 28 29 30 27 28 29 30 31<br />

JUNE DECEMBER JUNE DECEMBER JUNE<br />

1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 1 2<br />

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 4 5 7 S 9 10 3 4 5 6 7 8 9<br />

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 10 11 12 13 14 15 16<br />

20 21 22 23 24 25 26[l9 20 21 22 23 24 25 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 IS 19 2( 21 22 23 24 17 IS 19 20 21 22 23<br />

27 28 2f 30 |26 27 28 29 30 31 26 27 28 29 3( 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 24 25 26 27 28 29 30


COLLEGE CALENDAR<br />

1926-1927<br />

Entrance Exam<strong>in</strong>ations Monday, September 13<br />

Registration Tuesday <strong>and</strong> Wednesday, September 14 <strong>and</strong> IS<br />

Lectures Beg<strong>in</strong> Thursday, September 16<br />

Thanksgiv<strong>in</strong>g Day Thursday, November 25<br />

Cristmas Vacation Beg<strong>in</strong>s 4 p. m., Wednesday, December 22<br />

Christmas Vacation Ends 9 a. m., Monday, January 3<br />

First Term Ends Thursday, January 21<br />

Second Term Beg<strong>in</strong>s 8:40 a. m., Monday, January 31<br />

Second Term Ends Thursday, June 2<br />

Baccalaureate Sermon Sunday June 5<br />

Celebration <strong>of</strong> Literary Societies Monday, June 6<br />

Alumni Day Tuesday, June 7<br />

Clos<strong>in</strong>g Exercises <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Session Wednesday, June 8<br />

Summer Quarter Beg<strong>in</strong>s Monday. June 13<br />

Summer Quarter Ends Wednesday. August 31


BOARD OF VISITORS<br />

James H. Dillaku<br />

Rector<br />

George Walter Mapp<br />

Vice-Rector<br />

THE VISITORS OF THE COLLEGE<br />

To March 7, 1928<br />

A. H. Foreman<br />

Norfolk, Va.<br />

Lulu D. Metz<br />

Manassas, Va.<br />

Miss Gabriella Page<br />

Richmond, Va.<br />

Dr. F. W. Stiff<br />

Centre Cross, Va.<br />

John Archer Wilson<br />

Roanoke, Va.<br />

To March 7, 1930<br />

John Stewart Bryan<br />

Richmond, Va.<br />

James Hardy Dillard<br />

Charlottesville, Va.<br />

Charles Joseph Duke<br />

Portsmouth, Va.


<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

George Walter Mapp<br />

Accomac, Va.<br />

J. Douglass Mitchell<br />

Walkerton, Va.<br />

The State Super<strong>in</strong>tendent <strong>of</strong> Public Instruction, Ex-Officio<br />

Harris Hart<br />

Richmond, Va.<br />

Secretary to <strong>the</strong> Visitors<br />

Lev<strong>in</strong> W<strong>in</strong>der Lane, Jr.<br />

<strong>William</strong>sburg, Va.


OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION<br />

Julian Alv<strong>in</strong> Carroll Ch<strong>and</strong>ler, Ph. D., LL. D.<br />

Presiden t<br />

A. M., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1892; Ph. D.. Johns Hop-<br />

k<strong>in</strong>s University, 1896; LL. D., Richmond <strong>College</strong>, 1904; Act<strong>in</strong>g<br />

President, Woman's <strong>College</strong>, Richmond, 1899; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Eng-<br />

lish, Richmond <strong>College</strong>, 1900-04, <strong>and</strong> Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> History, 1908-09<br />

Editor Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Journal <strong>of</strong> Education, 1907-09; Super<strong>in</strong>tendent <strong>of</strong><br />

Schools, Richmond, 1909-19; Chief <strong>of</strong> Division <strong>of</strong> Rehabilitation<br />

<strong>of</strong> Disabled Soldiers <strong>and</strong> Sailors <strong>of</strong> Federal Board for Vocational<br />

Education, 1918-19; President <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1919<br />

Lyon Gard<strong>in</strong>er Tyler, M. A., LL. D.<br />

President Emeritus<br />

A. M., University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1876; LL. D., Tr<strong>in</strong>ity <strong>College</strong>,<br />

Connecticut, 1895, <strong>and</strong> University <strong>of</strong> Pittsburgh, 1911; Member<br />

American Historical Society; American Philosophical Society;<br />

Author; President <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1888-1919; Presi-<br />

dent Emeritus, 1919<br />

—<br />

John Lesslie Hall, Ph. D., Litt. D., LL. D.<br />

Dean <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Faculty<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English Language <strong>and</strong> Literature<br />

R<strong>and</strong>olph-Macon <strong>College</strong>, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia ; Fellow <strong>of</strong> Johns Hopk<strong>in</strong>s<br />

University, 1886-87; Fellow by Courtesy, Johns Hopk<strong>in</strong>s University,<br />

1887-88; Ph. D., Johns Hopk<strong>in</strong>s University, 1892; Litt. D„<br />

Wake Forest <strong>College</strong>, N. C, 1916; LL. D., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong>, 1921 ; Authors' Club <strong>of</strong> London ; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English, <strong>College</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1888—<br />

— ;


8 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Kremer J. Hoke, M. A., Ph. D.<br />

Dean <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong><br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Education<br />

B. A., Mt. St. <strong>Mary</strong>'s <strong>College</strong>, <strong>Mary</strong>l<strong>and</strong>, 1904; Graduate Student<br />

University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1906-07; M. A. <strong>and</strong> Ph. D., Columbia<br />

University, 1914; Assistant Super<strong>in</strong>tendent <strong>of</strong> Schools, Richmond,<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1910-16; Super<strong>in</strong>tendent <strong>of</strong> Schools, Duluth, M<strong>in</strong>nesota.<br />

1916-20; Dean <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>and</strong> Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Education, <strong>College</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1920—<br />

Anne Marion Powell, A. M.<br />

Dean <strong>of</strong> Women<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English<br />

Graduate <strong>in</strong> English <strong>and</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong> <strong>of</strong> Holl<strong>in</strong>s <strong>College</strong>, 1906; A. B..<br />

Sweet Briar <strong>College</strong>, 1910; A. M., Columbia University, 1913: In-<br />

structor <strong>in</strong> English, Sweet Briar <strong>College</strong>, 1910-14; Instructor <strong>in</strong><br />

English at State Teachers' <strong>College</strong>, Farmville, 1914-16; Teacher<br />

<strong>of</strong> English, Savannah High School, 1916-18; Head <strong>of</strong> English<br />

Department, Sull<strong>in</strong>s <strong>College</strong>, 1918-20; Pr<strong>in</strong>cipal <strong>of</strong> Chatham Episcopal<br />

Institute, 1920-25; Dean <strong>of</strong> Women <strong>and</strong> Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English,<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925—<br />

John Garl<strong>and</strong> Pollard, LL. B., LL. D.<br />

Dean <strong>of</strong> Marshall-Wy<strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Government <strong>and</strong> Citizenship<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Government <strong>and</strong> Citizenship<br />

Director <strong>of</strong> Correspondence Course <strong>in</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Government<br />

<strong>and</strong> Citicoisliip<br />

Student, University <strong>of</strong> Richmond ; LL. B., George Wash<strong>in</strong>gton<br />

University, 1893; LL. D., George Wash<strong>in</strong>gton University. 1921;<br />

Member <strong>of</strong> Constitutional Convention. Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. 1901 ; Editor Vir-<br />

g<strong>in</strong>ia Code, Annotated, 1904; Attorney-General <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. 1913-<br />

17; Member Federal Trade Commission, 1920-21; Member <strong>of</strong> State<br />

Board <strong>of</strong> Education, 1913-17; Member <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Commission for<br />

Simplification <strong>and</strong> Economy <strong>in</strong> Government. 1923-24: Pr<strong>of</strong>essor.<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1922


Officers <strong>of</strong> Instruction 9<br />

<strong>William</strong> Angus Hamilton, D. C. L.<br />

Dean <strong>of</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Economics <strong>and</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Jurisprudence<br />

A. B., Harvard University; LL. B., Cornell University; M. L.<br />

<strong>and</strong> D. C. L., Yale University; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Jurisprudence, <strong>College</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1921 ; Act<strong>in</strong>g Dean, School <strong>of</strong> Economics<br />

<strong>and</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration, 1923; Dean, School <strong>of</strong> Economics<br />

<strong>and</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration, 1924<br />

—<br />

Van Frankl<strong>in</strong> Garrett, A. M., M. D.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry Emeritus<br />

Graduate, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Military Institute; A. M., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Wil-<br />

liam <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>; Student, Medical Department <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> University<br />

<strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; M. D., Bellevue Medical <strong>College</strong>, New York City;<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor, Giles <strong>College</strong>, Tennessee; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry, Col-<br />

lege <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> Man', 1888-1923.<br />

Joseph Roy Geiger, M. A., Ph. D.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Philosophy <strong>and</strong> Psychology<br />

A. B., Furman University, 1909; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Philosophy <strong>and</strong> Eng-<br />

lish, Columbia <strong>College</strong>, 1909-11; Graduate Student <strong>and</strong> Instructor,<br />

John B. Stetson University, 1911-12; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Philosophy, Colum-<br />

bia <strong>College</strong>. 1912-13; Graduate Student, University <strong>of</strong> Chicago, 1913-<br />

16; M. A., University <strong>of</strong> Chicago, 1914; Ph. D., University <strong>of</strong> Chi-<br />

cago, 1916; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Philosophy <strong>and</strong> Psychology, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Wil-<br />

liam <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1916<br />

—<br />

Donald Walton Davis, Ph. D.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Biology<br />

A. B., Harvard <strong>College</strong>, 1905; Ph. D., Harvard University, 1913;<br />

Assistant <strong>in</strong> Zoology, University <strong>of</strong> California, 1905-06; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor<br />

<strong>of</strong> Biology, Sweet Briar <strong>College</strong>, 1907-09; Graduate Student <strong>in</strong><br />

Zoology, Harvard University, <strong>and</strong> Instructor <strong>in</strong> Zoology, Radcliffe<br />

<strong>College</strong>, 1909-12; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Zoology, Clark Colleg-e.<br />

1912-14; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Biology, DePauw University, 1914-16; Pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> Biology, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1916<br />


10 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Robert Gilchrist Robb, M. A., Sc. D.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Organic <strong>and</strong> Analytical Chemistry<br />

B. A., B. S., M. A., University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; Sc. D., St. Stephens<br />

<strong>College</strong>; Fellow <strong>in</strong> Astronomy, University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong><br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Marion Military Institute; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry.<br />

Miller Manual Labor School ;<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor<br />

<strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics. St.<br />

Stephens <strong>College</strong>; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry <strong>and</strong> Physics, St. Stephens<br />

<strong>College</strong>; Major Chemical Warfare Reserve, 1926; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Chem-<br />

istry, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1918<br />

— —<br />

Arthur George <strong>William</strong>s. M. A.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Modem Languages<br />

B. A., M. A., Roanoke <strong>College</strong>; M. A., University <strong>of</strong> Chicago:<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Modern Languages, City High School, Roanoke. Virg<strong>in</strong>ia,<br />

1902-07; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Modern Languages, Emory <strong>and</strong> Henry<br />

<strong>College</strong>, 1907-18; Instructor <strong>in</strong> German, University <strong>of</strong> Chicago. Summer<br />

Quarter, 1913; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Modern Languages. University <strong>of</strong><br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, Summer School. 1914-16; Lecturer on Lat<strong>in</strong>-American In-<br />

stitutions <strong>and</strong> History, Summer 1917; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Modern Lan-<br />

guages, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1918<br />

ROSCOE CONKLING YOUNG. Ph. D.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physics<br />

A. B.. B. S., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>; A. M.. <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1910; Ph. D., University <strong>of</strong> Chicago. 1925:<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Summer Session, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1913-15: Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physics. Sou<strong>the</strong>ast Missouri State<br />

Teachers' <strong>College</strong>, 1915-19; Fellow <strong>in</strong> Physics, University <strong>of</strong> Chicago.<br />

1924-25; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physics. <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>. 1919—<br />

Earl Gregg Swem. A. M.. Litt. D.<br />

Librarian<br />

A. B., Lafayette <strong>College</strong>. 1893; A. M.. 1896: Litt. D.. Hampden-<br />

Sidncy <strong>College</strong>, 1925; Instructor, Delaware Academy. Delhi. N. V.<br />

1893-96; Instructor High School, Cedar Rapids. Iowa. 1896-99:


Officers <strong>of</strong> Instruction 11<br />

Assistant, Documents Library, Wash<strong>in</strong>gton, D. C, 1900; Librarian,<br />

Armour Institute, 1901-02; Chief <strong>Catalogue</strong> Division, Copyright Of-<br />

fice, Library <strong>of</strong> Congress, 1903-07; Assistant Librarian Virg<strong>in</strong>ia<br />

State Library, 1907-19; Librarian <strong>of</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>,<br />

1920—<br />

Walter Alex<strong>and</strong>er Montgomery, Ph. D.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Ancient Languages<br />

A. B., 1892, <strong>and</strong> Ph. D., 1899. Johns Hopk<strong>in</strong>s University; Pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong> <strong>and</strong> Greek, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1906-12;<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong>, University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Summer School, 1907-<br />

15; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong>, Richmond <strong>College</strong>. 1912-18; Specialist<br />

United States Bureau <strong>of</strong> Education, 1918-20; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Ancient<br />

Languages, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1920<br />

<strong>William</strong> Thomas Hodges, A. M., Ed. D.<br />

A. B., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1902; A. M., Columbia<br />

University, 1916; Doctor <strong>of</strong> Education, Harvard, 1925; Teacher <strong>in</strong><br />

Public Schools <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia <strong>and</strong> North Carol<strong>in</strong>a, 1902-09; Division<br />

Super<strong>in</strong>tendent <strong>of</strong> Schools, Alex<strong>and</strong>ria County, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1909-16;<br />

State Supervisor, Rural Schools, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1916-20; Graduate<br />

Student <strong>and</strong> "Scholar <strong>in</strong> Education," Harvard, 1919-20: Pr<strong>of</strong>essor<br />

<strong>of</strong> Education, <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1920— ; Director <strong>of</strong> Extension,<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1921-24; Secretary-Treasurer, Alumni<br />

Association. <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923—<br />

—<br />

Richard Lee Morton, M. A., Ph. D.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> History<br />

B. A., Hampden-Sidney <strong>College</strong>; M. A., Harvard University;<br />

A. Rummill Graduate<br />

Ph. D., University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia ; James<br />

Scholar, Harvard University; Phelps-Stokes Fellow, University <strong>of</strong><br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia ; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> History <strong>and</strong> Political Science, Col-<br />

lege <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1919-21 ; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> History, <strong>College</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1921—<br />

"On leave <strong>of</strong> absence 1925-26.<br />

.


12 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Joseph Eugene Rowe, A. M., Ph. D.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics <strong>and</strong> Director <strong>of</strong> Extension<br />

A. B., Pennsylvania <strong>College</strong>, Gettysburg, Pa., 1904; A. M., Penn-<br />

Graduate Student, Univer-<br />

sylvania <strong>College</strong>, Gettysburg, Pa., 1907 ;<br />

sity <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1904-05; University Scholar <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, 1909:<br />

University Fellow <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, 1910. <strong>and</strong> Ph. D.. 1910, <strong>of</strong> Johns<br />

Hopk<strong>in</strong>s University; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor, Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>and</strong><br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Pennsylvania State <strong>College</strong>. 1914-20;<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics <strong>and</strong> Dynamics Expert <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Ordnance Department.<br />

U. S. A., at large, <strong>and</strong> Chief Ballistician <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Aberdeen Prov<strong>in</strong>g<br />

Ground, 1920-21 ; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>and</strong> Head <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Department <strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>-<br />

matics, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1921 ; Director <strong>of</strong> Extension<br />

Department, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924—<br />

<strong>William</strong> A. R. Goodw<strong>in</strong>, M. A., B. D., D. D.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Biblical Literature <strong>and</strong> Religious Education<br />

M. A., Roanoke <strong>College</strong>, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1889; Richmond <strong>College</strong>. 1890:<br />

B. D., Theological Sem<strong>in</strong>ary <strong>in</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, Alex<strong>and</strong>ria. 1893: Pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> Philosophy <strong>and</strong> Theology, Bishop Payne Div<strong>in</strong>ity School.<br />

Petersburg, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1893-99; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Summer School for<br />

Church Workers, Hobart <strong>College</strong>; Summer School, Pr<strong>in</strong>ceton Uni-<br />

versity ; Rector,<br />

Bruton Parish Church, <strong>William</strong>sburg, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia.<br />

1901-09; Rector, St. Paul's Church, Rochester. N. Y.. 1909-23: Pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> Biblical Literature <strong>and</strong> Religious Education, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923—<br />

*Cn arlf.s Clifton Fichtner. S. B.. Docteur en Droit<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Economics<br />

S. B., Harvard <strong>College</strong>; Harvard Graduate School <strong>of</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess<br />

Adm<strong>in</strong>istration; Docteur en Droit es Sciences Economiques. Uni-<br />

versity <strong>of</strong> Lyons (Lyons, France); University <strong>of</strong> Berl<strong>in</strong>: University<br />

<strong>of</strong> Paris; Assistant Bank Economist, New York: Associate Pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> Economics, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1922-24: Pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> Economics, 1924<br />

'Resigned.<br />


Officers <strong>of</strong> Instruction 13<br />

L. Tucker Jones<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physical Education<br />

New York Normal School <strong>of</strong> Physical Education (now Savage<br />

School); New York University; Medical <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; Cer-<br />

tificate <strong>of</strong> Vorturner Kurses, N. A. G. U.; Physical Director, St.<br />

John's <strong>College</strong>, Brooklyn, 1909-10; Physical Director, Richmond<br />

Schools, 1910-14; Social Work <strong>and</strong> Post Graduate Study, New<br />

York, 1914-16; Lecturer, Chautauqua School <strong>of</strong> Physical Education,<br />

1917— ; Lecturer <strong>in</strong> Physical Education, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong>, 1921; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physical Education, 1922-24; Associate<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physical Education, University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1924-25;<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physical Education, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>,<br />

1925—<br />

Leona Reaves, B. S., A. M.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Home Economics<br />

Graduate Harrisonburg Normal School; Student George Pea-<br />

body <strong>College</strong> for Teachers; B. S. <strong>and</strong> A. M., Columbia University;<br />

Recipient <strong>of</strong> Laura Spelman Rockefeller Scholarship ; Teacher <strong>of</strong><br />

Home Economics, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia High Schools ; Teacher <strong>of</strong> Foods <strong>and</strong><br />

Cookery, Raleigh High School ; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Home Economics,<br />

East Carol<strong>in</strong>a Teachers' <strong>College</strong>; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Home Economics,<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925<br />

Joseph Mart<strong>in</strong> Klamon, A. M., LL. B., J. D.<br />

—<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Economics<br />

Harris Teachers' <strong>College</strong>, St. Louis University, Wash<strong>in</strong>gton<br />

University, Wash<strong>in</strong>gton University Law School. Yale University<br />

Graduate School, Yale University Law School ; A. M., Yale Uni-<br />

versity Graduate School; LL. B., Wash<strong>in</strong>gton University; J. D.,<br />

Yale University Law School ; Assistant, Department <strong>of</strong> Economics,<br />

Yale University; Lecturer <strong>and</strong> Tutor, Roxbury Tutor<strong>in</strong>g School,<br />

New Haven; Instructor <strong>in</strong> F<strong>in</strong>ance, Temple University, Philadel-<br />

phia; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Economics, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1926<br />


14 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

H. Babcock, A. B., Ph. B., M. A.<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Journalism <strong>and</strong> Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English<br />

Elon <strong>College</strong>, A. B., Ph. B., M. A.; University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia.<br />

M. A.; Graduate work, Columbia University; Teacher <strong>of</strong> English.<br />

Appomattox State Agricultural High School; Teacher <strong>of</strong> English.<br />

Lynchburg High School ; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Military English, Students'<br />

Army Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g Corps; Assistant, Associate, Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>and</strong> Head<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Department <strong>of</strong> English Language, Elon <strong>College</strong>, X. C. ; Pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> Journalism <strong>and</strong> Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English. <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924—<br />

George Howard Gels<strong>in</strong>cer, M. A.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Greek <strong>and</strong> English<br />

A. B., Muhlenburg <strong>College</strong>, 1910; Associate Pr<strong>in</strong>cipal Haynes<br />

McLean School, 1911-13; M. A., Harvard University, 1914; Graduate<br />

Student, Harvard University, 1916-17, 1919; Head <strong>of</strong> Department <strong>of</strong><br />

Classics, Carthage <strong>College</strong>, 1914-18; Master <strong>of</strong> Greek <strong>and</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong>,<br />

Collegiate School, New York City; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Greek<br />

<strong>and</strong> English, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1920<br />

Edward Moseley Gwathmey, M. A.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> EnglisJi<br />

B. A., Richmond <strong>College</strong>; M. A., University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; Master<br />

<strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Jefferson School for Boys, Charlottesville. Virg<strong>in</strong>ia;<br />

Master <strong>in</strong> English <strong>and</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Culver Military <strong>and</strong> Naval<br />

School, Culver, Indiana; Special Student <strong>and</strong> Instructor <strong>in</strong> Social<br />

Work, New York City (Summer Session) ; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong><br />

English, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>. 1921-22; Associate Pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> English. <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1922-23 ; Act<strong>in</strong>g<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923-24;<br />

Graduate Student <strong>and</strong> Instructor <strong>in</strong> English, University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia.<br />

1924-25; Pr<strong>of</strong>esseur d'Anglais, Summer Session, University <strong>of</strong> Tou-<br />

louse, France, 1925; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925


Officers <strong>of</strong> Instruction 15<br />

Paul Alanson Warren, Ph. D.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Biology<br />

B. S. <strong>in</strong> Biology, University <strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>in</strong>e, 1915; Ph. D., University<br />

<strong>of</strong> Michigan, 1922; Assistant Plant Geneticist, Carnegie Institution,<br />

1915-17; Medical Bacteriologist, C. M. D. L., A. E. F., 1918-19;<br />

University Fellow, University <strong>of</strong> Michigan, 1919-22; Assistant <strong>in</strong><br />

Botany, University <strong>of</strong> Michigan, 1921-22; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>and</strong> Head <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> Department <strong>of</strong> Botany <strong>and</strong> Pharmacognosy, Medical <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1922— ; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Biology, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Wil-<br />

liam <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1922<br />

—<br />

— —<br />

*Albert Frankl<strong>in</strong> Doll<strong>of</strong>f, C. P. H.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Biology<br />

Student, Bates <strong>College</strong>, 1915-17; B. S., New Hampshire <strong>College</strong>,<br />

1921; C. P. H., Yale University, 1922; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong><br />

Biology, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1922<br />

Clarence M. Faithfull, A. B., M. A.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Psychology<br />

A. B., <strong>William</strong> Jewell <strong>College</strong> ; M. A., Columbia University<br />

Graduate Student, University <strong>of</strong> Chicago, George Peabody School<br />

for Teachers ; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Philosophy <strong>and</strong> Psychology, Tennessee<br />

<strong>College</strong>; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Psychology, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia State Normal School,<br />

Farmville; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Psychology, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923<br />

—<br />

Henry C. Krebs, B. S., M. A.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Education<br />

A., Rutgers<br />

B. S., State Normal School, Kutztown, Pa. ;<br />

<strong>College</strong> ; New Jersey ; County Super<strong>in</strong>tendent <strong>of</strong><br />

M.<br />

Schools, New Jer-<br />

sey, 1902-23; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English Literature, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Mount St.<br />

<strong>Mary</strong>, N. J., 1916-23; Member New Jersey State Board <strong>of</strong> Exam-<br />

<strong>in</strong>ers, 1912-23; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Methods <strong>of</strong> Teach<strong>in</strong>g, University <strong>of</strong><br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Summer School, 1917— ; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Educa-<br />

tion, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923<br />

*On leave <strong>of</strong> absence 1925-26.<br />

;


16 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

*Archie Garnett RylanDj M. A.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> French<br />

B. A., Richmond <strong>College</strong>, 1908 ; M. A., Harvard University, 1921 ;<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English <strong>and</strong> French, University <strong>of</strong> Rich-<br />

mond, 1919-20; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> French, University <strong>of</strong> Richmond,<br />

1920-22; Summer Courses at <strong>the</strong> Alliance Francaise <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Sorbonne University Paris, 1922; Repetiteur d'Anglais at <strong>the</strong> Ecolc<br />

Normale d'Instituteurs, Rouen, 1922-23 ; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong><br />

French, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923<br />

—<br />

Helen Foss Weeks, M. A.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Education<br />

B. S., University <strong>of</strong> California, 1906; M. A., Columbia Univer-<br />

sity, 1923; Teacher <strong>of</strong> Science <strong>and</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics; Head <strong>of</strong> Depart-<br />

ment <strong>and</strong> Assistant to <strong>the</strong> Pr<strong>in</strong>cipal, Alhambra, California, 1910-22;<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Education, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>.<br />

1923<br />

—<br />

Carlos Eduardo Castaneda, A. B., A. M.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Modern Languages<br />

A. B., 1921, A. M., 1923, University <strong>of</strong> Texas; Spanish Depart-<br />

ment, Brackenridge High School, 1922-23; Assistant <strong>in</strong> History,<br />

University <strong>of</strong> Texas, 1921, <strong>and</strong> summer 1923; Classifier <strong>of</strong> Bexar<br />

Archives, County Clerk's Office, San Antonio, Texas; Translator<br />

<strong>of</strong> Spanish Manuscripts <strong>in</strong> Archive Department, University <strong>of</strong><br />

Texas <strong>and</strong> State Library, Aust<strong>in</strong>, Texas; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong><br />

History <strong>and</strong> Government, University <strong>of</strong> Mexico Summer School.<br />

1925; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Modern Languages. <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Wil-<br />

liam <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923<br />

—<br />

Arthur Edward Nils son. M. B. A.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Economics<br />

B. S. C. E., Tufts, 1922; M. B. A., Harvard Graduate School<br />

<strong>of</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration. 1924; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess<br />

Economics, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924—<br />

*On leave <strong>of</strong> absence 1925-26.


Officers <strong>of</strong> Instruction 17<br />

Albert Farwell Voke, B. S., C. P. A.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Account<strong>in</strong>g<br />

B. S., Ohio State University; Graduate Student, American Uni-<br />

versity; Certified Public Accountant (Virg<strong>in</strong>ia); Resident Auditor,<br />

Income Tax Unit; Instructor <strong>of</strong> Account<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1922-23 ; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Account<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923-24; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Account<strong>in</strong>g,<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924—<br />

Harwood Lawrence Childs, A. B., M. A.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Government<br />

Dartmouth <strong>College</strong>, A. B., 1919; M. A., 1921; Instructor, Dartmouth<br />

<strong>College</strong>, 1919-21; Harvard Law School, 1921-22; recipient<br />

<strong>of</strong> Woodbury Law Scholarship (Dartmouth) <strong>and</strong> Jenks Law<br />

Scholarship <strong>in</strong> Railroad Law (Harvard) ; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor, Syra-<br />

cuse University, 1922-24; Industrial Research, New York City, 1924;<br />

Chicago University, Summer 1920; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Govern-<br />

ment, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925-26; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor<br />

<strong>of</strong> Government, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1926<br />

Jacob G. Jantz, A. B., M. S.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Biology<br />

•<br />

—<br />

—<br />

A. B., Bluffton <strong>College</strong>, 1921; University <strong>of</strong> Michigan Medical<br />

School, 1920-21 <strong>and</strong> 1922-23; M. S., University <strong>of</strong> Michigan, 1926;<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Biology, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>,<br />

1925—<br />

Beulah Russell, A. M.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics<br />

A. B., R<strong>and</strong>olph-Macon Woman's <strong>College</strong>, 1903; A. M., Uni-<br />

versity <strong>of</strong> Chicago, 1919 ; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Lafayette Col-<br />

lege, 1903-05; Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Grenada <strong>College</strong>, 1905-09;<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Adjunct Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics,<br />

R<strong>and</strong>olph-Macon Woman's <strong>College</strong>, 1909-25; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong><br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics. <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925


18 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

L<strong>in</strong> wood Taft, M. A., Ph. D.<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Education<br />

B. S., University <strong>of</strong> Missouri, 1915; M. A., University <strong>of</strong> Mis-<br />

souri, 1916; Ph. D., University <strong>of</strong> Missouri, 1918; Graduate Student.<br />

Teachers' <strong>College</strong>, Columbia University, 1923-24; Teacher, Boston.<br />

Mass., 1905-07; Union Super<strong>in</strong>tendent <strong>of</strong> Schools, Vermont, 1907-<br />

13; Head Department <strong>of</strong> Education, Christian <strong>College</strong>, Columbia.<br />

Mo., 1915-16; University Fellow <strong>in</strong> Education, University <strong>of</strong> Mis-<br />

souri, 1916-17; Pr<strong>in</strong>cipal Senior High School, Savannah. Georgia.<br />

1918-20; Extension Division, University <strong>of</strong> Oklahoma. 1920-21 :<br />

Pr<strong>in</strong>cipal High School Division, <strong>the</strong> Edgewood School, Greenwich,<br />

Conn., 1921-25; Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Education, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Wil-<br />

liam <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925<br />

—<br />

Gertrude L. Carey<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> F<strong>in</strong>e Arts<br />

Student Art Schools. Paris, 1900-02; Studied under Pr<strong>of</strong>essor<br />

Arthur W. Dow, 1902-06; Student New York University. 1910;<br />

Student Art School, Munich, 1914; Student Columbia University.<br />

1917; Instructor <strong>and</strong> Supervisor <strong>of</strong> Art, Public Schools <strong>of</strong> Duluth.<br />

M<strong>in</strong>nesota, 1906-22; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Art, State Teachers <strong>College</strong>.<br />

Duluth, M<strong>in</strong>nesota, 1920-22; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> F<strong>in</strong>e Arts.<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923—<br />

Reynold C. Siersema<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physical Education<br />

Graduate Newark Normal School for Physical Education <strong>and</strong><br />

Hygiene, 1922; Graduate Chautauqua Summer School for Physical<br />

Education, 1922; Athletic Director St. Peter's Athletic Club. New<br />

York, 1921-22; Gymnastic Coach, Newark Academy, Newark. N. J.;<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Physical Education, <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> <strong>College</strong>. 1922-<br />

24; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physical Education. <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924—


Officers <strong>of</strong> Instruction 19<br />

Martha Barksdale, A. B.<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Physical Education for Women<br />

A. B., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1921 ; Special Courses,<br />

Chautauqua School <strong>of</strong> Physical Education, 1921-22; Graduate Student,<br />

Harvard University, Summer 1923; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Physical Education,<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1921-24; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Hygiene<br />

<strong>and</strong> Physical Education, University <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, Summer<br />

Quarter, 1924; Act<strong>in</strong>g Chairman <strong>of</strong> Pr<strong>of</strong>essional Courses <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong>.<br />

ihe Department for Women, 1924<br />

—<br />

Bess P. Hodges, M. S.<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Holme Economics<br />

B. S., University <strong>of</strong> Arkansas; M. S., University <strong>of</strong> Wiscons<strong>in</strong>;<br />

Instructor High School, Oklahoma ; Instructor State Agricultural<br />

<strong>College</strong>, Russellville, Ark. ; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Home Eco-<br />

nomics, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> 1924<br />

—<br />

Peter Paul Peebles, LL. B., A. M.<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Jurisprudence<br />

A. B. <strong>and</strong> LL. B., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924; B. S.<br />

<strong>and</strong> A. M., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925 ; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Gov-<br />

ernment, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924-25 ; Assistant Pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> Jurisprudence, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925-26.<br />

<strong>William</strong> George Guy, Ph. D.<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry<br />

B. Sc, B. A., Mt. Allison University, Sackville, N. B„ Canada;<br />

B. A., Oxford University, Engl<strong>and</strong> ; Ph. D., University <strong>of</strong> Chicago<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>,<br />

1925<br />

—<br />

Frank A. Shufeldt, Jr., B. S.<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> French<br />

B. S., V. M. I., 1913; Graduate Student, Wahl-Henius, Chicago,<br />

1914; Graduate Work, Columbia University; Research Work, Col-<br />

lege de France, Paris, 1922; Graduate Work, La Sorbonne, Paris,<br />

;


20 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

1922-23; Alliance Francaise, New York <strong>and</strong> Paris, 1918-23; Assis-<br />

tant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor French <strong>and</strong> English, V. M. I.; Master <strong>in</strong> French<br />

<strong>and</strong> English, St. John's School ; Head <strong>of</strong> Department <strong>of</strong> French.<br />

New York Military Academy; Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> English <strong>and</strong><br />

French, Wash<strong>in</strong>gton <strong>and</strong> Lee University, 1922-24 ;<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> French, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925<br />

Merrill Proctor Ball<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Piano, Voice <strong>and</strong> Harmony<br />

Assistant<br />

Pro-<br />

Teacher's Certificate, Ohio Conservatory <strong>of</strong> Music, C<strong>in</strong>c<strong>in</strong>nati :<br />

Student <strong>of</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Music, C<strong>in</strong>c<strong>in</strong>nati; Student <strong>of</strong> Signor Alb<strong>in</strong>o<br />

Gorno, C<strong>in</strong>c<strong>in</strong>nati ; Student <strong>of</strong> Madame Laura Bell<strong>in</strong>i, New York<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Piano, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1920— ; In-<br />

structor <strong>in</strong> Voice, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1922— ; Instructor<br />

<strong>in</strong> Harmony, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923—<br />

Cecil Ravenscr<strong>of</strong>t Ball, A. B.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> English<br />

A. B., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923; Instructor <strong>in</strong> French.<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1922-23; Instructor <strong>in</strong> English. Col-<br />

lege <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923<br />

Emily Moore Hall, A. B., A. M.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> English<br />

A. B., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>. 1922: A. M.. <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1923; Instructor <strong>in</strong> English, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924—<br />

Joseph C Ch<strong>and</strong>ler. B. S.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Physical Education for Men<br />

\\. S., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, n<br />

l 24; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Phy-<br />

sical Education, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> Man-. 1924


Officers <strong>of</strong> Instruction 21<br />

Elizabeth Mercer, A. B.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics<br />

A. B., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics,<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924—<br />

Whit<strong>in</strong>g Faulkner Young, B. S.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Chemistry<br />

B. S., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Chem-<br />

istry, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1924<br />

Graves Glenwood Clark, B. A., LL. B.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> English<br />

LL. B., Richmond <strong>College</strong>; B. A., University <strong>of</strong> Richmond; Lec-<br />

turer <strong>in</strong> Story Writ<strong>in</strong>g, Peter Stuyvestant Neighborhood House,<br />

New York City, 1919-20; Lecturer <strong>in</strong> Story Writ<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> Extension,<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1920— ; Instructor <strong>in</strong> English, Col-<br />

lege <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925<br />

Joseph Thomas Ecker, M. A.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> History.<br />

A. B., Pr<strong>in</strong>ceton University, 1923; Graduate Student, Harvard<br />

University, 1923-25; M. A., 1924; Instructor <strong>in</strong> History, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925—<br />

Martha Holladay, B. S.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Home Economics<br />

Graduate, Georgia State Normal, 1923; B. S., Columbia University,<br />

1925; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Home Economics, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925—


11 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Marguerite Wynne- Roberts<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Physical Education for Women<br />

Graduate New Haven Normal School <strong>of</strong> Gymnastics, 1918;<br />

Graduate Bedford <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Danc<strong>in</strong>g, Engl<strong>and</strong>, 1924; Post-Gradu-<br />

ate Study Chelsea <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g, London, 1924-25<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Physical Education <strong>in</strong> St. Hilda's Hall, Charlestown,<br />

Wr<br />

. Va., 1918-20. 1921-1923; U. S. Public Health Service. Physio-<br />

<strong>the</strong>rapy Department, 1920-1921 ; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Physical Education.<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, Summer Quarters 1922 <strong>and</strong> 1923;<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Physical Education, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>.<br />

1925—<br />

Cecil B. Russell, B. S.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics <strong>and</strong> Industrial Arts<br />

B. S., Purdue University; Instructor <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics <strong>and</strong> In-<br />

dustrial Arts, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925<br />

—<br />

Olive Wii.lard Down<strong>in</strong>g, A. B., A. M.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Biblical Literature <strong>and</strong> Religious Education<br />

Life Certificate, Oklahoma Central State Teachers' <strong>College</strong>.<br />

1917; Student, C<strong>in</strong>c<strong>in</strong>nati Bible School, 1917-18; University <strong>of</strong><br />

Oklahoma, A. B., 1920; Boston University. A. M.. 1923: V. W. C.<br />

A. Membership <strong>and</strong> Religious Education Secretary, 1923-25; Bibli-<br />

cal Literature <strong>and</strong> Religious Education, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> anil<br />

<strong>Mary</strong>, 1925—<br />

Maurice P<strong>in</strong>el. B. A.. LL. B.<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Oral French<br />

B. A., University <strong>of</strong> Poitiers. France<br />

LL. B.. University <strong>of</strong> Bordeaux. France<br />

Mrs. Kathleen Hipp<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> Music<br />

:<br />

;


Officers <strong>of</strong> Instruction 23<br />

Henry H. Hibbs, Jr., Ph. D.<br />

Lecturer <strong>in</strong> Sociology<br />

Director <strong>of</strong> Richmond Extension Division <strong>and</strong><br />

School <strong>of</strong> Social Work<br />

A. B., Cumberl<strong>and</strong> <strong>College</strong>; A. M., Brown University; Ph. D.,<br />

Columbia University ; Formerly Fellow, Boston School <strong>of</strong> Social<br />

Work ; Instructor, Department <strong>of</strong> Sociology <strong>of</strong> University <strong>of</strong> Illi-<br />

nois; Director, Richmond School <strong>of</strong> Social Work <strong>and</strong> Public Health;<br />

Lecturer <strong>in</strong> Sociology, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1920<br />

George Woodford Brown, M. D.<br />

Lecturer <strong>in</strong> Cl<strong>in</strong>ical Psychology<br />

Graduate Jeffersonton Academy; Student, University <strong>of</strong> Vir-<br />

g<strong>in</strong>ia; M. D., <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Physicians <strong>and</strong> Surgeons (now University<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>l<strong>and</strong>), 1893; Graduate Student, Medical Department, University<br />

<strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; Interne, Baltimore City Hospital (now Mercy<br />

Hospital); General Practice <strong>in</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1895-1910; Super<strong>in</strong>ten-<br />

dent, Eastern State Hospital, <strong>William</strong>sburg, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1910; Lec-<br />

turer <strong>in</strong> Cl<strong>in</strong>ical Psychology, <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1921<br />

Rev. Leonidas W. Irw<strong>in</strong>, B. D., D. D.<br />

Lecturer <strong>in</strong> Biblical Literature <strong>and</strong> Religious Education.<br />

Student at Wash<strong>in</strong>gton <strong>and</strong> Lee University; B. D., Union Theo-<br />

logical Sem<strong>in</strong>ary, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; D. D., Wash<strong>in</strong>gton <strong>and</strong> Lee Univer-<br />

sity; Super<strong>in</strong>tendent <strong>of</strong> Public Schools, Radford, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, 1905-09;<br />

Student <strong>in</strong> special course <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Biblical Sem<strong>in</strong>ary, New York City;<br />

Instructor <strong>in</strong> English Bible <strong>in</strong> Concord State Normal <strong>College</strong>,<br />

A<strong>the</strong>ns, West Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; Pastor <strong>of</strong> Presbyterian Church, Radford,<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; Pastor <strong>of</strong> Presbyterian Church, Wlliamsburg, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia.<br />

Charles L. Sherman, D. C. L. (Yale)<br />

Lecturer <strong>in</strong> History<br />

—<br />


24 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Maynard L. Cassaday, M. A., Th. B.<br />

General Secretary Y. M. C. A.<br />

B. A., Juanita <strong>College</strong>, Pennsylvania, 1919; Instructor Science,<br />

Rockwood High School, Pennsylvania, 1920; M. A., Pr<strong>in</strong>ceton Uni-<br />

versity, 1923; Th. B., Pr<strong>in</strong>ceton Theological Sem<strong>in</strong>ary, 1923; Gel-<br />

ston-W<strong>in</strong>throp Fellow <strong>in</strong> Church History, University <strong>of</strong> Tub<strong>in</strong>gen.<br />

Germany, <strong>and</strong> University <strong>of</strong> Berl<strong>in</strong>, Germany, 1923-24; Instructor<br />

Lat<strong>in</strong>, Juanita <strong>College</strong>, 1924-25; General Secretary Y. M. C. A..<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1925-26.<br />

LIBRARY STAFF<br />

EARL G. SWEM, A. M., Litt D., Librarian.<br />

EMILY P. CHRISTIAN, Assistant Librarian.<br />

M. BEVERLEY RUFFIN, A. B., Assistant Librarian.<br />

JANE E. MOSS, A. B., Assistant.<br />

KATHLEEN LEE, Student Librarian.<br />

R. H. RICKMAN, Student Assistant.<br />

ELIZABETH SCHMUCKER. Student Assistant.<br />

HARLESS HICKS, Student Assistant.<br />

W. IT. LAWSON, Student Assistant.


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION<br />

JULIAN ALVIN CARROLL CHANDLER,' President.<br />

JOHN LESSLIE HALL, Dean <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Faculty.<br />

KREMER J. HOKE, Dean <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong>.<br />

ANNIE MARION POWELL, Dean <strong>of</strong> Women.<br />

JOHN GARLAND POLLARD, Dean <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Marshall-Wy<strong>the</strong><br />

School <strong>of</strong> Government <strong>and</strong> Citizenship.<br />

WILLIAM ANGUS HAMILTON, Dean <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Economics<br />

<strong>and</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration.<br />

*BESSIE PORTER TAYLOR, Social Director <strong>of</strong> Women.<br />

*ADELE CLARK, Act<strong>in</strong>g Social Director <strong>of</strong> Women.<br />

JOSEPH EUGENE ROWE, Director <strong>of</strong> Extension.<br />

HERBERT LEE BRIDGES, Registrar <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>and</strong> Sec-<br />

retary to <strong>the</strong> Faculty.<br />

LEVIN WINDER LANE, JR., Treasurer <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> ami<br />

Secretary to <strong>the</strong> Board <strong>of</strong> Visitors.<br />

DAVID J. KING, M. D., <strong>College</strong> Physician.<br />

ALICE M. ROSS, R. N., <strong>College</strong> Nurse.<br />

MARGUERITE STILES, Assistant <strong>College</strong> Nurse.<br />

KATHLEEN M. ALSOP, Secretary to <strong>the</strong> President.<br />

PEARL H. JONES, Assistant Secretary to <strong>the</strong> President.<br />

LOUISE R. INMAN, Secretary to <strong>the</strong> Registrar.<br />

MABEL G TRAIN, Secretary to <strong>the</strong> Dean.<br />

MRS. ELIZABETH PRENTISS, Assistant Secretary to Dean.<br />

MRS. A. Z. WILLIAMS, Assistant Secretary to Dean.<br />

MRS. B. L. SHEPHERD, Secretary to Treasurer.<br />

RAY P. EDWARDS, Bookkeeper.<br />

MALCOLM BRIDGES, Alumni Secretary.<br />

B. F. WOLFE, Super<strong>in</strong>tendent Grounds <strong>and</strong> Build<strong>in</strong>gs.<br />

L. SHELL JONES, Steward.<br />

C. M. ROBINSON, <strong>College</strong> Architect.<br />

"Miss Taylor on leave <strong>of</strong> absence March 1 to September 1, 1926.


PRIORITIES OF WILLIAM AND MARY<br />

The first American college to receive a charter from <strong>the</strong> crown<br />

this was dated 1693, under seal <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Privy Council.<br />

The first <strong>and</strong> only American college to be granted a coat <strong>of</strong><br />

arms from <strong>the</strong> Herald's <strong>College</strong>, 1694.<br />

The first American college to have a full faculty <strong>of</strong> president,<br />

six pr<strong>of</strong>essors, writ<strong>in</strong>g master <strong>and</strong> usher.<br />

The first medals awarded <strong>in</strong> America as collegiate prizes were<br />

those donated by Lord Botetourt, 1771.<br />

The first Greek letter fraternity was founded at <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong> on December 5, 1776. This fraternity, <strong>the</strong> Phi Beta Kappa,<br />

is <strong>the</strong> great honor society <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> foremost <strong>in</strong>stitutions <strong>of</strong> learn<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>in</strong> America.<br />

The first honor system.<br />

The first elective system <strong>of</strong> studies, 1779.<br />

The first schools <strong>of</strong> Modern Languages <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> Law were es-<br />

tablished <strong>in</strong> 1779, under <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>fluence <strong>of</strong> Jefferson.<br />

The first college to teach political economy was <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong> <strong>in</strong> 1784.<br />

The first school <strong>of</strong> history was founded here <strong>in</strong> 1803.


HISTORY<br />

Chartered <strong>in</strong> 1693 by <strong>the</strong> English k<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> queen whose names<br />

it bears, <strong>and</strong> fostered by royalty <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> care <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Bishop <strong>of</strong><br />

London, <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> soon after its establishment<br />

became associated with all <strong>the</strong> activities <strong>of</strong> early Virg<strong>in</strong>ia.<br />

Its dormitories are named for <strong>the</strong> English estate <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Braffer-<br />

ton <strong>in</strong> Yorkshire <strong>and</strong> for <strong>the</strong> dist<strong>in</strong>guished sons <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia<br />

Ewell, Taliaferro, Tyler, Jefferson <strong>and</strong> Monroe. The president's<br />

house, partially destroyed by fire <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Revolution, was restored<br />

at <strong>the</strong> private cost <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> k<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> .France; <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> statue <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

popular royal governor, Lord Botetourt, still st<strong>and</strong>s on a campus<br />

made sacred by <strong>the</strong> footsteps <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> patriots Wash<strong>in</strong>gton, Jefferson,<br />

Marshall <strong>and</strong> Monroe.<br />

The college prospered to a fair degree under its first president,<br />

Dr. James Blair, until October 20, 1705, when <strong>the</strong> only build<strong>in</strong>g<br />

was unfortunately burned. The work <strong>of</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g, however, went<br />

forward <strong>in</strong> spite <strong>of</strong> this disaster. By 1711 <strong>the</strong> college had been<br />

rebuilt upon <strong>the</strong> old walls, <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> 1723 was erected <strong>the</strong> new Braf-<br />

ferton build<strong>in</strong>g, at first used as a school for Indians. Later <strong>the</strong><br />

south w<strong>in</strong>g was added to <strong>the</strong> college build<strong>in</strong>g for a chapel <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

same year (1732) <strong>in</strong> which <strong>the</strong> foundation was laid for <strong>the</strong> home<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> president.<br />

Dr. Blair, by whom chiefly <strong>the</strong> college had been founded <strong>and</strong><br />

through whose efforts it had prospered, died <strong>in</strong> 1743; <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> pro-<br />

fessor <strong>of</strong> moral philosophy, Dr. <strong>William</strong> Dawson, succeeded him as<br />

president. It was dur<strong>in</strong>g President Dawson's adm<strong>in</strong>istration that<br />

George Wash<strong>in</strong>gton received his appo<strong>in</strong>tment from <strong>the</strong> college as<br />

county' surveyor <strong>of</strong> Fairfax. In 1750 <strong>the</strong> Flat Hat Club was estab-<br />

lished. Of this, <strong>the</strong> first college club <strong>of</strong> which <strong>the</strong>re is any record,<br />

Thomas Jefferson was a member. The next president was <strong>the</strong><br />

historian <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, <strong>William</strong> Stith, who came <strong>in</strong>to <strong>of</strong>fice after <strong>the</strong><br />

death <strong>of</strong> Dr. Dawson <strong>in</strong> 1752.<br />

Through a checkered career, as full <strong>of</strong> strife as <strong>of</strong> usefulness,<br />

<strong>the</strong> college, with a faculty <strong>of</strong> seven, cont<strong>in</strong>ued its labors, tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g<br />


28 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

men for <strong>the</strong> important struggle that was to come. Dur<strong>in</strong>g this<br />

period <strong>the</strong> presidents were Rev. Thomas Dawson, 1755-61 ; Rev.<br />

<strong>William</strong> Yates, 1761-64; Rev. James Horrocks, 1764-71; <strong>and</strong> Rev.<br />

John Camm, 1771-77. Dur<strong>in</strong>g Camm's adm<strong>in</strong>istration, Lord Bote-<br />

tourt <strong>in</strong> 1770 donated a number <strong>of</strong> medals to <strong>the</strong> college, which were<br />

<strong>the</strong> first collegiate prizes to be awarded <strong>in</strong> America. On December<br />

5, 1776, <strong>the</strong> famous Phi Beta Kappa, <strong>the</strong> first <strong>and</strong> most dist<strong>in</strong>guished<br />

<strong>of</strong> all Greek-letter fraternities, was founded by students <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

college.<br />

The character <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> students dur<strong>in</strong>g this early period <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

history <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> may be judged by <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>fluence <strong>of</strong><br />

its alumni upon <strong>the</strong> mak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> nation. Three presidents <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

United States attended classes at <strong>the</strong> college—Jefferson. Monroe<br />

<strong>and</strong> Tyler—<strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se, two were students before <strong>the</strong> Revolution.<br />

Fifteen governors <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia went from its halls ; <strong>and</strong> some <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> most dist<strong>in</strong>guished among <strong>the</strong>m— Jefferson, Benjam<strong>in</strong> Harri-<br />

son, <strong>the</strong> R<strong>and</strong>olphs, <strong>and</strong> John Page—were <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> early years.<br />

Four signers <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Declaration <strong>of</strong> Independence, <strong>and</strong> Marshall.<br />

Blair, Bushrod Wash<strong>in</strong>gton, <strong>and</strong> Philip P. Barbour, all <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Supreme bench, swell <strong>the</strong> honor roll <strong>of</strong> those by-gone days. Numerous<br />

as <strong>the</strong> dist<strong>in</strong>guished sons <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college <strong>in</strong> later years have<br />

been, no period <strong>in</strong> its history has produced <strong>the</strong> number <strong>of</strong> great<br />

men who attended as students dur<strong>in</strong>g pre-Revolutionary times.<br />

Throughout <strong>the</strong> Revolution <strong>the</strong> college cont<strong>in</strong>ued its exercises<br />

save for a short period at <strong>the</strong> time <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Yorktown campaigns,<br />

when <strong>William</strong>sburg became for a while almost <strong>the</strong> center <strong>of</strong> hos-<br />

tilities. The president's house suffered by fire, after hav<strong>in</strong>g been<br />

<strong>the</strong> headquarters <strong>of</strong> Lord Cornwallis. As it was burned dur<strong>in</strong>g its<br />

occupation by <strong>the</strong> French, it was restored at <strong>the</strong>ir expense.<br />

In 1777 Rev. James Madison was elected president, <strong>and</strong> under<br />

his energetic management <strong>the</strong> college entered upon a new era.<br />

Upon Jefferson's election as Governor <strong>in</strong> June, 1779, he became a<br />

member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Board <strong>of</strong> Visitors <strong>and</strong> put <strong>in</strong>to operation many <strong>of</strong><br />

his educational ideas. The college was changed to a university: <strong>and</strong><br />

schools <strong>of</strong> modern language <strong>and</strong> municipal law—<strong>the</strong> first <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

k<strong>in</strong>d <strong>in</strong> America—were <strong>in</strong>troduced along with a general lecture sys-<br />

tem with free election among <strong>the</strong> courses <strong>of</strong>fered. The pr<strong>in</strong>ciples<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> honor system may also be discerned as orisr<strong>in</strong>at<strong>in</strong>cr at this


History 29<br />

time. George Wy<strong>the</strong>, <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> law, <strong>and</strong> James McClung,<br />

pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>of</strong> medic<strong>in</strong>e, vied with President Madison <strong>in</strong> dist<strong>in</strong>ction.<br />

Although President Madison became <strong>the</strong> first bishop <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Epis-<br />

copal Church <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, <strong>the</strong> college never resumed its denom<strong>in</strong>a-<br />

tional connections after t<strong>the</strong> Revolution.<br />

President Madison died <strong>in</strong> 1812, after hav<strong>in</strong>g held <strong>the</strong> presi-<br />

dency s<strong>in</strong>ce his twenty-eighth year. A little later <strong>the</strong> college suf-<br />

fered a second loss <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> transference <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> patronage <strong>of</strong> Mr.<br />

Jefferson to his projected university at Charlottesville. The next<br />

presidents to follow were Rev. John Bracken, 1812-14; John Augus-<br />

t<strong>in</strong>e Smith, M. D., 1814-26; Rev. <strong>William</strong> H. Wilmer. 1826-27;<br />

Rev. Adam Empie, 1827-36; <strong>and</strong> Thomas R. Dew, 1836-46.<br />

Under <strong>the</strong> guidance <strong>of</strong> President Dew <strong>and</strong> a remarkably f<strong>in</strong>e<br />

faculty, <strong>the</strong> students <strong>in</strong>creased <strong>in</strong> number to 140 <strong>in</strong> 1839, a larger<br />

attendance than <strong>the</strong> college had had dur<strong>in</strong>g any previous session.<br />

A brief period <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>ternal strife was followed by a revival <strong>of</strong><br />

strength <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>fluence under Presidents Johns <strong>and</strong> Ewell. The<br />

presidents after Dew were Robert Saunders, 1846-47; Benjam<strong>in</strong> S.<br />

Ewell, 1848; Bishop John Johns, 1849-54; <strong>and</strong> Benjam<strong>in</strong> S. Ewell,<br />

1854-88. In 1859 <strong>the</strong> ma<strong>in</strong> build<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college was burned for<br />

<strong>the</strong> second time, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> precious contents <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> library were de-<br />

stroyed. The Civil War brought a suspension <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

college <strong>in</strong> 1861. Dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> ensu<strong>in</strong>g strife <strong>the</strong> ma<strong>in</strong> build<strong>in</strong>g was<br />

aga<strong>in</strong> burned, this third time while occupied by Federal soldiers.<br />

The United States Government reimbursed <strong>the</strong> college for this<br />

loss <strong>in</strong> 1893.<br />

After <strong>the</strong> war <strong>the</strong> college opened <strong>in</strong> 1865, with Colonel Benjam<strong>in</strong><br />

S. Ewell aga<strong>in</strong> act<strong>in</strong>g as president. An effort to remove <strong>the</strong><br />

college to Richmond was defeated, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> burnt build<strong>in</strong>gs were<br />

restored; but for f<strong>in</strong>ancial reasons <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college was<br />

suspended from 1881 to 1888.<br />

With <strong>the</strong> assistance <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> State <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, <strong>the</strong>re was a reorganization<br />

<strong>in</strong> 1888, with Lyon G. Tyler as president, under whom<br />

a period <strong>of</strong> new life <strong>and</strong> usefulness set <strong>in</strong>. In 1906 <strong>the</strong> college<br />

became strictly a State <strong>in</strong>stitution, operated by a board appo<strong>in</strong>ted<br />

by <strong>the</strong> Governor <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia S<strong>in</strong>ce <strong>the</strong> reopen<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college<br />

many new build<strong>in</strong>gs have been erected, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> number <strong>of</strong> pr<strong>of</strong>es-<br />

sorships has been greatly <strong>in</strong>creased. An <strong>in</strong>firmary, a science hall.


30 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

a library, three dormitories, a d<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g hall, <strong>and</strong> a power house have<br />

been built ; <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> work<strong>in</strong>g apparatus <strong>of</strong> every department has been<br />

constantly improved. The number <strong>of</strong> students has <strong>in</strong>creased with<br />

unusual rapidity ; <strong>the</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard <strong>of</strong> requirements for entrance <strong>and</strong> for<br />

<strong>the</strong> atta<strong>in</strong>ment <strong>of</strong> degrees has been materially raised; <strong>and</strong> a spirit<br />

<strong>of</strong> wholesome growth <strong>and</strong> advancement is evident throughout <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>in</strong>stitution.<br />

With <strong>the</strong> retirement <strong>of</strong> Dr. Tyler from active service <strong>in</strong> 1919.<br />

to become president emeritus, Julian A. C. Ch<strong>and</strong>ler assumed <strong>the</strong><br />

duties <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>of</strong>fice <strong>of</strong> president on July 1, 1919.<br />

In September, 1918, young women were admitted to <strong>the</strong> college.<br />

The General Assembly <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> session <strong>of</strong> 1920 made provision for<br />

a new dormitory <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>creased <strong>the</strong> annuity to <strong>the</strong> college. With<br />

this annuity <strong>the</strong> college has been able to extend its courses to <strong>in</strong>-<br />

clude a department <strong>of</strong> bus<strong>in</strong>ess adm<strong>in</strong>istration <strong>and</strong> commercial law<br />

teacher-tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g courses for home economics under <strong>the</strong> Smith-<br />

Hughes Act; <strong>and</strong> courses <strong>in</strong> public health <strong>and</strong> sanitation as an ex-<br />

tension <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> department <strong>of</strong> biology. By a proper adjustment <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong>ir courses, young men or young women may now prepare <strong>the</strong>m-<br />

selves to enter eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g, medic<strong>in</strong>e, law, agriculture, forestry <strong>and</strong><br />

similar subjects. Where <strong>the</strong>re was formerly only one pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>in</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> department <strong>of</strong> education, <strong>the</strong>re are at present four pr<strong>of</strong>essors<br />

especially equipped to prepare students to meet <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>creas<strong>in</strong>g dem<strong>and</strong><br />

for super<strong>in</strong>tendents, supervisors, pr<strong>in</strong>cipals <strong>and</strong> teachers.<br />

In September, 1919, <strong>the</strong> college enlarged its work by estab-<br />

lish<strong>in</strong>g extension classes <strong>in</strong> Richmond, Newport News <strong>and</strong> Norfolk.<br />

S<strong>in</strong>ce that time it has cont<strong>in</strong>ued its courses <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>se centers <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong><br />

Petersburg. It is now able to <strong>of</strong>fer work at such o<strong>the</strong>r centers as<br />

can show a sufficient dem<strong>and</strong>, for <strong>the</strong> courses. These classes are<br />

<strong>of</strong> college grade. Therefore, persons desir<strong>in</strong>g to enter <strong>the</strong>m have<br />

to be prepared for college as ei<strong>the</strong>r regular or special students.<br />

In 1779 <strong>the</strong> Board <strong>of</strong> Visitors, <strong>of</strong> which Mr. Jefferson <strong>and</strong> Mr.<br />

Madison were members, established <strong>the</strong> first school <strong>of</strong> law <strong>in</strong><br />

America, <strong>and</strong> elected George Wy<strong>the</strong> as pr<strong>of</strong>essor. Dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong><br />

years <strong>of</strong> its activity it had as pr<strong>of</strong>essors George Wy<strong>the</strong>. St. George<br />

Tucker, <strong>William</strong> Nelson, Robert Nelson, James Semple. N. Beverley<br />

Tucker, George P. Scarburgh, Lucian M<strong>in</strong>or atid Charles Mor-<br />

;


History 31<br />

ris. Unfortunately, at <strong>the</strong> outbreak <strong>of</strong> hostilities between <strong>the</strong><br />

States <strong>the</strong> school had to be discont<strong>in</strong>ued.<br />

On January 15, 1922, however, <strong>the</strong> college aga<strong>in</strong> assumed its<br />

function <strong>of</strong> <strong>of</strong>fer<strong>in</strong>g tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> jurisprudence <strong>and</strong> government by<br />

open<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> Marshall-Wy<strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Government <strong>and</strong> Citizen-<br />

ship. The address <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> occasion was delivered by Judge Alton<br />

B. Parker <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> presence <strong>of</strong> a dist<strong>in</strong>guished ga<strong>the</strong>r<strong>in</strong>g, among<br />

whom were members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> General Assembly <strong>and</strong> many guests<br />

from a distance. Lawyers, jurists <strong>and</strong> publicists <strong>of</strong> national repu-<br />

tation lectured weekly before <strong>the</strong> school for <strong>the</strong> rema<strong>in</strong>der <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

year. This school has, lead<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> A. B. degree, a four-year<br />

course, <strong>the</strong> last year <strong>of</strong> which is made up chiefly <strong>of</strong> law.<br />

The <strong>in</strong>tention <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Board <strong>of</strong> Visitors is to revive <strong>the</strong> law<br />

school <strong>in</strong> connection with <strong>the</strong> Marshall-Wy<strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Government<br />

<strong>and</strong> Citizenship. The plan is to have three years <strong>of</strong> academic<br />

work <strong>and</strong> three years <strong>of</strong> law. Upon satisfactory completion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

three years <strong>of</strong> academic work <strong>and</strong> one year <strong>of</strong> jurisprudence, <strong>the</strong><br />

student will be granted <strong>the</strong> A. B. degree ; <strong>and</strong> upon <strong>the</strong> completion<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r two years <strong>in</strong> law, <strong>the</strong> degree <strong>of</strong> Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Law.


BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS<br />

MAIN COLLEGE BUILDING AND PRESIDENT'S HOME<br />

The ma<strong>in</strong> college build<strong>in</strong>g, built orig<strong>in</strong>ally accord<strong>in</strong>g to plans<br />

drawn by Sir Christopher Wren, is <strong>the</strong> largest <strong>and</strong> oldest build<strong>in</strong>g<br />

on <strong>the</strong> campus. Its walls are for <strong>the</strong> most part <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> orig<strong>in</strong>al<br />

structure <strong>of</strong> 1693. In this build<strong>in</strong>g are <strong>the</strong> lecture rooms <strong>of</strong> Eng-<br />

lish, Lat<strong>in</strong> <strong>and</strong> Greek, ma<strong>the</strong>matics, modern languages, education<br />

<strong>and</strong> history. The south w<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> this build<strong>in</strong>g is <strong>the</strong> chapel, <strong>in</strong><br />

which are many <strong>in</strong>terest<strong>in</strong>g portraits, with tablets erected to <strong>the</strong><br />

memory <strong>of</strong> dist<strong>in</strong>guished alumni. The north w<strong>in</strong>g, where <strong>the</strong> House<br />

<strong>of</strong> Burgesses held its sessions from 1700-1704 <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> 1748-52. is<br />

used by <strong>the</strong> departments <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>dustrial arts <strong>and</strong> f<strong>in</strong>e arts.<br />

Nor<strong>the</strong>ast <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ma<strong>in</strong> build<strong>in</strong>g is <strong>the</strong> president's house. S<strong>in</strong>ce<br />

its erection <strong>in</strong> 1732 it has been <strong>the</strong> residence <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> successive presi-<br />

dents <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>stitution.<br />

BRAFFERTON HALL<br />

Sou<strong>the</strong>ast <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ma<strong>in</strong> build<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> fac<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> home <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

president st<strong>and</strong>s Brafferton Hall. Here are located <strong>the</strong> adm<strong>in</strong>is-<br />

trative, <strong>of</strong>fices <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college—namely, those <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> president, <strong>the</strong><br />

dean <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college, <strong>the</strong> registrar, <strong>the</strong> treasurer, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> secretary<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Alumni Association.<br />

Brafferton Hall was built from funds derived from <strong>the</strong> estate<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Honorable Robert Boyle, <strong>the</strong> dist<strong>in</strong>guished natural philoso-<br />

pher, who, <strong>in</strong> his will, had provided that four thous<strong>and</strong> pounds ster-<br />

l<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> his money should be employed <strong>in</strong> "pious <strong>and</strong> charitable<br />

uses." Dr. Blair, <strong>the</strong> first president <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college, be<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> Eng-<br />

l<strong>and</strong> at <strong>the</strong> death <strong>of</strong> Boyle, urged <strong>the</strong> Earl <strong>of</strong> Burl<strong>in</strong>gton, Boyle's<br />

nephew <strong>and</strong> executor, to direct <strong>the</strong> fund to <strong>the</strong> support <strong>of</strong> a school<br />

for Indians <strong>in</strong> connection with <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>.<br />

Burl<strong>in</strong>gton <strong>in</strong>vested <strong>the</strong> fund <strong>in</strong> an English manor called The Braf-<br />

ferton <strong>in</strong> Yorkshire, from which most <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> rents were to go to<br />

<strong>the</strong> college <strong>in</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. Brafferton Hall was built <strong>in</strong> 1723 from <strong>the</strong>


Build<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> Grounds 33<br />

proceeds <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Brafferton estate, <strong>and</strong> until <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Revolutionary War was used as a school for Indians.<br />

SCIENCE HALL<br />

Science Hall, erected <strong>in</strong> 1905, is located on <strong>the</strong> north side <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> campus. At present it houses <strong>the</strong> departments <strong>of</strong> physics, bio-<br />

logy <strong>and</strong> home economics. In 1923 chemistry was moved to a tem-<br />

porary build<strong>in</strong>g on <strong>the</strong> west side <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> campus.<br />

COLLEGE LIBRARY<br />

The library build<strong>in</strong>g was erected <strong>in</strong> 1908 with funds presented<br />

by Mr. Andrew Carnegie <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r friends <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college. In 1921<br />

<strong>the</strong> Carnegie Corporation through <strong>the</strong> gift <strong>of</strong> $25,000 made possible,<br />

as an addition to this build<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>the</strong> construction <strong>of</strong> a stack room<br />

with a capacity <strong>of</strong> 150,000 volumes. Here are stored 45,000 books,<br />

6,500 pamphlets, <strong>and</strong> an unusually valuable collection <strong>of</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ts <strong>and</strong><br />

manuscripts. The most valuable <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> rare books <strong>and</strong> manuscripts,<br />

toge<strong>the</strong>r with all non-current college records, are kept <strong>in</strong> a concrete<br />

vault adjo<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g room. The collection <strong>of</strong> manuscripts is<br />

constantly receiv<strong>in</strong>g valuable accessions through gifts from many<br />

friends <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college. The books are classified accord<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong><br />

Dewey decimal system. A dictionary card catalogue, kept up to<br />

date by <strong>the</strong> use <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ted cards <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Library <strong>of</strong> Congress,<br />

makes <strong>the</strong> resources <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> library available. The annual accessions<br />

approximate 4,000 volumes <strong>of</strong> carefully selected books. The num-<br />

ber <strong>of</strong> current periodicals regularly received is 506.<br />

The read<strong>in</strong>g rooms, on <strong>the</strong> walls <strong>of</strong> which are portraits <strong>of</strong> dis-<br />

t<strong>in</strong>guished alumni, em<strong>in</strong>ent Virg<strong>in</strong>ians, <strong>and</strong> benefactors <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> col-<br />

lege, can accommodate two hundred students. Students are en-<br />

couraged to consult books, not only <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g rooms, but also<br />

<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> stack room, to which <strong>the</strong>y are admitted at all times. To fur-<br />

<strong>the</strong>r <strong>the</strong> serviceableness <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> library, as a part <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college<br />

course <strong>in</strong> English <strong>the</strong> librarian <strong>of</strong>fers a series <strong>of</strong> lectures on <strong>the</strong> use<br />

<strong>of</strong> reference books. (See page 95, English 103-R). The library<br />

is open every day <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> year from 8 a. m. to 10 p. m., except<br />

Sundays, when <strong>the</strong> hours are from 2 to 10 p. m.


34 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

CITIZENSHIP BUILDING<br />

The Citizenship Build<strong>in</strong>g is a two-story brick structure to <strong>the</strong><br />

southwest <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ma<strong>in</strong> build<strong>in</strong>g. In this build<strong>in</strong>g are housed <strong>the</strong><br />

Marshall-Wy<strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Government <strong>and</strong> Citizenship, <strong>the</strong> School<br />

<strong>of</strong> Jurisprudence, <strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Economics <strong>and</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>is-<br />

tration, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> Department <strong>of</strong> Journalism.<br />

DINING HALL<br />

The temporary unit, built on to <strong>the</strong> old d<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g hall erected <strong>in</strong><br />

1914, was destroyed by fire on June 18, 1925. On <strong>the</strong> same day <strong>the</strong><br />

Governor authorized <strong>the</strong> erection <strong>of</strong> a new unit to cost $125,000.00.<br />

This new unit will be ready for use by September, 1926. <strong>and</strong> will<br />

seat 1,000 students.<br />

PHI BETA KAPPA MEMORIAL HALL<br />

The Phi Beta Kappa Memorial Hall is <strong>in</strong> process <strong>of</strong> construction,<br />

<strong>and</strong> will be ready for occupancy by December 4, 1926. The<br />

funds for tbe erection <strong>of</strong> this hall are to be supplied by <strong>the</strong> United<br />

Chapters <strong>of</strong> Phi Beta Kappa. The build<strong>in</strong>g is to be used as an<br />

auditorium <strong>and</strong> as a home for Phi Beta Kappa guests.<br />

INFIRMARY<br />

The college has an <strong>in</strong>firmary for <strong>the</strong> accommodation <strong>of</strong> students.<br />

Here <strong>the</strong> college physician has his <strong>of</strong>fice, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> nurse is <strong>in</strong> at-<br />

tendance.<br />

THE PRACTICE HOUSE<br />

The practice house, a recent addition to <strong>the</strong> department <strong>of</strong> home<br />

economics, is a large two-story frame structure, purchased <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

autumn <strong>of</strong> 1922. All remodel<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> renovat<strong>in</strong>g were done under<br />

<strong>the</strong> supervision <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> department. Although <strong>the</strong> house is not ex-<br />

pensively furnished, it presents a very attractive appearance.<br />

Under <strong>the</strong> supervision <strong>of</strong> a pr<strong>of</strong>essor, who is a member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

practice house family, a group <strong>of</strong> three or four students, juniors<br />

<strong>and</strong> seniors <strong>in</strong> home economics, lives <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> practice house for a


Build<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> Grounds 35<br />

period <strong>of</strong> twelve weeks, <strong>and</strong>, dur<strong>in</strong>g this time, does all <strong>the</strong> work<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> household. Although it is not <strong>the</strong> purpose <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> practice<br />

house to duplicate home conditions exactly, every effort is made to<br />

create a pleas<strong>in</strong>g, home-like atmosphere, <strong>in</strong> which <strong>the</strong> students<br />

should form <strong>the</strong> highest possible st<strong>and</strong>ards for home-mak<strong>in</strong>g. Visi-<br />

tors are welcome at all times.<br />

DORMITORIES FOR MEN<br />

There are five dormitories for men, with total accommodations<br />

for more than three hundred students. Taliaferro, Ewell <strong>and</strong> Ewell<br />

Annex dormitories are situated on <strong>the</strong> south side <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ma<strong>in</strong><br />

thoroughfare lead<strong>in</strong>g to Jamestown. They have been so remodeled<br />

that <strong>the</strong> rooms are very comfortable. These dormitories accommo-<br />

date one hundred <strong>and</strong> twenty students. The large <strong>and</strong> steady <strong>in</strong>-<br />

crease <strong>of</strong> male students s<strong>in</strong>ce 1919 has necessitated <strong>the</strong> leas<strong>in</strong>g as<br />

a dormitory for men a fourth build<strong>in</strong>g, orig<strong>in</strong>ally erected <strong>in</strong> 1908<br />

by <strong>the</strong> Norfolk Synod as a school for girls. The build<strong>in</strong>g is very<br />

conveniently located with<strong>in</strong> three hundred yards <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ma<strong>in</strong> build-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g. It is <strong>of</strong> brick, is two hundred <strong>and</strong> fifty-three feet by forty,<br />

<strong>and</strong> is three stories <strong>in</strong> height. Here one hundred <strong>and</strong> twenty-five<br />

students can f<strong>in</strong>d accommodation.<br />

The new men's dormitory, known as Monroe Hall, was opened<br />

for use <strong>in</strong> September, 1924. The cost <strong>of</strong> this hall, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g equipment,<br />

is two hundred thous<strong>and</strong> dollars. It is a thoroughly modern<br />

fire-pro<strong>of</strong> structure conta<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g memorials to many dist<strong>in</strong>guished<br />

alumni <strong>and</strong> afford<strong>in</strong>g accommodations for 168 students.<br />

All dormitories are heated with steam, are lighted with electricity,<br />

<strong>and</strong> are screened. Each room is supplied with pure runn<strong>in</strong>g water<br />

from <strong>the</strong> artesian well on <strong>the</strong> campus. There are hot <strong>and</strong> cold<br />

shower baths on each floor. The rooms conta<strong>in</strong> all necessary fur-<br />

niture, such as steel lockers, dressers, tables, chairs <strong>and</strong> s<strong>in</strong>gle iron<br />

bedsteads <strong>and</strong> mattresses.<br />

DORMITORIES FOR WOMEN<br />

Jefferson Hall, <strong>the</strong> dormitory for women, was erected by funds<br />

provided by <strong>the</strong> General Assembly <strong>of</strong> 1920. This brick build<strong>in</strong>g is<br />

two hundred feet by forty-one, <strong>in</strong> every respect modern, sanitary,


36<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> attractive. In <strong>the</strong> basement is a gymnasium eighty-eight feet<br />

by forty-one, <strong>and</strong> a swimm<strong>in</strong>g pool <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> capacity <strong>of</strong> forty-five<br />

thous<strong>and</strong> gallons. The ma<strong>in</strong>, or ground, floor conta<strong>in</strong>s <strong>the</strong> ma<strong>in</strong><br />

entrance, <strong>the</strong> parlors <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> apartments for <strong>the</strong> director <strong>of</strong> women<br />

<strong>and</strong> for <strong>the</strong> women teachers. The second <strong>and</strong> third floors are <strong>the</strong><br />

dormitories proper. The rooms are fourteen by fifteen feet <strong>in</strong> size,<br />

<strong>and</strong> each accommodates two students. There is <strong>in</strong> each room run-<br />

n<strong>in</strong>g water, hot <strong>and</strong> cold; two large closets, <strong>and</strong> two s<strong>in</strong>gle iron<br />

beds, besides a dresser, a table <strong>and</strong> chairs. The build<strong>in</strong>g accommo-<br />

dates one hundred <strong>and</strong> twenty-five students.<br />

The gymnasium <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> basement <strong>of</strong> Jefferson Hall is modern<br />

<strong>in</strong> all respects. Its floor space, eighty-eight feet by forty-one. is<br />

sufficient for basketball <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>door games <strong>and</strong> exercises. Adjo<strong>in</strong>-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g this open court are <strong>the</strong> swimm<strong>in</strong>g pool <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> dress<strong>in</strong>g rooms.<br />

The gymnasium is supplied with steel lockers, shower baths <strong>and</strong><br />

modern equipment.<br />

Tyler Hall, built <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> summer <strong>of</strong> 1916, is also used for women.<br />

Tt is a three-story brick build<strong>in</strong>g conta<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g twenty-seven very<br />

large, airy rooms, some <strong>of</strong> which have separate study <strong>and</strong> sleep<strong>in</strong>g<br />

apartments. The construction <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> build<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> two dist<strong>in</strong>ct units<br />

obviates <strong>the</strong> noise <strong>in</strong>cident to long corridors. This hall also is<br />

dist<strong>in</strong>ctly modern <strong>in</strong> all its equipment.<br />

Tyler Annex on <strong>the</strong> campus, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> Blair House two blocks<br />

away are also used as dormitories for women. These build<strong>in</strong>gs arc<br />

comfortable <strong>and</strong> have modern conveniences <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> rooms, or on each<br />

floor. All <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> s<strong>in</strong>gle rooms for women are <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>se build<strong>in</strong>gs.<br />

All women students <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong>, except those who come daily<br />

from <strong>the</strong>ir homes, are required to live <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> dormitories.<br />

Exceptions to this rule will be made only <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> cases <strong>of</strong> mature<br />

women who are twenty-five years <strong>of</strong> age or over.<br />

CARY FIELD PARK AND MEN'S GYMNASIUM<br />

The whole campus <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college conta<strong>in</strong>s about three hundred<br />

<strong>and</strong> fourteen acres, one hundred <strong>and</strong> thirty acres <strong>of</strong> which are<br />

cleared. The eastern portion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> campus, cover<strong>in</strong>g about thirty<br />

acres, is used for build<strong>in</strong>gs; <strong>the</strong> western portion is used for athletic<br />

purposes. The latter portion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> campus is known as Cary Field


Build<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> Grounds 37<br />

Park, named <strong>in</strong> honor <strong>of</strong> T. Archibald Cary, who gave <strong>the</strong> funds<br />

for grad<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> baseball <strong>and</strong> football grounds <strong>and</strong> for build<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong><br />

gr<strong>and</strong>st<strong>and</strong>. This year additional ground is be<strong>in</strong>g graded <strong>and</strong> put <strong>in</strong><br />

sbape so that <strong>the</strong>re will be ample room for all outdoor sports.<br />

THE GEORGE PRESTON BLOW MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM<br />

This build<strong>in</strong>g was given to <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>in</strong> 1924 by Mrs. George<br />

Preston Blow, <strong>of</strong> Yorktown, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, <strong>and</strong> La Salle, Ill<strong>in</strong>ois, <strong>and</strong><br />

by her children, <strong>in</strong> memory <strong>of</strong> Capta<strong>in</strong> George Preston Blow, <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> United States Navy, whose fa<strong>the</strong>r <strong>and</strong> gr<strong>and</strong>fa<strong>the</strong>r were alumni<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong>. It is one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> largest <strong>and</strong> best equipped gym-<br />

nasiums <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> South, conta<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g a st<strong>and</strong>ard size swimm<strong>in</strong>g pool,<br />

shower baths, lockers, basketball court, large gymnasium hall, run-<br />

n<strong>in</strong>g tracks, monogram <strong>and</strong> trophy room, <strong>and</strong> a large hall for<br />

Y. M. C. A. <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r meet<strong>in</strong>gs. In addition to <strong>the</strong> dedication tab-<br />

let, a large bronze tablet <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> entrance hall carries <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>in</strong>scription, 'sett<strong>in</strong>g forth <strong>the</strong> purposes to which <strong>the</strong> build<strong>in</strong>g is<br />

dedicated.<br />

UT SIT MENS SANA IN CORPORE SANO<br />

THIS BUILDING IS DEDICATED TO THE PURPOSE<br />

OF MINISTERING TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF MANHOOD<br />

AND THE MORE ABUNDANT LIFE<br />

IT IS TO BE USED AS A MEANS FOR MAKING THE HUMAN BODY<br />

THE FIT TEMPLE OF A DIVINE SPIRIT<br />

HERE THE BODY WILL BE TRAINED TO CONTRIBUTE<br />

TO THE GROWTH OF A CULTURED MIND<br />

AND BE MADE THE ALERT INSTRUMENT FOR THE EXPRESSION<br />

OF CLEAR THOUGHT AND NOBLE FEELING<br />

HERE MEN WILL BE ENDUED WITH STRENGTH TO HELP TO BEAR<br />

THE BURDENS OF THE WEAK:<br />

HERE THEY WILL GAIN PHYSICAL VITALITY<br />

AND LEARN TO REVERENCE AND CONSERVE IT IN LIVES OF<br />

CHASTITY<br />

AND TO EXPEND IT IN DEEDS OF CHIVALRY<br />

HERE THEY WILL LEARN THE TOY OF FELLOWSHIP<br />

AND GO FORTH AS COMRADES IN SERVICE<br />

AND IN THE FURTHER OUEST FOR THE TRUTH THAT MAKES<br />

MEN FREE


GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION<br />

Applicants for admission to college should always write to <strong>the</strong><br />

registrar <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college for <strong>the</strong> <strong>of</strong>ficial entrance application blank<br />

<strong>and</strong> should have <strong>the</strong>ir certificates <strong>of</strong> preparation filled out accord-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>structions given on page 57. The certificate should<br />

<strong>the</strong>n be filed with <strong>the</strong> registrar at least two zveeks before <strong>the</strong> open-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> session <strong>in</strong> order that applicants without <strong>the</strong> necessary<br />

preparation may be notified <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir failure to fulfill <strong>the</strong> entrance<br />

requirements.<br />

As soon as possible after arriv<strong>in</strong>g at college all students should<br />

report to <strong>the</strong> registrar's <strong>of</strong>fice <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Brafferton build<strong>in</strong>g. The<br />

registrar classifies <strong>the</strong> student <strong>and</strong> gives him a classification ticket<br />

which must <strong>the</strong>n be presented at <strong>the</strong> <strong>of</strong>fice <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> dean. From <strong>the</strong><br />

dean <strong>the</strong> student receives a card permitt<strong>in</strong>g him to matriculate.<br />

The classification ticket <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> matriculation card are <strong>the</strong>n<br />

presented to <strong>the</strong> treasurer <strong>in</strong> his <strong>of</strong>fice <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Brafferton build<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

On <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> fees <strong>the</strong> student is <strong>of</strong>ficially enrolled on <strong>the</strong><br />

register <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college.<br />

Official classification <strong>and</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> fees are requisite to en-<br />

rollment.<br />

STUDENT SUPERVISION<br />

The president <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> faculty, through committees assigned for<br />

<strong>the</strong> several academic classes, <strong>and</strong> through advisers for <strong>in</strong>dividual<br />

groups, endeavor to follow carefully <strong>the</strong> progress <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> behavior<br />

<strong>of</strong> every student <strong>in</strong> college, <strong>and</strong> by personal oversight <strong>and</strong> advice to<br />

<strong>in</strong>sure proper conduct <strong>and</strong> attention to duties. Tn addition, <strong>the</strong><br />

president re-enforces <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> several committees <strong>and</strong> ad-<br />

visers through <strong>in</strong>spection <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> monthly class reports <strong>and</strong> through<br />

personal <strong>in</strong>terviews with del<strong>in</strong>quents. Students are not permitted to<br />

enter any course or to drop a course after admission to it. except<br />

with <strong>the</strong> consent <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> dean. The president is also assisted <strong>in</strong> this<br />

work by <strong>the</strong> student committee <strong>of</strong> self-government.<br />

Monthly reports show<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> students <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir classes<br />

are sent to parents <strong>and</strong> guardians.


Government <strong>and</strong> Adm<strong>in</strong>istration 39<br />

The dean <strong>of</strong> women is <strong>the</strong> educational adviser <strong>of</strong> all women<br />

students. The social director, who is also a member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> faculty,<br />

is <strong>in</strong> charge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> social life <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> women. No effort is spared to<br />

<strong>in</strong>sure to women <strong>the</strong> most wholesome <strong>and</strong> stimulat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>tellectual <strong>and</strong><br />

social environment. The women's self-government association co-<br />

operates with <strong>the</strong> social director <strong>of</strong> women <strong>in</strong> regulat<strong>in</strong>g all matters<br />

<strong>of</strong> student life not under her immediate supervision.<br />

ABSENCE FROM LECTURES AND FROM COLLEGE<br />

Absence from classes or from o<strong>the</strong>r college duties without suf-<br />

ficient reason is not tolerated. Sickness or <strong>the</strong> permission <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

president or <strong>the</strong> dean to be absent from college constitutes a suf-<br />

ficient reason, but does not excuse <strong>the</strong> student from his class work.<br />

It is <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> prov<strong>in</strong>ce <strong>of</strong> each <strong>in</strong>structor to prescribe <strong>the</strong> conditions<br />

under which class work shall be made up, whatever <strong>the</strong> reason for<br />

absence.<br />

CHANGES IN COURSES<br />

After one week <strong>of</strong> a semester has elapsed no student will be per-<br />

mitted to change a course until a fee <strong>of</strong> three dollars has been paid.<br />

If a student drops a course because <strong>of</strong> his neglect <strong>of</strong> work, failure<br />

will be marked aga<strong>in</strong>st him for <strong>the</strong> term <strong>in</strong> this course.<br />

DELAYED REGISTRATION<br />

Any student who fails to register on or before Wednesday, September<br />

<strong>the</strong> fifteenth <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first semester, or to register before Monday,<br />

January <strong>the</strong> thirty-first, <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> second semester, will be charged<br />

a delayed fee <strong>of</strong> five dollars ($5.00), which will be remitted only <strong>in</strong><br />

case <strong>of</strong> sickness.<br />

For each day or part <strong>of</strong> a day that a student is absent from<br />

lectures follow<strong>in</strong>g registration, <strong>and</strong> preced<strong>in</strong>g or follow<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong><br />

Thanksgiv<strong>in</strong>g or Christmas Vacation, or any o<strong>the</strong>r holiday, a delayed<br />

fee <strong>of</strong> five dollars will be charged unless such absence is due to<br />

sickness or upon excuse secured from <strong>the</strong> president.


40 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> axd <strong>Mary</strong><br />

DISCIPLINE<br />

The discipl<strong>in</strong>e <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college is <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> h<strong>and</strong>s <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> president with<br />

<strong>the</strong> advice <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> faculty. The object is to ma<strong>in</strong>ta<strong>in</strong> regularity <strong>and</strong><br />

order <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>stitution <strong>and</strong> to <strong>in</strong>culcate <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> students <strong>the</strong> spirit<br />

<strong>of</strong> honor.<br />

The honor system as accepted at <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> assumes that<br />

every student is trustworthy <strong>and</strong> will not do a dishonest <strong>and</strong> dis-<br />

honorable th<strong>in</strong>g or violate his pledged word. Each student is re-<br />

quired to sign <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g pledge on written work: "I hereby<br />

declare upon my word <strong>of</strong> honor that I have nei<strong>the</strong>r given nor re-<br />

ceived help on this test (exam<strong>in</strong>ation or assignment)." The young<br />

men <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> young women, through <strong>the</strong>ir student councils, immediately<br />

take cognizance <strong>of</strong> any violation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> honor system, <strong>and</strong><br />

any student found guilty <strong>of</strong> violat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> accepted code is regarded<br />

as unfit to rema<strong>in</strong> as a member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college community.<br />

The exam<strong>in</strong>ations are given under <strong>the</strong> honor system <strong>and</strong> a formal<br />

pledge to every exam<strong>in</strong>ation or test paper is required.<br />

The respective student councils also take cognizance <strong>of</strong> any mat-<br />

ters which, <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir judgment, are <strong>in</strong>jurious to <strong>the</strong> well-be<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> college. So thoroughly is <strong>the</strong> enforcement <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> honor system<br />

placed <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> h<strong>and</strong>s <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> students that <strong>the</strong>re is rarely any appeal<br />

from <strong>the</strong>ir decision.<br />

The faculty believes that it owes as a duty to parents <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>-<br />

sistence upon <strong>the</strong> withdrawal <strong>of</strong> any student not pr<strong>of</strong>it<strong>in</strong>g by his stay<br />

at college ; <strong>and</strong>, when non-resident students are permitted to withdraw<br />

or are dropped from <strong>the</strong> roll or are suspended, <strong>the</strong>y must<br />

forthwith leave <strong>William</strong>sburg <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> vic<strong>in</strong>ity. Until this requirement<br />

is fulfilled, <strong>the</strong>y rema<strong>in</strong> subject to <strong>the</strong> authority <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>sti-<br />

tution <strong>and</strong> may be expelled. In every case <strong>of</strong> discipl<strong>in</strong>e <strong>the</strong> student's<br />

parent or guardian is <strong>in</strong>formed <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> action.<br />

A summary <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> regulations <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> is put <strong>in</strong>to <strong>the</strong><br />

h<strong>and</strong>s <strong>of</strong> every student when he presents himself for registration.<br />

He is required to sign <strong>the</strong>se regulations <strong>and</strong> to agree to abide by<br />

<strong>the</strong>m before lie is allowed to matriculate.<br />

Haz<strong>in</strong>g or subject<strong>in</strong>g a student to any form <strong>of</strong> humiliat<strong>in</strong>g treat-<br />

ment, us<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>toxicat<strong>in</strong>g liquors, gambl<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>and</strong> keep<strong>in</strong>g firearms <strong>in</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong>ir rooms are forbidden by <strong>the</strong> statutes <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college.


Government <strong>and</strong> Adm<strong>in</strong>istration 41<br />

Students are not allowed to have automobiles, except by special<br />

permission to be secured from <strong>the</strong> president.<br />

EXAMINATION AND SYSTEM OF GRADING<br />

Written exam<strong>in</strong>ations are held at <strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> each semester. An<br />

exam<strong>in</strong>ation grade <strong>of</strong> 75 per cent passes a student, provided his class<br />

st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> attendance are satisfactory to <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>of</strong>essor. The<br />

student's grades are recorded on <strong>the</strong> percentage basis.<br />

DROPPING FROM THE ROLL<br />

A freshman who fails at any regular semester exam<strong>in</strong>ation to<br />

pass unconditionally one-third <strong>of</strong> his hours will be dropped from<br />

<strong>the</strong> roll <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college, unless <strong>the</strong> failure is due to cont<strong>in</strong>ued sick-<br />

ness or to some o<strong>the</strong>r unavoidable cause. A freshman who for any<br />

reason is permitted to register for less than fifteen hours must pass<br />

at least five hours. An upper classman who fails at any regular<br />

semester exam<strong>in</strong>ation to pass unconditionally n<strong>in</strong>e hours will be<br />

dropped from <strong>the</strong> roll <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college, unless <strong>the</strong> failure is due to<br />

sickness or some o<strong>the</strong>r unavoidable cause. An upper classman who<br />

for any reason is permitted to register for less than fifteen hours<br />

must pass on at least n<strong>in</strong>e hours. In <strong>the</strong> enforcement <strong>of</strong> this regu-<br />

lation any student who has attended this college or any o<strong>the</strong>r col-<br />

lege dur<strong>in</strong>g any regular session will be regarded as an upper class-<br />

man, regardless <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> number <strong>of</strong> credits made. Hours as used<br />

above means semester hour credits.<br />

STUDENT ASSEMBLIES<br />

Student assemblies are held each week on Tuesday, Wednesday,<br />

Thursday <strong>and</strong> Friday at 8:40 o'clock. All students are <strong>in</strong>vited to<br />

attend each assembly ; but seniors are required to attend on Tues-<br />

day, juniors on Wednesday, sophomores on Thursday, <strong>and</strong> freshmen<br />

on Friday. All assemblies are opened with song, Bible read<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>and</strong><br />

prayer. These meet<strong>in</strong>gs are <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> h<strong>and</strong>s <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> president <strong>and</strong><br />

members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> faculty, but are <strong>of</strong>ten turned over to <strong>the</strong> students.


42 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

PUBLIC PERFORMANCES<br />

No person or group <strong>of</strong> persons associated with <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> shall give ei<strong>the</strong>r <strong>in</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg or elsewhere<br />

a public performance <strong>of</strong> any k<strong>in</strong>d unless prior to <strong>the</strong> first rehearsal<br />

<strong>the</strong> said person or group <strong>of</strong> persons shall have obta<strong>in</strong>ed from <strong>the</strong><br />

proper authorities <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college permission to present <strong>the</strong> enterta<strong>in</strong>-<br />

ment. In order to secure permission, those <strong>in</strong> charge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> performance<br />

must make written application to <strong>the</strong> president <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> col-<br />

lege or to a committee appo<strong>in</strong>ted by him <strong>and</strong> to be known as <strong>the</strong><br />

committee on public performances. The application must conta<strong>in</strong><br />

a statement as to <strong>the</strong> nature <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> performance to be given, <strong>the</strong><br />

time <strong>and</strong> place <strong>of</strong> presentation, <strong>the</strong> names <strong>of</strong> those direct<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong><br />

performance, <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> those tak<strong>in</strong>g part <strong>in</strong> it, <strong>the</strong> hours <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> place<br />

<strong>of</strong> rehearsals, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> names <strong>of</strong> those who are to chaperon both <strong>the</strong><br />

rehearsals <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> performances.<br />

SAMPLE AND SALES ROOMS<br />

The use <strong>of</strong> rooms <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> college build<strong>in</strong>gs for display<strong>in</strong>g samples<br />

<strong>and</strong> goods for sale to students <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>rs is not permitted. This<br />

applies to firms hav<strong>in</strong>g ei<strong>the</strong>r special agents or student represen-<br />

tatives.<br />

COMMUNICATIONS FOR STUDENTS<br />

Parents or friends wish<strong>in</strong>g to communicate with students must<br />

do so by letter or telegram. No student will be called to <strong>the</strong> tele-<br />

phone. The clerks at <strong>the</strong> college, however, will deliver a telephone<br />

message <strong>in</strong> case <strong>of</strong> emergency.


EXPENSES<br />

First semester—To facilitate bookkeep<strong>in</strong>g, parents are requested<br />

to send a check for <strong>the</strong> expenses <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> term, so far as known at<br />

<strong>the</strong> time, to <strong>the</strong> treasurer's <strong>of</strong>fice on or before September 8th.<br />

Second semester—A check for <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>cipal expenses is requested<br />

on or before January 20th.<br />

FEES FOR VIRGINIA STUDENTS<br />

Per term—payable <strong>in</strong> advance<br />

<strong>College</strong> fee $ 30.00<br />

Matriculation fee 7.50<br />

Athletic fee 11.50<br />

Students' Activities fee ~ 6.75<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>gent fee 1.50<br />

Library fee 1.50<br />

Gymnasium fee 5.00<br />

Laboratory Fees— payable <strong>in</strong> advance<br />

Per semester $ 7.50<br />

Organic chemistry 10.50<br />

TEACHERS' SCHOLARSHIPS<br />

$ 63.75<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students hold<strong>in</strong>g Teacher's Scholarships pledged to<br />

teach two years <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> public schools <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia are given a credit<br />

<strong>of</strong> $30.00 a semester on <strong>the</strong>ir fees.<br />

STUDENTS NOT LIVING IN VIRGINIA<br />

Students not liv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia pay at <strong>the</strong> same rate as Virg<strong>in</strong>ia<br />

students plus $45 per term for tuition, all payable <strong>in</strong> advance per<br />

term.<br />

All students room<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> dormitories are required to h<strong>and</strong>le <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

laundry through ihe college unless it is sent home. Laundry charges are<br />

75 cents per week.


44 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

GENERAL INFORMATION ON FEES<br />

All students should note that college expenses are payable <strong>in</strong> ad-<br />

vance by <strong>the</strong> semester, remittance be<strong>in</strong>g made by check, drawn to<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>. The charges for room rent,<br />

late matriculation fee, laboratory fees, music, journalism, special<br />

exam<strong>in</strong>ations, f<strong>in</strong>es for miss<strong>in</strong>g classes <strong>and</strong> similar items may be<br />

paid after <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> each semester <strong>and</strong> are not <strong>in</strong>cluded <strong>in</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> first check, as stated above. No student <strong>in</strong> arrears to <strong>the</strong> col-<br />

lege for fees or board will be awarded honors or degrees.<br />

The Athletic Fee ($11.50) had its' orig<strong>in</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> request <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

students. The money derived from this fee is used to defray <strong>the</strong><br />

expense <strong>of</strong> ma<strong>in</strong>ta<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> various forms <strong>of</strong> athletic activity at col-<br />

lege. Payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> fee entitles <strong>the</strong> student to membership <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

athletic association <strong>and</strong> to free admission to all athletic contests on<br />

<strong>the</strong> home grounds.<br />

The <strong>College</strong> Fee ($30.00 a semester) is a payment towards <strong>the</strong><br />

general <strong>in</strong>cidental expenses <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college, fuel, servants' hire, <strong>and</strong><br />

ma<strong>in</strong>tenance <strong>of</strong> build<strong>in</strong>gs.<br />

A Student Activities Fee <strong>of</strong> $6.75 a semester was requested by<br />

<strong>the</strong> student body. For purposes <strong>of</strong> adm<strong>in</strong>istration, it will be col-<br />

lected by <strong>the</strong> treasurer <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college <strong>and</strong> by vote <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> students i^<br />

divided as follows :<br />

9-27 to <strong>the</strong> Colonial Echo; 5-27 to <strong>the</strong> Flat Hat; 5-27 to <strong>the</strong><br />

Literary Magaz<strong>in</strong>e; 4-27 to <strong>the</strong> Y. M. C. A. or Y. W. C. A.; 4-27<br />

to <strong>the</strong> Literary Societies. One dollar from each Student Activities<br />

fee paid by <strong>the</strong> women goes to <strong>the</strong> Women's Student Government<br />

Association.<br />

Each student will be entitled, without additional charge, to a<br />

copy <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Colonial Echo, to a subscription to The Flat Hat <strong>and</strong><br />

Literary Magaz<strong>in</strong>e, to membership <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Y. M. C. A. or Y. W.<br />

C. A., as <strong>the</strong> case may be, <strong>and</strong> to membership <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> literary societv<br />

which <strong>the</strong> student may choose.<br />

Reductions.—No rebates <strong>in</strong> any <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> above fees will be al-<br />

lowed. No reduction will be made <strong>in</strong> board <strong>and</strong> room for periods<br />

less than one month. No meal tickets will be issued on credit.


Expenses 45<br />

Room rent <strong>and</strong> board <strong>in</strong>clude <strong>the</strong> charges for room, board, fur-<br />

niture, janitor service, light <strong>and</strong> heat. No part <strong>of</strong> room rent <strong>and</strong><br />

board will be refunded to <strong>the</strong> student who leaves <strong>the</strong> dormitory un-<br />

less he withdraws from college.<br />

FEES FOR HOLDERS OF SCHOLARSHIPS<br />

Any student hold<strong>in</strong>g a scholarship is required to pay matriculation,<br />

athletic, student activity, cont<strong>in</strong>gent, library <strong>and</strong> gymnasium<br />

fees.<br />

For schedule <strong>of</strong> rates for <strong>the</strong> rooms <strong>and</strong> board <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> different<br />

dormitories, see below. All students who room <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> college dormi-<br />

tories are required to board <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> college board<strong>in</strong>g department.<br />

Students who do not room <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> college dormitory cannot board<br />

<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> college board<strong>in</strong>g department without special permits.<br />

RESERVATION OF ROOMS IN DORMITORIES<br />

In order to have a room reserved for <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g session, <strong>the</strong><br />

applicant is required to make a deposit <strong>of</strong> $5 with <strong>the</strong> registrar.<br />

This deposit will be credited on <strong>the</strong> student's account, but will not<br />

be refunded to students who do not attend college unless <strong>the</strong> regis-<br />

trar is notified on or before August 15th.<br />

Students furnish <strong>the</strong>ir towels, bed l<strong>in</strong>en, blankets <strong>and</strong> pillozvs.<br />

RATES FOR ROOM AND BOARD<br />

Men<br />

Monroe Hall—Two <strong>in</strong> a room, per semester, each $160.00<br />

Room with bath, per semester, each 183.00<br />

Taliaferro—Two <strong>in</strong> a room, per semester, each 135.00<br />

S<strong>in</strong>gle room, per semester 150.00<br />

Ewell <strong>and</strong> Ewell Annex—Two <strong>in</strong> a room, per semester, ea. 135.00<br />

Boundary No. 1—Third floor Ewell, Ewell Annex <strong>and</strong><br />

Taliaferro—Two <strong>in</strong> a room, per semester, each 130.00<br />

S<strong>in</strong>gle room, per semester 144.00<br />

Scotl<strong>and</strong> Street Build<strong>in</strong>g—Two <strong>in</strong> a room, per semester,<br />

each 130.00


46 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Women<br />

Jefferson Hall—Two <strong>in</strong> a room, per semester, each $171.00<br />

Three <strong>in</strong> a room, per semester, each 171.00<br />

Tyler Hall, Deanery, Blair House, Practice House, Wolf<br />

House. Each student, per semester 153.00<br />

Tyler Annex—Two <strong>in</strong> a room, per semester, each 138.00<br />

S<strong>in</strong>gle room, per semester 153.00<br />

Boundary No. 2—Each student 138.00<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students hold<strong>in</strong>g Teacher's Scholarships pledged to<br />

teach two years <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> public schools <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia zvill be given a<br />

credit <strong>of</strong> $9.00 per semester on board.<br />

PHYSICAL CARE AND MEDICAL ATTENDANCE<br />

The college employs a physician, a nurse <strong>and</strong> assistant nurse<br />

to take care <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> physical welfare <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> students. Modern sani-<br />

tary conditions are ma<strong>in</strong>ta<strong>in</strong>ed <strong>and</strong> medical treatment is given to<br />

<strong>the</strong> students with no additional cost to <strong>the</strong>m beyond <strong>the</strong> ord<strong>in</strong>ary<br />

fees listed above. Physical exercises <strong>and</strong> athletic sports are under<br />

expert supervision <strong>and</strong> are conducted primarily for <strong>the</strong> promotion<br />

<strong>of</strong> health <strong>and</strong> efficiency. An <strong>in</strong>firmary affords facilities for <strong>the</strong> iso-<br />

lation <strong>of</strong> cases <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>fectious diseases or for those requir<strong>in</strong>g quiet<br />

surround<strong>in</strong>gs.<br />

Medical attention <strong>and</strong> staple medic<strong>in</strong>es are furnished free <strong>of</strong><br />

charge to <strong>the</strong> students, but <strong>the</strong> college does not assume <strong>the</strong> expense<br />

<strong>of</strong> consult<strong>in</strong>g physicians or surgical operations. Students not liv<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> college dormitories are charged a fee <strong>of</strong> $1.50 for each day<br />

<strong>the</strong>y may be conf<strong>in</strong>ed <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>firmary.<br />

SPECIAL FEES AND EXPENSES<br />

1. LABORATORY FEES. A laboratory fee <strong>of</strong> seven <strong>and</strong><br />

one-half dollars per semester is charged for each laboratory course<br />

taken <strong>in</strong> chemistry, biology, <strong>in</strong>dustrial arts, physics, stenography,<br />

typewrit<strong>in</strong>g, home economics <strong>and</strong> journalism. In organic chemistry<br />

<strong>the</strong> fee is ten <strong>and</strong> one-half dollars per semester. Breakage <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

laboratory will be charged aga<strong>in</strong>st <strong>the</strong> student.


Expenses 47<br />

2. Fees for Applied Music (Piano or Voice), $40.00 each<br />

semester. Use <strong>of</strong> practice piano, $5.00 for each semester.<br />

No fees for work <strong>in</strong> Harmony classes.<br />

3. SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS. A fee <strong>of</strong> three dollars is<br />

charged for all special exam<strong>in</strong>ations except such as are necessitated<br />

by sickness or o<strong>the</strong>r unavoidable causes. This fee must be paid <strong>in</strong><br />

advance, <strong>and</strong> a receipt from <strong>the</strong> treasurer <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college must be<br />

presented before <strong>the</strong> exam<strong>in</strong>ation is taken.<br />

4. THE CONTINGENT FEE. Every student is required to<br />

deposit with <strong>the</strong> treasurer at <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> each semester a con-<br />

t<strong>in</strong>gent fee <strong>of</strong> one dollar <strong>and</strong> fifty cents, which is not returnable.<br />

5. DIPLOMAS. The charge for <strong>the</strong> Master's diploma is ten<br />

dollars, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> charge for <strong>the</strong> Bachelor's diploma is seven dollars<br />

<strong>and</strong> fifty cents. These fees are payable at graduation.<br />

6. GYMNASIUM FEE. All students are charged a gymna-<br />

sium fee <strong>of</strong> five dollars. This fee covers use <strong>of</strong> equipment, locker,<br />

shower baths, swimm<strong>in</strong>g lessons <strong>and</strong> plunge periods.<br />

INCIDENTAL EXPENSES<br />

It is impossible to formulate <strong>the</strong> exact cost to students <strong>of</strong> cloth-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g, travel <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>cidental expenses. These are governed largely<br />

by <strong>the</strong> habits <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>dividual. The college endeavors to cultivate<br />

frugality <strong>and</strong> to protect <strong>the</strong> student from temptations. The size <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong>sburg aids materially <strong>in</strong> this matter by not subject<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong><br />

students to <strong>the</strong> diversions <strong>of</strong> a large city. As <strong>the</strong> dem<strong>and</strong>s for extra<br />

money are small, parents are advised to furnish only a small sum.<br />

The cost <strong>of</strong> books depends somewhat on <strong>the</strong> courses taken, but<br />

will seldom be less than fifteen dollars a year <strong>and</strong> does not usually<br />

exceed thirty dollars a year.<br />

REDUCTION OF EXPENSE TO HOLDERS OF STATE<br />

SCHOLARSHIPS<br />

A reduction <strong>of</strong> expenses to holders <strong>of</strong> State scholarships is made<br />

possible by <strong>the</strong> desire <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Commonwealth to develop a body <strong>of</strong>


48 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

men <strong>and</strong> women tra<strong>in</strong>ed for, <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>terested <strong>in</strong>, its greatest responsi-<br />

bility—<strong>the</strong> education <strong>of</strong> its children. Therefore, through <strong>the</strong> aid<br />

furnished by <strong>the</strong> State, <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> <strong>of</strong>fers<br />

one hundred <strong>and</strong> thirty-two scholarships to young men <strong>and</strong> women<br />

who wish to prepare <strong>the</strong>mselves to teach <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> public schools <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> State. These scholarships may be secured by apply<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong><br />

super<strong>in</strong>tendent <strong>of</strong> schools <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> counties <strong>and</strong> cities. Each scholarship<br />

entitles <strong>the</strong> holder to a credit on college expenses, amount<strong>in</strong>g<br />

to $78.00 per session.


SCHOLARSHIPS<br />

ROLL OF FAME SCHOLARSHIPS<br />

The <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> Roll <strong>of</strong> Fame <strong>in</strong>cludes three Presidents<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> United States, four judges <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> United States Supreme<br />

Court, four signers <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Declaration <strong>of</strong> Independence, fifteen<br />

Governors <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, <strong>and</strong> seven Governors <strong>of</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r States, sixteen<br />

Senators from Virg<strong>in</strong>ia <strong>and</strong> six from o<strong>the</strong>r States, three Speakers<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> House <strong>of</strong> Representatives, fifteen members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Cont<strong>in</strong>ental<br />

Congress, twenty-five members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Supreme Court <strong>of</strong> Appeals <strong>of</strong><br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, eleven members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> President's cab<strong>in</strong>et, a large number<br />

<strong>of</strong> members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> United States House <strong>of</strong> Representatives, <strong>and</strong><br />

many dist<strong>in</strong>guished physicians, pr<strong>of</strong>essors, clergymen, lawyers, army<br />

<strong>and</strong> navy <strong>of</strong>ficers, <strong>and</strong> several hundred judges <strong>of</strong> prom<strong>in</strong>ence. It<br />

is <strong>the</strong> hope <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college eventually to have memorials to all <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> dist<strong>in</strong>guished sons <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college whose names are found on its<br />

Roll <strong>of</strong> Fame. This Roll <strong>of</strong> Fame <strong>in</strong>cludes those who have been<br />

members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> faculty (whe<strong>the</strong>r graduates or not), members <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> Board <strong>of</strong> Visitors <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college <strong>and</strong> recipients <strong>of</strong> honorary de-<br />

grees <strong>and</strong> degree graduates.<br />

Below are published such scholarships as have been established<br />

to those on <strong>the</strong> Roll <strong>of</strong> Fame <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> order <strong>in</strong> which <strong>the</strong> scholar-<br />

ships were founded<br />

:<br />

1. THE CHANCELLOR SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial to<br />

George Wash<strong>in</strong>gton, Chancellor <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong>, 1788-1799, <strong>and</strong> John<br />

Tyler, Chancellor. 1859-1862. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1871 by Hugh Blair<br />

Grigsby, <strong>the</strong> last Chancellor <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong>. This scholarship will<br />

exempt Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee <strong>of</strong><br />

$60.00, <strong>and</strong> non-Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> tuition fee. It is<br />

awarded by <strong>the</strong> faculty on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit <strong>and</strong> is open to all<br />

students.<br />

2. JOSEPH PRENTIS SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial to<br />

Judge Joseph Prentis, student <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong>; Judge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Ad-<br />

miralty Court <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. 1777; member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Board <strong>of</strong> Visitors.


50 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

1791; Judge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> General Court, 1787-1809; holder <strong>of</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r public<br />

positions <strong>of</strong> honor <strong>and</strong> trust. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1920 by his great-gr<strong>and</strong>-<br />

son, Judge Robert R. Prentis, <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Supreme Court <strong>of</strong> Appeals<br />

<strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. This scholarship will exempt Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from<br />

<strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00, <strong>and</strong> non-Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students<br />

from <strong>the</strong> tuition fee. It is awarded on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit <strong>and</strong> is<br />

open to all students.<br />

3. GEORGE BLOW SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial to George<br />

Blow (1787-1870), <strong>of</strong> Sussex County, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, graduate <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Col-<br />

lege <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, <strong>and</strong> later a member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Board <strong>of</strong><br />

Visitors; <strong>and</strong> his son, George Blow (1813-1894), A. B. <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Congress <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Repub-<br />

lic <strong>of</strong> Texas. Brigadier-General <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia militia, member <strong>of</strong><br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Secession Convention ;<br />

Lieutenant-Colonel,<br />

C. S. A. ; Judge<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> First Judicial Circuit <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia; dist<strong>in</strong>guished attorney <strong>of</strong><br />

Norfolk, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1921 by Capta<strong>in</strong> George P. Blow<br />

(son <strong>of</strong> George Blow, <strong>the</strong> second), <strong>of</strong> Yorktown, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. This<br />

scholarship will exempt Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

college fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00 <strong>and</strong> non-Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> tuition fee.<br />

Tt is awarded by <strong>the</strong> faculty on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit <strong>and</strong> is open to<br />

all students.<br />

4. JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial<br />

to Joseph E. Johnston (1807-1897), graduate <strong>of</strong> West Po<strong>in</strong>t, general<br />

<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> United States Army, general <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Confederate Army, doc-<br />

member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Board <strong>of</strong> Visi-<br />

tor <strong>of</strong> laws <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> ;<br />

tors. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1921 by Robert M. Hughes, Jr.. <strong>of</strong> Norfolk. This<br />

scholarship will exempt Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

college fee <strong>of</strong> $60,00. <strong>and</strong> non-Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> tuition<br />

fee. It is awarded by <strong>the</strong> faculty on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit <strong>and</strong> is open<br />

to all students.<br />

5. JOHN ARCHER COKE SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial<br />

to John Archer Coke (1842-1920), A. B. <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1860; <strong>the</strong> youngest <strong>of</strong> five bro<strong>the</strong>rs receiv<strong>in</strong>g degrees from<br />

<strong>the</strong> college ; capta<strong>in</strong><br />

<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Confederate Army, <strong>and</strong> a dist<strong>in</strong>guished<br />

lawyer <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> city <strong>of</strong> Richmond. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1921 by his children.<br />

John Archer Coke, Esq., <strong>of</strong> Richmond. Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, <strong>and</strong> Mrs. Elsie


Scholarships 51<br />

Coke Flannagan, <strong>of</strong> Montclair, N. J. This scholarship will exempt<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00,<br />

<strong>and</strong> non-Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> tuition fee. It is awarded by<br />

<strong>the</strong> faculty on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit <strong>and</strong> is open to all students.<br />

6. ROBERT W. HUGHES SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial to<br />

Robert W. Hughes (1821-1901), editor, author <strong>and</strong> jurist; judge <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> United States District Court for <strong>the</strong> Eastern District <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia<br />

(1874-1898); doctor <strong>of</strong> laws <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong>, 1881. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1921 by his son, Robert M. Hughes,<br />

LL. D., <strong>of</strong> Norfolk, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. This scholarship will exempt Vir-<br />

g<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00. Tt<br />

is awarded by <strong>the</strong> faculty upon <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit.<br />

7. EDWARD COLES SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial to Edward<br />

Coles, born 1786 <strong>and</strong> died 1868; a student <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, 1807; Governor <strong>of</strong> Ill<strong>in</strong>ois, 1822; President <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> first Ill<strong>in</strong>ois Agricultural Association. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1922 by his<br />

gr<strong>and</strong>children, <strong>Mary</strong> Roberts Coles <strong>and</strong> Mrs. George S. Rob<strong>in</strong>s,<br />

<strong>of</strong> Philadelphia, Pa. This scholarship will exempt Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students<br />

from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00, <strong>and</strong> non-Virg<strong>in</strong>ia<br />

students from <strong>the</strong> tuition fee.<br />

8. GEORGE WASHINGTON SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial<br />

to George Wash<strong>in</strong>gton, licensed as a surveyor by <strong>the</strong> college, 1749,<br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> first Chancellor after <strong>the</strong> Revolution. Founded by <strong>the</strong><br />

Daughters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> C<strong>in</strong>c<strong>in</strong>nati, with <strong>the</strong> underst<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g that this<br />

scholarship will be open to <strong>the</strong> daughters <strong>of</strong> <strong>of</strong>ficers <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> United<br />

States Army <strong>and</strong> Navy. The award <strong>of</strong> this scholarship <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> first<br />

<strong>in</strong>stance, <strong>and</strong> to fill vacancies aris<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong>re<strong>in</strong>, shall be upon <strong>the</strong> written<br />

nom<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Daughters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> C<strong>in</strong>c<strong>in</strong>nati, provided, how-<br />

ever, that <strong>in</strong> case <strong>the</strong> society should fail to nom<strong>in</strong>ate a c<strong>and</strong>idate<br />

on or before September 1st <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> year, <strong>the</strong> faculty <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> shall have power to assign <strong>the</strong> scholarship<br />

to any properly qualified daughter <strong>of</strong> a regular <strong>of</strong>ficer <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> army<br />

or navy <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> United States. This scholarship will exempt <strong>the</strong><br />

holder from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> tuition <strong>and</strong> college fee.<br />

9. THOMAS JEFFERSON SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial to<br />

Thomas Jefferson, a graduate <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college, doctor <strong>of</strong> laws, <strong>and</strong> a


52 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

member <strong>of</strong> its Board <strong>of</strong> Trustees. Founded by <strong>the</strong> Daughters <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> C<strong>in</strong>c<strong>in</strong>nati, with <strong>the</strong> underst<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g that this scholarship will<br />

be open to <strong>the</strong> daughters <strong>of</strong> <strong>of</strong>ficers <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> United States Army <strong>and</strong><br />

Navy. The award <strong>of</strong> this scholarship <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> first <strong>in</strong>stance, <strong>and</strong> to<br />

fill vacancies aris<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong>re<strong>in</strong>, shall be upon <strong>the</strong> written nom<strong>in</strong>ation<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Daughters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> C<strong>in</strong>c<strong>in</strong>nati, provided, however, that <strong>in</strong> case<br />

<strong>the</strong> society should fail to nom<strong>in</strong>ate a c<strong>and</strong>idate on or before Sep-<br />

tember 1st <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> year, <strong>the</strong> faculty <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>Mary</strong> shall have power to assign <strong>the</strong> scholarship to any properly<br />

qualified daughter <strong>of</strong> a regular <strong>of</strong>ficer <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> army or navy <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

United States. This scholarship will exempt <strong>the</strong> holder from <strong>the</strong><br />

payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> tuition <strong>and</strong> college fee.<br />

10. SAMUEL MYERS SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial to<br />

Samuel Myers, a Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Arts <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college <strong>in</strong> 1809. Founded<br />

<strong>in</strong> 1922 by his gr<strong>and</strong>son, Barton Myers, <strong>of</strong> Norfolk, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. This<br />

scholarship exempts <strong>the</strong> holder from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee.<br />

It is awarded to a member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> graduat<strong>in</strong>g class <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Maury<br />

High School, Norfolk, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia.<br />

OTHER SCHOLARSHIPS<br />

1. CORCORAN SCHOLARSHIP. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1867 by W. W.<br />

Corcoran (1798-1888), Wash<strong>in</strong>gton, D. C. This scholarship will<br />

exempt Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee <strong>of</strong><br />

$60.00, <strong>and</strong> non-Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> tuition fee. It is awarded<br />

by <strong>the</strong> faculty on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit <strong>and</strong> is open to all students.<br />

2. SOUTTER SCHOLARSHIP. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1869 by James<br />

T. Soutter, <strong>of</strong> New York. This scholarship will exempt Virg<strong>in</strong>ia<br />

students from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00, <strong>and</strong> non-<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> tuition fee. It is awarded by <strong>the</strong> faculty<br />

on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit <strong>and</strong> is open to all students.<br />

3. GRAVES SCHOLARSHIP. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1872 by <strong>the</strong> Rev.<br />

Dr. Robert J. Graves, <strong>of</strong> Pennsylvania. This scholarship will exempt<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00,<br />

<strong>and</strong> non-Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students from <strong>the</strong> tuition fee. It is awarded by<br />

<strong>the</strong> faculty on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit <strong>and</strong> is open to all students.


Scholarships 53<br />

4. JAMES BARRON HOPE SCHOLARSHIP. Founded <strong>in</strong><br />

1897 by Robert M. Hughes, LL. D, <strong>of</strong> Norfolk, Va. This scholarship<br />

is awarded for <strong>the</strong> best poem published <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> college maga-<br />

z<strong>in</strong>e <strong>and</strong> exempts <strong>the</strong> holder from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee<br />

<strong>of</strong> $60.00.<br />

5. PI KAPPA ALPHA SCHOLARSHIP. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1897<br />

by Robert M. Hughes, LL. D., <strong>of</strong> Norfolk, Va. This scholarship<br />

is awarded to some member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity for<br />

<strong>the</strong> best translation published <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> college magaz<strong>in</strong>e <strong>and</strong> exempts<br />

<strong>the</strong> holder from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00.<br />

6. WILLIAM BARTON ROGERS SCHOLARSHIP. This<br />

scholarship was founded <strong>in</strong> 1905 by <strong>the</strong> Massachusetts Institute <strong>of</strong><br />

Technology, <strong>in</strong> memory <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> Barton Rogers (1804-1882),<br />

founder <strong>and</strong> first president <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>stitute <strong>and</strong> former student <strong>and</strong><br />

pr<strong>of</strong>essor at <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>. The value is three<br />

hundred dollars <strong>and</strong> will be awarded by <strong>the</strong> faculty to some student<br />

at this college who has taken sufficient work at <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

to enter <strong>the</strong> Institute <strong>of</strong> Technology.<br />

7. PHI BETA KAPPA SCHOLARSHIP. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1911<br />

by <strong>the</strong> United Chapters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Phi Beta Kappa Society <strong>in</strong> recogni-<br />

tion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> establishment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> society at <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> December 5, 1776. This scholarship can be awarded only<br />

to a son or daughter <strong>of</strong> a member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> society, <strong>and</strong> has an actual<br />

cash value <strong>of</strong> fifty dollars. The scholarship is awarded entirely<br />

on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> merit.<br />

8. BELLE S. BRYAN SCHOLARSHIP. A memorial to <strong>the</strong><br />

services <strong>of</strong> Mrs. Bryan to <strong>the</strong> Association for <strong>the</strong> Preservation <strong>of</strong><br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Antiquities, which society she served for more than a<br />

quarter <strong>of</strong> a century, first as secretary <strong>and</strong> later as president.<br />

Founded <strong>in</strong> 1920 by her son, John Stewart Bryan, Esq., <strong>of</strong> Richmond,<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. This scholarship will be awarded on nom<strong>in</strong>ation<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Association for <strong>the</strong> Preservation <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Antiquities to<br />

ei<strong>the</strong>r a young man or woman, provided such nom<strong>in</strong>ation is made<br />

before September 1st. In <strong>the</strong> event <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> failure <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> associa-<br />

tion to make <strong>the</strong> nom<strong>in</strong>ation, <strong>the</strong> president <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college is author-<br />

ized to make <strong>the</strong> appo<strong>in</strong>tment to some deserv<strong>in</strong>g Virg<strong>in</strong>ia student.


54 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

The scholarship exempts <strong>the</strong> recipient from payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college<br />

fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00.<br />

9. THE VIRGINIA PILOT ASSOCIATION SCHOLAR-<br />

SHIP. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1921 by <strong>the</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Pilot Association <strong>of</strong> Nor-<br />

folk, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, through its president, Capta<strong>in</strong> W. R. Boutwell, with<br />

<strong>the</strong> hope <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>creas<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> usefulness <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> vic<strong>in</strong>ity<br />

around Hampton Roads. This scholarship will be awarded upon<br />

nom<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Pilot Association to a young man or<br />

woman resid<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> cities <strong>of</strong> Norfolk, Portsmouth or Newport<br />

News, or <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> counties <strong>of</strong> Norfolk, Elizabeth City or Warwick.<br />

This scholarship exempts <strong>the</strong> recipient from payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> col-<br />

lege fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00.<br />

10. UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY<br />

SCHOLARSHIP. The United Daughters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Confederacy grant<br />

a number <strong>of</strong> scholarships to young women. One scholarship is<br />

known as <strong>the</strong> Janet Weaver R<strong>and</strong>olph Scliolarship, as a memorial<br />

to Mrs. Norman R<strong>and</strong>olph, <strong>of</strong> Richmond, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia. This will pay<br />

directly to <strong>the</strong> young woman appo<strong>in</strong>ted <strong>the</strong> sum <strong>of</strong> $250 to aid her<br />

<strong>in</strong> her course. In addition to this, <strong>the</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Division has estab-<br />

lished a scholarship, which pays tuition; <strong>the</strong> Georgia Division has<br />

established a scholarship pay<strong>in</strong>g tuition, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> Colorado Division<br />

has established a scholarship pay<strong>in</strong>g tuition.<br />

11. RICHMOND DENTAL SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP.<br />

Founded <strong>in</strong> 1922 by <strong>the</strong> Richmond, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, Dental Society. This<br />

scholarship pays a cash sum <strong>of</strong> $75.00 per session to its holder. It<br />

is awarded <strong>in</strong> recognition <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ideals <strong>of</strong> higher learn<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> education<br />

<strong>and</strong> with <strong>the</strong> desire to foster this spirit, preferably to some<br />

one prepar<strong>in</strong>g to be a dentist.<br />

12. VIRGINIA STATE DENTAL ASSOCIATION<br />

SCHOLARSHIP. Founded <strong>in</strong> 1923 by <strong>the</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia State Dental<br />

Association. This scholarship pays a cash sum <strong>of</strong> $100 per session<br />

to its holder. It is to be used for some worthy Virg<strong>in</strong>ia student<br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> selection is left to <strong>the</strong> discretion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college authorities.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> faculty is to award it as a rule to some one<br />

prepar<strong>in</strong>g to be a dentist.


Scholarships 55<br />

13. HOPE-MAURY LOAN SCHOLARSHIP. The Hope-<br />

Maury Chapter <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> United Daughters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Confederacy has<br />

established at <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> a loan scholarship<br />

whereby a student will be lent for four years <strong>the</strong> sum <strong>of</strong> $250 per<br />

annum, which sum will cover his fees, board, <strong>and</strong> room rent <strong>in</strong> one<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> dormitories to be designated by <strong>the</strong> President <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong>,<br />

with <strong>the</strong> proviso that <strong>the</strong> student shall beg<strong>in</strong> to pay back <strong>the</strong> amount<br />

with<strong>in</strong> four months after he has graduated or left college. The<br />

student hold<strong>in</strong>g this scholarship will be nom<strong>in</strong>ated by <strong>the</strong> Hope-<br />

Maury Chapter <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> United Daughters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Confederacy.<br />

In addition to <strong>the</strong>se scholarships, <strong>the</strong> college <strong>of</strong>fers scholarships<br />

to a number <strong>of</strong> accredited high schools throughout <strong>the</strong> State. These<br />

scholarships exempt <strong>the</strong> student from <strong>the</strong> payment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong><br />

fee <strong>of</strong> $60.00, <strong>and</strong> are renewable <strong>the</strong> second year if <strong>the</strong> holder <strong>the</strong>re<strong>of</strong><br />

makes a satisfactory record <strong>the</strong> first year.<br />

STATE TEACHERS' SCHOLARSHIPS<br />

One hundred <strong>and</strong> thirty-two scholarships <strong>of</strong> annual value <strong>of</strong><br />

$78.00 each are <strong>of</strong>fered to prospective teachers. For a full account<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se see page 47.<br />

MINISTERIAL STUDENTS<br />

Students furnish<strong>in</strong>g satisfactory evidence <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir <strong>in</strong>tention <strong>and</strong><br />

fitness to enter <strong>the</strong> m<strong>in</strong>istry are admitted upon <strong>the</strong> same terms as<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia students hold<strong>in</strong>g State scholarships.<br />

STATE STUDENTS' LOAN FUND<br />

By act <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> General Assembly a students' loan fund has been<br />

created, <strong>and</strong> any deserv<strong>in</strong>g student may secure a loan on which <strong>the</strong><br />

rate <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>terest is fixed by law at 4 per cent.<br />

PHILO SHERMAN BENNETT LOAN FUND<br />

This fund was established <strong>in</strong> 1905 by <strong>William</strong> Jenn<strong>in</strong>gs Bryan,<br />

<strong>of</strong> L<strong>in</strong>coln, Nebraska. It is part <strong>of</strong> a trust fund left by Philo Sherman<br />

Bennett, <strong>of</strong> New Haven, Conn., for <strong>the</strong> purpose <strong>of</strong> aid<strong>in</strong>g de-


56 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

serv<strong>in</strong>g students. The proceeds <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> fund are used to make loans<br />

to students need<strong>in</strong>g assistance dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong>ir college career.<br />

SMOOT MEMORIAL LOAN FUND<br />

This fund was established <strong>in</strong> 1913 by <strong>the</strong> Fairfax County Chap-<br />

ter, Daughters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> American Revolution, as a memorial to Wil-<br />

liam So<strong>the</strong>ron Smoot. The fund was donated by Mrs. James R.<br />

Smoot <strong>and</strong> is <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> form <strong>of</strong> a loan which is to be made to some<br />

deserv<strong>in</strong>g student dur<strong>in</strong>g his senior year <strong>in</strong> college.<br />

FORM OF BEQUEST<br />

I give <strong>and</strong> bequeath to <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> <strong>in</strong><br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, a corporation established by law <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> State <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia,<br />

<strong>the</strong> sum <strong>of</strong> $ to be <strong>in</strong>vested <strong>and</strong> preserved <strong>in</strong>-<br />

violably for <strong>the</strong> endowment* <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>,<br />

located at <strong>William</strong>sburg, Virg<strong>in</strong>ia.<br />

Dated<br />

*Note—The bequest may be made, if desired, for foundation <strong>of</strong> a pr<strong>of</strong>essor's<br />

chair, for scholarships, or for some o<strong>the</strong>r specified purpose.


ADMISSION<br />

1. By act <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> General Assembly, approved March, 1918, both<br />

men <strong>and</strong> women are admitted to <strong>the</strong> college on <strong>the</strong> same conditions.<br />

2. Applicants must be at least sixteen years <strong>of</strong> age.<br />

3. Every applicant must present a satisfactory certificate <strong>of</strong><br />

good character, <strong>and</strong> must also present <strong>the</strong> recommendation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

pr<strong>in</strong>cipal <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> high school or secondary school last attended.<br />

4. A student desir<strong>in</strong>g to enter upon certification must meet one<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g requirements<br />

:<br />

a. Graduation from an accredited four-year public high school<br />

with sixteen units, or<br />

b. Graduation from an accredited four-year private secondary<br />

school with sixteen units or completion <strong>of</strong> a four-year<br />

course <strong>in</strong> an accredited private secondary school with six-<br />

teen units.<br />

5. Students present<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong>mselves without proper certification<br />

from an accredited school, as outl<strong>in</strong>ed above, will lie required to<br />

take <strong>the</strong> college entrance exam<strong>in</strong>ations for<br />

3 units <strong>in</strong> English.<br />

2J/2 units <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics.<br />

1 unit <strong>in</strong> History.<br />

9]/2 additional units, selected from <strong>the</strong> subjects on which exami-<br />

nations will be given as outl<strong>in</strong>ed <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> appendix.<br />

6. Any student over twenty years <strong>of</strong> age at <strong>the</strong> time <strong>of</strong> enter<strong>in</strong>g<br />

college, upon satisfactory evidence <strong>of</strong> his ability to pursue success-<br />

fully <strong>the</strong> courses for which he desires to register, may be admitted<br />

as a special student, but cannot become an applicant for a degree<br />

until full entrance requirements are met.


58 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Entrance Requirements for Bachelor's Degrees.<br />

1. All students enter<strong>in</strong>g upon a course lead<strong>in</strong>g to a bachelor's<br />

degree must have credits as follows<br />

English (grammar, composition, rhetoric <strong>and</strong><br />

literature) 3 units<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics (algebra through b<strong>in</strong>omials <strong>and</strong><br />

plane geometry) 2^2 units<br />

History (general, English or American) 1 unit<br />

*Foreign languages (all must be <strong>in</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong><br />

for A. B.) 3 units<br />

Electives 6 l/2 units<br />

Total 16 units<br />

2. A c<strong>and</strong>idate for <strong>the</strong> B. S. degree must have for entrance<br />

three units <strong>in</strong> one foreign language, or two units <strong>in</strong> each <strong>of</strong> two<br />

foreign languages. Students who present full sixteen units <strong>in</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r<br />

subjects, but do not have <strong>the</strong>se necessary language qualifications<br />

will enter <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>ners' classes provided <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> foreign languages<br />

<strong>and</strong> will absolve <strong>the</strong> language entrance requirements by tak<strong>in</strong>g<br />

courses without college credit. One college course is accepted for<br />

one entrance unit.<br />

3. A c<strong>and</strong>idate for <strong>the</strong> A. B. degree must have three entrance<br />

units <strong>in</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong>.<br />

4. A student who meets <strong>the</strong> requirements for admission, but<br />

who does not <strong>of</strong>fer <strong>the</strong> three units <strong>in</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong> or <strong>in</strong> foreign languages<br />

necessary to beg<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> work for a bachelor's degree, must make up<br />

<strong>the</strong>se requirements with<strong>in</strong> two years after entrance.<br />

5. Every student will be registered for a degree course unless<br />

he registers for ano<strong>the</strong>r course <strong>of</strong>fered <strong>in</strong> this catalogue.<br />

6. <strong>College</strong> work counted for entrance units cannot be counted<br />

for a degree.<br />

*In accordance with <strong>the</strong> regulations <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> State Board <strong>of</strong> Education no<br />

credit will he given for a s<strong>in</strong>gle unit <strong>in</strong> a foreign language.


x\DMISSION 59<br />

7. The selection, quantity <strong>and</strong> character <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> work done by<br />

a special student is subject to approval by <strong>the</strong> president. Except<br />

by special permission, special students will be required to do <strong>the</strong><br />

same work as is required for regular students.<br />

The follow<strong>in</strong>g table <strong>in</strong>dicates <strong>the</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard units accepted for<br />

entrance<br />

:<br />

SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ENTRANCE<br />

The <strong>in</strong>dividual units <strong>in</strong> this table are reckoned on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong><br />

five forty-m<strong>in</strong>ute periods a week for a session <strong>of</strong> thirty-six weeks.<br />

Subjects Topics Units<br />

English A English grammer <strong>and</strong> analysis (required) 1<br />

English B Composition <strong>and</strong> rhetoric (required) 1<br />

English C Literature (required) 1<br />

English D History <strong>of</strong> English literature (optional) 1<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics A.. Algebra to quadratics (required) 1<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics B.. Quadratics, progression, b<strong>in</strong>omials, etc. (re-<br />

quired) V2 or 1<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics C... Plane geometry (required) 1<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics D.... Solid geometry (optional)<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics E...Plane trigonometry (optional) Vi<br />

History A Greek <strong>and</strong> Roman history<br />

History B Medieval <strong>and</strong> Modern European<br />

history<br />

History C English history<br />

History D American history <strong>and</strong> civil gov-<br />

ernment<br />

J<br />

Lat<strong>in</strong> A Grammar, composition <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

Lat<strong>in</strong> B Caesar's Gallic War, I-IV; gram-<br />

mar; composition<br />

Lat<strong>in</strong> C Cicero's Orations (6); grammar;<br />

composition [<br />

Lat<strong>in</strong> D Virgil's Aeneid, I-VI ; grammar;<br />

composition<br />

for<br />

f<br />

Required<br />

One Unit<br />

Three<br />

Required<br />

a.<br />

lA


60<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Greek A Elementary grammar, composition <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation 1<br />

Greek B Xenophon's Anabasis, I-IV; grammar; com-<br />

position<br />

Greek C Homer's Iliad, I-III; grammar; composition-<br />

German A Elementary grammar, composition <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

German B Intermediate grammar, composition <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

German C Third-year grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

German D Fourth-year grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

French A Elementary grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

French B Intermediate grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

French C Third-year grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

French D Fourth-year grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

Spanish A Elementary grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

Spanish B Intermediate grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

Spanish C Third-year grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

Spanish D Fourth-year grammar, composition, <strong>and</strong> trans-<br />

lation<br />

Science A Physical geography with laboratory work<br />

Science B Chemistry with laboratory work<br />

Science C Physics with laboratory work<br />

Science D Botany J4<br />

Science E Zoology V2<br />

Science F Physiology ., V2


Admission 61<br />

Vocational Subjects (Not more than four units)<br />

Mechanical <strong>and</strong> Projection Draw<strong>in</strong>g l/2 to 1<br />

Draw<strong>in</strong>g<br />

Shop work<br />

Home economics<br />

J/2 to 1<br />

y2 to 4<br />

Yz to 2<br />

(Accredited agricultural schools) l/2 \.oA<br />

Commercial geography Yi<br />

Shorth<strong>and</strong> <strong>and</strong> typewrit<strong>in</strong>g y2 to 1<br />

Bookkeep<strong>in</strong>g 1<br />

Commercial arithmetic Vz to 1<br />

Music V2 to 1<br />

Note—For description <strong>of</strong> courses <strong>and</strong> units allowed <strong>in</strong> va-<br />

rious subjects, see appendix.


DEGREE REQUIREMENTS<br />

The degrees conferred are Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Arts (A. B.), Bachelor<br />

<strong>of</strong> Science (B. S.), <strong>and</strong> Master <strong>of</strong> Arts (A. M.).<br />

The requirements for degrees are stated <strong>in</strong> terms <strong>of</strong> "credits."<br />

A credit is given for one class hour, or two laboratory hours a<br />

week through one semester, which is a term <strong>of</strong> approximately<br />

eighteen weeks. This is one-half <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> usual college session <strong>of</strong><br />

thirty-six weeks. A course runs for a semester, <strong>and</strong> carries as many<br />

credits as it has class meet<strong>in</strong>gs, or two-hour laboratory periods,<br />

a week through <strong>the</strong> semester. Class meet<strong>in</strong>gs, or periods, are one<br />

hour <strong>in</strong> length (<strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g five m<strong>in</strong>utes for change <strong>of</strong> classes) ;<br />

<strong>and</strong> a laboratory period is two hours <strong>in</strong> length <strong>and</strong> counts one<br />

credit. For students who entered under <strong>the</strong> quarter system, which<br />

prevailed for <strong>the</strong> years 1922-23, 1923-24, <strong>and</strong> 1924-25, equivalents<br />

<strong>of</strong> credits will be calculated by add<strong>in</strong>g one-half to <strong>the</strong> semester<br />

credits as set down <strong>in</strong> this catalogue.<br />

RESIDENT REQUIREMENT FOR DEGREES<br />

No degree will be granted by <strong>the</strong> college until <strong>the</strong> applicant has<br />

secured at <strong>the</strong> college <strong>in</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg at least 30 semester hours<br />

<strong>of</strong> credit.<br />

BACHELOR'S DEGREES<br />

The completion <strong>of</strong> 126 credits is required for ei<strong>the</strong>r bachelor's<br />

degree. Of <strong>the</strong>se 126 credits, sixty-five are prescribed for <strong>the</strong><br />

bachelor <strong>of</strong> arts, <strong>and</strong> sixty-three are prescribed for <strong>the</strong> bachelor <strong>of</strong><br />

science. The prescribed courses for each degree are set forth below.<br />

M<strong>in</strong>imum Requirements for Baehelor <strong>of</strong> Arts<br />

Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 12<br />

One Modern Language 12<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 6


Degree Reguirements 63<br />

Lat<strong>in</strong> or Greek 6<br />

Biology, or Chemistry, or Physics 10<br />

History (American) 3<br />

Government (Virg<strong>in</strong>ia <strong>and</strong> United States) 6<br />

Psychology 3<br />

Philosophy 3<br />

Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g 4<br />

Total 65<br />

*"Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Government (Gov. 101) <strong>and</strong> U. S. History (Hist. 101) are required<br />

<strong>of</strong> all Freshmen. At <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> session, one-half <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Freshmen (those whose names beg<strong>in</strong> with letters from A to K, <strong>in</strong>clusive),<br />

should take Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Government <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> rema<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g half U. S. History. At<br />

<strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> second term those who have taken Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Government<br />

should take <strong>the</strong> U. S. History <strong>and</strong> vice versa. Students from o<strong>the</strong>r states<br />

may substitute any <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Government courses for Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Government."<br />

M<strong>in</strong>imum Requirements for Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Science<br />

Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 12<br />

One Modern Language 9<br />

*Biology, or Chemistry, or Physics (10 credits <strong>in</strong> any two) 20<br />

**Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 6<br />

fHistory (American) 3<br />

fGovernment (Virg<strong>in</strong>ia <strong>and</strong> United States) 6<br />

Psychology 3<br />

Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g 4<br />

Total 63<br />

*Students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Economics <strong>and</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration<br />

course are required to take only ten semester hours <strong>in</strong> one natural science.<br />

**Students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> Home Economics <strong>and</strong> Physical Education are required<br />

to take only three semester hours <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics: students major<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>in</strong> Economics <strong>and</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration courses must take three semester<br />

hours <strong>in</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Statistics.<br />

tSee footnote to m<strong>in</strong>imum requirements for Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Arts degree.<br />

MAJORS AND MINORS<br />

To <strong>in</strong>sure a reasonable amount <strong>of</strong> concentration upon advanced<br />

work <strong>in</strong> a few subjects ra<strong>the</strong>r than upon elementary classes <strong>in</strong> many<br />

subjects, <strong>the</strong> student is required to <strong>in</strong>clude <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> work for a bache-


64 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

lor's degree two majors or a major <strong>and</strong> two m<strong>in</strong>ors. A major con-<br />

sists <strong>of</strong> thirty credits <strong>in</strong> one subject <strong>and</strong> a m<strong>in</strong>or consists <strong>of</strong> twenty<br />

credits <strong>in</strong> one subject. Major <strong>and</strong> m<strong>in</strong>or subjects must be selected<br />

before <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> third year <strong>of</strong> work, must be <strong>in</strong> related<br />

fields, <strong>and</strong> must have <strong>the</strong> approval <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> president or dean.<br />

For <strong>the</strong> A. B. degree both majors must be chosen from arts<br />

courses, <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> case two m<strong>in</strong>ors are chosen at least one must be<br />

from arts courses. For <strong>the</strong> B. S. degree both majors must be<br />

chosen from biology, or chemistry, or physics; <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> case two<br />

m<strong>in</strong>ors are chosen at least one must be from <strong>the</strong>se same subjects.<br />

Any departure from this rule must be approved by <strong>the</strong> Degree Com-<br />

mittee before February 1st <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> applicant's junior year, o<strong>the</strong>r-<br />

wise <strong>the</strong> rule will be applied.<br />

State students, i. c., students pledged to teach two years <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

State <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia, must <strong>in</strong>clude <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir bachelor's degree at least<br />

twenty semester hours <strong>in</strong> education. For <strong>the</strong> special courses re-<br />

quired <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>se twenty semester hours, see curriculum for teachers,<br />

page 167.<br />

Physical tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> hygiene. Dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> first two years<br />

<strong>of</strong> his course, three hours a week <strong>in</strong> physical tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> hygiene<br />

are required <strong>of</strong> each student. For this he shall receive, when satis-<br />

factorily completed, one credit <strong>in</strong> each semester.<br />

Credit for student activities. The college requires for a bachelor's<br />

degree 126 semester hours, or sixty-three session hours, <strong>in</strong>stead <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> 120 semester hours, or sixty session hours, usually required for<br />

a bachelor's degree. Of <strong>the</strong> extra six semester hours, <strong>the</strong> student<br />

must elect four <strong>in</strong> physical tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g. He may elect <strong>the</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r two<br />

<strong>in</strong> student activities, such as participation <strong>in</strong> literary society work,<br />

editorial or managerial work on college publications, or service on<br />

<strong>the</strong> student council. Credits for <strong>the</strong>se activities are awarded by<br />

faculty members under plans <strong>and</strong> supervision <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> student activi-<br />

ties committees. Students who do not earn <strong>the</strong>se two credits <strong>in</strong><br />

student activities must elect <strong>the</strong>m from regular college work.<br />

Selection <strong>of</strong> courses. In arrang<strong>in</strong>g classes, students must first<br />

absolve <strong>the</strong>ir m<strong>in</strong>imum degree requirements <strong>and</strong> must elect <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

courses <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> order <strong>of</strong> sequence as <strong>in</strong>dicated by number<strong>in</strong>g.


Degree Regu1rem£nts 65<br />

Grade <strong>of</strong> credits: The normal load for a student is fifteen<br />

semester hours. To this may be added one semester hour <strong>in</strong> physical<br />

education. To carry eighteen semester hours, a student must<br />

have made dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> previous semester at least n<strong>in</strong>e semester hours<br />

<strong>of</strong> grade 83 or above <strong>and</strong> three semester hours <strong>of</strong> grade 91 or<br />

above. To carry more than eighteen hours, a student must have<br />

made dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> previous semester at least n<strong>in</strong>e semester hours<br />

<strong>of</strong> grade 91 or above <strong>and</strong> must have made no grade below 83.<br />

To receive a Bachelor's degree a student must have at least one-<br />

half <strong>of</strong> his credits <strong>of</strong> grade 83 or higher.<br />

SUGGESTED COURSE FOR BACHELOR OF ARTS<br />

DEGREE*<br />

First Semester Credits<br />

English 101 3<br />

Lat<strong>in</strong> or Greek 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101 3<br />

History or Government 101 3<br />

Modern Language 3<br />

Phvsical Education 101 1<br />

First Semester Credits<br />

English 3<br />

Modern Language 3<br />

Psychology 3<br />

Science 5<br />

Elective 3<br />

Phy. Ed 1<br />

Freshman Year<br />

Second Semester Credits<br />

English 102 3<br />

Lat<strong>in</strong> or Greek 102 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 102 3<br />

Government or History 102 3<br />

Modern Language 3<br />

Physical Education 102 1<br />

16 16<br />

Sophomore Year<br />

Second Semester Credits<br />

English 3<br />

Modern Language 3<br />

Science 5<br />

M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Elective 3<br />

Phy. Ed 1<br />

18 18<br />

*Unless two credits are counted for student activities, <strong>the</strong>se credits must<br />

be made up by additional electives.


66<br />

First Semester Credits<br />

Major 3<br />

First M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Philosophy 301 —(Logic).... 3<br />

Elective 3<br />

First Semester Credits<br />

Major 3<br />

First M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Electives 6<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Junior Year<br />

Second Semester Credits<br />

Major 3<br />

First M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Electives 6<br />

15 15<br />

Senior Year<br />

Second Semester Credits<br />

Major 3<br />

First M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Electives 6<br />

15 15<br />

SUGGESTED COURSE FOR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE<br />

DEGREE*<br />

First Semester Credits<br />

English 101 3<br />

Science 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101 3<br />

History, or Government, or<br />

Modern Language 3<br />

Physical Ed. 101 1<br />

Freslhnan Year<br />

Second Semester Credits<br />

English 102 3<br />

Science 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 102 3<br />

History, or Government, or<br />

Modern Language 3<br />

Physical Ed. 102 1<br />

IS 15<br />

*Unless two credits are counted for student activities, <strong>the</strong>se credits must<br />

be made up by additional electives.


First Semester Credits<br />

Science (Major) 5<br />

Psychology 3<br />

English 3<br />

Modern Language 3<br />

Phy. Ed 1<br />

Elective 2<br />

First Semester Credits<br />

Science (Major) 5<br />

Science (M<strong>in</strong>or) 5<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Elective 3<br />

First Semester Credits<br />

First M<strong>in</strong>or Science 5<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Major or Elective 5<br />

Elective 2<br />

Degree Reguirements 67<br />

Sopliomore Year<br />

Second Semester Credits<br />

Science (Major) 5<br />

English 3<br />

Modern Language or Elec-<br />

tive 3<br />

Phy. Ed 1<br />

Elective 5<br />

17 17<br />

Junior Year<br />

Second Semester Credits<br />

Science (Major) 5<br />

Science (M<strong>in</strong>or, first) 5<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Elective 3<br />

16 16<br />

Senior Year<br />

Second Semester Credits<br />

First M<strong>in</strong>or Science 5<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or 3<br />

Major or Elective 5<br />

Elective 2<br />

15 15<br />

MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE<br />

The requirements for <strong>the</strong> degree <strong>of</strong> Master <strong>of</strong> Arts are as<br />

follows<br />

:<br />

1. The applicant must be <strong>the</strong> holder <strong>of</strong> an A. B. or B. S. degree<br />

from this college, or from some o<strong>the</strong>r <strong>in</strong>stitution <strong>of</strong> approved<br />

st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g.


68 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

2. The applicant must be registered <strong>and</strong> approved as a c<strong>and</strong>i-<br />

date for <strong>the</strong> Master <strong>of</strong> Arts degree before beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g any course<br />

that is to be counted for credit toward that degree.<br />

3. Applicants duly approved <strong>and</strong> registered for this degree must,<br />

at <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> course, submit a plan <strong>of</strong> study which will<br />

show that <strong>the</strong> work to be pursued is grouped about one subject as<br />

a major <strong>in</strong> which he has had <strong>in</strong> his Bachelor's degree at least twelve<br />

semester hours <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> which he will take at least twelve semester<br />

hours <strong>of</strong> M. A. grade. The rema<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g eighteen hours must be <strong>in</strong><br />

two subjects related to this major subject. In addition, <strong>the</strong> appli-<br />

cant must, by <strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> first semester, select a <strong>the</strong>sis with <strong>the</strong><br />

advice <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>in</strong> whose department <strong>the</strong> subject <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong>sis is chosen. The <strong>the</strong>sis <strong>in</strong> his major subject must be completed<br />

<strong>and</strong> approved by <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>in</strong> charge, by <strong>the</strong> first <strong>of</strong> May. Three<br />

copies <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>sis <strong>in</strong> typewritten form, each bear<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> follow-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g title on <strong>the</strong> front page, must be submitted: "A Thesis presented<br />

at <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> as a Partial Requirement for<br />

<strong>the</strong> Degree <strong>of</strong> Master <strong>of</strong> Arts."<br />

4. Courses selected <strong>in</strong> meet<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> thirty semester hour credits<br />

for <strong>the</strong> Master's degree will be approved by <strong>the</strong> Degree Commit-<br />

tee on <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g conditions<br />

a. That <strong>the</strong> requirements mentioned above are met.<br />

b. That no course with a grade below 83 will be counted.<br />

c. That <strong>in</strong> general onlv fourth vear courses can be counted.


COURSES OF INSTRUCTION<br />

ANCIENT LANGUAGES<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Montgomery<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Gels<strong>in</strong>ger<br />

LATIN<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Montgomery<br />

101*. VIRGIL'S AENEID. First three books; first semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

First three books, with parallel read<strong>in</strong>g upon <strong>the</strong> epic; Virgil's<br />

place <strong>in</strong> European literature; mythology, scansion, vocabulary, sys-<br />

tematic review <strong>of</strong> grammar, exercises <strong>in</strong> prose composition, elemen-<br />

tary Roman antiquities. Repeated <strong>in</strong> summer session. For freshmen<br />

<strong>and</strong> sophomores.<br />

102. BOOKS IV, V, VI OF VIRGIL'S AENEID. SELEC-<br />

TIONS FROM THE ECLOGUES AND THE GEORGICS.<br />

Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

201. SELECTIONS FROM LIVY, AND TACITUS. First<br />

semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Parallel read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> lectures upon Roman historiography ; its<br />

debt to <strong>the</strong> Greek, <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>fluence upon <strong>the</strong> modern ; advanced prose<br />

composition work; <strong>in</strong>dividual conferences with students. For sopho-<br />

mores <strong>and</strong> juniors.<br />

202. ROMAN LYRIC POETRY. Second semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

*In number<strong>in</strong>g courses, <strong>the</strong> digit <strong>in</strong> hundred's place <strong>in</strong>dicates whe<strong>the</strong>r<br />

<strong>the</strong> course is primarily for freshmen, sophomores, juniors or seniors. The<br />

digit <strong>in</strong> ten's place, o<strong>the</strong>r than zero, <strong>in</strong>dicates that <strong>the</strong> department <strong>of</strong>fers<br />

more than five (5) courses <strong>in</strong> ei<strong>the</strong>r semester. The digit <strong>in</strong> unit's place <strong>in</strong>dicates<br />

<strong>the</strong> sequence number <strong>of</strong> courses <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> department, odd numbers<br />

<strong>in</strong>dicat<strong>in</strong>g th first semester, even numbers <strong>in</strong>dicat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> second semester.<br />

For example, Lat<strong>in</strong> 101 means freshman Lat<strong>in</strong>, first semester, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> first<br />

course <strong>in</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong> dur<strong>in</strong>g that semester. Bus. 412 (Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Cycles) means<br />

senior Bank<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> F<strong>in</strong>ance, second semester, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> sixth course <strong>in</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess<br />

Adm<strong>in</strong>istration dur<strong>in</strong>g that semester.


70 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Selections from <strong>the</strong> Roman lyric poets, center<strong>in</strong>g around Hor-<br />

ace's odes <strong>and</strong> epodes ; lectures <strong>and</strong> parallel read<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>in</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong> <strong>and</strong><br />

English, upon <strong>the</strong> life <strong>and</strong> thought <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> early Empire; <strong>in</strong>dividual<br />

conferences. Repeated <strong>in</strong> summer session. For sophomores, juniors<br />

<strong>and</strong> seniors.<br />

301. SELECTIONS FROM THE LETTERS OF CICERO<br />

AND PLINY. First semester; three hours ; three credits.<br />

Parallel read<strong>in</strong>g, lectures <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>mes upon Roman epistolography,<br />

its <strong>in</strong>fluence upon <strong>the</strong> mediaeval <strong>and</strong> modern ; Cicero <strong>and</strong><br />

Pl<strong>in</strong>y as literary figures; advanced prose composition work; <strong>in</strong>di-<br />

vidual conferences. For juniors, seniors, <strong>and</strong> A. M. work.<br />

302. ROMAN ELEGY FROM CATULLUS TO OVID. First<br />

semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Rapid read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> a considerable body <strong>of</strong> Lat<strong>in</strong> elegiac verse<br />

parallel read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> English upon Greek, Lat<strong>in</strong> <strong>and</strong> English elegy.<br />

For juniors, seniors, <strong>and</strong> A. M. work.<br />

401. LATIN LITERATURE CYCLE. First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

These courses are open only to students <strong>of</strong> approved maturity<br />

<strong>and</strong> constitute a cont<strong>in</strong>uous unit <strong>of</strong> study projected along <strong>the</strong> cycle<br />

plan. Orig<strong>in</strong>al research upon assigned topics will be required. For<br />

1926-27 <strong>the</strong> subject will be Roman oratory, center<strong>in</strong>g around Cicero,<br />

<strong>the</strong> rhetorical schools, <strong>the</strong> debt to A<strong>the</strong>nian oratory, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>-<br />

fluence upon modern oratory. For juniors, seniors, <strong>and</strong> A. M.<br />

work.<br />

402. LATIN LITERATURE CYCLE (Cont<strong>in</strong>ued). Second<br />

semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

For 1926-27, <strong>the</strong> subject will be Roman Comedy, its debt to <strong>the</strong><br />

Greek, <strong>and</strong> its <strong>in</strong>fluence upon modern comedy. Selected plays <strong>of</strong><br />

Plautus <strong>and</strong> Terence will be read. For juniors, seniors, <strong>and</strong> A. M.<br />

work.<br />

501. LATIN LITERATURE CYCLE (Cont<strong>in</strong>ued). First<br />

semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

For 1926-27 <strong>the</strong> subject will be Cicero's philosophical works.<br />

Repeated <strong>in</strong> summer session. For seniors <strong>and</strong> A. M. work.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 71<br />

502. TEACHERS' COURSE. Second semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> high school Lat<strong>in</strong>, with especial at-<br />

tention to <strong>the</strong> problems <strong>and</strong> difficulties <strong>of</strong> each year; consideration<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Direct Method, <strong>the</strong> acquisition <strong>of</strong> a vocabulary, <strong>and</strong> sound<br />

knowledge <strong>of</strong> forms ; <strong>the</strong> debt <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> English vocabulary to <strong>the</strong><br />

Lat<strong>in</strong>; <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> translation; assignments <strong>of</strong> various text-<br />

books to members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> class, <strong>and</strong> report <strong>the</strong>reon; historic survey<br />

<strong>of</strong> methods <strong>of</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g Lat<strong>in</strong>. Content as well as method will be<br />

uniformly stressed. Repeated <strong>in</strong> summer session. For all prospec-<br />

tive teachers <strong>of</strong> high school Lat<strong>in</strong>.<br />

GREEK<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Gels<strong>in</strong>ger<br />

101. BEGINNERS' GREEK. First semester; three hours; no<br />

credit until Greek 102 is completed.<br />

An <strong>in</strong>troduction to <strong>the</strong> elements <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> language.<br />

<strong>College</strong> credit for this course will be given only to those who<br />

complete Greek 102 also.<br />

102. INTERMEDIATE GREEK. Second semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> Greek 101 <strong>and</strong> dependent upon it. The course<br />

<strong>in</strong>cludes <strong>the</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> easy Greek, systematic development <strong>of</strong> vo-<br />

cabulary, <strong>and</strong> detailed study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> syntax.<br />

201. PLATO'S APOLOGY AND CRITO. First semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

The whole <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Apology is read <strong>and</strong> as much <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Crito as<br />

time permits. The life <strong>and</strong> work <strong>of</strong> Socrates are discussed <strong>in</strong> lec-<br />

tures, <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> papers prepared by members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> class.<br />

202. HOMER. Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Selections from <strong>the</strong> Iliad <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> Odyssey <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Greek, <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> both poems entire <strong>in</strong> English outside <strong>the</strong> class. The<br />

course <strong>in</strong>cludes work <strong>in</strong> Greek Prose Composition.<br />

>;: H1 % ;fc<br />

ijc sfc ^<br />

The courses listed below are planned for students who have com-


72 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

pleted at least two years <strong>of</strong> Greek. With<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> fields designated<br />

<strong>the</strong> work can be so varied as to permit those who take Greek four<br />

years to elect <strong>the</strong>se courses more than once without repetition.<br />

301. GREEK DRAMA. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

The read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> two plays, with explanatory lectures.<br />

303. GREEK ORATORY. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

Read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> Demos<strong>the</strong>nes or <strong>in</strong> some o<strong>the</strong>r orator. Lectures <strong>and</strong><br />

assigned papers on <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> Greek oratory.<br />

402. GREEK HISTORIANS. Second semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

Parts <strong>of</strong> Herodotus or Thucydides.<br />

404. NEW TESTAMENT AND PATRISTIC GREEK. Sec-<br />

ond semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

The class reads one Gospel, one <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> shorter Epistles, <strong>and</strong> se-<br />

lections from early Christian writers.<br />

guage :<br />

The follow<strong>in</strong>g courses require no knowledge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Greek lan-<br />

405. HISTORY OF GREEK RELIGION. First semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> religious practices <strong>and</strong> beliefs <strong>of</strong> Classical An-<br />

tiquity, with some account <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> discussions about religion <strong>in</strong><br />

Greek literature.<br />

406. HISTORY OF GREEK LITERATURE. Second semes-<br />

ter; three hours; three credits.<br />

Read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> important authors <strong>in</strong> translation, with lectures<br />

<strong>and</strong> assigned papers on appropriate topics.<br />

408. BYZANTINE HISTORY. Second semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

A summary survey <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Eastern Empire to <strong>the</strong><br />

fall <strong>of</strong> Constant<strong>in</strong>ople.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 73<br />

FINE ARTS<br />

Miss Cary<br />

The courses <strong>of</strong>fered <strong>in</strong> this department are planned to give a<br />

knowledge <strong>and</strong> appreciation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> F<strong>in</strong>e <strong>and</strong> Industrial Arts, to ac-<br />

qua<strong>in</strong>t <strong>the</strong> student with <strong>the</strong> historical development <strong>of</strong> Art, <strong>and</strong> to<br />

give opportunities for art expression through draw<strong>in</strong>g, design, com-<br />

position, color, <strong>and</strong> model<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

101. ART STRUCTURE A. First semester; two lectures <strong>and</strong><br />

one laboratory period; three credits.<br />

Lays a foundation for <strong>the</strong> courses <strong>in</strong> draw<strong>in</strong>g, model<strong>in</strong>g, house<br />

decoration, color, costume design <strong>and</strong> letter<strong>in</strong>g, with emphasis upon<br />

general pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> technique.<br />

Composition by Dow; The Enjoyment <strong>and</strong> Use <strong>of</strong> Color by<br />

Sargeant; Pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> Design by Batchelder are used as a basis<br />

for <strong>the</strong> work.<br />

102. INTRODUCTORY DRAWING AND PAINTING. Sec-<br />

ond semester; two lectures <strong>and</strong> one laboratory period; three credits.<br />

Pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> draw<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> pa<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g; expression by l<strong>in</strong>e, dark <strong>and</strong><br />

light, <strong>and</strong> color, <strong>in</strong> draw<strong>in</strong>g from objects <strong>and</strong> from nature.<br />

Perspective for Art Students, by Hatton ; Composition by Dow<br />

used as texts.<br />

103-R. ART HISTORY AND APPRECIATION. First se-<br />

mester; three lectures; three credits. History <strong>and</strong> development<br />

<strong>of</strong> civilization as revealed by art. Appreciative study <strong>of</strong> architec-<br />

ture, sculpture, <strong>and</strong> pa<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> time <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Renaissance. Slides,<br />

photographs <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r illustrative material will be used to sup-<br />

plement <strong>the</strong> text. The Nature, Practice, <strong>and</strong> History <strong>of</strong> Art by<br />

Magonigle. Required <strong>of</strong> all students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> F<strong>in</strong>e Arts.<br />

104-R. ART HISTORY AND APPRECIATION. Second se-<br />

mester; three lectures; three credits. Appreciative study <strong>of</strong> archi-<br />

tecture, sculpture, pa<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> m<strong>in</strong>or arts from <strong>the</strong> Renais-<br />

sance to <strong>the</strong> present time. Required <strong>of</strong> all students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong><br />

F<strong>in</strong>e Arts. The Nature, Practice <strong>and</strong> History <strong>of</strong> Art by Magonigle<br />

used as a text, supplemented by slides <strong>and</strong> photographs.<br />

201. ART STRUCTURE (B). Prerequisite, F<strong>in</strong>e Arts 101.


74 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

First semester; two lectures <strong>and</strong> one laboratory period; three<br />

credits.<br />

Advanced Design, Composition <strong>and</strong> Color Theory, with <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

applications to specific problems <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> F<strong>in</strong>e Arts <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> Art In-<br />

dustries.<br />

202. HOUSE FURNISHING AND COSTUME DESIGN.<br />

Second semester; tzvo lectures <strong>and</strong> one laboratory period; three<br />

credits.<br />

The pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> Design <strong>and</strong> Color as applied to house furnish-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> selection <strong>of</strong> cloth<strong>in</strong>g. Treatment <strong>of</strong> walls, space rela-<br />

tions, arrangement <strong>of</strong> rugs, furniture, curta<strong>in</strong>s, etc., <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> plan-<br />

n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> clo<strong>the</strong>s for different types <strong>of</strong> people <strong>and</strong> for different occa-<br />

sions. The Practical Book <strong>of</strong> Interior Decorat<strong>in</strong>g by Eberle<strong>in</strong>,<br />

Holloway <strong>and</strong> McClure, The Enjoyment <strong>and</strong> Use <strong>of</strong> Color by Sar-<br />

gent, <strong>and</strong> Art <strong>in</strong> Every Day Life by Goldste<strong>in</strong> used for study <strong>and</strong><br />

reference.<br />

t<br />

204. COLOR PRINTING AND LETTERING. Second se-<br />

mester; three laboratory periods with half hour lecture dur<strong>in</strong>g each;<br />

three credits.<br />

History <strong>and</strong> development <strong>of</strong> different alphabets. Letter<strong>in</strong>g with<br />

reed <strong>and</strong> steel pens, <strong>and</strong> color pr<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g with wood <strong>and</strong> l<strong>in</strong>oleum<br />

blocks. Writ<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> Illum<strong>in</strong>at<strong>in</strong>g by Johnston, <strong>and</strong> P's <strong>and</strong> Q's<br />

<strong>of</strong> Letter<strong>in</strong>g by Tannahill used as texts.<br />

301. ADVANCED DRAWING AND PAINTING. Prerequi-<br />

site, F<strong>in</strong>e Arts 102. First semester; tn'o lectures <strong>and</strong> one laboratory<br />

period; three credits.<br />

Lectures <strong>and</strong> laboratory work deal<strong>in</strong>g with <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> per-<br />

spective, light <strong>and</strong> shade, <strong>and</strong> color <strong>in</strong> art.<br />

302. HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF AMERICAN<br />

ART. Second semester; three lectures; three credits.<br />

The history <strong>and</strong> development <strong>of</strong> architecture, pa<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g, sculpture<br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> development <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> art <strong>in</strong>dustries <strong>in</strong> America.<br />

The strong <strong>in</strong>fluence <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> art <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> colonial period upon<br />

<strong>the</strong> architecture <strong>and</strong> house furnish<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> present day, <strong>and</strong> its<br />

historical significance will be stressed.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 75<br />

402. DESIGN IN THE ART INDUSTRIES. Second se-<br />

mester; two lectures <strong>and</strong> one laboratory period; three credits.<br />

History <strong>and</strong> development <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great world <strong>in</strong>dustries <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

relation <strong>of</strong> design <strong>and</strong> color to each. Orig<strong>in</strong>al designs for tex-<br />

tiles, wall paper, posters, sta<strong>in</strong>ed glass, pottery, metal <strong>and</strong> jewelry<br />

developed <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> laboratory.<br />

404. THEORY AND PRACTICE OF TEACHING ART.<br />

Prerequisite, IS credits <strong>in</strong> F<strong>in</strong>e Arts. Second semester; two lec-<br />

tures <strong>and</strong> one laboratory period; three credits.<br />

Methods <strong>of</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g art <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> elementary <strong>and</strong> high school.<br />

plann<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> courses, relation <strong>of</strong> art to o<strong>the</strong>r subjects <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> curricu-<br />

lum, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> place <strong>of</strong> art <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> home, <strong>the</strong> school, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> com-<br />

munity. Problems call<strong>in</strong>g for <strong>in</strong>itiative, discrim<strong>in</strong>ation, appreciation<br />

<strong>of</strong> f<strong>in</strong>e quality, <strong>and</strong> skill <strong>in</strong> execution will be developed <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

laboratory.<br />

INDUSTRIAL ARTS DEPARTMENT<br />

Mr. Russell<br />

Outfit for courses <strong>in</strong> Eng<strong>in</strong>eer Draw<strong>in</strong>g to be furnished by <strong>the</strong><br />

student.<br />

Dividers, 5^4 <strong>in</strong>ch.<br />

Compass, 6]/2 <strong>in</strong>ch, with needle po<strong>in</strong>t, pencil po<strong>in</strong>t, pen <strong>and</strong><br />

leng<strong>the</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g bar.<br />

Spr<strong>in</strong>g Bow Dividers, 3% <strong>in</strong>ch, with needle po<strong>in</strong>t.<br />

Spr<strong>in</strong>g Bow Pencil, 3% <strong>in</strong>ch, with needle po<strong>in</strong>t.<br />

Spr<strong>in</strong>g Bow Pen, 3^4 <strong>in</strong>ch, with needle po<strong>in</strong>t.<br />

Draw<strong>in</strong>g Pen, upper blade with spr<strong>in</strong>g A l/2 <strong>in</strong>ch.<br />

Draw<strong>in</strong>g Pen, upper blade with spr<strong>in</strong>g 5j4 <strong>in</strong>ch.<br />

Lead Box, conta<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g six leads.<br />

Draw<strong>in</strong>g Paper (to be specified).<br />

Draw<strong>in</strong>g Ink.<br />

Writ<strong>in</strong>g Pens, ball po<strong>in</strong>t <strong>and</strong> medium.<br />

Pencils, 2H, 4H, 6H.<br />

Thumb Tacks.<br />

Artgum.<br />

Eraser.


76 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

101. MECHANICAL DRAWING, ELEMENTS OF ENGI-<br />

NEERING DRAFTING. Prerequisite, Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101. One<br />

lecture hour, four hours <strong>in</strong> draft<strong>in</strong>g room; three credits.<br />

A course <strong>in</strong> draft<strong>in</strong>g, compris<strong>in</strong>g a general view <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> subject<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>strumental, geometrical draft<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> ultimate object to be<br />

atta<strong>in</strong>ed. Draft<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong>struments <strong>and</strong> materials, <strong>the</strong>ir care <strong>and</strong> use;<br />

<strong>the</strong> arrangement <strong>of</strong> geometrical problems sufficiently numerous <strong>and</strong><br />

varied to lead up to <strong>the</strong> mak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> mechanical draw<strong>in</strong>g; letter<strong>in</strong>g,<br />

mechanical <strong>and</strong> free h<strong>and</strong>. Text : Anthony's Mechanical Draw<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

102. MECHANICAL DRAWING, ENGINEERING, DRAFT-<br />

ING. Prerequisite 101. One hour lecture, four hours <strong>in</strong> draft<strong>in</strong>g<br />

room; three credits.<br />

Projections <strong>of</strong> po<strong>in</strong>t, l<strong>in</strong>e, plane, solids, sections, <strong>in</strong>tersections,<br />

developments, orthographic, cab<strong>in</strong>et projections <strong>and</strong> isometric pro-<br />

jections, shades <strong>and</strong> shadows, trac<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> blue pr<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g. Text:<br />

Anthony's Mechanical Draw<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

302. MACHINE DRAWING. Prerequisite 102. Lecture two<br />

hours, draft<strong>in</strong>g room two hours; three credits.<br />

Practice <strong>in</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g draw<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> build<strong>in</strong>g up draw<strong>in</strong>gs from<br />

details. Mak<strong>in</strong>g detail sketches <strong>and</strong> draw<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>of</strong> mach<strong>in</strong>e parts.<br />

Assembly draw<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>of</strong> valves, la<strong>the</strong>s <strong>and</strong> simple mach<strong>in</strong>es. Texti<br />

Anthony's Mach<strong>in</strong>e Draw<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

401. STRUCTURAL DRAWING. Prerequisite ma<strong>the</strong>matics<br />

102. Lecture one hour; draft<strong>in</strong>g room four hours; three credits.<br />

Relation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>of</strong> structures to eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g practice<br />

through <strong>the</strong> preparation <strong>of</strong> designs <strong>and</strong> draw<strong>in</strong>g for a plate girder<br />

railway bridge, a wooden ro<strong>of</strong> truss, a re<strong>in</strong>forced concrete <strong>and</strong><br />

steel truss highway bridge, build<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> miscellaneous structures.<br />

Text: Bishop's Structural Draw<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Goodw<strong>in</strong><br />

Miss Down<strong>in</strong>g<br />

Dr. Irw<strong>in</strong><br />

101. INTRODUCTION TO THE ENGLISH BIBLE. (Pro-<br />

fessor Goodw<strong>in</strong>). First semester; three hours; three credits.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 11<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> conditions, geographical, ethnological, social, moral,<br />

1<br />

<strong>and</strong> spiritual, <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Hebrew people as <strong>the</strong> background <strong>of</strong> Old Tes-<br />

tament literature, with <strong>in</strong>troduction to <strong>the</strong> historical study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Old Testament books. The moral <strong>and</strong> spiritual significance <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Old Testament.<br />

102. INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF THE BIBLE.<br />

(Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Goodw<strong>in</strong>). Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> New Testament world. The history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

growth <strong>of</strong> New Testament literature, with an <strong>in</strong>troductory study <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> books <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> New Testament. The various translations <strong>and</strong><br />

versions <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> English Bible. The moral <strong>and</strong> spiritual signifi-<br />

cance <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> New Testament.<br />

103. THE HEROES OF ISRAEL. (Miss Down<strong>in</strong>g). First<br />

semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great personalities <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Old Testament from<br />

<strong>the</strong> Patriarchs down to <strong>the</strong> Exile, with emphasis upon <strong>the</strong> social,<br />

political, economic, <strong>and</strong> religious background.<br />

104. THE IDEALS AND INSTITUTIONS OF THE HE-<br />

BREWS. (Miss Down<strong>in</strong>g). Second semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> creative forces, ideals, <strong>and</strong> personalities result<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> establishment <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>stitutions <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Hebrew nation. Con-<br />

t<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> first semester, from Exile to New Testament times,<br />

bridg<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> gap between <strong>the</strong> Old <strong>and</strong> New Testaments.<br />

201. THE SPIRITUAL AND MORAL CONTENT AND<br />

RELATIONSHIPS OF EDUCATION. (Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Goodw<strong>in</strong>).<br />

First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> this course is to show <strong>the</strong> fundamental <strong>and</strong> es-<br />

sential relationship <strong>of</strong> all education to <strong>the</strong> moral <strong>and</strong> spiritual forces<br />

<strong>and</strong> factors <strong>of</strong> life. The nature <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Spirit life will be considered.<br />

The relation <strong>of</strong> this life to <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> education <strong>and</strong><br />

to <strong>the</strong> content <strong>and</strong> purpose <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> various college courses will be<br />

shown with a view <strong>of</strong> emphasiz<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> fact that religion <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

Spirit life are not annexes to education <strong>and</strong> to life, but <strong>in</strong>tegral<br />

<strong>and</strong> essential factors def<strong>in</strong>itely <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>dispensably related to <strong>the</strong> facts


78 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> forces presented through History, Literature, Psychology, Phil-<br />

osophy, Science, Education, Government, etc. Not <strong>of</strong>fered 1926-27.<br />

202. THE ORGANIZATION AND THE ADMINISTRA-<br />

TION OF RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL SERVICE WORK.<br />

(Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Goodw<strong>in</strong>). Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> this course is to tra<strong>in</strong> students <strong>in</strong> proper methods<br />

<strong>of</strong> deal<strong>in</strong>g with groups <strong>of</strong> people associated for study <strong>and</strong> service.<br />

This course is not primarily <strong>in</strong>tended for m<strong>in</strong>isterial students. Not<br />

<strong>of</strong>fered 1926-27.<br />

205. LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF JESUS. (Miss Down-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g). First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A detailed study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Gospel narratives, which will <strong>in</strong>clude<br />

an <strong>in</strong>tensive study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> person, life, <strong>and</strong> public m<strong>in</strong>istry <strong>of</strong> Jesus,<br />

toge<strong>the</strong>r with a brief survey <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Life <strong>of</strong> Christ <strong>in</strong> Art.<br />

• 206. LIFE AND LETTERS OF PAUL. (Miss Down<strong>in</strong>g).<br />

Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

In this course special attention is given to <strong>the</strong> life <strong>of</strong> Paul, <strong>the</strong><br />

beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Christian church, <strong>the</strong> writ<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

New Testament epistles <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r early Christian literature,<br />

clos<strong>in</strong>g with a discussion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> place <strong>and</strong> importance <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> New<br />

Testament <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> life <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> church.<br />

301. BIBLE AS LITERATURE, I. (Miss Down<strong>in</strong>g.) First<br />

semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> history, story <strong>and</strong> wisdom materials <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Bible.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> course is to <strong>in</strong>sure a knowledge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> contents;<br />

to develop an appreciation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> wealth <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Bible as a work <strong>of</strong><br />

literary art.<br />

302. BIBLE AS LITERATURE. II. (Miss Down<strong>in</strong>g).<br />

Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> lyric <strong>and</strong> prophetic materials <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Bible. (This<br />

course is designed to supplement Course 103).<br />

303. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE SPIRIT LIFE. (Pro-<br />

fessor Goodw<strong>in</strong>). First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> fundamental pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> thought <strong>and</strong> faith as


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 79<br />

related to <strong>the</strong> nature <strong>and</strong> obligation <strong>of</strong> service <strong>and</strong> leadership. In<br />

this course <strong>the</strong> source <strong>and</strong> foundation <strong>of</strong> character <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> life's re-<br />

lationships <strong>and</strong> ethical <strong>and</strong> spiritual obligations will be <strong>in</strong>vesti-<br />

gated. Text: Evelyn Underbill's "Life <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Spirit <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> Life<br />

<strong>of</strong> Today." ,<br />

304. THE TEACHINGS AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF JE-<br />

SUS. (Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Goodw<strong>in</strong>). Second semester; three hours; thrice<br />

credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> personality <strong>of</strong> Jesus, <strong>the</strong> great fundamentals<br />

<strong>of</strong> His teach<strong>in</strong>g, with special reference to <strong>the</strong> psychological pr<strong>in</strong>ci-<br />

ples embodied <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>of</strong> Christ.<br />

305. BEGINNINGS OF CHRISTIANITY. (Miss Down-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g). First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Political, economic, <strong>and</strong> religious conditions among Jews <strong>and</strong><br />

Gentiles <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Roman Empire; rise <strong>and</strong> early development <strong>of</strong><br />

Christian movement <strong>in</strong> Palest<strong>in</strong>e ; <strong>the</strong> missionary career <strong>of</strong> Paul<br />

expansion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> movement to <strong>the</strong> close <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> second century; <strong>the</strong><br />

ideals <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>stitutions <strong>of</strong> early Christian movement.<br />

306. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY. (Miss Down<strong>in</strong>g).<br />

Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A survey <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> outst<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g developments <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> life <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

church from <strong>the</strong> apostolic age to <strong>the</strong> present.<br />

307. INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF THE BOOKS<br />

OF THE OLD TESTAMENT: HISTORY AND PROPHETS.<br />

(Dr. Irw<strong>in</strong>). First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> this course, which should be cont<strong>in</strong>ued by <strong>the</strong><br />

student if possible through both terms, is to <strong>in</strong>troduce <strong>the</strong> student<br />

to <strong>the</strong> study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> books <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Bible based on <strong>the</strong> use <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

St<strong>and</strong>ard American Revised Version. The aim <strong>of</strong> this course is<br />

threefold : to give <strong>the</strong> student an adequate knowledge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> struc-<br />

ture <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Bible <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> contents <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> books, Bible geography<br />

<strong>and</strong> history, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> results <strong>of</strong> latest archaeological research ; to give<br />

a rational <strong>and</strong> practical method <strong>of</strong> first h<strong>and</strong> study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> books<br />

to tra<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> student <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> ability to see <strong>and</strong> underst<strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> great<br />

messages <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> books.<br />

; ;


80 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

308. INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF THE BOOKS<br />

OF THE NEW TESTAMENT. (Dr. Irw<strong>in</strong>). Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

Gospels, Acts <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Apostles, <strong>and</strong> Epistles.<br />

401. THE GREAT TRUTHS AND GREAT CHARACTERS<br />

OF THE BIBLE. (Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Goodw<strong>in</strong>). First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> this cou/se is to make an <strong>in</strong>tensive study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

great characters <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Bible with a view <strong>of</strong> show<strong>in</strong>g how <strong>the</strong>y were<br />

<strong>the</strong> revealers <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great truths <strong>of</strong> spiritual forces which are permanent<br />

<strong>and</strong> creative <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> life <strong>of</strong> man. Not <strong>of</strong>feerd 1926-27.<br />

402. A STUDY OF SOME OF THE GREAT PERSONALI-<br />

TIES OF HUMAN HISTORY. (Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Goodw<strong>in</strong>). Second<br />

semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

In this course some <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great characters <strong>of</strong> history will be<br />

studied with a view <strong>of</strong> evaluat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> forces which contributed to<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir greatness <strong>and</strong> to <strong>the</strong>ir <strong>in</strong>fluence. Not <strong>of</strong>fered 1926-27.<br />

403. SOCIAL MESSAGE OF THE PROPHETS OF IS-<br />

RAEL. (Miss Down<strong>in</strong>g). First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

A survey <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> preparation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Hebrew people for <strong>the</strong> work<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> religious <strong>and</strong> social leaders <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> people; <strong>the</strong>ir contribution<br />

to <strong>the</strong>ir times <strong>and</strong> to social world betterment.<br />

404. PRINCIPLES OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION. (Miss<br />

Down<strong>in</strong>g). Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Pr<strong>in</strong>ciples, methods <strong>and</strong> curriculum are carefully studied ; also<br />

<strong>the</strong> church as an education <strong>in</strong>stitution. The implication <strong>of</strong> current<br />

psychological <strong>and</strong> philosophical concepts are considered. (Open only<br />

to seniors <strong>and</strong> graduates.)<br />

405. COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS. (Miss Down<strong>in</strong>g). First<br />

semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> this course is to study <strong>the</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great<br />

ethnic religions as compared with <strong>the</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>of</strong> Christianity.<br />

Also a brief biographical study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> leaders <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> great ethnic<br />

religions.


«<br />

Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 81<br />

BIOLOGY<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Davis<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Jones<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Warren<br />

*Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Doll<strong>of</strong>f<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Jantz<br />

LABORATORY ASSISTANTS<br />

J. B. Baker B. B. Shotwell<br />

S. H. Hopk<strong>in</strong>s C. C. Tucker<br />

R. L. Wells<br />

101. ZOOLOGY. First semester; lectures three or two hours;<br />

laboratory four or six hours; five credits. Required for prc-<br />

medical students.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> structure, activities, relationships <strong>and</strong> distribu-<br />

tion <strong>of</strong> animals.<br />

102. BOTANY. Second semester; lectures three or two hours;<br />

laboratory four or six hours; five credits. Required <strong>of</strong> pre-medi-<br />

cal students.<br />

The structure, function <strong>and</strong> orig<strong>in</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> primary organs <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

higher plants; adaptation <strong>of</strong> plants to <strong>the</strong>ir physical environment;<br />

<strong>the</strong> relationships, geographic distribution <strong>and</strong> evolution <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> four<br />

great groups <strong>of</strong> plants.<br />

tl03. PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE. First semester; two<br />

hours; two credits. Elective for freshmen <strong>and</strong> sophomores.<br />

An elementary study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> structures <strong>and</strong> activity <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> va-<br />

rious parts <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> human mach<strong>in</strong>e with conclusions as to <strong>the</strong> most<br />

efficient methods <strong>of</strong> operation based on such a study. May be taken<br />

by students deficient <strong>in</strong> entrance credits to make up this deficiency.<br />

It is recommended that students who have not had high school phy-<br />

siology take this course before Biology 104.<br />

*On leave <strong>of</strong> absence 1925-26.<br />

tNote—Courses 103 <strong>and</strong> 104 count as electives only, not <strong>in</strong> fulfilment <strong>of</strong><br />

m<strong>in</strong>imum degree requirements <strong>in</strong> science, nor toward a major or m<strong>in</strong>or <strong>in</strong><br />

Biology.


82 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

*104. SCHOOL HYGIENE. Second semester; two hours;<br />

two credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> hygiene <strong>and</strong> sanitation with especial reference to <strong>the</strong><br />

schools, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g methods <strong>of</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>and</strong> physical <strong>in</strong>spection <strong>of</strong><br />

school children. This course is <strong>in</strong>tended primarily for teachers, to<br />

meet <strong>the</strong> requirements <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> West Law.<br />

201. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES.<br />

Prerequisite, Zoology. First semester; lectures two hours; labora-<br />

tory six hours; five credits.<br />

This course takes up, <strong>in</strong> a comparative way, <strong>the</strong> structure <strong>of</strong><br />

vertebrate animals. A number <strong>of</strong> types are dissected <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> labora-<br />

tory.<br />

202. EMBRYOLOGY OF VERTEBRATES. Prerequisite,<br />

Comparative Anatomy <strong>of</strong> Vertebrates {except with consent <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>in</strong>structor). Second semester; lectures two hours; laboratory six<br />

hours; five credits.<br />

The work <strong>of</strong> this course is based on <strong>the</strong> study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> development<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> chick with comparative treatment <strong>of</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r forms.<br />

203. HEREDITY. First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

In this course are studied <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> heredity, with special<br />

attention to <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>heritance <strong>of</strong> human traits <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> improvement <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>born traits <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> race.<br />

Note—Courses 203 <strong>and</strong> 204 may be taken by sophomores or up-<br />

per classmen as electives but do not count <strong>in</strong> fulfillment <strong>of</strong> m<strong>in</strong>imum<br />

degree requirements <strong>in</strong> science nor toward a major or m<strong>in</strong>or<br />

<strong>in</strong> Biology.<br />

204. EVOLUTION. Second semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

This course deals with <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> idea <strong>of</strong> evolution, <strong>the</strong><br />

facts for which a <strong>the</strong>ory is dem<strong>and</strong>ed, <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>of</strong> evolution <strong>and</strong><br />

alternative <strong>the</strong>ories ; <strong>and</strong> with <strong>the</strong> factors <strong>of</strong> evolution accord<strong>in</strong>g to<br />

Lamarck. Darw<strong>in</strong> <strong>and</strong> more recent biologists. It is designed for<br />

*Note—Courses 103 <strong>and</strong> 104 count as electives only, not <strong>in</strong> fulfilment <strong>of</strong><br />

m<strong>in</strong>imum degree requirements <strong>in</strong> science, nor toward a major or m<strong>in</strong>or <strong>in</strong><br />

Biology.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 83<br />

those who do not have a specialized acqua<strong>in</strong>tance with Biology.<br />

See note under Course 203.<br />

205. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. Prerequisite, Botany. First<br />

semester; lectures three hours; laboratory four hours; five credits.<br />

Morphology <strong>and</strong> physiology <strong>of</strong> plants. A detailed study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

correlations <strong>of</strong> structure with <strong>the</strong> phenomena <strong>of</strong> growth, nutrition<br />

<strong>and</strong> movements <strong>of</strong> plant organs. The laboratory work is designed<br />

to acqua<strong>in</strong>t <strong>the</strong> student with <strong>the</strong> methods <strong>of</strong> demonstrat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> processes<br />

<strong>of</strong> absorption, movement <strong>and</strong> transformations <strong>of</strong> food ma-<br />

terials <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> methods <strong>of</strong> observ<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> measur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> reactions<br />

<strong>of</strong> plants to stimuli.<br />

206. PLANT TAXONOMY. Prerequisite, Botany. Second<br />

semester; lectures two hours; laboratory six hours; five credits.<br />

The collection <strong>and</strong> systematic classification <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ferns <strong>and</strong><br />

seed plants; a detailed exam<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> morphology <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> organs<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> plant especially employed <strong>in</strong> classification; a study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

ecological relationships <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> plants collected. Laboratory <strong>and</strong><br />

field work on <strong>the</strong> flora <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg. Each student prepares<br />

an herbarium.<br />

301. BACTERIOLOGY. Prerequisites, Botany <strong>and</strong> General<br />

Chemistry. First semester; lectures two hours; laboratory six<br />

hours; five credits. Open to juniors <strong>and</strong> seniors.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> forms, activities, relationships <strong>and</strong> culture <strong>of</strong><br />

bacteria, yeasts <strong>and</strong> molds, <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir economic, <strong>in</strong>dustrial <strong>and</strong><br />

hygienic significance.<br />

302. COMMUNITY HYGIENE. Prerequisite, Bacteriology.<br />

Second semester; lectures three hours; laboratory four hours; five<br />

credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> cause, nature, transmission, <strong>and</strong> prevention <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>in</strong>fections; home sanitation, <strong>and</strong> methods <strong>of</strong> health promotion de-<br />

pendent upon <strong>the</strong> concerted action <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>dividuals. See note to<br />

Course 306.<br />

303. HUMAN ANATOMY. Prerequisite. Zoology. First se-<br />

mester; lectures two hours; laboratory two hours; three credits.<br />

Open only to students tak<strong>in</strong>g a major <strong>in</strong> Physical Education.<br />

Lectures <strong>and</strong> demonstrations on <strong>the</strong> bones, jo<strong>in</strong>ts, ligaments,


84<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

muscles <strong>and</strong> nervous <strong>and</strong> circulatory systems as related to phy-<br />

sical education.<br />

304. PHYSIOLOGY. Prerequisites, Zoology <strong>and</strong> General<br />

Chemistry. It will be advantageous to have taken, or to take with<br />

this course, Comparative Anatomy <strong>of</strong> Vertebrates, Organic Chem-<br />

istry <strong>and</strong> Physics. Second semester ; lectures three hours; labora-<br />

tory four hours ; five credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> activities <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> human body as a basis for its<br />

proper underst<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> effective care.<br />

305. APPLIED ANATOMY AND BODILY MECHANICS.<br />

This course should follow Biology 303 or be taken with it. First<br />

semester; three hours; three credits. Open only to students tak-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g a major <strong>in</strong> Physical Education.<br />

Lecture <strong>and</strong> recitations on <strong>the</strong> anatomical mechanism <strong>of</strong> move-<br />

ments <strong>and</strong> fundamental pr<strong>in</strong>ciples regard<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> selection, classifi-<br />

cation <strong>and</strong> application <strong>of</strong> physical education.<br />

306. ADVANCED HYGIENE. Second semester; lectures<br />

three hours; laboratory four hours; five credits. Not open to<br />

those who have credit for Bacteriology.<br />

A course <strong>in</strong> personal <strong>and</strong> community hygiene, emphasiz<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong><br />

prevention <strong>and</strong> control <strong>of</strong> communicable diseases, with studies <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

rudiments <strong>of</strong> bacteriology <strong>and</strong> with field work.<br />

Note—Courses 304 or 306 will be given, but not both, <strong>the</strong> choice<br />

to be determ<strong>in</strong>ed by <strong>the</strong> needs <strong>of</strong> those apply<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

401. CYTOLOGY. Prerequisite, Botany. First semester; lec-<br />

tures two hours; laboratory six hours; five credits.<br />

The structure <strong>and</strong> structural transformations <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> cell with<br />

special reference to <strong>the</strong> phenomena <strong>of</strong> cell division <strong>and</strong> cell differen-<br />

tiation <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> growth <strong>and</strong> reproductive tissues <strong>of</strong> plants. Recent<br />

discoveries concerned with <strong>the</strong> relationship <strong>of</strong> nucleus <strong>and</strong> cyto-<br />

plasm to <strong>in</strong>heritance <strong>in</strong> both plants <strong>and</strong> animals. Each student is<br />

tra<strong>in</strong>ed <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> various methods <strong>of</strong> prepar<strong>in</strong>g liv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> killed ma-<br />

terial for certa<strong>in</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se studies. Counts for A. M. credit.<br />

402. GENETICS. Prerequisites, Zoology <strong>and</strong> Botany. Cy-<br />

tology is recommended but not required <strong>in</strong> preparation for this


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 85<br />

course. Second semester; lectures three hours; laboratory work<br />

may be taken <strong>in</strong> connection with this course by register<strong>in</strong>g also<br />

for Course 403, provided arrangements are made <strong>in</strong> advance with<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>structor.<br />

The pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> variation <strong>and</strong> heredity, <strong>the</strong> orig<strong>in</strong> <strong>of</strong> new types<br />

<strong>and</strong> factors concerned with <strong>the</strong>ir development. Counts for A. M.<br />

credit.<br />

403. PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY. Prerequisite, approval <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>structor. Any semester; hours to be arranged; credits ac-<br />

cord<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> work done.<br />

The work <strong>of</strong> this course is strictly <strong>in</strong>dividual <strong>and</strong> varies with<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>terests <strong>and</strong> needs <strong>of</strong> advanced students. Those <strong>in</strong>terested<br />

should consult <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>structors before register<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong>, if possible, some<br />

months <strong>in</strong> advance. Counts for A. M. credit.<br />

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION<br />

(See page 176)<br />

CHEMISTRY<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Rorb<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Guy<br />

Mr. Young<br />

Laboratory Assistants<br />

Alkire, H. L. Thorpe, M. A.<br />

Goodwyn, D. L. Tood, R. G.<br />

K<strong>in</strong>g, A. S. Van Laer, R. E.<br />

Temple, M. H.<br />

101. ELEMENTARY GENERAL CHEMISTRY. First se-<br />

mester; lecture three hours; laboratory four hours; five credits.<br />

Required <strong>of</strong> pre-medical students.<br />

Chemical Laws <strong>and</strong> chemistry <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> non-metals.<br />

102. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. Prerequisite, wi. Re-


86 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

quired <strong>of</strong> pre-medical students. Second semester; lecture two<br />

hours; five credits.<br />

The lectures will be on <strong>the</strong> most common metals, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> labora-<br />

tory work is a course <strong>in</strong> qualitative analysis <strong>of</strong> metals <strong>and</strong> acids.<br />

201. MINERALOGY AND CRYSTALLOGRAPHY. Pre-<br />

requisite, 102. First semester; lecture two hours; laboartory six<br />

hours ; laboratory six hours; five credits.<br />

This course takes up <strong>the</strong> qualitative study <strong>of</strong> ores <strong>and</strong> rocks.<br />

203. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Volumetric. Prerequi-<br />

site, 102. Required <strong>of</strong> all those who expect to major <strong>in</strong> chemistry.<br />

First semester; lecture one hour; laboratory eight hours; five<br />

credits.<br />

A course <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> quantitative analysis. The labora-<br />

tory work will <strong>in</strong>clude <strong>the</strong> preparation <strong>of</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard <strong>and</strong> normal solu-<br />

tions, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> volumetric determ<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> iron, copper, arsenic,<br />

silver, manganese, etc.<br />

204. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Gravimetric technique.<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 203. Second semester; lecture one hour; labora-<br />

tory eight hours; five credits.<br />

The determ<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> chlor<strong>in</strong>e, iron, phosphorous, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> potas-<br />

sium. Gravimetric analysis <strong>of</strong> various ores <strong>and</strong> alloys.<br />

301. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite. 102. First se-<br />

mester; lecture three hours; laboratory four hours; five credits.<br />

The foundation <strong>of</strong> organic chemistry; a study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> aliphatic<br />

hydrocarbons <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir derivatives. May be counted for <strong>the</strong> A. M.<br />

degree.<br />

302. ORGANIC CHEMHSTRY. Prerequisite, 301. Second se-<br />

mester; required <strong>of</strong> pre-medical students; lecture three hours;<br />

laboratory four hours; five credits.<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 301. Carbohydrates, prote<strong>in</strong>s, mixed compounds,<br />

<strong>the</strong> cyclic hydrocarbons <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir derivatives. May count for A. M.<br />

degree.<br />

303. CHEMICAL MICROSCOPY. Prerequisite, fifteen se-


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 87<br />

mester hours <strong>in</strong> chemistry. First semester; lecture one hour;<br />

laboratory eight hours; five credits.<br />

The application <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> microscope to analytical work. This <strong>in</strong>-<br />

cludes qualitative analysis <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>organic compounds, textiles, papers,<br />

<strong>and</strong> also work <strong>in</strong> measurements.<br />

304. OPTICAL METHODS. Prerequisite, 303. Second se-<br />

mester; lecture one hour; laboratory eight hours; five credits.<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 303. The laboratory work <strong>in</strong>cludes <strong>the</strong> quanti-<br />

tative study <strong>of</strong> sugars <strong>and</strong> optically active solutions, <strong>and</strong> a quali-<br />

tative analysis <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> most common elements with <strong>the</strong> spectroscope.<br />

305. AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD CHEMISTRY. Pre-<br />

requisites, 102, 203. First semester; lecture two hours; laboratory<br />

six hours; five credits.<br />

A quantitative determ<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> ash, moisture, prote<strong>in</strong>, fats, car-<br />

bohydrates, etc., <strong>and</strong> lecture work on metabolism <strong>of</strong> foods, etc.<br />

308. INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, twenty se-<br />

mester hours <strong>in</strong> chemistry. Second semester; lecture three hours;<br />

laboratory four hours; five credits.<br />

The laboratory work <strong>in</strong>cludes <strong>the</strong> analyses <strong>of</strong> fuels <strong>and</strong> steels,<br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> lecture work covers a variety <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>dustrial products such<br />

as coal, sulfuric acid, nitric acid <strong>and</strong> alloys.<br />

401. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, two years <strong>of</strong><br />

college chemistry <strong>and</strong> one year <strong>of</strong> college physics. First semester;<br />

lecture three hours; laboratory four hours; five credits. May count<br />

for A. M. degree.<br />

Lectures <strong>and</strong> laboratory work <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g determ<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> molecu-<br />

lar weights, ionization, <strong>in</strong>dicators, liquids <strong>and</strong> liquid mixtures, vis-<br />

cosity, vapor pressures, elevation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> boil<strong>in</strong>g po<strong>in</strong>t, distillation <strong>of</strong><br />

liquid mixtures, <strong>and</strong> solution <strong>and</strong> solubility.<br />

402. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite, 401. Second<br />

semester; lecture three hours; laboratory four hours; five credits.<br />

May count for A. M. degree.<br />

Lectures <strong>and</strong> laboratory work <strong>in</strong>clude colloids, equilibrium <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> phase rule, refractive <strong>in</strong>dex, speed <strong>of</strong> reaction, catalysis, saponi-<br />

fication, <strong>the</strong>rmochemistry, electrolysis, <strong>and</strong> problems.


88<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

403. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite,<br />

two years <strong>of</strong> college chemistry. First semester; lecture three hours;<br />

laboratory four hours; five credits. May count for A. M. degree.<br />

Lectures <strong>and</strong> laboratory work cover<strong>in</strong>g all <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> elements <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

periodic table, <strong>and</strong> laboratory work cover<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong>ir extraction from<br />

ores <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir qualitative separation. Particular emphasis is placed<br />

upon <strong>the</strong> chemistry <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> rarer elements. There will be def<strong>in</strong>ite<br />

problems.<br />

404. ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequi-<br />

site, 403. Second semester; lecture three hours; laboratory four<br />

hours; five credits. May count for A. M. degree.<br />

Lectures <strong>and</strong> laboratory work cont<strong>in</strong>ued with special emphasis<br />

on radioactivity, <strong>the</strong> modern <strong>the</strong>ories <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> atomic structure, crys-<br />

tal analysis, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> preparation <strong>of</strong> rare compounds. Extensive<br />

read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> library will be assigned <strong>and</strong> some orig<strong>in</strong>al research<br />

work done.<br />

405. ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Prere-<br />

quisite, 203, 204. First semester; lecture one hour; laboratory eight<br />

hours; five credits. May count for A. M. degree.<br />

The application <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> quantitative analysis to <strong>in</strong>-<br />

dustrial products. The work will be varied to suit <strong>in</strong>dividual pref-<br />

erences. Analyses will <strong>in</strong>clude fertilizers, foodstuffs, water, lime-<br />

stone, <strong>and</strong> cement.<br />

406. ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Cont<strong>in</strong>u-<br />

ation <strong>of</strong> 405. Second semester; laboratory ten hours; five credits.<br />

May count for A. M. degree.<br />

sis.<br />

Considerable latitude allowed <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> choice <strong>of</strong> subjects for analy-<br />

407. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite.<br />

302. First semester; lecture one hour; laboratory eight hours; five<br />

credits.<br />

Qualitative analysis <strong>of</strong> organic compounds; a separation <strong>of</strong> mix-<br />

tures ; organic combustions.<br />

408. ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Prerequisite.<br />

407. Second semester; laboratory ten hours; five credits.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 89<br />

Quantitative organic analysis; determ<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> molecular<br />

weights; estimation <strong>of</strong> halogens, sulfur, radicals, <strong>and</strong> unsaturation <strong>in</strong>-<br />

organic compounds.<br />

ECONOMICS<br />

(See page 185)<br />

EDUCATION<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Hoke<br />

* Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Hodges<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Krebs<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Weeks<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Taft<br />

202. INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF EDUCATION.<br />

Second semester; three hours; three credits. 9 a. m.<br />

Required <strong>of</strong> all students hold<strong>in</strong>g state scholarships, <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> stu-<br />

dents tak<strong>in</strong>g a major or m<strong>in</strong>or <strong>in</strong> education. It is also recommended<br />

to o<strong>the</strong>r students as an elective, regardless <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir plans to enter<br />

<strong>the</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g pr<strong>of</strong>ession.<br />

This course emphasizes <strong>the</strong> "history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> adm<strong>in</strong>istrative prog-<br />

ress" <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> school for <strong>the</strong> purpose <strong>of</strong> giv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> student, first,<br />

an enlarged view <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> school, with emphasis on its relation to <strong>the</strong><br />

state <strong>and</strong> to o<strong>the</strong>r social <strong>in</strong>stitutions <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> state; second, an under-<br />

st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> teacher's relationships <strong>and</strong> functions <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> school<br />

<strong>and</strong>, third, aid <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> choice <strong>of</strong> a particular field <strong>of</strong> activity <strong>in</strong> edu-<br />

cation <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> selection <strong>of</strong> courses to fit him for his chosen activity.<br />

It will <strong>in</strong>clude <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g topics : Historical development, modi-<br />

fy<strong>in</strong>g forces <strong>in</strong> education, new concepts <strong>in</strong> education, reorganization<br />

<strong>in</strong> education, teach<strong>in</strong>g as a pr<strong>of</strong>ession, choos<strong>in</strong>g a teach<strong>in</strong>g position.<br />

301 R. PROBLEMS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. Eath<br />

semester; three hours; three credits. Required <strong>of</strong> all students hold<strong>in</strong>g<br />

state scholarships, <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> students tak<strong>in</strong>g a major or m<strong>in</strong>or<br />

<strong>in</strong> Education. 10 a. m.<br />

*On leave <strong>of</strong> absence 1925-26.<br />

;


90 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

This course presents to <strong>the</strong> student a broad view <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g<br />

phase <strong>of</strong> high school work. The follow<strong>in</strong>g topics will be <strong>in</strong>cluded<br />

Aims <strong>and</strong> objectives <strong>of</strong> secondary education, <strong>the</strong> school population,<br />

native endowment <strong>of</strong> pupils, physical <strong>and</strong> mental traits, <strong>in</strong>dividual<br />

differences, adolescence, transfer <strong>of</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g, development <strong>of</strong> cur-<br />

riculum, extra-curricular activities, nature <strong>of</strong> learn<strong>in</strong>g, measur<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>the</strong> results <strong>of</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

302. THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS. Second se-<br />

mester; three hours; three credits. 9 a. m. Prerequisite, io credits<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics.<br />

This course is <strong>in</strong>tended to present to prospective teachers or<br />

supervisors <strong>of</strong> ma<strong>the</strong>matics <strong>the</strong> modern po<strong>in</strong>t <strong>of</strong> view <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> sub-<br />

ject. In addition to a review <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> subject matter <strong>of</strong> algebra,<br />

geometry <strong>and</strong> trigonometry, <strong>and</strong> practice <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> presentation <strong>of</strong><br />

typical units, <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g topics will be discussed : The place <strong>of</strong><br />

ma<strong>the</strong>matics <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> curriculum, present tendencies <strong>in</strong> reorganization,<br />

<strong>the</strong> use <strong>of</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard tests, projects <strong>and</strong> supervised study, <strong>the</strong> junior<br />

high school movement <strong>in</strong> ma<strong>the</strong>matics, <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>troduction <strong>of</strong> elemen-<br />

tary calculus <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> senior high school, judg<strong>in</strong>g text books.<br />

303. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. First semester; two<br />

lectures; two hours laboratory ; three credits. For seniors <strong>and</strong> ad-<br />

vanced students <strong>in</strong> education or psychology. 2 p. m. Same as<br />

Psychology 307.<br />

Experimental course <strong>in</strong> analysis <strong>of</strong> selected learn<strong>in</strong>g activities.<br />

Experiments <strong>in</strong> laboratory <strong>and</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g school ; <strong>in</strong>dividual <strong>and</strong><br />

group <strong>in</strong>vestigations.<br />

304. THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH. Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits. 3 p. m.<br />

This course is <strong>in</strong>tended for teachers <strong>of</strong> English <strong>and</strong> for pr<strong>in</strong>ci-<br />

The present status <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

pals. It will consist <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g :<br />

teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> composition <strong>and</strong> literature, <strong>the</strong> objectives <strong>of</strong> oral <strong>and</strong><br />

written composition, sources <strong>and</strong> treatment <strong>of</strong> oral <strong>and</strong> written<br />

<strong>the</strong>mes, mechanics <strong>of</strong> composition <strong>in</strong> relation to content, st<strong>and</strong>ards<br />

<strong>of</strong> atta<strong>in</strong>ment <strong>in</strong> composition, objectives <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> study <strong>of</strong> literature,<br />

choice <strong>and</strong> treatment <strong>of</strong> literarv selections.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 91<br />

305. HISTORY OF EDUCATION. First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits. 9 a. m.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> education as a phase <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> history<br />

<strong>of</strong> civilization. Emphasis will be upon <strong>the</strong> development <strong>of</strong> educa-<br />

tional practices <strong>in</strong>stead <strong>of</strong> upon <strong>the</strong> development <strong>of</strong> educational<br />

<strong>the</strong>ories. Beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g with a study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> sources <strong>of</strong> our civilization,<br />

<strong>the</strong> course will embrace <strong>the</strong> educational practices <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Greeks,<br />

<strong>the</strong> Romans, <strong>the</strong> early Christians <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> peoples <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> mediaeval<br />

times, with especial attention to <strong>the</strong> educational causes <strong>and</strong> conse-<br />

quences <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Reformation. Its purpose is to give prospective educational<br />

leaders such knowledge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> past as will enable <strong>the</strong>m<br />

to appraise <strong>the</strong> practices <strong>and</strong> problems <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> present.<br />

306. THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL SCIENCES. Second<br />

semester; three hours; three credits. Prerequisite, ten credits gov-<br />

ernmental history. 12 m.<br />

This course is <strong>in</strong>tended for prospective high school teachers, pr<strong>in</strong>-<br />

cipals, supervisors <strong>and</strong> super<strong>in</strong>tendents. Selection <strong>and</strong> organization<br />

<strong>of</strong> material <strong>in</strong> civics <strong>and</strong> history; problems <strong>of</strong> democracy, citizen-<br />

ship, correlation with o<strong>the</strong>r school subjects; methods <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>struction.<br />

307. EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits. 3 p. m.<br />

General human relations will be studied for one month <strong>in</strong> order<br />

that <strong>the</strong> students (juniors <strong>and</strong> seniors) may get sufficient perspec-<br />

tive for <strong>the</strong> rema<strong>in</strong>der <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> course, which will be a study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

evolution <strong>of</strong> present rural social conditions <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>stitutions. Pros-<br />

pective teachers, pr<strong>in</strong>cipals, super<strong>in</strong>tendents <strong>and</strong> directors <strong>of</strong> physical<br />

education, as well as <strong>the</strong> general student, will f<strong>in</strong>d direct values <strong>in</strong><br />

this course.<br />

308. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION. Second semester; three<br />

hours; three credits. Required <strong>of</strong> all students tak<strong>in</strong>g a major <strong>in</strong><br />

education. 2 p. m.<br />

This course is primarily for students plann<strong>in</strong>g to become pr<strong>in</strong>-<br />

cipals <strong>and</strong> super<strong>in</strong>tendents. It is recommended also for students<br />

prepar<strong>in</strong>g to become teachers <strong>in</strong> junior or senior high schools.<br />

While emphasis will be placed on <strong>the</strong> organization problems <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

junior <strong>and</strong> senior high schools, attention will be given to similar


92 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

problems <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> elementary schools. It will <strong>in</strong>clude <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g<br />

problems: Classification <strong>and</strong> promotion <strong>of</strong> pupils, discipl<strong>in</strong>e <strong>and</strong><br />

control, program-mak<strong>in</strong>g, records <strong>and</strong> reports, school laws, schedules,<br />

elim<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>and</strong> follow-up <strong>of</strong> pupils, methods <strong>of</strong> grad<strong>in</strong>g, health <strong>and</strong><br />

sanitary control, supervised study, use <strong>of</strong> assembly periods, development<br />

<strong>of</strong> school spirit.<br />

309. EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE.<br />

First semester; three hours; three credits. 10 a. m.<br />

A general survey <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> vocational guidance movement, with<br />

especial emphasis rpon its educational implications, <strong>and</strong> upon <strong>the</strong><br />

educational <strong>and</strong> vocational needs <strong>of</strong> high school children. Particu-<br />

lar attention will be given to <strong>the</strong> special guidance needs <strong>of</strong> students<br />

who take <strong>the</strong> course. Lectures, read<strong>in</strong>gs, discussions, <strong>and</strong> reports.<br />

310. RURAL SCHOOL PROBLEMS. Second semester; three<br />

hours; three credits. 2 p. m.<br />

This course is a practical study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> adjustment <strong>of</strong> educational<br />

methods <strong>and</strong> organization to <strong>the</strong> needs <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia rural communi-<br />

ties. Survey <strong>of</strong> selected rural communities, study <strong>of</strong> rural elementary<br />

<strong>and</strong> high schools, reports, class discussions, lectures, <strong>and</strong><br />

read<strong>in</strong>gs.<br />

311. THE TEACHING OF SCIENCE. First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits. Prerequisite, three credits <strong>in</strong> one science.<br />

9 a. m.<br />

This course is <strong>in</strong>tended for prospective high school teachers or<br />

supervisors <strong>of</strong> science, <strong>and</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>cipals. Texts, subject matter, ap-<br />

paratus <strong>and</strong> methods <strong>of</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g will be discussed. Typical projects<br />

will be developed <strong>and</strong> present tendencies <strong>in</strong> reorganization studied.<br />

401-R. SUPERVISED TEACHING. Each semester; ten<br />

hours; six credits. Prerequisite, Education 301 <strong>and</strong> a methods<br />

course related to <strong>the</strong> major or m<strong>in</strong>or. Hours to be arranged.<br />

Required <strong>of</strong> all state students <strong>and</strong> c<strong>and</strong>idates for pr<strong>of</strong>essional<br />

certificates. Terms <strong>and</strong> schedule to be arranged with director <strong>of</strong><br />

supervised teach<strong>in</strong>g. Schedule <strong>and</strong> assignment must be arranged<br />

two weeks before <strong>the</strong> close <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> quarter preced<strong>in</strong>g that <strong>in</strong> which<br />

<strong>the</strong> course is taken. Course consists <strong>of</strong> preparation <strong>of</strong> lesson plans


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 93<br />

<strong>and</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g classes under supervision, toge<strong>the</strong>r with observation<br />

<strong>and</strong> criticism <strong>of</strong> o<strong>the</strong>rs, supervision <strong>of</strong> study, mak<strong>in</strong>g reports <strong>and</strong><br />

records, discipl<strong>in</strong>e, <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r practical work <strong>of</strong> a teacher. Three<br />

hours per day; five days <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> week.<br />

402. ORGANIZATION AND SUPERVISION OF THE<br />

CURRICULUM. Second semester; three hours; three credits. 11<br />

a. m. Not given <strong>in</strong> 1926-27.<br />

This course is planned for teachers, pr<strong>in</strong>cipals <strong>and</strong> super<strong>in</strong>ten-<br />

dents. Emphasis will be placed on <strong>the</strong> curriculum <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> junior<br />

<strong>and</strong> senior high schools. The curriculum <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> elementary schools<br />

will also be considered. The course will <strong>in</strong>clude <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g<br />

topics : Historical development, pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> organization <strong>and</strong> se-<br />

lection, value <strong>of</strong> studies, adjustment <strong>of</strong> curriculum to needs <strong>of</strong><br />

pupil, type studies, consideration <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>terpretation by <strong>the</strong> teacher,<br />

pr<strong>in</strong>cipal, <strong>and</strong> supervisor. The Virg<strong>in</strong>ia State course <strong>of</strong> study <strong>and</strong><br />

courses <strong>of</strong> study from o<strong>the</strong>r states <strong>and</strong> cities will be used as a basis<br />

for discussion.<br />

403. MEASUREMENT IN EDUCATION. First semester;<br />

three hours; three credits. 11 a. m.<br />

This course is <strong>in</strong>tended for prospective teachers, pr<strong>in</strong>cipals, super-<br />

visors, <strong>and</strong> super<strong>in</strong>tendents. It will embrace a study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> follow-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g: History <strong>of</strong> scientific methods <strong>in</strong> education, <strong>in</strong>dividual differ-<br />

ences, statistical methods, <strong>in</strong>telligence, nature <strong>and</strong> method <strong>of</strong> meas-<br />

urement, <strong>in</strong>telligence tests <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir use, achievement tests <strong>in</strong> arith-<br />

metic, penmanship, spell<strong>in</strong>g, geography <strong>and</strong> history, corrective meas-<br />

ures. Opportunities will be given for <strong>the</strong> application <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se tests<br />

<strong>in</strong> nearby school systems.<br />

404. FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION PRACTICE. Second<br />

semester ; three hours; three credits. Required <strong>of</strong> all students<br />

tak<strong>in</strong>g a major or m<strong>in</strong>or <strong>in</strong> education. 10 a. m.<br />

The aim <strong>of</strong> this course is to develop a sound educational <strong>the</strong>ory<br />

which is fundamental to modern practice <strong>in</strong> education. It pre-sup-<br />

poses experience <strong>in</strong> a teach<strong>in</strong>g situation, ei<strong>the</strong>r as a regular teacher<br />

or as a practice student. It will <strong>in</strong>clude <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g topics : Na-<br />

ture <strong>of</strong> th<strong>in</strong>k<strong>in</strong>g, nature <strong>of</strong> experience, problem <strong>of</strong> method, nature<br />

<strong>and</strong> organization <strong>of</strong> subject matter, nature <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>dividual, <strong>in</strong>terest <strong>and</strong>


94 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

effort, moral education, dem<strong>and</strong>s <strong>of</strong> democracy upon education,<br />

demonstration teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> treatment <strong>of</strong> material illustrat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong>se<br />

factors.<br />

405. SUPERVISION OF INSTRUCTION. First semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

This course is <strong>in</strong>tended for persons prepar<strong>in</strong>g to be pr<strong>in</strong>cipals,<br />

supervisors, <strong>and</strong> super<strong>in</strong>tendents. It can be taken with pr<strong>of</strong>it by<br />

teachers <strong>of</strong> experience who have had at least n<strong>in</strong>e quarter hours <strong>in</strong><br />

education. Emphasis will be placed on <strong>the</strong> field <strong>of</strong> secondary edu-<br />

cation, although <strong>the</strong> field <strong>of</strong> elementary education will be considered.<br />

The follow<strong>in</strong>g topics will be covered : Need for supervision <strong>in</strong> <strong>in</strong>-<br />

struction ; tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> teacher, her characteristics <strong>and</strong> problems<br />

necessary for supervision ; <strong>the</strong> child, his characteristics <strong>and</strong> method<br />

<strong>of</strong> learn<strong>in</strong>g; review subject matter, its nature <strong>and</strong> form, <strong>and</strong> method,<br />

general <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>dividual ; <strong>the</strong> curriculum, its construction <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>ter-<br />

pretation; factors <strong>of</strong> study; st<strong>and</strong>ards for judg<strong>in</strong>g results <strong>of</strong> teach-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g; type lessons <strong>and</strong> demonstrations.<br />

407. ADMINISTRATION OF STATE AND COUNTY<br />

SCHOOL SYSTEMS. First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

10 a. m.<br />

While given primarily for school super<strong>in</strong>tendents <strong>and</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>cipals,<br />

this course will be <strong>of</strong> value to <strong>the</strong> general student. It will compare<br />

<strong>the</strong> school system <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia with that <strong>of</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r states <strong>and</strong> will<br />

give consideration to <strong>the</strong> problems <strong>of</strong> legislation, organization, state<br />

<strong>and</strong> county school f<strong>in</strong>ance, <strong>and</strong> educational leadership.<br />

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Hall<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Powell<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Gwathmey<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Gels<strong>in</strong>ger<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Babcock<br />

Cecil R. Ball G. G. Clarke<br />

Emily M. Hall Snowden C. Hall


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 95<br />

Student Assistant<br />

George E. Gregory<br />

Note—On <strong>the</strong> m<strong>in</strong>imum degree requirements English 101, 102,<br />

201, 202 are required. Not more than six semester hours <strong>in</strong> Journal-<br />

ism may be counted for a major <strong>in</strong> English <strong>and</strong> three semester hours<br />

<strong>in</strong> Journalism may be counted on a m<strong>in</strong>or <strong>in</strong> English.<br />

101-R. ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION. Pre-<br />

requisite, three units <strong>of</strong> high school English; three hours; three<br />

credits; required.<br />

The freshman course <strong>in</strong> English grammar represents a thorough<br />

review <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> fundamentals <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> subject. The pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> para-<br />

graph writ<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>of</strong> exposition, <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> argumentation are given as<br />

much attention as time permits. One <strong>the</strong>me is required each week.<br />

As collateral read<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>the</strong> monthly issues <strong>of</strong> Current Op<strong>in</strong>ion <strong>and</strong><br />

twelve hundred pages from st<strong>and</strong>ard English authors are assigned.<br />

102-R. ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Prerequisite, English<br />

ioi ; three hours; three credits; required.<br />

Paragraph <strong>and</strong> sentence structure are emphasized. One <strong>the</strong>me<br />

<strong>in</strong> narration or description is required each week. As collateral<br />

read<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>the</strong> monthly issues <strong>of</strong> Current Op<strong>in</strong>ion <strong>and</strong> fifteen hundred<br />

pages from st<strong>and</strong>ard English authors are assigned.<br />

103-R. THE USE OF REFERENCE BOOKS. Prerequisite,<br />

three units <strong>of</strong> high school English; two hours; favo credits; elective.<br />

Although <strong>the</strong> course <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> use <strong>of</strong> reference books is planned<br />

primarily for freshmen, it is open to upper classmen also. In this<br />

course <strong>in</strong>struction is given <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> use <strong>of</strong> dictionaries, encyclopedias,<br />

atlases, concordances, <strong>in</strong>dexes to periodical literature, year-books,<br />

<strong>and</strong> city, State <strong>and</strong> Federal documents. The pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> library<br />

classification <strong>and</strong> catalogu<strong>in</strong>g are presented briefly, so that <strong>the</strong><br />

student may know how to use <strong>the</strong> college library.<br />

201. AMERICAN LITERATURE. Prerequisite. English ioi<br />

<strong>and</strong> 102; three hours; three credits. Required by <strong>the</strong> State Board<br />

<strong>of</strong> Education <strong>of</strong> all n'ho expect to teach <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> public high schools.<br />

This course is a survey <strong>of</strong> American literature. Emphasis is laid


% <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> MarV<br />

upon <strong>the</strong> product <strong>of</strong> American authors ra<strong>the</strong>r than upon <strong>the</strong>ir lives.<br />

Frequent <strong>the</strong>mes.<br />

202. ENGLISH LITERATURE. Prerequisite, English 101 <strong>and</strong><br />

102; three hours; three credits. Required by <strong>the</strong> State Board <strong>of</strong><br />

Education <strong>of</strong> all who expect to beach <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> public high schools.<br />

Interpretation <strong>of</strong> literature, with <strong>in</strong>cidental biography.<br />

This is a survey <strong>of</strong> English literature for twelve centuries.<br />

Great productions <strong>of</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard authors are <strong>in</strong>terpreted by <strong>the</strong> pro-<br />

fessor. Frequent <strong>the</strong>mes. This course may be <strong>of</strong>fered <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> first<br />

semester also.<br />

203. TENNYSON AND BROWNING. Prerequisite, English<br />

101 <strong>and</strong> 102; three hours; three credits.<br />

The course will <strong>in</strong>clude a careful read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> best poems <strong>of</strong><br />

Tennyson <strong>and</strong> Brown<strong>in</strong>g, with extensive read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> poets contem-<br />

porary with <strong>the</strong>m.<br />

204. GRAMMAR FOR HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS. Pre-<br />

requisite, English 101 <strong>and</strong> 102; three hours; three credits.<br />

A good many st<strong>and</strong>ard grammars <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> library are used for<br />

collateral study. Various problems <strong>in</strong> grammar are carefully dis-<br />

cussed. Analysis is emphasized.<br />

205. ANALYTICAL STUDY OF ONE OR TWO PLAYS<br />

OF SHAKESPEARE. Prerequisite, English 101 <strong>and</strong> 102; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

A careful study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> technique <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> drama. Parallel read-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g. Frequent <strong>the</strong>mes.<br />

207. PUBLIC SPEAKING. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> this course is to <strong>in</strong>struct <strong>and</strong> tra<strong>in</strong> students <strong>in</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> preparation <strong>and</strong> effective delivery <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> customary types <strong>of</strong><br />

public address. The fundamental pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> platform deport-<br />

ment, persuasion, <strong>and</strong> conviction will be studied. Each member <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> class will be given frequent practice <strong>in</strong> prepar<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> deliver-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g speeches <strong>of</strong> his own composition; special attention be<strong>in</strong>g given,<br />

to <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>formal <strong>and</strong> extemporaneous talk, <strong>the</strong> after-d<strong>in</strong>ner speech,<br />

<strong>the</strong> formal oration, argumentation, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> forensic debate.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 97<br />

301. THE STUDY OF WORDS. Prerequisite, n<strong>in</strong>e semester<br />

hours <strong>in</strong> English; three hours; three credits.<br />

This course traces words <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir ways <strong>in</strong> English; <strong>the</strong> place<br />

<strong>of</strong> slang <strong>in</strong> language; fashions <strong>and</strong> movements <strong>in</strong> English; various<br />

phenomena <strong>of</strong> language.<br />

302. EDGAR ALLAN POE. HIS TALES, POETRY,<br />

CRITICAL ESSAYS. Prerequisite, twelve semester credits <strong>in</strong><br />

English; three hours; three credits.<br />

Parallel read<strong>in</strong>g; essays.<br />

303. EXPOSITORY WRITING. Prerequisite, twelve semester<br />

credits <strong>in</strong> English; three hours; three credits.<br />

The subjects for discussion <strong>in</strong>clude: (1) <strong>the</strong> choice <strong>of</strong> material<br />

for exposition; (2) def<strong>in</strong>ition; (3) analysis; (4) <strong>the</strong> fundamentals<br />

<strong>of</strong> literary criticism; (5) <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> formal literary criticism;<br />

<strong>and</strong> (6) expository biography. One or more <strong>the</strong>mes each week.<br />

304. THE AMERICAN NOVEL. Its development from <strong>the</strong><br />

work <strong>of</strong> Charles Brockden Brown to <strong>the</strong> present day. Prerequi-<br />

site, twelve semester credits <strong>in</strong> English; three hours; three credits.<br />

Open to juniors <strong>and</strong> seniors <strong>in</strong> English.<br />

305. THE ENGLISH NOVEL. Prerequisite, twelve semester<br />

credits <strong>in</strong> English; three hours; three credits. Open to juniors<br />

<strong>and</strong> seniors <strong>in</strong> English.<br />

A survey course cover<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> development <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> English novel<br />

from <strong>the</strong> time <strong>of</strong> Field<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> time <strong>of</strong> Meredith.<br />

401. OLD ENGLISH (ANGLO-SAXON). Prerequisite, fifteen<br />

semester credits <strong>in</strong> English; three hours. Students are ex-<br />

pected to cont<strong>in</strong>ue Old English <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> second term.<br />

Prose <strong>and</strong> poetry, <strong>the</strong> latter <strong>in</strong> Beowulf.<br />

402. OLD ENGLISH (ANGLO-SAXON) Cont<strong>in</strong>ued. Pre-<br />

requisite, English 401. The two terms give six semester credits.<br />

404. NINETEENTH CENTURY ESSAYISTS. Prerequisite,<br />

fifteen semester hours <strong>in</strong> English; three hours; three credits.<br />

Rusk<strong>in</strong>, Carlyle, Arnold, Newman, <strong>and</strong> Stevenson as essayists


93 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

furnish <strong>the</strong> material for discussion <strong>in</strong> this course. Frequent reports<br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>mes.<br />

406. SHAKESPEARE. Three hours; three credits. This<br />

course is limited to students <strong>of</strong> senior st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g.<br />

An extensive course cover<strong>in</strong>g twenty plays <strong>in</strong> class, with o<strong>the</strong>r<br />

plays for collateral read<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

GOVERNMENT<br />

(See Page 199)<br />

HISTORY<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Morton<br />

Mr. Ecker<br />

Student Assistant, Miss Payne<br />

All freshmen are required to take <strong>the</strong> general course <strong>in</strong> United<br />

States History (101) as a basis for <strong>the</strong> study <strong>of</strong> Economics, Ameri-<br />

can Literature, <strong>and</strong> American Government, <strong>and</strong> as an <strong>in</strong>troduction<br />

to <strong>the</strong> fur<strong>the</strong>r study <strong>of</strong> American History. At <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> session, one-half <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> freshmen (those whose names beg<strong>in</strong><br />

with letters from A to K, <strong>in</strong>clusive) will be assigned to Virg<strong>in</strong>ia<br />

Government (101), which is also required <strong>of</strong> freshmen; <strong>the</strong> rema<strong>in</strong>der<br />

will be assigned to United States History. At <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>-<br />

n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> second semester, those who have taken United States<br />

History will take Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Government, <strong>and</strong> vice versa.<br />

Students tak<strong>in</strong>g a major or a m<strong>in</strong>or <strong>in</strong> history are required<br />

to take, <strong>in</strong> addition to History 101, History 201, History 202, <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> requisite number <strong>of</strong> hours <strong>in</strong> those history courses which shall<br />

meet with <strong>the</strong> approval <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> members <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> faculty <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> His-<br />

tory Department.<br />

HISTORY 101-R. UNITED STATES. First semester, re-<br />

peated <strong>in</strong> second semester; three hours; three credits; required <strong>of</strong><br />

all freshmen. (See statement above.) Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Morton.<br />

A brief but thorough survey <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> United States.<br />

Each member <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> class is required to contribute a small fee for<br />

<strong>the</strong> purchase <strong>of</strong> material for collateral work.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 99<br />

HISTORY 201. EUROPE TO 1715. First semester; three<br />

hours;<br />

Ecker.<br />

three credits; for sopJiomores, juniors, <strong>and</strong> seniors. Mr.<br />

A general course show<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> development <strong>and</strong> expansion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

states <strong>of</strong> Europe to 1715, <strong>in</strong> which emphasis is placed upon <strong>the</strong><br />

social, economic, <strong>and</strong> religious history as well as upon <strong>the</strong> political<br />

side.<br />

HISTORY 202. EUROPE SINCE 1715. Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits; for sophomores, juniors <strong>and</strong> seniors.<br />

Mr. Ecker.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> History 201, which, however, is not a pre-<br />

requisite. The course will treat <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Industrial Revolution, <strong>the</strong><br />

French Revolution, <strong>the</strong> development <strong>of</strong> nationalism, democracy <strong>and</strong><br />

imperialism, <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> effects <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se forces <strong>in</strong> modern European<br />

history.<br />

HISTORY 203. ENGLAND TO 1688. First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits; for sophomores ; juniors, <strong>and</strong> seniors. Mr.<br />

Ecker.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> that period <strong>in</strong> English history which furnishes <strong>the</strong><br />

background to our language, laws, <strong>and</strong> literature.<br />

HISTORY 204. ENGLAND SINCE 1688. Second semester;<br />

three hows; three credits; for sophomores, juniors, <strong>and</strong> seniors.<br />

Mr. Ecker.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> History 203, which is not a prerequisite, how-<br />

ever. It deals with <strong>the</strong> mak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> modern Engl<strong>and</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

British Commonwealth <strong>of</strong> nations.<br />

HISTORY 301. EUROPE, 1871 TO 1918. First semester;<br />

three hours; three credits; prerequisite, History 202; for juniors<br />

<strong>and</strong> seniors. Mr. Ecker.<br />

An advanced course show<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> background to <strong>the</strong> World War<br />

<strong>and</strong> contemporary Europe. May be taken as part <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> requirement<br />

for <strong>the</strong> master's degree.<br />

HISTORY 302. EUROPE SINCE 1918. Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits; prerequisite, History 202; for juniors<br />

<strong>and</strong> seniors. Mr. Ecker.


100 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Peace Conference at Paris, <strong>the</strong> peace treaties,<br />

<strong>the</strong> rise <strong>of</strong> new national states, <strong>the</strong> League <strong>of</strong> Nations, <strong>and</strong> contemporary<br />

European problems. May be taken as part <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> work<br />

for <strong>the</strong> master's degree.<br />

HISTORY 401. PROBLEMS IN UNITED STATES HIS-<br />

TORY, TO 1865. First semester; three hours; three credits; for<br />

juniors <strong>and</strong> seniors; may be taken for A. M. credit; prerequisites,<br />

History ioi <strong>and</strong> permission <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>structor. Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Morton.<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> this course is to give <strong>the</strong> student an opportunity<br />

to study more thoroughly certa<strong>in</strong> phases <strong>of</strong> American history which<br />

may be <strong>of</strong> special <strong>in</strong>terest to him; to aid him <strong>in</strong> work<strong>in</strong>g out prob-<br />

lems for himself <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Library; <strong>and</strong> to give him practice <strong>in</strong><br />

present<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> class <strong>the</strong> results <strong>of</strong> his work.<br />

HISTORY 402. PROBLEMS IN UNITED STATES HIS-<br />

TORY, SINCE 1865. Second semester; three hours; three credits;<br />

juniors <strong>and</strong> seniors; may be taken for A. M. credit; prerequisites,<br />

History ioi <strong>and</strong> permission <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>sructor. Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Morton.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> History 401. (401 is not a prerequisite).<br />

HISTORY 403. VIRGINIA TO 1830. First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits; for juniors <strong>and</strong> se.niors; may be taken for<br />

A. M. credit; prerequisite. History ioi. Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Morton.<br />

The development <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia as a colony <strong>and</strong> as a common-<br />

wealth. Special study will be made <strong>of</strong> those persons <strong>and</strong> events<br />

which are associated with <strong>William</strong>sburg, <strong>the</strong> colonial capital <strong>of</strong> Vir-<br />

g<strong>in</strong>ia; with <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, <strong>the</strong> colonial college; with Jamestown;<br />

with Yorktown ; <strong>and</strong> with o<strong>the</strong>r places <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>terest <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

oldest English community <strong>in</strong> America. See <strong>in</strong>structor <strong>in</strong> regard to<br />

special prize for scholarship <strong>of</strong>fered by <strong>the</strong> editors <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> W. & M.<br />

Hist. Mag.<br />

HISTORY 404. VIRGINIA SINCE 1830. Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits; for juniors <strong>and</strong> seniors; may be ta&cn<br />

for A. M. credit; prerequisite, History ioi. Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Morton.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> development <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia from <strong>the</strong> adoption <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> Constitution <strong>of</strong> 1830 to <strong>the</strong> present. Note prize above, which is<br />

also <strong>of</strong>fered <strong>in</strong> this course.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 101<br />

HISTORY 405. THE ANCIENT WORLD. Omitted 1926-27.<br />

HISTORY 406. THE MEDIAEVAL WORLD. Omitted<br />

1926-27.<br />

HISTORY 409. SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY<br />

OF THE MIDDLE AGES. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits; prerequisite, History 201; for juniors <strong>and</strong> seniors. Mr.<br />

Ecker.<br />

An advanced course which will attempt to give <strong>the</strong> student an<br />

<strong>in</strong>sight <strong>in</strong>to Mediaeval life <strong>and</strong> thought. May be taken as part <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> work for <strong>the</strong> master's degree.<br />

HISTORY 410. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION.<br />

Second semester; three hours; three credits; prerequisite, History<br />

201 ; for juniors <strong>and</strong> seniors. Mr. Ecker.<br />

An advanced course <strong>in</strong> .which special emphasis will be given to<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>tellectual, literary, artistic <strong>and</strong> religious movements <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

period. May be taken as part <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> work for <strong>the</strong> masters' degree.<br />

HOME ECONOMICS<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Reaves<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Hodges<br />

Instructor Holliday<br />

All students tak<strong>in</strong>g food courses <strong>in</strong> Home Economics are re-<br />

quired to wear a simple white cotton or l<strong>in</strong>en costume, while <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

laboratory. A straight one-piece dress, without color <strong>in</strong> bows or<br />

ribbons, is desirable; white shoes with rubber heels preferred.<br />

101. ELEMENTARY FOODS AND COOKERY. First se-<br />

mester; -two hours lecture; four hours laboratory ; four credits.<br />

General pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> cookery, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir application to <strong>the</strong> more<br />

common foods ; production, composition, <strong>and</strong> dietetic value <strong>of</strong> foods<br />

preparation <strong>and</strong> serv<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> simple meals.<br />

102. ELEMENTARY SEWING AND TEXTILES. Second<br />

semester; tzvo hours lecture; four hours laboratory ; four credits.<br />

This course <strong>in</strong>cludes <strong>the</strong> study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> characteristics <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

;


102 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

manufacture <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> textile fabrics, from <strong>the</strong> st<strong>and</strong>po<strong>in</strong>t <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

use <strong>in</strong> cloth<strong>in</strong>g; <strong>the</strong> choice, care <strong>and</strong> cost <strong>of</strong> cloth<strong>in</strong>g; <strong>the</strong> applica-<br />

tion <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> technique <strong>of</strong> sew<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> mak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> garments.<br />

201. ADVANCED FOODS AND COOKERY. First semes-<br />

ter; one hour lecture; four hours laboratory; three credits; pre-<br />

requisite, IOI.<br />

Application <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> fundamental pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> cookery to <strong>the</strong><br />

preparation <strong>of</strong> more elaborate meals ; experience <strong>in</strong> simple enter-<br />

ta<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g; <strong>the</strong> course will <strong>in</strong>clude a rigid review <strong>and</strong> enlargement <strong>of</strong><br />

subject matter from 101.<br />

202. ELEMENTARY DRESSMAKING. Second semester;<br />

one hour lecture; four hours laboratory; three credits, prerequi-<br />

site, 102.<br />

This course gives practice <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> mak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> patterns by draft-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g, model<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> design<strong>in</strong>g ; adaptations <strong>of</strong> commercial patterns<br />

<strong>the</strong>se patterns are used <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> mak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> tailored blouses <strong>and</strong> skirts,<br />

wash dresses, wool dresses, renovation <strong>of</strong> garments ; emphasis is<br />

laid on good design, <strong>and</strong> wise choice <strong>of</strong> materials.<br />

301. ADVANCED DRESSMAKING AND DESIGN. First<br />

semester; one hour lecture; four hours laboratory ; three credits;<br />

prerequisites, 102 <strong>and</strong> 202.<br />

This course gives practical tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> application <strong>of</strong> color<br />

harmony, l<strong>in</strong>e <strong>and</strong> texture to <strong>the</strong> costume ; orig<strong>in</strong>al designs are<br />

made, <strong>and</strong> practice is given <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> use <strong>and</strong> adaptations for different<br />

types <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>dividuals ; mak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> more elaborate garments.<br />

302. MENU PLANNING AND MARKETING. Second se-<br />

mester; one hour lecture; four hours laboratory ; three credits;<br />

prerequisite, 101 <strong>and</strong> 201.<br />

This course gives practice <strong>in</strong> home cookery <strong>and</strong> table service;<br />

<strong>the</strong> newest phases <strong>of</strong> nutrition are studied <strong>and</strong> applied to <strong>the</strong> plan-<br />

n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> food for <strong>the</strong> average American family ; market<strong>in</strong>g is done on<br />

<strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> budget, allow<strong>in</strong>g a limited amount for food ; stress<br />

is laid on proper plann<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> food for <strong>the</strong> young, <strong>the</strong> aged, <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>valid.<br />

303. HOMEMAKING. First semester; three hours lecture;


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 103<br />

three credits; prerequisites, all freshman <strong>and</strong> sophomore courses<br />

<strong>in</strong> Home Economics.<br />

This course <strong>in</strong>cludes a broad study <strong>of</strong> homemak<strong>in</strong>g, as a career;<br />

ideals <strong>of</strong> homemak<strong>in</strong>g, relationships <strong>of</strong> family members, study <strong>of</strong><br />

selection <strong>and</strong> care <strong>of</strong> home <strong>and</strong> its equipment, family <strong>and</strong> personal<br />

budget, labor sav<strong>in</strong>g devices, household efficiency <strong>and</strong> service.<br />

304. THE CHILD: HIS NATURE AND HIS NEEDS.<br />

Second semester; tzvo Jwurs lecture; two credits; prerequisite,<br />

psychology.<br />

Physical care <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>fant <strong>and</strong> pre-school child ; a study <strong>of</strong> children<br />

<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir various stages <strong>of</strong> development ; a study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> forces <strong>and</strong><br />

experiences that modify <strong>the</strong> conduct <strong>of</strong> children.<br />

305. THE CHILD: HIS NATURE AND HIS NEEDS.<br />

First semester; three hours lecture; three credits.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 304.<br />

309. HOME NURSING. First semester; two hours lecture;<br />

two credits.<br />

Home <strong>and</strong> personal hygiene, first aid, recognition <strong>of</strong> symptoms<br />

<strong>of</strong> common ailments ; general care <strong>of</strong> sick room <strong>and</strong> patient ; diet<br />

for <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>valid.<br />

307-R. PRACTICE HOUSE. Three credits; twelve weeks'<br />

residence dur<strong>in</strong>g junior year.<br />

Group <strong>of</strong> students will live <strong>in</strong> modern apartment for twelve<br />

weeks; course <strong>in</strong>cludes management, buy<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> plann<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> meals;<br />

clean<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>and</strong> experience <strong>in</strong> all household duties ; experience as<br />

hostess.<br />

406. METHODS OF TEACHING HOME ECONOMICS.<br />

Second semester; three hours lecture; three credits.<br />

Study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> development <strong>of</strong> Home Economics, various State<br />

<strong>and</strong> Federal laws, Smith-Hughes, Smith-Lever bills; organization<br />

<strong>of</strong> various types <strong>of</strong> schools; study <strong>of</strong> methods as applied to <strong>the</strong><br />

teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> Home Economics, plann<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> lessons, mak<strong>in</strong>g courses<br />

<strong>of</strong> study for various grades <strong>and</strong> types <strong>of</strong> schools, equipment, man-<br />

agement problems, class demonstrations.


104 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

402. NUTRITION. Second semester; two hours lecture; two<br />

hours laboratory; three credits; prerequisites, organic chemistry<br />

<strong>and</strong> all food courses.<br />

The fundamental pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> human nutrition applied to <strong>the</strong><br />

feed<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> family <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> groups; relation <strong>of</strong> cost to <strong>the</strong> family<br />

budget, detailed study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> nutritive requirements <strong>of</strong> man, prac-<br />

tical dietaries.<br />

403. MILLINERY. First semester; four hours laboratory;<br />

two credits; prerequisite, 102.<br />

Paper patterns, wire, willow, <strong>and</strong> buckram frames; mak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong><br />

children's hats <strong>and</strong> bonnets, spr<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> w<strong>in</strong>ter hats, renovation <strong>and</strong><br />

remodel<strong>in</strong>g, trimm<strong>in</strong>gs.<br />

404. SHORT SURVEY OF HOME AND COMMUNITY<br />

PROBLEMS. Second semester; two hours lecture; two hours<br />

laboratory; three credits.<br />

An appreciation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> conditions <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> field <strong>and</strong> how <strong>the</strong> girl<br />

can best adjust her work to meet <strong>the</strong> needs as she sees <strong>the</strong>m.<br />

405-R. PRACTICE TEACHING. Senior year, three hours<br />

daily for eighteen weeks, teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> observation at <strong>William</strong>sburg<br />

High School; six credits.<br />

Daily lessons <strong>and</strong> observations <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg High School<br />

under supervision <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> Home Economics Department.<br />

JOURNALISM<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Babcock<br />

Mr. Clark<br />

While not to be confused with graduate work, <strong>the</strong> work <strong>in</strong><br />

journalism will provide <strong>in</strong>struction <strong>in</strong> important aspects <strong>of</strong> news-<br />

paper mak<strong>in</strong>g, with such studies as should equip <strong>the</strong> student for<br />

<strong>the</strong> dem<strong>and</strong>s <strong>of</strong> active service. It will teach its students how to<br />

ga<strong>the</strong>r, write, edit, <strong>in</strong>terpret <strong>and</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>t <strong>the</strong> news. Particularized<br />

to <strong>the</strong> extent that it will cover such Subjects as report<strong>in</strong>g, copy-<br />

read<strong>in</strong>g, editorial writ<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> journalism, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> prob-<br />

lems <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> country weekly ; it will also, through requirements <strong>in</strong>


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 105<br />

history, politics, government, economics <strong>and</strong> sociology, attempt to<br />

endow <strong>the</strong> student with broad <strong>in</strong>tellectual horizons, so that <strong>the</strong><br />

journalist may be fully conscious <strong>of</strong> his function <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> life <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

world. F<strong>in</strong>ally, <strong>the</strong> course will have as an essential part <strong>of</strong> its program<br />

<strong>the</strong> ground<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> its students <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> use <strong>of</strong> a lucid, vigorous,<br />

concise <strong>and</strong> mov<strong>in</strong>g English style.<br />

Only juniors, or those who have successfully completed two<br />

years <strong>of</strong> work at a college or university <strong>of</strong> satisfactory grade, will<br />

be admitted to <strong>the</strong> course <strong>in</strong> journalism.<br />

301. JOURNALISTIC BACKGROUNDS. Prerequisite, junior<br />

or senior st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g. First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

This course is aimed to give students <strong>of</strong> journalism primarily,<br />

as well as o<strong>the</strong>rs <strong>in</strong>terested <strong>in</strong> cultural tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g, a systematic con-<br />

ception <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> backgrounds <strong>of</strong> current civilization. The chief his-<br />

torical, economic <strong>and</strong> cultural phases <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> present-day life <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> lead<strong>in</strong>g nations will be outl<strong>in</strong>ed. Pr<strong>of</strong>essors <strong>of</strong> allied sub-<br />

jects, such as history, economics, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> several sciences, will lec-<br />

ture at <strong>in</strong>tervals to <strong>the</strong> class upon outst<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g contributions <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong>ir respective fields to <strong>the</strong> subject under consideration. Parallel<br />

read<strong>in</strong>g will be assigned, <strong>and</strong> periodical oral <strong>and</strong> written reports<br />

will be presented for <strong>the</strong> criticism <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> class.<br />

303-R. HISTORY OF JOURNALISM. Prerequisite, junior<br />

or senior st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g. First <strong>and</strong> second semesters; three hours each<br />

semester; three credits each semester.<br />

Survey <strong>of</strong> journalism <strong>in</strong> this country from <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>gs, <strong>of</strong>-<br />

fer<strong>in</strong>g at once a newspaper <strong>and</strong> politico-social background <strong>of</strong> pro-<br />

fessional <strong>and</strong> cultural value.<br />

302. THE SHORT STORY. Prerequisite, junior or senior<br />

st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g. Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

The appreciation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> short story ; extensive read<strong>in</strong>gs ; prac-<br />

tical assignments.<br />

401. EDITORIAL WRITING AND POLICY. Prerequisite,<br />

junior or senior st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

Editorial policy ; newspaper ethics, <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>and</strong> practice <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>-<br />

terpret<strong>in</strong>g news by <strong>the</strong> use <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> editorial ; assignments.


106 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

402. FEATURE AND MAGAZINE WRITING. Prerequi-<br />

site, junior or senior st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g. Second semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

Practice <strong>in</strong> writ<strong>in</strong>g special newspaper <strong>and</strong> magaz<strong>in</strong>e articles<br />

study <strong>of</strong> current newspaper supplements <strong>and</strong> magaz<strong>in</strong>es ; practical<br />

assignments.<br />

404. LITERARY AND DRAMATIC REVIEWING. Pre-<br />

requisite, junior or senior st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g. Second semester ; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

The field <strong>of</strong> work belong<strong>in</strong>g to literary <strong>and</strong> dramatic criticism.<br />

Book reviews <strong>and</strong> dramatic criticisms studied ; practical assign-<br />

ments.<br />

406. THE VIRGINIA GAZETTE. The oldest Sou<strong>the</strong>rn news-<br />

paper, <strong>the</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Gazette, has been revived <strong>and</strong> is be<strong>in</strong>g operated<br />

by students selected from <strong>the</strong> classes <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>William</strong> Parks School<br />

<strong>of</strong> Journalism. The Hughes Build<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>the</strong> gift <strong>of</strong> Mr. Robert M.<br />

Hughes, <strong>of</strong> Norfolk, has been equipped as a laboratory for all<br />

classes <strong>in</strong> Journalism, <strong>and</strong> a complete pr<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g plant will eventually<br />

be <strong>in</strong>stalled so that courses <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>t<strong>in</strong>g trades may be <strong>of</strong>fered<br />

on <strong>the</strong> campus. The entire operation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Gazette is <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

h<strong>and</strong>s <strong>of</strong> students, with <strong>the</strong> editorial supervision <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> head <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> department. The paper was revived January 1, 1926, <strong>and</strong> has<br />

already achieved some reputation as a state weekly <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>terest <strong>and</strong><br />

color.<br />

305-R. NEWS WRITING AND EDITING. First <strong>and</strong> second<br />

semesters; three hours; three credits.<br />

A course <strong>in</strong>volv<strong>in</strong>g primarily <strong>the</strong> recognition, preparation, <strong>and</strong><br />

presentation <strong>of</strong> news, <strong>and</strong> secondarily such aspects <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> subject<br />

as yellow journalism, suppression <strong>and</strong> color<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> news, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

timel<strong>in</strong>ess <strong>and</strong> localization <strong>of</strong> news. As practical assignments members<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> class will correspond for state papers <strong>and</strong> serve as an<br />

auxiliary staff <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Gazette, oldest newspaper <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

South, which has been revived <strong>and</strong> is at present operated by <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>William</strong> Parks School <strong>of</strong> Journalism. Eligibility for this course<br />

will be determ<strong>in</strong>ed ei<strong>the</strong>r on <strong>the</strong> basis <strong>of</strong> prerequisite work or<br />

special exam<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>structor <strong>in</strong> charge.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 107<br />

JURISPRUDENCE<br />

(See page 202)<br />

MATHEMATICS<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Rowe<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Russell<br />

Miss Mercer<br />

Mr. Russell<br />

Student Assistants.<br />

G. Marcele<strong>in</strong>e Thierry Ruth Yeamans<br />

The courses have been numbered <strong>in</strong> such a way that <strong>of</strong> two<br />

courses given at <strong>the</strong> same time, <strong>the</strong> one recommended by <strong>the</strong> de-<br />

partment is <strong>in</strong>dicated by <strong>the</strong> smaller number. Students who ex-<br />

pect to take a major <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics should plan to complete Math.<br />

102 <strong>and</strong> its prerequisites by <strong>the</strong> end <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> freshman year; failure<br />

to meet this requirement may make it impossible to complete a<br />

major <strong>in</strong> four years.<br />

101 -R. COLLEGE ALGEBRA. First semester; lectures three<br />

hours; three credits. Repeated second semester.<br />

Review <strong>of</strong> elementary algebra ; algebraic reductions ; variables<br />

<strong>and</strong> functions; <strong>the</strong> equation; l<strong>in</strong>ear equations; quadratic equations;<br />

simultaneous quadratic equations; graphs; def<strong>in</strong>ition <strong>and</strong> use <strong>of</strong><br />

logarithms.<br />

Text :<br />

Rcitc <strong>and</strong> Crathorne's <strong>College</strong> Algebra.<br />

102. PLANE ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. Prerequisites, ioi<br />

<strong>and</strong> 103; second semester; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

This course covers <strong>the</strong> first two hundred <strong>and</strong> fifty-eight pages<br />

<strong>of</strong> IVilson <strong>and</strong> Tracey's Analytical Geometry.<br />

103-R. PLANE AND SPHERICAL TRIGONOMETRY.<br />

First semester; lectures three hours; three credits. Repeated sec-<br />

ond semester.


108 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Text: New Plane <strong>and</strong> Spherical Trigonometry with Tables<br />

(Wells).<br />

Students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Chemistry, Physics, <strong>and</strong> all<br />

pre-eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g students should take 101 <strong>and</strong> 103 dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> first<br />

semester <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> freshman year.<br />

105. PLANE SURVEYING. Prerequisites ioi <strong>and</strong> 103; first<br />

semester; lectures three hours; laboratory four hours; five credits.<br />

Use <strong>of</strong> steel, level, <strong>and</strong> transit ; measurement <strong>of</strong> l<strong>in</strong>es, angles <strong>and</strong><br />

differences <strong>of</strong> elevation ; laud survey<strong>in</strong>g, areas, <strong>and</strong> plott<strong>in</strong>g. Pre-<br />

lim<strong>in</strong>ary surveys, maps <strong>and</strong> contours, cross-sections, earthwork com-<br />

putations ; simple <strong>and</strong> compound curves.<br />

Text: Raymond's Plane Survey<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

106. DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY. Prerequisites, 101, 103<br />

<strong>and</strong> 102; second semester; lectures three hours; laboratory four<br />

hours; five credits.<br />

Graphical representation <strong>of</strong> l<strong>in</strong>es, planes, solids, <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> solu-<br />

tion <strong>of</strong> problems concern<strong>in</strong>g size <strong>and</strong> relative proportions, shades<br />

<strong>and</strong> shadows.<br />

Text: Kenison <strong>and</strong> Bradley's Descriptive Geometry.<br />

107. SOLID GEOMETRY. First semester; lectures three<br />

hours; three credits, provided that students have not used solid<br />

geometry for entrance credit.<br />

Text: Wentworth <strong>and</strong> Smith's Solid Geometry.<br />

108. ADVANCED COLLEGE ALGEBRA. Second semester;<br />

lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

Inequalities, ma<strong>the</strong>matical <strong>in</strong>duction; variables; progressions;<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>of</strong> logarithms ; partial fractions ; permutations <strong>and</strong> com-<br />

b<strong>in</strong>ations; complex numbers; <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>of</strong> equations; determ<strong>in</strong>ants;<br />

limits; <strong>in</strong>f<strong>in</strong>ite series.<br />

Text: Fifes' <strong>College</strong> Algebra.<br />

201. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS. Prerequisite, 102; first<br />

semester; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

Derivation <strong>of</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard formulas ; application to geometry ; ve-<br />

locity; acceleration; rates; maxima <strong>and</strong> m<strong>in</strong>ima; curvature.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 109<br />

Text: Granville's Differential <strong>and</strong> Integral Calculus, Revised<br />

Edition.<br />

202. INTEGRAL CALCULUS. Prequisite, 201 ; second se-<br />

mester; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

Derivation <strong>of</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard formulas; <strong>in</strong>tegration as a process <strong>of</strong><br />

summation; area; length; surface; volume.<br />

Text :<br />

Edition.<br />

Granville's<br />

Differential <strong>and</strong> Integral Calculus, Revised<br />

203. ADVANCED ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. Prerequisite,<br />

102; first semester; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

This course covers <strong>the</strong> second half <strong>of</strong> Osgood <strong>and</strong> Grauste<strong>in</strong>'s<br />

Plane <strong>and</strong> Solid Analytic Geometry.<br />

Students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Chemistry, Physics, <strong>and</strong> all<br />

pre-eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g students should take this course along with 201.<br />

205. MATHEMATICAL THEORY OF INVESTMENT.<br />

Advanced <strong>College</strong> Algebra with emphasis upon Modern Ma<strong>the</strong>-<br />

matical Theory <strong>of</strong> Investment. First semester ; lectures three hours;<br />

three credits. 205 <strong>and</strong> 206 are courses recommended for students<br />

<strong>in</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration.<br />

206. MODERN STATISTICAL METHODS. Second semes-<br />

ter; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

301. DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALCULUS. A<br />

more advanced course <strong>in</strong> Calculus. Prerequisites 201, 202. First<br />

semester; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

This course is <strong>in</strong>tended to cover with emphasis <strong>the</strong> more <strong>the</strong>oretical<br />

portions <strong>of</strong> such books as Granville's Calculus, <strong>and</strong> to com-<br />

plete <strong>the</strong> portions not taken up <strong>in</strong> 201 <strong>and</strong> 202.<br />

Text: Granville's Differential <strong>and</strong> Integral Calculus, Revised<br />

Edition.<br />

This course should be taken by all eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g students <strong>and</strong> by<br />

all students who expect to teach ma<strong>the</strong>matics.<br />

302. MECHANICS. KINEMATICS. Prerequisites 201, 202,<br />

301, <strong>and</strong> one year <strong>of</strong> college physics. Second semester; lectures<br />

three hours; three credits.


110 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Composition <strong>and</strong> resolution <strong>of</strong> velocities <strong>and</strong> accelerations ; hodo-<br />

graph ; distance-time <strong>and</strong> speed-time curves; moments; composition<br />

<strong>of</strong> angular velocities. Fundamental dynamical pr<strong>in</strong>ciples ; laws <strong>of</strong><br />

motion ; mass ; weight ; force ; work ; power ; efficiency ; impulse ;<br />

momentum; impact Statics; center <strong>of</strong> gravity; structures; external<br />

forces; jo<strong>in</strong>t reactions.<br />

Text :<br />

Smith<br />

<strong>and</strong> Longley's Theoretical Mechanics.<br />

401. MECHANICS. Prerequisites 302. First semester; lec-<br />

tures three hours; three credits.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 302 embrac<strong>in</strong>g D'alembert's Pr<strong>in</strong>ciple, centri-<br />

fugal <strong>and</strong> centripetal force ; a complete ma<strong>the</strong>matical treatment <strong>of</strong><br />

harmonic motion; elastic vibrations; <strong>the</strong> pendulum. The k<strong>in</strong>etics<br />

<strong>of</strong> rigid bodies; moment <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>ertia; radius <strong>of</strong> gyration; physical<br />

pendulum; <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>of</strong> models; dimensionality. This course may be<br />

used for A. M. credit.<br />

Text :<br />

Smith<br />

<strong>and</strong> Longley's Theoretical Mechanics.<br />

402. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. Prerequisites 201, 202,<br />

301. Second semester ; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

A course cover<strong>in</strong>g Murray's Differential Equations.<br />

This course may be used for A. M. credit.<br />

404. TEACHERS' COURSE IN ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA<br />

AND GEOMETRY. Second semester; lectures three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

Emphasis placed upon <strong>the</strong> method <strong>of</strong> present<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong>se subjects.<br />

This course should be taken by all students who expect to teach<br />

<strong>the</strong>se subjects after graduation.<br />

*On leave <strong>of</strong> absence 1925-26.<br />

MODERN LANGUAGES<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>William</strong>s<br />

*Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Ryl<strong>and</strong><br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Castaneda<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Shufeldt<br />

Mr. Ball


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 111<br />

Student Assistants<br />

Mr. P<strong>in</strong>el Mr. Adams<br />

Miss Calk<strong>in</strong>s Mr. Add<strong>in</strong>gton<br />

FRENCH<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>William</strong>s<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Shufeldt<br />

Mr. Ball<br />

Mr. P<strong>in</strong>el Miss Calk<strong>in</strong>s<br />

101. BEGINNERS' FRENCH. No college credit. First semes-<br />

ter; three hours.<br />

Elementary grammar <strong>and</strong> easy read<strong>in</strong>g ; written exercises <strong>and</strong><br />

oral drill ; <strong>the</strong> acquir<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> a correct pronunciation <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ear for <strong>the</strong> underst<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> spoken as well as <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ted<br />

word will be stressed from <strong>the</strong> very beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g. As far as is con-<br />

sistent with sound pedagogy French will be <strong>the</strong> language <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

lecture-room.<br />

102. ELEMENTARY FRENCH. Second semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 101 <strong>and</strong> dependent upon it. Elementary grammar<br />

completed ; read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> simple st<strong>and</strong>ard prose ; oral <strong>and</strong> written<br />

composition.<br />

201. READINGS IN MODERN FRENCH PROSE. First<br />

semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Rapid read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> representative works <strong>of</strong> Anatole France. Care-<br />

ful attention given to structure <strong>and</strong> style. Accurate translation<br />

from French <strong>in</strong>to English required. Read<strong>in</strong>g at sight. Practice <strong>in</strong><br />

pronunciation. Open to those present<strong>in</strong>g three high school units for<br />

entrance.<br />

(In alternative years <strong>the</strong>re may be substituted <strong>in</strong> this course for<br />

Anatole France o<strong>the</strong>r authors such as Baz<strong>in</strong>, Boylesve, Bordeaux.)<br />

202. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. Open to<br />

students present<strong>in</strong>g three high school units for entrance. Two sec-<br />

tions. Second semester; three hours; three credits.


112 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

A systematic study <strong>of</strong> syntax <strong>and</strong> idioms by means <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>termediate<br />

composition, written <strong>and</strong> oral, with especial reference to<br />

<strong>the</strong> language <strong>of</strong> every day life. This course is required <strong>of</strong> all who<br />

m<strong>in</strong>or <strong>in</strong> French.<br />

203. READING AND COMPOSITION. Planned for students<br />

not prepared for 201 <strong>and</strong> open to those who present two high school<br />

units for entrance. First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

This course consists <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> translation <strong>in</strong>to English<br />

<strong>of</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard French stories <strong>and</strong> plays by such authors as Daudet,<br />

Dumas, Labiche, Malot, S<strong>and</strong>, S<strong>and</strong>eau <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>rs. Written <strong>and</strong><br />

oral composition based on <strong>the</strong> text. Grammar review, especially <strong>of</strong><br />

verbs <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> syntax <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> subjunctive. Drill <strong>in</strong> pronunciation.<br />

204. SCIENTIFIC FRENCH. Prerequisite, a fair read<strong>in</strong>g<br />

knowledge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> language. Second semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

Intended primarily for students tak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> pre-medical <strong>and</strong> pre-<br />

eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g courses but open to any sufficiently prepared to do this<br />

type <strong>of</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g. Drill <strong>in</strong> pronunciation <strong>in</strong> this as <strong>in</strong> all o<strong>the</strong>r<br />

courses.<br />

301. TEACHERS' COURSE. Prerequisite, French 201 <strong>and</strong> 202<br />

or <strong>the</strong> equivalent. First semester ; three hours; three credits.<br />

Review <strong>and</strong> more thorough study <strong>of</strong> phonetics ; brief survey <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> French language ; an <strong>in</strong>tensive study, through<br />

advanced composition, <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> differences between French <strong>and</strong> English<br />

syntax ; methods <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>struction compared <strong>and</strong> illustrated ; how<br />

to vitalize foreign language teach<strong>in</strong>g ; bibliography <strong>of</strong> a teacher's<br />

reference library. Required <strong>of</strong> all who major <strong>in</strong> French.<br />

303. THE CLASSICAL DRAMA OF FRANCE. Prerequisite,<br />

201 <strong>and</strong> 202 or <strong>the</strong> equivalent. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

Intended as an <strong>in</strong>troduction to <strong>the</strong> classical period <strong>of</strong> French<br />

literature. Read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>terpretation <strong>of</strong> representative plays <strong>of</strong><br />

Corneille, Rac<strong>in</strong>e <strong>and</strong> Moliere. Lectures <strong>and</strong> supplementary read<strong>in</strong>g<br />

on <strong>the</strong> political <strong>and</strong> social history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> age <strong>of</strong> Louis XIV.<br />

302. READINGS IN EIGHTEENTH CENTURY PROSE.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction<br />

Prerequisite, 301 or 305. Second semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

A survey <strong>of</strong> French literature with <strong>the</strong> purpose <strong>of</strong> obta<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g a<br />

clear idea <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> social <strong>and</strong> political trend <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> age, <strong>the</strong> antece-<br />

dents <strong>of</strong> romanticism <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> impetus given to scientific <strong>and</strong> philo-<br />

sophic th<strong>in</strong>k<strong>in</strong>g. Special emphasis will be put on such writers as<br />

Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, Rousseau <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> Encyclopedists<br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir part <strong>in</strong> pav<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> way for <strong>the</strong> French Revolution.<br />

304. THE ROMANTIC MOVEMENT IN FRENCH LIT-<br />

ERATURE. Prerequisite, one Junior course. Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

The contribution <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> chief precursors <strong>of</strong> Romanticism (l'Abbe<br />

Prevost, Rousseau, Bernard<strong>in</strong> de St. Pierre, Madame de Stael <strong>and</strong><br />

Chateaubri<strong>and</strong>) will be noted. Through <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>terpretative read<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>of</strong> typical plays by Victor Hugo <strong>and</strong> Edmond Rost<strong>and</strong> a study <strong>of</strong><br />

French Romanticism <strong>and</strong> its revival at <strong>the</strong> close <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> n<strong>in</strong>eteenth<br />

century will be made. Outside read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> written reports will be<br />

required.<br />

306. FRENCH LYRIC POETRY OF THE NINETEENTH<br />

CENTURY. Prerequisite, one Junior course. Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

A brief study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> development <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> French lyric. Selec-<br />

tions from Lamart<strong>in</strong>e, Victor Hugo, Alfred de Vigny, Alfred de<br />

Musset, Thephile Gautier, Leconte de Lisle <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>rs will be carefully<br />

studied <strong>in</strong> class with due attention to <strong>the</strong> technique <strong>of</strong> French<br />

verse. Outside read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> written reports required. (Given <strong>in</strong><br />

alternate years; see French 308.)<br />

308. THE FRENCH NOVEL SINCE 1850. Prerequisite, one<br />

Junior course. Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A study, through <strong>the</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> typical works, <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> various<br />

schools <strong>of</strong> French fiction from 1850 to 1925, with <strong>in</strong>troductory lec-<br />

tures on <strong>the</strong> evolution <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> novel <strong>in</strong> France. Outside read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong><br />

written reports required. Given <strong>in</strong> alternate years; see French 306.<br />

401. HISTORY OF FRENCH LITERATURE. Prerequisite,<br />

18 semester hours <strong>of</strong> French. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

•"<br />

113


114 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

A survey course <strong>of</strong> French literature from <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>gs to <strong>the</strong><br />

present time with emphasis on <strong>the</strong> last three centuries. Text : Abry-<br />

Audic-Crouzet Histoire Illustrce de la Litterature Francaise. Re-<br />

quired <strong>of</strong> all who major <strong>in</strong> French.<br />

403. MOLIERE COURSE. Prerequisite, 18 semester hours <strong>of</strong><br />

French. First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

An <strong>in</strong>tensive study <strong>of</strong> Moliere, his work <strong>and</strong> his place <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> lit-<br />

erature <strong>of</strong> France <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> world. About six representative comedies<br />

will be studied.<br />

402. MODERN FRANCE. Prerequisite, 18 semester hours <strong>of</strong><br />

French. Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

This course <strong>in</strong>cludes: <strong>in</strong>troductory lectures on <strong>the</strong> orig<strong>in</strong>s <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

French state <strong>and</strong> its history through <strong>the</strong> revolutionary period to<br />

1815; <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> France from 1815 to 1914 with especial stress<br />

on <strong>the</strong> Third Republic ; <strong>the</strong> geography <strong>and</strong> government <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> France<br />

<strong>of</strong> to-day.<br />

404. FRENCH SYNONYMS AND STYLE. Prerequisite, 18<br />

semester hours <strong>in</strong> French. Second semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

Advanced composition with especial stress on: <strong>the</strong> shades <strong>of</strong> difference<br />

between synonymous words ; <strong>the</strong> possible syntactical varia-<br />

tions for express<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> same thought.<br />

GERMAN<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>William</strong>s<br />

101. BEGINNERS' GERMAN. No college credit. First semes-<br />

ter; three hours.<br />

Elementary grammar <strong>and</strong> easy read<strong>in</strong>g ; written <strong>and</strong> oral exer-<br />

cises; pronunciation stressed; from <strong>the</strong> very beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g attention is<br />

called to English-German cognates. As far as feasible German<br />

will be <strong>the</strong> language <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> lecture-room.<br />

102. ELEMENTARY GERMAN. Second semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

%


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 115<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 101 <strong>and</strong> dependent upon it. Elementary grammar<br />

completed; read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> simple st<strong>and</strong>ard prose; oral <strong>and</strong> written<br />

composition.<br />

201. GERMAN PROSE OF THE NINETEENTH AND<br />

TWENTIETH CENTURIES. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

Rapid read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> short stories <strong>and</strong> essays by st<strong>and</strong>ard authors.<br />

Instead <strong>of</strong> fiction <strong>the</strong> read<strong>in</strong>gs may be <strong>in</strong> scientific German. Prac-<br />

tice <strong>in</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g at sight. Open to those present<strong>in</strong>g two high school<br />

units for entrance.<br />

202. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. Second se-<br />

mester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A systematic course <strong>in</strong> syntax, idioms <strong>and</strong> synonyms <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g<br />

a study <strong>of</strong> Grimm's Lazv <strong>and</strong> English-German cognates. The work<br />

<strong>in</strong> class will be largely oral but abundant written translation from<br />

English <strong>in</strong>to German as well as orig<strong>in</strong>al compositions will be re-<br />

quired. Open to those present<strong>in</strong>g three high school units.<br />

301. TEACHERS' COURSE. Prerequisite, German 201 <strong>and</strong><br />

202. First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

For content, aim <strong>and</strong> scope <strong>of</strong> this course see French 301.<br />

302. SCHILLER COURSE. Prerequisite, German 201 <strong>and</strong> 202.<br />

Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

An <strong>in</strong>troduction to <strong>the</strong> German literature <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> classical period.<br />

Read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>terpretation <strong>of</strong> representative works toge<strong>the</strong>r with a<br />

survey <strong>of</strong> Schillers' life <strong>and</strong> time. (Given <strong>in</strong> alternate years; see<br />

German 304.)<br />

304. GOETHE COURSE. Prerequisite, German 201 <strong>and</strong> 202.<br />

Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> Faust, Part I, with selections from Part II. Goe<strong>the</strong>'s<br />

life <strong>and</strong> place <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> world's literature. (Given <strong>in</strong> alternate years;<br />

see German 302.)


116 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

SPANISH<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor <strong>William</strong>s<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Castaneda<br />

Mr. Adams Mr. Add<strong>in</strong>gton<br />

101. BEGINNERS' SPANISH. No college credit. First se-<br />

mester; three hours.<br />

Elementary grammar <strong>and</strong> easy read<strong>in</strong>g ; written exercises <strong>and</strong><br />

oral drill ; <strong>the</strong> acquir<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> a correct pronunciation <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ear for <strong>the</strong> underst<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> spoken as well as <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ted<br />

word will be stressed from <strong>the</strong> very beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g. As far as consist-<br />

ent with sound pedagogy Spanish will be <strong>the</strong> language <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> lec-<br />

ture-room.<br />

102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH. Second semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> Spanish 101 <strong>and</strong> dependent upon it. Elementary<br />

grammar completed ; read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> simple st<strong>and</strong>ard prose<br />

oral <strong>and</strong> written composition.<br />

201. COMMERCIAL SPANISH. First semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> letter-writ<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> bus<strong>in</strong>ess forms common <strong>in</strong> Spanish-American<br />

trade. Especially designed for students tak<strong>in</strong>g courses<br />

<strong>in</strong> bus<strong>in</strong>ess adm<strong>in</strong>istration <strong>and</strong> commerce. Written exercises <strong>and</strong><br />

oral drill. Open to those present<strong>in</strong>g three high school units for<br />

entrance.<br />

203. READING AND COMPOSITION. First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

Interpretative read<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> texts that represent <strong>the</strong> best modern<br />

Spanish prose. Written composition <strong>and</strong> daily oral drill. Practice<br />

<strong>in</strong> read<strong>in</strong>g at sight. Open to those present<strong>in</strong>g two high school units<br />

for entrance.<br />

202. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. Second se-<br />

mester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Spanish syntax <strong>and</strong> idioms through abundant written work <strong>and</strong><br />

;


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 117<br />

oral drill ; practice <strong>in</strong> conversation. Open to students present<strong>in</strong>g<br />

three high school units for entrance. Required <strong>of</strong> all who m<strong>in</strong>or <strong>in</strong><br />

Spanish.<br />

204. SPANISH AMERICA. Prerequisite, 201 <strong>and</strong> 203 or equiv-<br />

alent. Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Read<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> literature <strong>and</strong> history <strong>of</strong> Spanish America <strong>and</strong><br />

Mexico. Intended as an <strong>in</strong>troduction to <strong>the</strong> subject. Collateral<br />

read<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> written reports required.<br />

301. TEACHERS' COURSE. Prerequisite, 201 or 203 <strong>and</strong> 202,<br />

or equivalent. First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Intended for those prepar<strong>in</strong>g to teach Spanish. A review <strong>and</strong><br />

more thorough study <strong>of</strong> syntax ; Spanish phonetics ; a brief survey<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Spanish language ; a discussion <strong>of</strong> methods <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>in</strong>struction; devices for vitaliz<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> a foreign lan-<br />

guage ; bibliography <strong>of</strong> works for a teacher's reference library. Re-<br />

quired <strong>of</strong> all who major <strong>in</strong> Spanish. ~<br />

302. CONTEMPORARY NOVEL. Prerequisite, 202 <strong>and</strong> one<br />

Junior course. Second semester; thfce hours ; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> orig<strong>in</strong> <strong>and</strong> development <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> contemporary<br />

novel. Representative authors will be read. Lectures on Spanish<br />

literature <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> novel. Fitzmaurice-Kelly's<br />

Historia.<br />

303. CONTEMPORARY DRAMA. Prerequisite, 201 or 203<br />

<strong>and</strong> 202, or <strong>the</strong> equivalent. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> chief tendencies <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> present day drama s<strong>in</strong>ce<br />

1890. The best works <strong>of</strong> representative authors will be read <strong>and</strong><br />

analyzed <strong>in</strong> -class. Lectures, collateral read<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> reports. Fitz-<br />

maurice-Kelly's Historia de la Literatura Espanola.<br />

304. CERVANTES AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES. Pre-<br />

requisite, 202 <strong>and</strong> one Junior course. Second semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

A rapid survey <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> most important movements <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> development<br />

<strong>of</strong> Spanish prose <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> sixteenth <strong>and</strong> seventeenth cen-


118 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

turies, with emphasis on Cervantes. (Given <strong>in</strong> alternate years; see<br />

Spanish 306.)<br />

306. CLASSICAL DRAMA. Prerequisite, 202 <strong>and</strong> one Junior<br />

course. Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Outl<strong>in</strong>e <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> orig<strong>in</strong> <strong>and</strong> development <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Spanish drama;<br />

careful exam<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> a number <strong>of</strong> representative Spanish dramas<br />

<strong>of</strong> Lope de Vega, Tirso de Mol<strong>in</strong>a <strong>and</strong> Alarcon ; collateral read<strong>in</strong>gs<br />

<strong>and</strong> reports. (Given <strong>in</strong> alternate years; see Spanish 304.)<br />

401. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE. Prerequisite.<br />

18 semester hours <strong>of</strong> Spanish. First semester; three hours; three<br />

credits.<br />

A rapid survey <strong>of</strong> Spanish literature from its beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong><br />

present time with stress on <strong>the</strong> outst<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g figures <strong>in</strong> Spanish let-<br />

ters; lectures, collateral read<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> reports. Hurtadon y Palen-<br />

cia's Historia de al Literatura Espanola. Required <strong>of</strong> all who major<br />

<strong>in</strong> Spanish.<br />

402. CALDERON de la BARCA. Prerequisite, 18 semester<br />

hours <strong>of</strong> Spanish. Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> life <strong>of</strong> this author <strong>and</strong> his works. A number <strong>of</strong><br />

typical plays will be read <strong>in</strong> class; lectures, read<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> reports.<br />

(Given <strong>in</strong> alternate years; see Spanish 404.)<br />

404. THE SPANISH BALLAD AND LYRIC. Prerequisite,<br />

18 semester hours <strong>in</strong> Spanish. Second semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

The orig<strong>in</strong>, development <strong>and</strong> metrical form <strong>of</strong> Spanish ballad<br />

<strong>and</strong> lyric poetry, with attention to <strong>the</strong> modern lyric both <strong>of</strong> Spa<strong>in</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong> Spanish America. A number <strong>of</strong> typical poems will be read<br />

<strong>in</strong> class; lectures, parallel read<strong>in</strong>gs <strong>and</strong> written reports. Given <strong>in</strong><br />

alternate years; see Spanish 402.<br />

Methods <strong>and</strong> Laboratory Work <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> Modern Language Courses<br />

Emphasis is placed on <strong>the</strong> oral language <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> acquir<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> a<br />

correct pronunciation is stressed <strong>in</strong>cessantly. Every effort is made<br />

to tra<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> ear as well as <strong>the</strong> eye <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> student so that, at <strong>the</strong> com-


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 119<br />

pletion <strong>of</strong> his course, he may know, not merely <strong>the</strong> language <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

pr<strong>in</strong>ted page, but also that <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> spoken word <strong>and</strong> that he may be<br />

able to express himself with some facility <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> foreign tongue.<br />

As far as possible <strong>the</strong> language taught is <strong>the</strong> language <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> lec-<br />

ture-room. In <strong>the</strong> advanced courses <strong>the</strong> work is conducted practi-<br />

cally altoge<strong>the</strong>r <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> foreign language. In every course, even those<br />

purely literary <strong>in</strong> character, <strong>the</strong>re will be more or less oral drill.<br />

For laboratory work, clubs are organized <strong>in</strong> which <strong>the</strong> more ad-<br />

vanced students are given <strong>the</strong> opportunity to cultivate <strong>and</strong> develop<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir power <strong>of</strong> self-expression <strong>in</strong> <strong>in</strong>formal conversation. In <strong>the</strong> d<strong>in</strong>-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g-hall <strong>the</strong>re are reserved for <strong>the</strong> students <strong>in</strong> French <strong>and</strong> Spanish<br />

special tables, at which only <strong>the</strong>se languages are spoken.<br />

MUSIC<br />

Mrs. Ball<br />

201. HARMONY. First semester; one hour; one credit.<br />

Notation. Formation <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>tervals. Keys <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir relationship.<br />

Scales. A survey <strong>of</strong> tempo, rhythm, marks <strong>of</strong> expression <strong>and</strong> all<br />

rudiments <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>oretical music. Simple triads <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir harmoni-<br />

zation.<br />

202. HARMONY. Prerequisite, Harmony 201. Second se-<br />

mester; two hours; two credits.<br />

Thorough treatment <strong>of</strong> triads <strong>and</strong> chords <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> seventh, se-<br />

quences, modulation, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> use <strong>of</strong> pass<strong>in</strong>g notes <strong>and</strong> suspensions.<br />

Harmonization from figured bass <strong>and</strong> soprano.<br />

APPLIED MUSIC<br />

Applied Music, from elementary to advanced, may be followed<br />

throughout <strong>the</strong> college course. Credit toward a degree will be<br />

allowed for <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g courses <strong>in</strong> advanced Piano <strong>and</strong> Voice,<br />

after <strong>the</strong> exam<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>in</strong> Harmony 202 has been passed. A maximum<br />

<strong>of</strong> three credits toward a degree will be allowed <strong>in</strong> Applied<br />

Music. The student elect<strong>in</strong>g this work for credit must pass <strong>the</strong><br />

required exam<strong>in</strong>ation before entrance upon <strong>the</strong> course to be pur-<br />

sued.


120 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

As only a limited number <strong>of</strong> students can be received <strong>in</strong> Ap-<br />

plied Music, it is advised that early application be made for<br />

work <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> branch desired.<br />

PIANO<br />

101 -R. PIANOFORTE. Both semesters; one credit each<br />

semester. Prerequisite, <strong>the</strong> ability to play at a rapid tempo <strong>the</strong><br />

major <strong>and</strong> m<strong>in</strong>or scales <strong>in</strong> s<strong>in</strong>gle tenths, thirds <strong>and</strong> sixths, <strong>and</strong><br />

successions <strong>of</strong> dom<strong>in</strong>ant <strong>and</strong> dim<strong>in</strong>ished seventh chords <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

<strong>in</strong>versions <strong>in</strong> all keys. A knowledge <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> pedal equivalent to <strong>the</strong><br />

work given <strong>in</strong> Gorno's Pedal Studies, Book I. The ability to<br />

play well an easy sonata <strong>of</strong> Mozart, Haydn or Bcctthoven, <strong>and</strong> a<br />

moderately difficult composition <strong>of</strong> a Classic or Romantic master.<br />

A knowledge <strong>of</strong> Theory equivalent to Harmony 201.<br />

Advanced technical work. Studies to meet <strong>the</strong> student's <strong>in</strong>di-<br />

vidual needs. Gorno's Pedal Studies, Book II. Special study <strong>of</strong><br />

medium <strong>and</strong> difficult sonatas <strong>of</strong> Classic <strong>and</strong> Romantic masters.<br />

Beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g dementi's Gradus ad Parnassian. Suitable composi-<br />

tions.<br />

102-R. PIANOFORTE. Both semesters; one credit each se-<br />

mester. Prerequisite, 201 or its equivalent.<br />

Gradus ad Parnassum cont<strong>in</strong>ued. One concerto <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r <strong>of</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong> larger works <strong>of</strong> Classic <strong>and</strong> Romantic masters.<br />

COLLEGE MUSIC<br />

Mrs. Kathleen Hipp<br />

Lecture Courses<br />

Beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g with <strong>the</strong> second semester <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> 1925-26 session, <strong>the</strong><br />

follow<strong>in</strong>g courses <strong>in</strong> music were <strong>of</strong>fered<br />

102. MUSIC APPRECIATION. Second semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

This course is designed to give a general view <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> history <strong>of</strong><br />

music, <strong>and</strong> to stimulate appreciation <strong>of</strong> musical art. It is suited to<br />

<strong>the</strong> needs <strong>of</strong> those who desire an underst<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> music as a part


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 121<br />

<strong>of</strong> liberal culture, <strong>and</strong> is illustrated throughout with music. The <strong>in</strong>-<br />

struments <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> symphony orchestra are taught by sight <strong>and</strong> sound.<br />

No previous knowledge <strong>of</strong> music is required.<br />

204. MUSIC APPRECIATION. Second semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> Italian, French, German, <strong>and</strong> present day American<br />

opera <strong>and</strong> oratorio.<br />

Chorus<br />

Instruction was given to a women's chorus <strong>of</strong> sixty students,<br />

<strong>and</strong> to a men's chorus <strong>of</strong> thirty students, each meet<strong>in</strong>g regularly<br />

twice a week, <strong>and</strong> for which one semester hour credit was granted.<br />

These choruses took part <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> different social college functions<br />

dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> semester. The department, with <strong>the</strong> aid <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> women's<br />

choir, has furnished music for <strong>the</strong> chapel assemblies.<br />

The work <strong>in</strong> music will be cont<strong>in</strong>ued dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> 1926 summer<br />

session with <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g courses :<br />

141. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC FOR THE ELEMENTARY<br />

SCHOOLS. First <strong>and</strong> second terms; 5 hrs. lee; 1 sem. hr. each<br />

term. Mrs. Hipp.<br />

This course presupposes a knowledge <strong>of</strong> technique <strong>of</strong> s<strong>in</strong>g<strong>in</strong>g,<br />

tone quality, ear tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g, measures <strong>and</strong> rhythm, rudiments <strong>of</strong><br />

music, sight read<strong>in</strong>g, chorus, etc. It will deal with <strong>the</strong> methods <strong>of</strong><br />

teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> conduct<strong>in</strong>g music <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> elementary schools.<br />

142. MUSIC APPRECIATION. Second term; 5 hrs. lee;<br />

2 sem. hrs. Mrs. Hipp.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> Italian, French, German, <strong>and</strong> American opera <strong>and</strong><br />

oratorio.<br />

143. MUSIC APPRECIATION. First term; 5 hrs lee;<br />

2 sem. hrs. Mrs. Hipp. Will be <strong>of</strong>fered <strong>the</strong> second term if enrollment<br />

justifies.<br />

A course which is <strong>in</strong>tended to serve both as an <strong>in</strong>troduction to <strong>the</strong><br />

study <strong>of</strong> music as an art <strong>and</strong> as a means <strong>of</strong> extend<strong>in</strong>g any study<br />

already begun. By means <strong>of</strong> abundant illustrations <strong>in</strong>trpreted broadly<br />

by word, picture, <strong>and</strong> design, it aims to lay down a few funda-


122 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

mental pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>telligent listen<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> to build up a repertory<br />

<strong>of</strong> music which should be <strong>the</strong> possession <strong>of</strong> every generally cultured<br />

person. No previous knowledge <strong>of</strong> music is required, <strong>and</strong> but<br />

slight use <strong>of</strong> technical terms will be made. Throughout, <strong>the</strong> endeavor<br />

will be to <strong>in</strong>crease <strong>the</strong> enjoyment <strong>of</strong> music ra<strong>the</strong>r than to build up<br />

a body <strong>of</strong> facts concern<strong>in</strong>g it.<br />

Note : Students desir<strong>in</strong>g private <strong>in</strong>struction <strong>in</strong> music should com-<br />

municate with <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>structor.<br />

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Tucker Jones<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Martha Barksdale<br />

Assistant Pr<strong>of</strong>essor R. C. Siersema<br />

Medical Exam<strong>in</strong>er Dr. D. J. K<strong>in</strong>g<br />

Joseph C. Ch<strong>and</strong>ler<br />

Marguerite Wynne-Roberts<br />

Student Assistants<br />

Anna Wilkens<br />

Louise Love<br />

The Department <strong>of</strong> Physical Education conducts two dist<strong>in</strong>ct<br />

classes <strong>of</strong> <strong>in</strong>struction :<br />

Division 1—Required Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> Mass Athletics.<br />

Division 2— Pr<strong>of</strong>essional Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> Physical Education.<br />

Division 1<br />

At <strong>the</strong> beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> each semester a physical <strong>and</strong> medical exam<strong>in</strong>ation<br />

is given to all students, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g both men <strong>and</strong> women.<br />

A system <strong>of</strong> graded courses is prescribed for <strong>the</strong> sound students,<br />

while a special corrective gymnastic treatment is outl<strong>in</strong>ed for <strong>the</strong><br />

physically subnormal student.<br />

mlOl. PHYSICAL TRAINING AND HYGIENE FOR MEN.<br />

Autumn semester; three hours; one credit.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 123<br />

Physical exam<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>and</strong> classification, prescription <strong>and</strong> demonstration<br />

<strong>of</strong> corrective measures, free st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g gymnastics, games,<br />

athletics, <strong>and</strong> personal hygiene. Required <strong>of</strong> all freshmen.<br />

ml02. PHYSICAL TRAINING AND HYGIENE FOR MEN.<br />

Spr<strong>in</strong>g semester; three hours; one credit.<br />

March<strong>in</strong>g, free st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g, <strong>and</strong> apparatus gymnastics, athletics,<br />

<strong>and</strong> athletic rules. Required <strong>of</strong> all freshmen.<br />

wlOl. PHYSICAL TRAINING AND HYGIENE FOR<br />

WOMEN. Autumn semester; three hours; one credit.<br />

Physical exam<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>and</strong> classification, prescription, <strong>and</strong> de-<br />

monstration <strong>of</strong> corrective measures, free st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g gymnastics,<br />

games, athletics, <strong>and</strong> personal hygiene. Required <strong>of</strong> all freshmen.<br />

wlOZ PHYSICAL TRAINING AND HYGIENE FOR<br />

WOMEN. Spr<strong>in</strong>g semester; three hours; one credit.<br />

March<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> free st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g gymnastics, apparatus, athletics,<br />

<strong>and</strong> athletic rules. Required <strong>of</strong> all freshmen.<br />

m201. ADVANCED PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR MEN.<br />

Autumn; three hours; two credits. Prerequisite, Pliysical Educa-<br />

tion wi <strong>and</strong> 102. Required <strong>of</strong> sophomore men 1927-28.<br />

The materials <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>se courses are arranged <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>and</strong><br />

practice so that <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> ei<strong>the</strong>r semester, toge<strong>the</strong>r with Biology<br />

104, <strong>and</strong> Physical Education 101 <strong>and</strong> 102, will meet <strong>the</strong> requirements<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> West Law. The daily programs <strong>in</strong>clude: Introductory,<br />

Postural, Educational, General Exercise <strong>and</strong> Recreational periods.<br />

The <strong>the</strong>ory periods treat <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> objectives <strong>of</strong> physical education, <strong>the</strong><br />

effects <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> activities <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> lesson-plan, school athletics, organized<br />

recess, achievement tests, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> management <strong>of</strong> field days <strong>and</strong><br />

demonstrations.<br />

w201. ADVANCED PHYSICAL TRAINING FOR WO-<br />

MEN. Same as m20i. Required <strong>of</strong> all sophomore women.<br />

m202. SEASONAL ACTIVITIES. Required <strong>of</strong> all sopho-<br />

more men 1927-28.


124 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

w202. SEASONAL ACTIVITIES. Second semester; three<br />

hours; one credit. Prerequisite, 101, 102, <strong>and</strong> 201. Required <strong>of</strong> all<br />

sophomore women 1926-27. Open to all upper classmen.<br />

The aim <strong>of</strong> this course is to develop skills <strong>in</strong> athletic <strong>and</strong><br />

recreative activities. The course <strong>in</strong>cludes regular work with <strong>the</strong><br />

athletic teams <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college or with o<strong>the</strong>r organized groups under<br />

supervision. Special groups will be arranged <strong>in</strong> sports, apparatus,<br />

danc<strong>in</strong>g, swimm<strong>in</strong>g, etc.<br />

Division 2<br />

The follow<strong>in</strong>g are requirements for students tak<strong>in</strong>g a major<br />

<strong>in</strong> Physical Education<br />

Biology— 101, 302, 304, 303, 305.<br />

Chemistry— 101, 102.<br />

:<br />

Swimm<strong>in</strong>g—All students must pass <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>termediate swimm<strong>in</strong>g<br />

test <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>of</strong> life sav<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Note: Physical Education 307, 308, 405, 406, 407. 414, may be<br />

counted as Education or as Physical Education.<br />

301. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. First semester;<br />

three hours ; one credit. Prerequisite, Physical Education 201. 202.<br />

Physical education programs embrac<strong>in</strong>g march<strong>in</strong>g, gymnastics<br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> advanced technique <strong>of</strong> athletics <strong>and</strong> seasonal sports.<br />

302. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Second semes-<br />

ter; three hours; one credit. Cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 301.<br />

303. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Autumn semes-<br />

ter; two hours; one credit.<br />

Danc<strong>in</strong>g—Folk <strong>and</strong> character dances.<br />

304. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Spr<strong>in</strong>g semes-<br />

ter; tzvo hours; one credit.<br />

Danc<strong>in</strong>g—Natural—This course is based on free <strong>and</strong> natural<br />

movements. From primitive rhythms progression is made to <strong>in</strong>-<br />

terpretative <strong>and</strong> pantomimic danc<strong>in</strong>g suitable for festivals <strong>and</strong> dra-<br />

matics.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 125<br />

305, 306. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION—ATHLET-<br />

ICS. Each semester; three hours; one credit each semester.<br />

Credit <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>se courses is dependent upon rat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> sports.<br />

Each semester two sports must be passed with a grade <strong>of</strong> B, <strong>and</strong><br />

all o<strong>the</strong>rs at least a grade <strong>of</strong> C. If, however, dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> first<br />

two years a grade <strong>of</strong> A has been made <strong>in</strong> a sport <strong>the</strong> student<br />

may be exempt <strong>in</strong> that activity.<br />

First Semester: Second Semester:<br />

Mass Games, m&w Box<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> Wrestl<strong>in</strong>g, m<br />

Soccer, m&w Fenc<strong>in</strong>g, m&w<br />

Football, m Tennis, m&w<br />

Hockey, m Track, m&w<br />

Indoor Mass Games, m&w Swimm<strong>in</strong>g, m&w<br />

Volley Ball, m&w Baseball, m<br />

Basketball, m&w Hik<strong>in</strong>g, w<br />

Archery, w Indoor Baseball, w<br />

307. PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF PHYSICAL EDU-<br />

CATION. Autumn semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

308. TECHNIQUE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Spr<strong>in</strong>g<br />

semester; two hours; one credit.<br />

Technique <strong>of</strong> comm<strong>and</strong>s <strong>and</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> gymnastic lessons.<br />

310. HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF PHYSICAL EDU-<br />

CATION. Spr<strong>in</strong>g semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

A brief historical study followed by <strong>the</strong> study <strong>of</strong> current litera-<br />

ture, reference books, <strong>and</strong> survey methods.<br />

401. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. First semester;<br />

three hours; two credits. Prerequisite, Physical Education 302.<br />

Physical Education programs <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g activities from athletics<br />

<strong>and</strong> seasonal sports with emphasis on lesson composition <strong>and</strong><br />

teach<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

402. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. First semester;<br />

three hours; two credits. Cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 401.<br />

Note: Courses 301-302-401-402, are closely correlated with ath-<br />

letic participation <strong>and</strong> coach<strong>in</strong>g.


126 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

403. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Autumn semes-<br />

try; three hours, two credits. Prerequisite, 304.<br />

Advanced folk, national, <strong>and</strong> aes<strong>the</strong>tic danc<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

404. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Spr<strong>in</strong>g semes-<br />

ter; three hours; two credits. Prerequisite, 403.<br />

Interpretative danc<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> natural danc<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

405. 406. APPLIED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Athletic<br />

coach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong>ficiat<strong>in</strong>g. Each semester; three hours; tivo credits<br />

each semester.<br />

407. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF<br />

PHYSICAL EDUCATION. FIRST AID. Autumn semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

409. APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY. Prerequisite, Physiology.<br />

Autumn semester; two hours lecture, two hours laboratory; three<br />

credits.<br />

Lectures <strong>and</strong> experiments on <strong>the</strong> physical <strong>and</strong> pathological effects<br />

<strong>of</strong> exercise, tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> overwork.<br />

410. THERAPEUTIC GYMNASTICS. Prerequisite, Anat-<br />

omy, Applied Anatomy, <strong>and</strong> Applied Physiology. Spr<strong>in</strong>g semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

Lectures <strong>and</strong> practice <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> technique <strong>of</strong> massage, corrective ex-<br />

ercises, reconstruction, <strong>and</strong> case work.<br />

Note :<br />

One<br />

try <strong>and</strong> Diagnosis.<br />

hour a week is given to <strong>the</strong> study <strong>of</strong> Anthropome-<br />

412. PLAYGROUND AND PAGEANTRY. Spr<strong>in</strong>g semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

A course deal<strong>in</strong>g with <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>ories <strong>of</strong> play, <strong>the</strong> organization <strong>and</strong><br />

adm<strong>in</strong>istration <strong>of</strong> playgrounds; <strong>the</strong> technique <strong>and</strong> organization <strong>of</strong><br />

pageantry <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r exhibits.<br />

414. PRACTICE TEACHING IN PHYSICAL EDUCA-<br />

TION. Spr<strong>in</strong>g semester; four hours two credits.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 127<br />

Teach<strong>in</strong>g done at <strong>the</strong> public schools dur<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> senior year.<br />

Note: Physical Education 307, 407, 308, 405, 406, 414, may be<br />

counted as Education for Pr<strong>of</strong>essional Students <strong>in</strong> Physical Educa-<br />

tion.<br />

Medical Attention<br />

The college will not be responsible for doctors' bills or for<br />

medical attention <strong>of</strong> any k<strong>in</strong>d for students who are <strong>in</strong>jured <strong>in</strong><br />

athletics or physical exercises, except such as is furnished by <strong>the</strong><br />

college physician <strong>and</strong> resident nurse.<br />

PHYSICS<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Young<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor<br />

Laboratory Assistants<br />

J. L. Crigler<br />

R. H. Kelly<br />

R. A. WlNBORNE<br />

101. GENERAL PHYSICS. First semester; lectures three<br />

hours; laboratory four hours; five credits. Required <strong>of</strong> pre-medi-<br />

cal students.<br />

A first course <strong>in</strong> college physics cover<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> topics <strong>of</strong> mechan-<br />

ics <strong>and</strong> heat. Theory, problems <strong>and</strong> laboratory work. Written<br />

reports are required on all experiments. 101 <strong>and</strong> 102 constitute a<br />

year's work <strong>in</strong> general physics <strong>and</strong> are required <strong>of</strong> all students<br />

major<strong>in</strong>g or m<strong>in</strong>or<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> physics as well as pre-medical students<br />

<strong>and</strong> students prepar<strong>in</strong>g for eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

102. GENERAL PHYSICS. Second semester; lectures three<br />

hours; laboratory four hours; five credits. Required <strong>of</strong> pre-medical<br />

students.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 101 but cover<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> subjects <strong>of</strong> electricity,<br />

sound <strong>and</strong> light.<br />

203. MECHANICS, MOLECULAR PHYSICS AND HEAT.<br />

Prerequisite, general physics. First semester; lectures three hours;<br />

laboratory four hours; five credits.


128 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

This course covers topics not touched <strong>in</strong> general physics, <strong>and</strong><br />

is presented from a more advanced po<strong>in</strong>t <strong>of</strong> view. Emphasis is<br />

placed on <strong>the</strong> solution <strong>of</strong> problems <strong>and</strong> upon <strong>the</strong> development <strong>of</strong><br />

skill <strong>in</strong> mak<strong>in</strong>g laboratory measurements <strong>of</strong> precision. 203 <strong>and</strong> 204<br />

are required <strong>of</strong> all students major<strong>in</strong>g or m<strong>in</strong>or<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> physics <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> all students prepar<strong>in</strong>g for eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g. Students major<strong>in</strong>g or<br />

m<strong>in</strong>or<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> ma<strong>the</strong>matics will f<strong>in</strong>d <strong>the</strong>se courses valuable.<br />

204. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM. Second Semester;<br />

lectures three hours; laboratory four hours; five credits.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 203 but cover<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> subjects <strong>of</strong> electricity <strong>and</strong><br />

magnetism.<br />

205. X-RAYS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS. Prerequisite,<br />

general physics. First semester ; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> methods <strong>of</strong> produc<strong>in</strong>g X-rays, <strong>the</strong>ir nature <strong>and</strong><br />

properties, toge<strong>the</strong>r with <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>formation which <strong>the</strong>y give concern-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> structure <strong>of</strong> matter. Special emphasis is placed on <strong>the</strong>ir<br />

radiographic <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>rapeutical properties which should make <strong>the</strong><br />

course especially pr<strong>of</strong>itable to pre-medical students.<br />

206. PRINCIPLES OF RADIO COMMUNICATION. Pre-<br />

requisite, general physics. Second semester; lectures three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>rmionic tube as detector, amplifier <strong>and</strong> oscil-<br />

lator; antennae <strong>and</strong> radiation; damped <strong>and</strong> undamped waves; <strong>the</strong><br />

wave meter ; various receiv<strong>in</strong>g circuits.<br />

305. ADVANCED LIGHT. Prerequisites, general physics <strong>and</strong><br />

calculus. First semester; lectures three hours; laboratory four<br />

hours; live credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> limit <strong>of</strong> resolution <strong>of</strong> optical <strong>in</strong>struments, Fres-<br />

nel mirrors, <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>terferometer, <strong>the</strong> diffraction grat<strong>in</strong>g, spectroscopy,<br />

polarized light, photographic processes, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> development <strong>of</strong> optical<br />

<strong>the</strong>ory. Intended for eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g students <strong>and</strong> students major-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> physics.<br />

306. ALTERNATING CURRENTS. Prerequisites, general<br />

physics <strong>and</strong> calculus. Second semester; lectures three hours; lab-<br />

oratory four hours; live credits.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 129<br />

A beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g course <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> alternat<strong>in</strong>g currents,<br />

treat<strong>in</strong>g such subjects as frequency, <strong>in</strong>ductance, capacity, impedance,<br />

polyphase currents <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> measurement <strong>of</strong> power. Intended for<br />

eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g students <strong>and</strong> students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> physics.<br />

401. KINETIC THEORY. Prerequisites, two years <strong>of</strong> physics<br />

<strong>and</strong> calculus. First semester; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> gas laws, pressure <strong>the</strong>ory, specific heats, equipar-<br />

tition <strong>of</strong> energy, Maxwell's distribution law, viscosity, heat conduc-<br />

tion, <strong>the</strong>rmydynamics <strong>and</strong> Brownian movements. Intended for<br />

students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> physics. This course will be found valuable<br />

to students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> ma<strong>the</strong>matics <strong>and</strong> chemistry.<br />

402. ELECTRON THEORY. Prerequisite, two years <strong>of</strong> physics<br />

<strong>and</strong> calculus. Second semester; lectures three hours; three credits.<br />

A study <strong>of</strong> cathode rays, measurements <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> charge <strong>and</strong> mass<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> electron, scatter<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> X-rays, Bohr's <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>of</strong> atomic struc-<br />

ture, <strong>the</strong> photo-electric effect, metallic conduction <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> mobility<br />

<strong>of</strong> electrons. Intended for students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> physics. This<br />

course will be found pr<strong>of</strong>itable to students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> ma<strong>the</strong>-<br />

matics <strong>and</strong> chemistry.<br />

403. ADVANCED LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS. Pre-<br />

requisites, tzvo years <strong>of</strong> physics <strong>and</strong> calculus. First semester; six<br />

hours <strong>of</strong> laboratory ; three credits.<br />

A course <strong>in</strong> precision measurements along <strong>the</strong> l<strong>in</strong>e <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> student's<br />

chief <strong>in</strong>terest. Research work <strong>and</strong> orig<strong>in</strong>al <strong>in</strong>vestigation is encour-<br />

aged. For eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g students <strong>and</strong> students major<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> physics.<br />

404. ADVANCED LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS. Pre-<br />

requisites, two years <strong>of</strong> physics <strong>and</strong> calculus. Second semester;<br />

laboratory six hours; three credits.<br />

A cont<strong>in</strong>uation <strong>of</strong> 403.<br />

PSYCHOLOGY AND PHILOSOPHY<br />

Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Geiger<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Faithfull<br />

Associate Pr<strong>of</strong>essor Krebs


130<br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Lecturers<br />

Dr. Brown<br />

Dr. Hibbs<br />

Joseph<strong>in</strong>e Barney, Student Assistant<br />

PSYCHOLOGY<br />

201. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. First semester, repeated <strong>in</strong><br />

spr<strong>in</strong>g, three hours; three credits.<br />

This course <strong>in</strong>cludes <strong>the</strong> usual topics covered <strong>in</strong> a general <strong>in</strong>-<br />

troduction to psychology. Required <strong>of</strong> all students work<strong>in</strong>g for<br />

<strong>the</strong> A. B. or B. S. degree. This course is prerequisite to all ad-<br />

vanced psychology courses <strong>and</strong> to all courses <strong>in</strong> philosophy.<br />

202. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. Second semester;<br />

two lectures; two hours laboratory ; three credits.<br />

A general experimental course <strong>in</strong>volv<strong>in</strong>g selected problems.<br />

303. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. First semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

The topics discussed <strong>in</strong> this course are <strong>the</strong> phenomena aris<strong>in</strong>g<br />

out <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> various forms <strong>of</strong> social <strong>in</strong>teraction, such as imitation,<br />

suggestion, <strong>the</strong> crowd, <strong>the</strong> mob, fashion, fads, custom, convention-<br />

ality, <strong>the</strong> self, public op<strong>in</strong>ion, social consciousness, <strong>and</strong> collective<br />

volition ; also types <strong>of</strong> social groups, methods <strong>of</strong> social control <strong>and</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong>ories <strong>of</strong> social progress. (Not given <strong>in</strong> 1926-27).<br />

304. ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY. Second semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

A general <strong>in</strong>troduction to <strong>the</strong> special fields <strong>and</strong> practical appli-<br />

cations <strong>of</strong> psychology.<br />

305. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY. First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

Lectures, assigned read<strong>in</strong>g, reports, <strong>and</strong> discussions cover<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong><br />

various forms <strong>of</strong> unusual <strong>and</strong> abnormal behavior. Cl<strong>in</strong>ical demon-<br />

strations at <strong>the</strong> Eastern State Hospital. Not given <strong>in</strong> 1925-26.


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 131<br />

307. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. First semester; two<br />

lectures; two hours laboratory ; three credits. Prerequisites, Psy-<br />

chology 201 <strong>and</strong> Education.<br />

401. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY. First semester; three hours;<br />

three credits.<br />

This course will <strong>in</strong>clude lectures, assigned read<strong>in</strong>g, <strong>and</strong> discus-<br />

sions cover<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> application <strong>of</strong> phychology <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> fields <strong>of</strong> per-<br />

sonal efficiency, bus<strong>in</strong>ess <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong>dustrial efficiency, advertis<strong>in</strong>g, sales-<br />

manship, hygiene, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>rapeutics.<br />

For advanced students <strong>in</strong> education or psychology. Experimental<br />

course <strong>in</strong> analysis <strong>of</strong> selected learn<strong>in</strong>g activities. Review <strong>of</strong> experimental<br />

literature <strong>in</strong> topic <strong>of</strong> quarter; experiments <strong>in</strong> laboratory <strong>and</strong><br />

tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g school; <strong>in</strong>dividual <strong>and</strong> group <strong>in</strong>vestigations.<br />

402. PROBLEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY. Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

This is a course for seniors <strong>and</strong> graduate students specializ<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>in</strong> psychology.<br />

PHILOSOPHY<br />

Note: Students must satisfy <strong>the</strong> m<strong>in</strong>imum requirements <strong>in</strong><br />

psychology before be<strong>in</strong>g admitted to courses <strong>in</strong> philosophy. Any<br />

student <strong>of</strong> junior rank who has met <strong>the</strong>se requirements will be ad-<br />

mitted to any advanced course <strong>in</strong> philosophy.<br />

301. LOGIC. First semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

Topics discussed <strong>in</strong> this course are those usually <strong>in</strong>cluded <strong>in</strong> a<br />

survey <strong>of</strong> logic. Special emphasis will be placed upon logic as <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>the</strong>ory <strong>of</strong> scientific method.<br />

302. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY. Second semes-<br />

ter; three hours; three credits.<br />

An elementary treatment <strong>of</strong> important problems <strong>of</strong> reflective<br />

thought.<br />

304. ETHICS. Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

This course is <strong>in</strong>tended to familiarize <strong>the</strong> students with <strong>the</strong><br />

ma<strong>in</strong> aspects <strong>of</strong> ethical history <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>and</strong>, through this, to<br />

reach a method <strong>of</strong> estimat<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> controll<strong>in</strong>g conduct.


132 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

403. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. First semester; three<br />

hours; three credits.<br />

An historical <strong>and</strong> psychological exam<strong>in</strong>ation <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> development<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> religious consciousness <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> race <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>in</strong>dividual<br />

is followed by a consideration <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> significance <strong>and</strong> validity <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

concepts <strong>of</strong> religion. Not given <strong>in</strong> 1925-26.<br />

406. HISTORY OF ANGIENT AND MODERN PHILOSO-<br />

PHY. Second semester; three hours; three credits.<br />

The lead<strong>in</strong>g systems <strong>of</strong> philosophic thought belong<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong>se<br />

periods will be studied with special reference to <strong>the</strong>ir social back-<br />

grounds. Attention will also be given to <strong>the</strong> relations <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se<br />

systems to present-day thought.<br />

408. CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY. Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

An <strong>in</strong>tensive study <strong>of</strong> present philosophical tendencies. (Not<br />

given <strong>in</strong> 1926-27).<br />

SOCIOLOGY<br />

302. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY. Second semester;<br />

three hours; three credits.<br />

Nature <strong>and</strong> analysis <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> life <strong>of</strong> society; social evolution;<br />

factors <strong>in</strong> social progress.<br />

SOCIOLOGY 304. Social <strong>and</strong> Vocational Orientation. Second<br />

semester; three hours; three credits. Electh'e for juniors <strong>and</strong><br />

seniors. Adapted especially to zvomen.<br />

The course will deal with <strong>the</strong> social changes <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> family, <strong>in</strong><br />

<strong>in</strong>dustry, <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> education, lay<strong>in</strong>g especial stress on <strong>the</strong> chang<strong>in</strong>g<br />

position <strong>of</strong> woman. Start<strong>in</strong>g with a study <strong>of</strong> primitive times <strong>and</strong>.<br />

pass<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> rapid survey through <strong>the</strong> Hebrew, Greek, <strong>and</strong> Roman<br />

periods, through <strong>the</strong> Middle Ages <strong>and</strong> Industrial Revolution, with<br />

its manifold <strong>in</strong>fluences on society, <strong>the</strong> course will <strong>in</strong>clude a thorough<br />

study <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> social <strong>and</strong> economic problems <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> present time as<br />

<strong>the</strong>y relate to women. It will, it is believed, give a student both<br />

knowledge <strong>and</strong> view po<strong>in</strong>t from which to see more clearly her place<br />

<strong>in</strong> modern society <strong>and</strong> make a wise choice <strong>of</strong> a life work. Lec-<br />

tures, read<strong>in</strong>gs, <strong>and</strong> discussions.


FRESHMAN COURSES<br />

The Freshman student is faced with serious problems. Some<br />

come to college with a def<strong>in</strong>ite purpose <strong>in</strong> m<strong>in</strong>d <strong>and</strong> proceed to se-<br />

lect courses to this end. Very <strong>of</strong>ten this purpose has been de-<br />

term<strong>in</strong>ed by <strong>the</strong> desires <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> family, <strong>the</strong> traditions <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> com-<br />

munity, or o<strong>the</strong>rwise.^ As a result, some students f<strong>in</strong>d <strong>the</strong>mselves<br />

<strong>in</strong> a position <strong>in</strong> which <strong>the</strong>y are unable to meet <strong>the</strong> preparation for<br />

<strong>the</strong> atta<strong>in</strong>ment <strong>of</strong> this purpose. The result is failure. O<strong>the</strong>r<br />

students come to college with no def<strong>in</strong>ite purpose <strong>in</strong> m<strong>in</strong>d o<strong>the</strong>r<br />

than to be at college. Both <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong>se groups present a serious<br />

problem. The former calls for a readjustment; <strong>the</strong> latter calls<br />

for development. To meet this situation <strong>the</strong> college is endeavor<strong>in</strong>g<br />

to give careful attention to <strong>the</strong> students enter<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> Freshman<br />

class. Through <strong>the</strong> careful arrangement <strong>and</strong> selection <strong>of</strong> courses<br />

based on <strong>the</strong> application <strong>of</strong> appropriate tests, <strong>and</strong> a system <strong>of</strong><br />

thoughtful counsel<strong>in</strong>g from <strong>the</strong> faculty, <strong>the</strong> college hopes to help<br />

<strong>the</strong> students who have already determ<strong>in</strong>ed <strong>the</strong>ir purpose <strong>and</strong> also<br />

<strong>the</strong> students who must have <strong>the</strong>ir purposes developed.<br />

Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Arts Course<br />

Freshman Year<br />

First Semester Second Semester<br />

Credits Credits<br />

English 101 3 English 102 3<br />

Lat<strong>in</strong> or Greek 101 3 Lat<strong>in</strong> or Greek 102 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101 3 Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 102 3<br />

History, or Government 101 3 Government, or History 102 3<br />

Modern Language 3 Modern Language 3<br />

Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g 101 1 Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g 102 1<br />

Total 16 Total 16


134 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

First Semester<br />

Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Science Course<br />

Freshman Year<br />

Credits<br />

English 101 3<br />

Science 101 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101 3<br />

History, or Government, or<br />

Modern Language 3<br />

Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g 101 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 102 3<br />

Science 102 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 102 3<br />

History, or Government, or<br />

Modern Language 3<br />

Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g 102 1<br />

Total. IS Total. 15<br />

Course Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Chemical <strong>and</strong> M<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g Eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g<br />

First Semester<br />

Freshman Year<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 101 5<br />

English 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 103 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Physical Ed 1<br />

Total : 18<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 102 5<br />

English 102 3<br />

Government 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 102 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Physical Ed 1<br />

Total 18<br />

Course Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Civil <strong>and</strong> Mechanical Eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g<br />

First Semester<br />

Freshman Year<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 101 5<br />

English 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 103 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Physical Ed 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 102 S<br />

English 102 3<br />

Government 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 102 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Physical Ed 1<br />

Total. 18 Total. 18


Courses <strong>of</strong> Instruction 135<br />

Courses Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Electrical Eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g<br />

First Semester<br />

Freshman Year<br />

Credits<br />

English 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 103 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Physics 101 5<br />

Physical Ed 1<br />

Total 18<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 101 3<br />

Government 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 102 3<br />

Mod. »Lang 3<br />

Physics 102 5<br />

Physical Ed 1<br />

Total.<br />

Economics <strong>and</strong> Bus<strong>in</strong>ess Adm<strong>in</strong>istration Courses<br />

First Semester<br />

Freshman Year<br />

Credits<br />

English 101 3<br />

Science 101 5<br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia Gov't 3<br />

Math. 101 3<br />

Phys. Tra<strong>in</strong>. 101 1<br />

IS<br />

Course Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Forestry<br />

(See Pre-Medical Course, page 147)<br />

Government<br />

Second Semester<br />

18<br />

Credits<br />

English 102 3<br />

Science 102 5<br />

American History 3<br />

American Econ. Hist, or<br />

Math. 102 3<br />

Phys. Tra<strong>in</strong>. 102 1<br />

(See Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Arts Course, page 133)<br />

15


136 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

First Semester<br />

Home Economics Course<br />

Freshman Year<br />

Credits<br />

Home Economics 101 4<br />

Chemistry 101 5<br />

English 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101 3<br />

Phys. Tra<strong>in</strong>. 101 1<br />

First Semester<br />

16<br />

Physical Education Course<br />

Freshman Year<br />

Credits<br />

English 101 3<br />

Govt. 101 3<br />

Chemstry 101 5<br />

Matematics 101 3<br />

Phys. Edu. 101 1<br />

First Semester<br />

15<br />

Social Work<br />

(See for Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Arts, page 62)<br />

Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry Course<br />

Freshman Year<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 101 5<br />

History 101 3<br />

Ind. Arts 101 3<br />

English 101 3<br />

Math. 101 3<br />

Phys. Tra<strong>in</strong>. 101 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Home Economics 102 4<br />

Chemistry 102 5<br />

English 102 3<br />

History (or Govt.) 101-R.. 3<br />

Phys. Tra<strong>in</strong>. 102 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

16<br />

Credits<br />

English 102 3<br />

History 101 3<br />

Chemistry 102 5<br />

Language 102 3<br />

Phvs. Educ. 102 1<br />

Secod Semester<br />

15<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 102 5<br />

Govt. 102 3<br />

Math. 102 3<br />

English 102 3<br />

Mod. Lang. 101-R 3<br />

Phvs. Tra<strong>in</strong>. 102 1<br />

18 18


SPECIAL COURSES<br />

COURSES LEADING TO ENGINEERING<br />

The eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g courses outl<strong>in</strong>ed below are designed to prepare<br />

students to enter <strong>the</strong> junior class <strong>of</strong> any st<strong>and</strong>ard eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g<br />

school. These courses conta<strong>in</strong> not only <strong>the</strong> m<strong>in</strong>imum for <strong>the</strong> first<br />

two years <strong>of</strong> eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g, but also additional subjects that will be<br />

found very helpful to eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g students.<br />

Solid geometry is presupposed for entrance to eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g<br />

courses. If not taken before enter<strong>in</strong>g, it should be taken <strong>in</strong> addi-<br />

tion to <strong>the</strong> prescribed ma<strong>the</strong>matics.<br />

The third year courses should He chosen <strong>in</strong> accordance with <strong>the</strong><br />

requirements <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g school <strong>and</strong> class that <strong>the</strong> student<br />

plans to enter. Modification may be made <strong>in</strong> any <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> courses,<br />

with a similar end <strong>in</strong> view, with <strong>the</strong> approval <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> appropriate<br />

committee.<br />

Students will be granted a B. S. degree by <strong>the</strong> college upon <strong>the</strong><br />

successful completion <strong>of</strong> any <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g courses <strong>and</strong> an<br />

additional year's work <strong>in</strong> residence, provided <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ad-<br />

ditional year completes <strong>the</strong> degree requirements as stated on page<br />

62. Likewise students who complete this work <strong>in</strong> eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g<br />

will be granted a B. S. degree by <strong>the</strong> college when <strong>the</strong>y have f<strong>in</strong>-<br />

ished <strong>the</strong>ir courses at an approved eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g college.<br />

In order to qualify for a degree or to be recommended to an<br />

eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g school a student must make a grade <strong>of</strong> 83 or higher<br />

on at least half <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> credits earned at this college.<br />

Course Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Chemical <strong>and</strong> M<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g Eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g<br />

M<strong>in</strong>imum requirements same as for B. S. degree.<br />

M<strong>in</strong>ors :<br />

Major :<br />

Chemistry<br />

Physics <strong>and</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics<br />

Freshman Year<br />

See under Freshman Courses


138 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

First Semester<br />

Sophomore Year<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 203 5<br />

English 3<br />

Ind. Arts 101 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Physics 101 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

First Semester<br />

20<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 301 5 •<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 105 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 201 3<br />

Physics 203 5<br />

Junior Year<br />

18<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 204 5<br />

English 3<br />

Hist. CAmer.) 3<br />

Ind. Arts 102 3<br />

Physics 102 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

20<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 302 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 106 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 202 3<br />

Physics 204 5<br />

Course Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Civil <strong>and</strong> Mechanical Eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g<br />

M<strong>in</strong>imum requirements same as for B. S. degree<br />

Majors: Physics <strong>and</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics (a)<br />

First Semester<br />

Freshman Year<br />

See under Freshman Courses<br />

Sophomore Year<br />

Credits<br />

Ind. Arts 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 105 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 201 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Physics 101 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

20<br />

Second Semester<br />

18<br />

Credits<br />

Hist. (Amer.) 3<br />

Ind. Arts 102 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 106 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 202 3<br />

Physics 102 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

(a) Ma<strong>the</strong>matics will he accepted as a major for <strong>the</strong> B. S. de-<br />

gree <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> case <strong>of</strong> eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g students.<br />

20


First Semester<br />

Special Courses 139<br />

Credits<br />

English 3<br />

Ind. Arts 401 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 301 3<br />

Physics 203 5<br />

Physics 305 5<br />

Junior Year<br />

19<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 3<br />

Ind. Arts 302 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 302 3<br />

Physics 204 5<br />

Physics 306 5<br />

Course Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Electrical Eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g<br />

M<strong>in</strong>imum requirements same as for B. S. degree<br />

Majors :<br />

First Semester<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics<br />

<strong>and</strong> Physics (a)<br />

Freshman Year<br />

See under Freshman Courses<br />

Sophomore Year<br />

Credits<br />

English 3<br />

Ind. Arts 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 201 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Physics 203 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

18<br />

Second Semester<br />

19<br />

Credits<br />

English 3<br />

Ind. Arts 102 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 106 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 202 3<br />

Physics 204 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

(a) Ma<strong>the</strong>matics will be accepted as a major for <strong>the</strong> B. S.<br />

degree <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> case <strong>of</strong> eng<strong>in</strong>eer<strong>in</strong>g students.<br />

20


140 <strong>College</strong> oe <strong>William</strong> anh <strong>Mary</strong><br />

First Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Hist. (Amer.) 3<br />

Ind. Arts 101 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 301 3<br />

Physics 305 5<br />

Physics 403 3<br />

Junior Year<br />

17<br />

Courses Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Forestry<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Ind. Arts 302 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 302 3<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 402 3<br />

Physics 306 5<br />

Physics 404 3<br />

Freshman Year (Same as Pre-Medical)<br />

(See page 146)<br />

Pre-Dental Course<br />

(See page 144)<br />

Pre-Medical Course<br />

(See page 145)<br />

Public Health Course<br />

Freshman Year (Same as for Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Science)<br />

(See page 147)<br />

COURSE LEADING TO FORESTRY<br />

This course is <strong>in</strong>tended to qualify students for <strong>the</strong> junior class<br />

<strong>of</strong> a pr<strong>of</strong>essional school <strong>of</strong> forestry. Students are urged to choose<br />

<strong>the</strong>ir pr<strong>of</strong>essional school early <strong>and</strong> to <strong>in</strong>sure that any special re-<br />

quirements <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> chosen school are met. Modifications <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

course as outl<strong>in</strong>ed may be made, with a similar end <strong>in</strong> view, sub-<br />

ject to <strong>the</strong> approval <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> dean. A two-year course may be ar-<br />

ranged by suitable selection.<br />

17


Special Courses 141<br />

Students complet<strong>in</strong>g this course, toge<strong>the</strong>r with two credits<br />

(which may consist <strong>of</strong> credit for student activities, see page 64)<br />

<strong>and</strong> one additional year <strong>of</strong> work <strong>in</strong> residence, will be granted <strong>the</strong><br />

B. S. degree, provided <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> additional year completes<br />

<strong>the</strong> degree requirements as stated on page 62.<br />

The college will grant <strong>the</strong> B. S. degree to a student who, after<br />

complet<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> three-year course with two additional credits (which<br />

may consist <strong>of</strong> credit for student activities, see page 64), has suc-<br />

cessfully completed <strong>the</strong> course <strong>of</strong> an approved college <strong>of</strong> forestry.<br />

In order to qualify for a degree <strong>in</strong> this course or to be recommended<br />

for transfer to a school <strong>of</strong> forestry a student must have<br />

a grade <strong>of</strong> 83 or higher <strong>in</strong> at least half <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> credits earned at<br />

this college.<br />

Suggested Course Lead<strong>in</strong>g to Forestry<br />

For m<strong>in</strong>imum requirements, see page 63<br />

First Semester<br />

Major: Biology<br />

First M<strong>in</strong>or :<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or: Physics<br />

First Year<br />

(See page 147)<br />

Credits<br />

Biology 101 5<br />

Physics 101 5<br />

Math. 201 3<br />

Ind. Arts 101 3<br />

Biology 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

Second Year<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Biology 102 5<br />

Physics 101 5<br />

Math. 202 3<br />

Ind. Arts 102 3<br />

Biology 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

22 22


142 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Third Year<br />

Major, m<strong>in</strong>ors, <strong>and</strong> related subjects<br />

HOME ECONOMICS<br />

The home economics department was established <strong>in</strong> 1918 under<br />

<strong>the</strong> Smith-Hughes Act, which grants Federal aid for <strong>the</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>of</strong> teachers <strong>of</strong> home economics. The course <strong>of</strong> study is four years<br />

<strong>in</strong> length <strong>and</strong> leads to <strong>the</strong> degree <strong>of</strong> Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Science.<br />

The curriculum provides for a liberal amount <strong>of</strong> academic work<br />

<strong>in</strong> addition to <strong>the</strong> science underly<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> technical courses, thus <strong>in</strong>-<br />

sur<strong>in</strong>g a good general education as well as pr<strong>of</strong>essional tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Though <strong>in</strong>tended primarily for <strong>the</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> teachers <strong>of</strong> home<br />

economics, freshmen <strong>and</strong> sophomore classes are open to all women<br />

students <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> college, <strong>and</strong> to o<strong>the</strong>rs who desire to elect <strong>the</strong>m.<br />

One<br />

Major: Home Economics<br />

First M<strong>in</strong>or : Education<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or :<br />

Science<br />

M<strong>in</strong>imum Requirements:<br />

English 12<br />

One Modern Language 9<br />

Biology or Chemistry or Physics (10 credits <strong>in</strong><br />

any two 20<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 3<br />

History (American) 3<br />

Government (Virg<strong>in</strong>ia <strong>and</strong> United States) 6<br />

Psychology 3<br />

Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g 4<br />

Courses designated below must be taken by c<strong>and</strong>idates for this<br />

degree <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g subjects : Home economics, education,<br />

bacteriology, f<strong>in</strong>e arts, West Law.<br />

Suggested Course for B. S. Degree <strong>in</strong> Home Economics<br />

Freshman Year<br />

(See page 134)<br />

60


First Semester<br />

Special Courses 143<br />

Sophomore Year<br />

Credits<br />

Home Econ. 201 3<br />

Chemistry 5<br />

English 201 3<br />

Biology 201 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

First Semester<br />

Credits<br />

F<strong>in</strong>e Arts 101 3<br />

Home Econ. 301 3<br />

Home Econ. 303 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Home Econ. 305 2<br />

History (or Gov't) 3<br />

First Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Education 3<br />

Home Econ. 407 2<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Home Econ. 403 2<br />

Home Econ. 405-R 6<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Home Econ. 202 3<br />

English 202 3<br />

History (or Gov't) 3<br />

Biology 102 5<br />

Psychology 3<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

17 18<br />

Junior Year<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

F<strong>in</strong>e Arts 102 3<br />

Home Econ. 302 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Home Econ. 307 3<br />

Home Econ. 406 3<br />

Education 3<br />

17 18<br />

Senior Year<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Home Econ. 404 2<br />

Home Econ. 402 3<br />

West Law 2<br />

Education 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

16 13


144 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

PRE-DENTAL COURSE<br />

The st<strong>and</strong>ard dental colleges require for admission at least one<br />

year <strong>of</strong> college work, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g a full year <strong>of</strong> work <strong>in</strong> English,<br />

chemistry, physics <strong>and</strong> biology. This m<strong>in</strong>imum requirement may<br />

be met by <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g courses: English 101, 102, <strong>and</strong> 201; chem-<br />

istry 101, 102; physics 101, 102; biology 101, 102.<br />

It is highly desirable that those expect<strong>in</strong>g to go <strong>in</strong>to dentistry<br />

should take more than <strong>the</strong> m<strong>in</strong>imum <strong>of</strong> preparaory work. The man<br />

who has taken two or three years <strong>of</strong> college tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g will f<strong>in</strong>d<br />

himself able to take advantage <strong>of</strong> opportunities for much advanced<br />

tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> valuable practical experience dur<strong>in</strong>g his dental course.<br />

For such extended tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> follow<strong>in</strong>g course is outl<strong>in</strong>ed.<br />

Students complet<strong>in</strong>g this three-year course, toge<strong>the</strong>r with two ad-<br />

ditional credits (which may consist <strong>of</strong> credit for student activities,<br />

see page 64), <strong>and</strong> one additional year <strong>of</strong> work <strong>in</strong> residence, will<br />

be granted <strong>the</strong> B. S. degree, provided <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> additional<br />

year completes <strong>the</strong> degree requirements as stated on page 62. The<br />

college will grant <strong>the</strong> B. S. degree to a student who, after complet<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>the</strong> three-year course with four addiional credis (which may<br />

consist <strong>of</strong> credit for student activities, see page 64), has success-<br />

fully completed <strong>the</strong> course <strong>of</strong> an approved dental school requir<strong>in</strong>g<br />

a m<strong>in</strong>imum <strong>of</strong> one year <strong>of</strong> pre-dental work.<br />

In order to qualify for a degree <strong>in</strong> this course or to be recommended<br />

for entrance to a dental school, a student must have a grade<br />

<strong>of</strong> 83 or higher <strong>in</strong> at least half <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> credits earned at this college.<br />

Suggested Pre-Dental Course<br />

For m<strong>in</strong>imum requirements see page 63<br />

First Major :<br />

Chemistry<br />

Second Major: Biology<br />

First Year (Same as for Pre-Medical)<br />

(See page 147)


First Semester<br />

Special Courses 145<br />

Second Year<br />

Credits<br />

Biology 201 5<br />

Chemistry 201 5<br />

Physics 101 5<br />

Gov't (or History).,. 3<br />

First Semester<br />

18<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 301 5<br />

Government 3<br />

Biology 203 3<br />

Modern Lang 3<br />

English 201 3<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

Third Year<br />

17<br />

PRE-MEDICAL COURSES<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Biology 202 5<br />

Chemistry 204 5<br />

Physics 102 5<br />

History (or Gov't) 3<br />

Second Semester<br />

18<br />

Credits<br />

Chemistry 302 5<br />

Psychology 3<br />

Biology 304 S<br />

Modern Lang 3<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

The st<strong>and</strong>ard medical <strong>in</strong>stitutions belong<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> Association<br />

<strong>of</strong> American Medical <strong>College</strong>s require two or more years <strong>of</strong> col-<br />

legiate work for entrance. The m<strong>in</strong>imum <strong>of</strong> sixty semester hours<br />

must <strong>in</strong>clude eight <strong>in</strong> <strong>in</strong>organic chemistry, four <strong>in</strong> organic chemistry,<br />

eight <strong>in</strong> biology, eight <strong>in</strong> physics, <strong>and</strong> six <strong>in</strong> English compo-<br />

stion <strong>and</strong> literature. It is desirable that <strong>the</strong> choice <strong>of</strong> a medical<br />

school be made early <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> course <strong>and</strong> that <strong>the</strong> committee on regis-<br />

tration <strong>of</strong> pre-medical students be consulted to <strong>in</strong>sure that any<br />

special requirement <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> school chosen is met. The work here out-<br />

l<strong>in</strong>ed covers ei<strong>the</strong>r three or two years. It is preferable for <strong>the</strong> student<br />

to take <strong>the</strong> three-year course, s<strong>in</strong>ce this not only meets <strong>the</strong> m<strong>in</strong>imum<br />

requirement for medical colleges, but also covers o<strong>the</strong>r subjects that<br />

will be found very helpful <strong>in</strong> medical work, <strong>and</strong> leads to <strong>the</strong> B. S.<br />

19


146 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

degree, which is now very generally desired by graduates <strong>in</strong> medi-<br />

c<strong>in</strong>e.<br />

Students complet<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> three-year course, toge<strong>the</strong>r with two<br />

credits (which may consist <strong>of</strong> credit for student activities, see<br />

page 64), <strong>and</strong> one additional year <strong>of</strong> work <strong>in</strong> residence, will be<br />

granted <strong>the</strong> B. S. degree, provided <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> additional year<br />

completes <strong>the</strong> degree requirements as stated on page 62. The col-<br />

lege will grant <strong>the</strong> B. S. degree to a student* who, after complet<strong>in</strong>g<br />

<strong>the</strong> three-year course with two additional credits (which may con-<br />

sist <strong>of</strong> credit for student activities, see page 64), has successfully<br />

completed <strong>the</strong> course <strong>of</strong> an approved medical college.<br />

In order to qualify for a degree <strong>in</strong> this course or to be recommended<br />

for entrance to a medical school a student must have a<br />

grade <strong>of</strong> 83 or higher <strong>in</strong> at least half <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> credits earned at this<br />

college.<br />

Two-Year Course<br />

First Year (The same for Two- <strong>and</strong> Three-Year Courses)<br />

First Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 101 3<br />

Chemitsry 101 5<br />

Biology 101 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 101 3<br />

Physical Education 101 1<br />

First Semester<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 102 3<br />

Chemistry 102 5<br />

Biology 102 5<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics 102 3<br />

Physical Education 102 1<br />

17 17<br />

Second Year<br />

Credits<br />

Biology 201 5<br />

Chemistry 201 5<br />

Physics 101 5<br />

History (or Gov't) 3<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Biology 202 5<br />

Chemistry 202 5<br />

Physics 102 5<br />

Government (or Hist.) 3<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

10 19


Special Courses- 147<br />

Three-Year Course<br />

For m<strong>in</strong>imum requirements see page 63<br />

First Major: Chemistry<br />

Second Major: Biology<br />

Or M<strong>in</strong>ors: Biology <strong>and</strong> related subjects<br />

First Year (Same as for Two-Year Course)<br />

First Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Physics 101 5<br />

Chemistry 301 5<br />

Modern Lang 3<br />

History (or Gov't) 101 3<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

First Semester<br />

Second Year<br />

17<br />

Credits<br />

Biology 201 5<br />

Chemistry 401 5<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

English 3<br />

Government 3<br />

Third Year<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Physics 101 5<br />

Chemistry 302 5<br />

Modern Lang 3<br />

Government (or Hist.) 3<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

17<br />

Credits<br />

Biology 202 5<br />

Chemistry 204 5<br />

English 3<br />

Psychology 201 3<br />

19 16<br />

PUBLIC HEALTH COURSE<br />

The course outl<strong>in</strong>ed below is designed to prepare <strong>the</strong> student for<br />

public health service. Three years <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> course is <strong>of</strong>fered at this<br />

college. The fourth year must be taken at a school <strong>of</strong> public health<br />

at a st<strong>and</strong>ard medical college, or o<strong>the</strong>r <strong>in</strong>stitution equipped for <strong>the</strong><br />

work <strong>and</strong> approved by this college. It is desirable that <strong>the</strong> choice<br />

<strong>of</strong> a school <strong>in</strong> which to complete <strong>the</strong> course be made early <strong>and</strong>


148 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

that <strong>the</strong> committee on pre-medical students be consulted to <strong>in</strong>sure<br />

that special requirements <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> school chosen are met. Students<br />

complet<strong>in</strong>g this course, toge<strong>the</strong>r with two credits (which may con-<br />

sist <strong>of</strong> credit for student activities, see page 64), <strong>and</strong> one addi-<br />

tional year <strong>of</strong> work <strong>in</strong> residence, will be granted <strong>the</strong> B. S. degree,<br />

provided <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> additional year completes <strong>the</strong> degree re-<br />

quirements as stated on page 62. The college will grant <strong>the</strong> B. S.<br />

degree to a student who, after complet<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> three-year course<br />

with two additional credits (which may consist <strong>of</strong> credit for<br />

student activities, see page 64), has successfully completed a year<br />

<strong>of</strong> work at an approved <strong>in</strong>stitution giv<strong>in</strong>g work suitable for de-<br />

grees <strong>in</strong> public health.<br />

In order to qualify for a degree <strong>in</strong> this course or to be recommended<br />

for admission to ano<strong>the</strong>r school a student must have a<br />

grade <strong>of</strong> 83 or higher <strong>in</strong> at least half <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> credits earned at this<br />

college.<br />

Public Health Course<br />

For m<strong>in</strong>imum degree requirements see page 63<br />

First Major: Chemistry<br />

Second Major: Biology<br />

Or M<strong>in</strong>ors: Biology <strong>and</strong> related subjects<br />

First Year (Same as for Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Science)<br />

(See page 134)<br />

Second Year (Same as for Pre-Medical)<br />

(See page 147)<br />

Third Year<br />

First Semester Second Semester<br />

Credits Credits<br />

Biology 301 5 Biology 302 5<br />

Chemistry 5 Chemistry 5<br />

Modern Language 3 English 3<br />

English 3 Psychology 3<br />

Government 3<br />

19<br />

16


Special Courses 149<br />

DEGREE OF B. S. IN PHARMACY (Medical <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong><br />

Virg<strong>in</strong>ia)<br />

The degree <strong>of</strong> Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Science <strong>in</strong> Pharmacy is <strong>of</strong>fered by<br />

<strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Pharmacy <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Medical <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> Virg<strong>in</strong>ia <strong>in</strong><br />

co-operation with <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> for one year<br />

<strong>of</strong> work at this college <strong>and</strong> three years <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Pharmacy.<br />

(Beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g with <strong>the</strong> year 1925-26, c<strong>and</strong>idates for <strong>the</strong> degree <strong>of</strong> Ph.<br />

G. at <strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Pharmacy are required to pursue a three-year<br />

curriculum <strong>in</strong>stead <strong>of</strong> two years, as heret<strong>of</strong>ore). C<strong>and</strong>idates for<br />

<strong>the</strong> degree <strong>of</strong> B. S. <strong>in</strong> Pharmacy are required to take, <strong>in</strong> addition<br />

to <strong>the</strong> three years <strong>of</strong> work at <strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Pharmacy, one year <strong>of</strong><br />

academic college work. This academic work must <strong>in</strong>clude six<br />

semester hours <strong>of</strong> English <strong>and</strong> six semester hours <strong>of</strong> Ma<strong>the</strong>matics.<br />

The additional courses listed below are recommended.<br />

Academic Year at <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

First Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 101 3<br />

Math. 101 3<br />

Biology 101 5<br />

History 101 3<br />

Modern Language 101 3<br />

Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g 101 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 102 3<br />

Math. 102 3<br />

Biology 202 5<br />

Psychology 201 3<br />

Modern Language 102 3<br />

Physical Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g 102 1<br />

18 18<br />

BACHELOR OF CHEMISTRY COURSE<br />

The <strong>in</strong>dustries are call<strong>in</strong>g for men <strong>and</strong> women tra<strong>in</strong>ed <strong>in</strong> chem-<br />

istry to compete with foreign research. The teach<strong>in</strong>g pr<strong>of</strong>ession<br />

is also dem<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g teachers better tra<strong>in</strong>ed <strong>in</strong> science. To supply this<br />

need <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong> has decided to <strong>of</strong>fer a special<br />

degree <strong>in</strong> chemistry. The work has been carefully planned with <strong>the</strong><br />

idea <strong>in</strong> view <strong>of</strong> mak<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> student familiar with <strong>the</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard<br />

methods <strong>of</strong> attack<strong>in</strong>g <strong>and</strong> solv<strong>in</strong>g chemical problems.


150 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

First Semester<br />

Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry<br />

Credits<br />

Chem. 101 5<br />

History 101 3<br />

Mech. Draw 3<br />

English 101 3<br />

Math. 101 3<br />

Phys. Tra<strong>in</strong>. 101 1<br />

First Semester<br />

First Year<br />

18<br />

Credits<br />

Chem. 203 5<br />

Physics<br />

Biology }<br />

opt.<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Psychology 3<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

First Semester<br />

Second Year<br />

17<br />

Credits<br />

Chem. 301 5<br />

Physics<br />

opt.<br />

Biology<br />

Foods Lab 3<br />

English 3<br />

Third Year<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Chem. 102 5<br />

Gov. 102 3<br />

Math. 102 3<br />

Eng. 102 3<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Phys. Tra<strong>in</strong>. 102 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

18<br />

Credits<br />

Chem. 204 5<br />

Phyysics<br />

Biology<br />

Mod. Lang 3<br />

Chem. 308 5<br />

Physical Education 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

19<br />

Credits<br />

Chem. 302 5<br />

English 3<br />

Chem. Opt 5<br />

Physical Ed 2<br />

16 15


First Semester<br />

Special Courses 151<br />

Credits<br />

Chem. 401 5<br />

Major Chem 5<br />

Math.<br />

Cliem.<br />

Phys.<br />

Biology<br />

opt.<br />

:<br />

Fourth Year<br />

15<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Gov 3<br />

Chem. Major 5<br />

Opt. Chem 5<br />

Term Paper. 13<br />

The requirements for Bachelor <strong>of</strong> Chemistry degree may be summed<br />

up as follows<br />

Chemistry required (two majors)<br />

63<br />

Math. (6)<br />

English (12)<br />

Gov. (6)<br />

2 Draw<strong>in</strong>g<br />

History (3)<br />

Mod. Lang. (9)<br />

Psychology (3)<br />

Phys. Ed. (2)<br />

20 Optionals which may be chosen entirely or <strong>in</strong> part from<br />

126<br />

Ma<strong>the</strong>matics, Biology, Physics <strong>and</strong> Chemistry, provided<br />

<strong>the</strong>y <strong>in</strong>clude ten semester credits <strong>in</strong> Biology or Physics.<br />

Suggested Course Lead<strong>in</strong>g to B. S. Degree, with Major <strong>in</strong><br />

Physical Education<br />

(For m<strong>in</strong>imum degree requirements, see page 63)<br />

Second M<strong>in</strong>or :<br />

First M<strong>in</strong>or <strong>in</strong> Biology<br />

Elective <strong>in</strong> related subject<br />

For Freshman Year see page 134


152 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

First Semester<br />

Sophomore Year<br />

Credits<br />

Biology 101 5<br />

English 201 3<br />

Language 201 3<br />

Psychology 201 3<br />

Physical Education 201 2<br />

First Semester<br />

16<br />

Credits<br />

Education 301 3<br />

Government 201 3<br />

Physical Education 301 1<br />

Physical Education 303 1<br />

Physical Education 305 1<br />

Biology 303 3<br />

Biology 305 3<br />

First Semester<br />

Junior Year<br />

15<br />

Credits<br />

Physical Education 307 3<br />

Physical Education 407 3<br />

Physical Education 409 2<br />

Physical Education 401 2<br />

Physical Education 403 2<br />

Physical Education 405 2<br />

Elective (non-tech.) 3<br />

Senior Year<br />

Second Semester<br />

Credits<br />

English 202 3<br />

Language 202 3<br />

Education 202 3<br />

Biology 302 5<br />

Physical Education 202 2<br />

Second Semester<br />

16<br />

Credits<br />

Education 404 3<br />

Biology 304 5<br />

Physical Education 302 1<br />

Physical Education 304 1<br />

Physical Education 306 1<br />

Physical Education 308 1<br />

Physical Education 310 3<br />

Second Semester<br />

15<br />

Credits<br />

Physical Education 402 2<br />

Physical Education 404 2<br />

Physical Education 406 2<br />

Physical Education 410 3<br />

Physical Education 412 3<br />

Physical Education 414 2<br />

Elective (non-tech. -<br />

) 3<br />

17 17


RICHMOND SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK AND<br />

PUBLIC HEALTH<br />

Frankl<strong>in</strong> <strong>and</strong> Shafer Streets<br />

RICHMOND, VA.<br />

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION<br />

Julian Alv<strong>in</strong> Carroll Ch<strong>and</strong>ler, Ph. D., LL. D., President, <strong>College</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>.<br />

Henry Horace Hibbs, A. M., Ph. D., Director, School <strong>of</strong> Social<br />

Work <strong>and</strong> Public Health.<br />

FACULTY<br />

Havilah Babcock, M. A., English.<br />

Martha Barksdale, A. B., Physical Education.<br />

Marian Bjorhus, A. B., Recreation <strong>and</strong> Community Work.<br />

Harvey D. Coghill, Abnormal Psychology.<br />

Emily Isabel Elliott, R. N., Public Health Nurs<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Roy K. Flannagan, M. D., Preventive Medic<strong>in</strong>e.<br />

R. F<strong>in</strong>ley Gayle, M. D., Mental Elygiene.<br />

Joseph Roy Geiger, Ph. D., Psychology.<br />

H. H. Hibbs, Jr., Ph. D., Sociology.<br />

Arthur W. James, A. B., Rural Social Work.<br />

Henry C. Krebs, B. S., M. A., Methods <strong>of</strong> Teach<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Leone Reaves, B. S., Child Welfare <strong>and</strong> Parenthood.<br />

Ella W. Thomas, Physical Education.<br />

Luella Townley, A. B., A. M., Social Case Work.<br />

Florence Van Deren Whipple, R. N., Public Health Nurs<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Juanita Woods, R. N., Public Health Nurs<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

Mrs. Frank D. Woodworth, Dramatics—Public Speak<strong>in</strong>g.


154 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

GENERAL INFORMATION*<br />

The School <strong>of</strong> Social Work <strong>and</strong> Public Health <strong>in</strong> Richmond was<br />

organized <strong>in</strong> 1917, for <strong>the</strong> purpose <strong>of</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g social workers, public<br />

health nurses, child welfare workers, leaders <strong>and</strong> teachers <strong>of</strong> recrea-<br />

tion, physical education <strong>and</strong> community work.<br />

In 1919 <strong>the</strong> School became affiliated with <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong><br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>. With <strong>the</strong> session, beg<strong>in</strong>n<strong>in</strong>g September 22, 1925, <strong>the</strong><br />

School was taken over entirely by <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>and</strong> ma<strong>in</strong>ta<strong>in</strong>ed <strong>in</strong><br />

Richmond as a part <strong>of</strong> its regular work.<br />

Major Subjects. The tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g courses <strong>of</strong>fered are divided <strong>in</strong>to<br />

three groups or majors, as follows:<br />

I. General Social Work, <strong>in</strong>clud<strong>in</strong>g Child Welfare Work.<br />

II. Recreation, Physical Education <strong>and</strong> Community Work.<br />

III. Public Health Nurs<strong>in</strong>g.<br />

The third course, public health nurs<strong>in</strong>g, is open only to graduate<br />

nurses. Courses I <strong>and</strong> II are open to college <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r qualified<br />

students under conditions described later. It is not necessary for<br />

students to decide at time <strong>of</strong> admission whe<strong>the</strong>r <strong>the</strong>y will major<br />

<strong>in</strong> general social work, child welfare, or recreation, physical edu-<br />

cation <strong>and</strong> community work. This decision can be made at <strong>the</strong><br />

end <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> student's first four montbs <strong>of</strong> study <strong>in</strong> Richmond. A<br />

wiser decision can <strong>of</strong>ten be made after this experience.<br />

Field Work. Tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g for <strong>the</strong>se positions cannot be given by<br />

lectures, read<strong>in</strong>gs or class work alone. These methods <strong>of</strong> study<br />

must be supplemented by actual practical work under supervision.<br />

Supervised practice work, <strong>the</strong>refore, or field work, as it is called,<br />

constitutes an important part <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g at <strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> So-<br />

cial Work <strong>and</strong> Public Health. The pr<strong>of</strong>essional tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g is given<br />

<strong>in</strong> Richmond, ra<strong>the</strong>r than at <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg, because<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> large number <strong>of</strong> social, health, educational <strong>and</strong> community<br />

agencies available.<br />

Build<strong>in</strong>gs. Co<strong>in</strong>cident with <strong>the</strong> tak<strong>in</strong>g over <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> School by<br />

*A separate bullet<strong>in</strong> describ<strong>in</strong>g <strong>the</strong> work <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> School <strong>of</strong> Sucial Work<br />

<strong>and</strong> Public Health <strong>in</strong> Richmond will be sent on request to <strong>the</strong> director at<br />

<strong>the</strong> Richmond <strong>of</strong>fice.


Special Courses 155<br />

<strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> order to provide for <strong>the</strong> enlargement <strong>of</strong> its<br />

work, <strong>the</strong> Board <strong>of</strong> Trustees <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> Richmond School <strong>of</strong> Social<br />

Work <strong>and</strong> Public Health, Incorporated, <strong>the</strong> body which has f<strong>in</strong>anced<br />

<strong>and</strong> operated <strong>the</strong> School s<strong>in</strong>ce 1917, has purchased as a permanent<br />

home for <strong>the</strong> school, <strong>the</strong> extensive property located on <strong>the</strong> south-<br />

east corner <strong>of</strong> Frankl<strong>in</strong> <strong>and</strong> Shafer Streets, across Shafer Street<br />

from <strong>the</strong> Richmond Public Library.<br />

There are two build<strong>in</strong>gs on <strong>the</strong> property at present, a large<br />

brick three-story-<strong>and</strong>-basement structure with twenty-five rooms<br />

<strong>and</strong> a smaller story-<strong>and</strong>-a-half brick build<strong>in</strong>g, 36 by 50 feet, front-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g on Shafer Street.<br />

The first floor <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> ma<strong>in</strong> build<strong>in</strong>g will be used for class-rooms<br />

<strong>and</strong> <strong>of</strong>fices <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> second <strong>and</strong> third floors for a dormitory. The<br />

build<strong>in</strong>g front<strong>in</strong>g on Shafer Street will be remodeled <strong>and</strong> used<br />

for an assembly hall <strong>and</strong> gymnasium.<br />

There is also a vacant lawn 50 feet by 165 feet, upon which an<br />

additional build<strong>in</strong>g will be constructed later. In <strong>the</strong> meantime, <strong>the</strong><br />

lawn is used as a playground.<br />

Dormitory Facilities. In <strong>the</strong> new location it will be possible<br />

for <strong>the</strong> school to provide dormitory accommodations for twenty-five<br />

additional students. Information about rates <strong>and</strong> dormitory facili-<br />

ties is given <strong>in</strong> a separate circular which will be sent on request.<br />

COURSES OF STUDY—I: GENERAL SOCIAL WORK<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> courses <strong>in</strong> General Social Work is to pro-<br />

vide tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g for positions as secretaries <strong>and</strong> visitors <strong>of</strong> associated<br />

charities <strong>and</strong> family welfare societies, county super<strong>in</strong>tendents <strong>of</strong><br />

public welfare <strong>and</strong> rural social workers, travelers aid workers, so-<br />

cial workers with churches <strong>and</strong> for o<strong>the</strong>r positions <strong>in</strong> which gen-<br />

eralized tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> social service is necessary.<br />

This department, supplemented by <strong>the</strong> courses <strong>in</strong> Child Welfare,<br />

described on page 165, <strong>and</strong> <strong>the</strong> courses <strong>in</strong> Recreation <strong>and</strong> Commun-<br />

ity Work, described on page 158, also <strong>of</strong>fers tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g for positions<br />

as probation <strong>of</strong>ficers <strong>and</strong> juvenile court workers, school visitors,<br />

agents <strong>of</strong> societies for prevention <strong>of</strong> cruelty to children, visitors for<br />

children's home societies, state <strong>and</strong> national children's bureaux,


156 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

super<strong>in</strong>tendents, teachers <strong>and</strong> matrons <strong>of</strong> children's <strong>in</strong>stitutions, <strong>in</strong>-<br />

dustrial schools, orphan's homes, teachers <strong>of</strong> child study <strong>and</strong> child<br />

welfare, etc.<br />

Salaries <strong>and</strong> Open<strong>in</strong>gs. Salaries <strong>of</strong> social workers with general<br />

tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g vary from $1,080 to $1,500 to beg<strong>in</strong>, depend<strong>in</strong>g somewhat<br />

on education <strong>and</strong> previous experience. Salaries <strong>of</strong> graduates <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong><br />

school after experience <strong>in</strong> social work are <strong>of</strong> course larger.<br />

Entrance Requirements: Length <strong>of</strong> Courses. Three programs<br />

<strong>of</strong> study are <strong>of</strong>fered<br />

:<br />

1. A four-year college course lead<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> A. B. or B. S.<br />

degree. The Freshman <strong>and</strong> Sophomore years <strong>of</strong> this program are<br />

given entirely at <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> at <strong>William</strong>sburg. The second two<br />

years, Junior <strong>and</strong> Senior, are given by <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>in</strong> Richmond.<br />

The requirements for admission to this course are <strong>the</strong> usual re-<br />

quirements for admission to <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong>, namely, graduation from<br />

an accredited four-year public high school with sixteen units or<br />

from an accredited four-year private secondary school with sixteen<br />

units. Full <strong>in</strong>formation about entrance requirements are set forth<br />

<strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> catalogue.<br />

Students who have had one or two years' work <strong>in</strong> ano<strong>the</strong>r ac-<br />

credited <strong>in</strong>stitution will be given advanced st<strong>and</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> four-year<br />

course <strong>and</strong> will be accepted, upon approval <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> president, as can-<br />

didates for a degree. But all such students before receiv<strong>in</strong>g a de-<br />

gree must have completed one full year <strong>of</strong> academic work at <strong>the</strong><br />

<strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>.<br />

2. A tivo-year program open to students <strong>of</strong> mature age. who by<br />

reason <strong>of</strong> study <strong>in</strong> some o<strong>the</strong>r college, normal school or o<strong>the</strong>r edu-<br />

cational <strong>in</strong>stitution <strong>of</strong> college grade, or by reason <strong>of</strong> experience <strong>in</strong><br />

scial work or teach<strong>in</strong>g, are able to demonstrate to <strong>the</strong> satisfaction<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> entrance committee <strong>the</strong>ir ability to pr<strong>of</strong>it by <strong>the</strong> work <strong>and</strong> to<br />

become successful social workers. Such special students will not<br />

be accepted as c<strong>and</strong>idates for degrees, but, if <strong>the</strong>ir work is satis-<br />

factory, will be given a certificate <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> work done <strong>and</strong> recommended<br />

for positions.<br />

3. A one-year graduate pr<strong>of</strong>essional course, open to college


Special Courses 157<br />

graduates who have had a sufficient amount <strong>of</strong> work <strong>in</strong> economics,<br />

sociology, political science, psychology, education <strong>and</strong> similar sub-<br />

jects.<br />

Suggested Outl<strong>in</strong>e <strong>of</strong> a Four-Year <strong>College</strong> Course<br />

Freshman Year (<strong>in</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg)<br />

Same subjects as recommended <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> catalogue, i. e.,<br />

usual Freshman subjects.<br />

Sophomore Year (<strong>in</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg)<br />

Same subjects as recommended <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> catalogue, <strong>in</strong>-<br />

clud<strong>in</strong>g psychology, economics, <strong>and</strong> education.<br />

Junior Year (<strong>in</strong> Richmond)<br />

First Semester<br />

Second Semester<br />

Semester<br />

Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Sociology 2<br />

Social Case Methods 3<br />

Social Institutions 2<br />

Psychology or elective 2<br />

Field Work (16 hrs.) 7<br />

Senior Year<br />

First Semester<br />

Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Economics or elective 2<br />

Mental Hygiene '. 2<br />

Child Welfare <strong>and</strong> Parenthood<br />

2<br />

Rural Social Work 1<br />

Sem<strong>in</strong>ar <strong>in</strong> Social Case<br />

Work 2<br />

Field Work (2 days) 7<br />

Credits<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>ued 2<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>ued 3<br />

Preventive Medic<strong>in</strong>e 1<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>ued 2<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>ued 7<br />

Elective 1<br />

16 16<br />

16<br />

(<strong>in</strong> Richmond)<br />

Second Semester<br />

Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>ued 2<br />

Abnormal Psychology 2<br />

Child Welfare <strong>and</strong> Parenthood<br />

2<br />

Social Legislation 1<br />

Publicity <strong>and</strong> Adm<strong>in</strong>istra-<br />

tion 2<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>ued 7<br />

16


158 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

Students are advised to elect some <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> courses <strong>in</strong> recreation<br />

<strong>and</strong> community work, described on page 158.<br />

Suggested Outl<strong>in</strong>e for a Two-Year Program<br />

(a) Special students <strong>of</strong> mature age accepted for <strong>the</strong> two-year<br />

program <strong>of</strong> pr<strong>of</strong>essional work given <strong>in</strong> Richmond <strong>and</strong> (b) students<br />

who have completed two years' work <strong>in</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r colleges pursue prac-<br />

tically <strong>the</strong> same courses as suggested for <strong>the</strong> junior <strong>and</strong> senior years<br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> four-year course.<br />

Suggested One-Year Graduate Program. This program, which<br />

is open to graduates <strong>of</strong> st<strong>and</strong>ard colleges <strong>and</strong> to seniors <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong><br />

<strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>, comprises 11 hours per week class work<br />

<strong>and</strong> two days (7 credits), field work, a total <strong>of</strong> 18 credits per<br />

semester. The class work <strong>in</strong>cludes : Sem<strong>in</strong>ar <strong>in</strong> Case Work, Social<br />

Case Methods, Mental Hygiene, Abnormal Psychology. Rural<br />

Social Work <strong>and</strong> Social Legislation.<br />

II<br />

RECREATION, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND<br />

COMMUNITY WORK<br />

The purpose <strong>of</strong> this department is to tra<strong>in</strong> students for two<br />

types <strong>of</strong> positions<br />

Group I: Community Work. Supervisors <strong>and</strong> directors <strong>of</strong><br />

play, games, story tell<strong>in</strong>g, dramatics, athletics <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r forms <strong>of</strong><br />

recreation <strong>and</strong> play <strong>in</strong> playgrounds, community centers <strong>and</strong> settle-<br />

ments, summer camps, <strong>in</strong> boys' <strong>and</strong> girls' clubs, community churches,<br />

factories, stores, mill villages, Y. W. C. A.'s, k<strong>in</strong>dergartens, orphan-<br />

ages, <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r community agencies.<br />

Group II : Physical Education <strong>in</strong> Schools. Teachers <strong>of</strong> physi-<br />

cal education <strong>and</strong> recreation <strong>in</strong> private <strong>and</strong> public schools. This<br />

work is given <strong>in</strong> co-operation with <strong>the</strong> Department <strong>of</strong> Physical<br />

Education at <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong>. Students plann<strong>in</strong>g<br />

to teach <strong>in</strong> high schools should usually plan <strong>the</strong>ir course so that<br />

<strong>the</strong>y will be able when necessary to teach some academic subject,<br />

as English, <strong>in</strong> addition to <strong>the</strong> teach<strong>in</strong>g <strong>of</strong> physical education <strong>and</strong>


Special Courses 159<br />

<strong>the</strong> supervision <strong>of</strong> athletics, dramatics, recreation <strong>and</strong> o<strong>the</strong>r student<br />

activities.<br />

The dist<strong>in</strong>ction between <strong>the</strong> positions described <strong>in</strong> Group I <strong>and</strong><br />

Group II lies <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> fact that <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> latter case, <strong>the</strong> employ<strong>in</strong>g<br />

agency is a school, while <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> former, employment is by a community<br />

agency such as those named. The k<strong>in</strong>d <strong>of</strong> tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g required<br />

is essentially <strong>the</strong> same, <strong>the</strong> chief difference ly<strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> fact that<br />

more tra<strong>in</strong><strong>in</strong>g <strong>in</strong> formal gymnastics <strong>and</strong> <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>the</strong>ory <strong>of</strong> physical<br />

education is required <strong>of</strong> teachers.<br />

Salaries <strong>and</strong> Open<strong>in</strong>gs: The dem<strong>and</strong> for tra<strong>in</strong>ed women for<br />

positions <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong>se fields is <strong>in</strong>creas<strong>in</strong>g rapidly. Salaries range from<br />

$800.00 to $1,400.00 per year to beg<strong>in</strong>, depend<strong>in</strong>g on <strong>the</strong> maturity<br />

<strong>and</strong> previous experience <strong>of</strong> <strong>the</strong> student.<br />

fered :<br />

Length <strong>of</strong> Courses: The follow<strong>in</strong>g programs <strong>of</strong> study are <strong>of</strong>-<br />

I. Four-year college course lead<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> A. B. degree. This<br />

work is given partly <strong>in</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg <strong>and</strong> partly <strong>in</strong> Richmond.<br />

II. Two-year pr<strong>of</strong>essional course lead<strong>in</strong>g to a certificate. This<br />

work is given entirely <strong>in</strong> Richmond.<br />

III. One-year pr<strong>of</strong>essional course open to college graduates<br />

<strong>and</strong> given entirely <strong>in</strong> Richmond.<br />

The Four-Year Program Lead<strong>in</strong>g to a Degree: To complete<br />

<strong>the</strong> full course <strong>of</strong> study lead<strong>in</strong>g to <strong>the</strong> A. B. or B. S. degree, four<br />

academic years' work above high school are required.<br />

Freshman Year (<strong>in</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg)<br />

Same subjects as recommended <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> catalogue, i. e.,<br />

usual Freshman subjects.<br />

Sophomore Year (<strong>in</strong> <strong>William</strong>sburg)<br />

Same subjects as recommended <strong>in</strong> <strong>the</strong> <strong>College</strong> catalogue. Stu-<br />

dents should take courses <strong>in</strong> economics <strong>and</strong> physical education as<br />

electives. They should also take a course <strong>in</strong> education.


160 <strong>College</strong> <strong>of</strong> <strong>William</strong> <strong>and</strong> <strong>Mary</strong><br />

First Semester<br />

Junior Year (<strong>in</strong> Richmond)<br />

Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Sociology 2<br />

Mental Hygiene 2<br />

Physiology, Hygiene <strong>and</strong><br />

Anatomy 3<br />

Child Study 1<br />

Social Institutions 1<br />

History <strong>and</strong> Pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong><br />

Physical Education 2<br />

First year practice : Ath-<br />

letics, gymnastics, games,<br />

swimm<strong>in</strong>g, folk danc<strong>in</strong>g<br />

(8 hours) 4<br />

Field Work: (Practice)<br />

<strong>in</strong> settlements, play-<br />

grounds, community cen-<br />

ters, etc. (2 hours) 1<br />

Second Semester<br />

Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Cont<strong>in</strong>ued 2<br />

H<strong>and</strong>work 1<br />

Physiology, Hygiene <strong>and</strong><br />

Anatomy 3<br />

Child Study 1<br />

Story Tell<strong>in</strong>g 1 1<br />

Technic <strong>of</strong> Coach<strong>in</strong>g, Teach-<br />

<strong>in</strong>g, Officiat<strong>in</strong>g 2<br />

First year practice: Con-<br />

t<strong>in</strong>ued (8 hours) 2<br />

Field Work : Cont<strong>in</strong>ued (4<br />

hours) 2<br />

16 16


First Semester<br />

Special Courses 161<br />

Senior Year (<strong>in</strong> Richmond)<br />

Semester<br />

Credits<br />

Pr<strong>in</strong>ciples <strong>of</strong> Teach<strong>in</strong>g 2<br />

Organization <strong>and</strong> Adm<strong>in</strong>istration<br />

I : Community<br /&