Course Offering Book 2011-2012 - J. Sterling Morton High School ...

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Course Offering Book 2011-2012 - J. Sterling Morton High School ...

MORTON ALTERNATIVE

SCHOOL

J. STERLING MORTON

HIGH SCHOOLS

DISTRICT 201

MORTON FRESHMAN

CENTER

COURSE OFFERING BOOK

2013-2014

MORTON WEST CAMPUS

MORTON EAST CAMPUS


Mr. Joseph Keating, Vice President

Mr. Mark D. Kraft, Member

Dr. Margaret Kelly, Member

BOARD OF EDUCATION

Mr. Jeffry Pesek, President

Ms. Jessica Jaramillo-Flores, Secretary

Ms. Laura Salazar, Member

Mr. Michael A. Iniquez, Member

DISTRICT

Dr. Michael Kuzniewski, Superintendent

Mr. Timothy Truesdale, Assistant Superintendent of Educational Programs

Ms. Cathy Johnson, Chief Financial Officer

Ms. Roxana Sanders, Director of Human Resources

Mr. Keith Beisman, Director of Science

Ms. Nicole Ebsen, Director of Athletics, Physical Education, Health, Dance, and Driver Education

Mr. Anthony Grazzini, Director of Social Science/Fine Arts

Mr. Jason Hlavacs, Director of Career and Technical Education/Media Services

Ms. Mary O’Sullivan, Director of Mathematics

Dr. Michael Parrie, Director of Student Success and Accountability

Dr. Ramona Stavros, Director of Special Education

Mr. Timothy Truesdale, Director of ELL/Bilingual/Modern Language

Mr. Fred Ulrich, Director of English/Reading

SCHOOLS

East Campus West Campus Alternative School Freshman Center

Principal Principal Principal Principal

Mr. Frank Zarate Mr. Joseph Gunty Mr. Rudy Hernandez Ms. Mayra Barahona-Arroyo

2423 South Austin Blvd. 2400 South Home Ave. 1874 South 54 th Ave. 1801 South 55 th Ave.

Cicero, IL 60804 Berwyn, IL 60402 Cicero, IL 60804 Cicero, IL 60804

(708) 780-4000 (708) 780-4100 (708) 780-4080 (708) 863-7900

IMPORTANT INFORMATION

J. Sterling Morton supports specific grade level definitions based upon credits earned rather than social promotion.

Definitions are as follows:

Grade Level

Freshman

Sophomore

Junior

Senior

Units of Credit

Less than 5 credits

5 – 9.5 credits

10 – 14.5 credits

15 or more credits

Students electing to enroll in a program which is offered only at one campus will have the option of:

Transferring enrollment to that campus --OR-- dividing their day between both campuses

Transportation will be provided by the district.

STUDENT RECORDS

J. Sterling Morton shall maintain student permanent records for not less than 60 years after the student has

transferred, graduated or withdrawn. Permanent records include: transcript of grades, student's name, birth date,

address, grades, parents' name and attendance records.

J. Sterling Morton shall maintain student temporary records no longer than five years. Temporary records include:

test scores, disciplinary records, teacher evaluations and family background information.

All course opportunities are offered without regard to race, color, national origin, sex or disability.


J. STERLING MORTON HIGH SCHOOL DISTRICT 201

VISION

J. Sterling Morton High School District 201 educates all students to meet or exceed the

standards of learning by providing educational experiences that challenge, engage, and

empower them to be productive members of the global community.

MISSION

Every student succeeds.

CORE BELIEFS

We believe

all students are learners and we accept the responsibility for their learning














the student’s physical, social, and emotional wellness is achieved within a safe,

supportive learning environment

a standards-based curriculum, relevant to students and the community, is essential for

student achievement and leads to post-secondary opportunities

current technology, aligned to best practice instruction, enhances student learning

faculty and staff are engaged in continuing and meaningful professional development

connected to sustained district initiatives

ongoing formative assessment directs instruction that is differentiated and student

centered

the climate of value and respect in each building is characterized by high morale and

positive attitudes of staff and students

parents are welcomed and necessary partners in the education of their children

working partnerships are developed and shared; decision-making is cultivated among

school, community, and home

resources must be used wisely

the richness of diversity—multicultural and individual—inherent in our district provides

students with knowledge of, and respect for, all individuals and cultures

co-curricular activities enrich the high school experience

effective communication and collaboration are vital for continuous school improvement

and student achievement

our faculty and staff are committed to excellence

Adopted by the Board of Education on September 9, 2009


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Guidance/Career Information ............................................................................................................................... 1

Sample Course Sequence ...................................................................................................................................... 1

Graduation Requirements .................................................................................................................................... 2

Advanced Placement (AP) & Honor Point Courses ............................................................................................ 3-4

NCAA (National College Athletic Association) ...................................................................................................... 4

College Admission Requirements ...................................................................................................................... 4-5

Dual Credit Opportunities .................................................................................................................................. 5-7

Interpretation of Course Listings, Levels .............................................................................................................. 7

English .............................................................................................................................................................. 8-13

Mathematics .................................................................................................................................................. 14-16

Science ........................................................................................................................................................... 17-21

Social Science ................................................................................................................................................. 22-25

Physical Education, Health, Dance & Driver Education ............................................................................... 26-31

Career and Technical Education .................................................................................................................... 32-43

Consumer Education ..................................................................................................................................... 44-47

Fine Arts ......................................................................................................................................................... 48-59

Special Education .......................................................................................................................................... 60-63

English As A New Language and Bilingual Education ................................................................................... 64-68

Modern Language.......................................................................................................................................... 69-71

Alternative School Program .......................................................................................................................... 72-74

Updated 11/1/2012


Subject Area

GUIDANCE/CAREER INFORMATION

The Morton Guidance Department provides services to help students develop educationally, socially and vocationally.

Each student is assigned to a counselor who is available to assist in whatever way is necessary to enhance the student's

school experience. Counselors meet individually and in groups with students, parents and teachers as the need arises.

All students will meet with their counselors several times a year.

It is our goal to allow students to self-select into higher level courses should they desire to do so. Counselors will consult

with students regarding prerequisites noted in the COB. Prerequisites in the COB will be considered but are not

definitive.

Morton presents career information through classroom activities and oriented programs planned by the guidance staff.

Students are urged to seek the aid of their counselor who will assist them with college and career decision making.

These guidance services are provided for students:

1. Planning and preparing students' programs for each year in school.

2. Organizing college night conferences.

3. Collecting and organizing material for college entrance and for future employment.

4. Interpreting tests and inventories to develop plans relative to the student's future.

5. Adjusting subject selections and programs to meet changing needs of students.

6. Scheduling conferences with parents to develop workable plans for success in high school.

7. Providing the means for meeting emergencies and to help work out personal problems.

8. Acting as liaison between students, parents, teachers and administrators.

9. Maintaining a current file of data on students in order to aid them in solving educational, social and emotional

problems.

10. Organizing career information meetings.

11. Organizing small group meetings with visiting college representatives.

The Guidance Staff encourages students and parents to use the services available to them through their counselor.

Parents may contact their student's counselor by calling the Guidance Office.

Campus Counseling Contact Phone

Alternative School Steven Swon (708) 780-4080 x 4023

East Erika Medina (708) 780-4000 x 2232

Freshman Center Jody Russe (708) 863-7900 x 1137

West Yolanda Martinez (708) 780-4100 x 3025

TYPICAL FOUR-YEAR COURSE SEQUENCE

Grade

9 10 11 12 Total

English (Core or Honors) 1 1 1 1 4

Math (Core or Honors) 1 1 1 3

Social Studies

(Core or Honors+Consumer Ed) 1 1 0.5 2.5

Science (Core or Honors) 1 1 2

PE/Health 1 1 1 1 4

Elective 2 2.5 4.5

Total 5 5 5 5 20

1


GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Credits (Class of 2013 and Beyond)

Notes

English 4.0

Math 3.0 Algebra I; Geometry

Science 2.0

Social Science 2.0

World History;

US History

Consumer Education or

AP Micro Economics

0.5

PE 3.5

Health 0.5

Flexible Academic Units 4.5

TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED 20.0

Includes 0.25 credit in

Driver’s Education

Must include 1.0

credit of fine arts or

career and technical

education or 2.0

credits of the same

modern language

NOTE: IN ORDER TO GRADUATE, A STUDENT MUST TAKE THE ILLINOIS PRAIRIE STATE ACHIEVEMENT

EXAMINATION (PSAE).

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR ELL STUDENTS

Credits

ELL English 4.0

Bilingual Math 3.0

Bilingual Science 2.0

Bilingual Social Science 2.0

Bilingual Consumer

Education

0.5

PE 3.5

Health 0.5

Flexible Academic Units

(Applied Technology,

Modern Language, Fine

Arts, or ELL Reading 1, 2)

4.5

TOTAL CREDITS REQUIRED 20.0

Notes

World History;

US History

Includes 0.25 credit in

Driver’s Education

Must include 1.0

credit of fine arts or

career and technical

education or 2.0

credits of the same

modern language

2


ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) & HONOR POINT COURSES

ADVANCED PLACEMENT: Admission to the Advanced Placement (AP) program is open to all

students, and requires an additional fee. This program addresses the English, Social Studies,

Mathematics, Science, Modern Languages and Fine Arts. Upon completion of an Advanced

Placement course in any of the fundamental learning areas, students are required to take the

Advanced Placement exam which may earn them credit hours at the college level. Advanced

Placement course sequence options include:

9 th Grade Placement:

Social Studies Math Science

World History-Honors Algebra-Honors Biology-Honors

AP Government & Politics Geometry-Honors Chemistry-Honors

AP Psychology Advanced Algebra-Honors Physics-Honors

AP European History Pre-Calculus-Honors AP Biology

AP American History AP Calculus AP Chemistry

AP Micro Economics AP Statistics AP Environmental Science

English Modern Language Fine Arts

English 1/2-Honors AP French AP Music Theory

English 3/4-Honors Italian 7/8-Honors AP Studio Art

AP English Language & Composition

AP English Literature & Composition

AP Spanish Language

AP Spanish Literature

Grades in the above courses are weighted as follows: A-5; B-4; C-3; D-1

Student Placement and Progression: Honors Programs

Honors Program:

Placement is based on 8 th grade achievement, assessment, and teacher recommendation.

10 th – 12 th Grade Placement:

Honors Program:

a) A student demonstrating success in an Honors class at the current grade level may continue in the

Honors sequence the following year.

b) A student may move from the CORE Program to an Honors class. A student entering Morton after

Freshman year may be placed in the Honors Program based on his/her past performance as indicated on

the transcripts from his/her previous school.

Course Progression: Repeating a failed course during the school day is not allowed. Credit recovery options include Night

School, Summer School, or other Board approved credit recovery. Failure of a “Required Course” demands that either: (a) the

same course must be repeated and passed, or (b) an “Approved Alternative Course” must be passed to earn graduation credit.

3


HONOR ROLL

GOLD HONOR ROLL: Achieved by full-time students who are enrolled in five courses (two and one-half credits),

only one of which may be P.E., and earn a 4.0 or higher grade point average.

SILVER HONOR ROLL: Achieved by full time students who are enrolled in five courses (two and one-half credits),

only one of which may be P.E., and earn a 3.0 to 3.99 grade point average.

Only full-time students are eligible for honor roll and class rank recognition. A full-time student is enrolled in the

equivalent of two and one-half credits per semester (5 courses). Only one-half of the two and one-half credits

may be P.E. A grade of “D” or “E” in any subject including P.E. disqualifies a student from Honor Roll. Questions

regarding Honor Roll should be directed to the advisor of the National Honor Society or a guidance counselor.

Valedictorian and Salutatorian must be full-time students and are selected by year of entry into high school.

COLLEGE ADMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS

The Illinois Board of Higher Education has established statewide minimum admission standards for public colleges

and universities in Illinois. The following high school subjects are recommended for freshmen entering community

colleges and public universities.

Units Subjects

4 English (emphasizing written and oral communications and literature)

3 Social Studies (emphasizing history and government)

3 Mathematics (algebra, geometry, and advanced algebra)

3 Science (laboratory sciences)

2 Modern language, music, art, or career and technical education

Individual public universities and community colleges may have other subject requirements, as well as other test

score and grade point average requirements. Applicants must contact each college or university for details about

all of its requirements. Admission requirements for private colleges and universities vary.

NCAA (National College Athletic Association)

All high school students who wish to practice and compete for a Division I or II institution must register with the

NCAA Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse will determine a student’s initial eligibility status for all

Division I and II institutions by reviewing an official high school transcript and official SAT/ACT scores.

Students may register on-line at www.NCAACLEARINGHOUSE.net.

COLLEGE ADMISSIONS STANDARDS

ADMISSION STANDARD

RECOMMENDED ACT COMPOSITE

OPEN - All graduates accepted until enrollment capacity is reached. 17-20

LIBERAL - Some freshmen are accepted from the lower half of their high 19-21

school graduating class.

TRADITIONAL - The majority of freshmen accepted are 20-22

in the top 50 percent of their graduating class.

SELECTIVE - The majority of freshmen accepted are in 23-25

the top 25 percent of their graduating class.

HIGHLY SELECTIVE - The majority of freshmen 26-29

accepted are in the top 10 percent of their graduating class.

4


Dual Credit Opportunities

Morton College and Morton High School District 201

Students taking any of these high school courses in the 2013-2014 school year will have the option of signing

up for Dual Credit with Morton College for specified courses in this handbook. College course credit will

appear on the student’s Morton College transcript after successful completion of the Morton High School

course, and the course will also appear on the Morton High School transcript for credit towards High School

graduation.

This Dual Credit agreement is active from October 2011 through September 2014. The agreement is

renewable every three years in fall thereafter, based on High School and College faculty review of course

content.

This Dual credit may apply as a required course in the Career Degree area represented, or may apply as an

elective credit in any other certificate or degree program that Morton College offers.

Knowledge comes from reading, discussing, thinking, and experiencing many things. How much knowledge

we gain and how we use it is up to each individual. Today’s jobs require people who have: solid academics,

technical proficiency, productive work habits, problem solving skills, communication skills, ability to think

logically, and the ability to work in teams.

What Will You Do With What You Are Learning?

Morton High School students can learn about career choices at the school Career Centers. Start with the online

Personal Interest Inventory to find career choices which would be a good fit for you. Then look up details

about careers you might like. You can get started on developing career credentials by taking Dual Credit

classes in High School.

Jump-start your college education and save money!

Taking high school electives that are articulated with the community college can mean employment in a nontraditional

position requiring an A.A.S. Degree or Certificate within two years of graduation from High School.

Participate in the Dual Credit Program with Morton Community College. By enrolling in and successfully

completing the eligible courses, you will be awarded credit on both your high school and Morton College

transcripts at the same time!

Dual Credit Program Benefits:



Earn college and high school credit at the same time

Shorten the amount of time it takes you to complete college graduation requirements

5


Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Morton High School Course

Architectural Drafting 1 & 2

150

A

1

Morton College Course

Architectural Drafting I

(Residential Architecture)

CAD 130

3 semester hours

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Accounting I

150

A

1

Business 102

BUS 102

3 Semester Hours

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Auto 3/4

150

B or better and NATEF

Competency Portfolio

1

Auto 5/6

300

B or better and NATEF

Competency Portfolio

2

CAD 1 and CAD 2

150

A

1

Basic Vehicle Mechanics

ATM 120

80

3 Semester Hours

Brakes

ATM 104

80

3 Semester Hours

AUTOCAD Fundamentals

CAD 100

3 semester hours

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

CAD 3 and CAD 4

150

A

1

Computer Applications I

70

B or better

.5

Fundamentals of Drafting

CAD 101

3 semester hours

Introductions to Windows

CIS 130

16

1 semester hour

6


Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Course Name:

Course Number:

Contact Hours:

Required Grade:

Credits:

Computer Applications 2

70

B or better

.5

Computer Networking I

150

B or better

1

Computer Networking II

150

B or better

1

Child Development 3/4

150

B or better

1

Web Page & Interactive Media Design I

150

B or better

1

Web Page & Interactive Media Design II

150

B or better

1

MS Access I and MS Excel 1

CIS 124 and CIS 142

16 hours each

1 semester hour each

Introduction to Networking

CIS 132

48

3 semester hours

Microsoft Windows Server

CIS 136

96

4 semester hours

Intro to Early Childhood

ECE 110

3 semester hours

Creating a Web Page

CIS 156

16

1 Semester Hour

Internet Applications

CIS 116

80

3 Semester Hour

INTERPRETATION OF COURSE LISTINGS, LEVELS

Under each course name and number, the following information is given:

(1) Offered: Year course --OR-- Semester course

(2) For: Year course may be taken (determined by year in school, not credit status)

09 Freshman

10 Sophomore

11 Junior

12 Senior

(3) Prerequisites: Requirements which must be met prior to taking a course

(4) Fees: Any fee required for the course

(5) Course Description: Summary of course content

7


ENGLISH

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGLISH COURSE SEQUENCES

Honors

Core

Senior Course

Options

FRESHMAN

English 1/2 -

Honors

SOPHOMORE

English 3/4 -

Honors

JUNIOR

AP English:

Language and

Composition

SENIOR

AP English:

Literature and

Composition

FRESHMAN

English 1/2 - Core

SOPHOMORE

English 3/4 - Core

JUNIOR

English 5/6 - Core

SENIOR

Senior Course

Options

SENIOR SEMESTER ELECTIVE

OPTIONS

College Preparatory English

Contemporary Literature

Creative Writing

Humanities

Latin American Literature

Multi-Cultural Themes

Science Fiction

Journalism*

*Must be taken as a year-long

course; fulfills the English

requirement if taken as a Senior;

fulfills an elective requirement if

taken as a Sophomore or Junior.

8


FRESHMAN ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGLISH 1/2—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Placement by 8th Grade Test Score and/or Teacher Recommendation.

Required Textbook: The Language of Literature Grade 09 (McDougal Littell / Houghton Mifflin 2001)


This class is an introduction to reading, writing, listening, and speaking at the high school level. Students work in an

accelerated and in-depth structure to study literature as presented through the novel, short story, drama, poetry and nonfiction.

A variety of reading strategies are used to improve comprehension and examine elements of literature. The writing

process will be reviewed and reinforced. Students will learn fundamental skills such as listening and research strategies.

Special emphasis is placed on test preparation as well as Morton Literacy and Information Literacy Standards. Emphasis is

on higher level writing and reading skills including analysis and evaluation.

ENGLISH 1/2—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Placement by 8th grade Test Scores

Required Textbook: The Language of Literature Grade 09 (McDougal Littell / Houghton Mifflin 2001)

This class is an introduction to reading, writing, literature and speaking at the high school level. A variety of reading

strategies are used to improve comprehension and examine elements of literature in fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama.

The writing process will be reviewed and reinforced. Students will learn fundamental skills such as listening and research.

Special emphasis is placed on test preparation and Morton Literacy and Information Literacy Standards.

SOPHOMORE ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGLISH 3/4—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 10

Prerequisite: (1) Credit for English 1/2-H

--OR--

(2) Appropriate grade in English 1/2 -Core or Teacher Recommendation

Required Textbook: The Language of Literature Grade 10 (McDougal Littell / Houghton Mifflin 2001)


Students work in an accelerated and in-depth structure to study literature presented through the novel, short story, drama,

poetry, and non-fiction. They will examine how the development of theme, character, plot and setting contribute to the

overall impact of literature. Special attention is paid to the Morton Literacy and Information Literacy Standards. Students

will examine general literature, focus on reading, writing, critical thinking, public speaking, grammar, vocabulary

development and research. The emphasis of this course is on higher level writing and reading skills, including analysis

and evaluation. Continued emphasis will be on the development of critical thinking skills and Test prep strategies.

9


ENGLISH 3/4—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 10

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 1/2.

Required Textbook: The Language of Literature Grade 10 (McDougal Littell / Houghton Mifflin 2001)

Students continue to develop reading & writing skills. They will examine how the development of the theme, character,

plot, and setting contribute to the overall impact of literature. Special attention is paid to the Morton Literacy and

Information Literacy Standards. There will be a focus on general literature, reading, writing, critical thinking, public

speaking, grammar, vocabulary development, test prep strategies and research.

JOURNALISM

Offered: Year Course

For: 12 (10 & 11 as a general elective only)

NOTE: Sophomores may take this course as an elective in addition to the English 3/4 class: instructor approval is

required.

Journalism is a senior English class designed to teach students elements of journalistic writing. A major objective of this

course is to contribute to publications such as the school newspaper and yearbook. The class is writing intensive, and the

main goal is to teach students how to write for different media. Students will also spend time discussing and evaluating

the importance of ethical journalistic behavior. Students will also study libel and press laws, photo caption and headline

writing, and mechanical production. Additional hours before and after school will be required to meet deadlines for

finishing the literary publications.

JUNIOR ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

AP ENGLISH: LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

Offered: Year Course

For: 11

Prerequisite:

(1) Credit for English 3/4-H

--OR--

(2) Appropriate grade in English 3/4-Core

Fees: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.


Required Textbook: The Language of Composition (Bedford/St. Martin’s 2008)

The focus of this full-year course is the exploration of American literature. In it, students will continue to develop their

reading and writing skills as they analyze & evaluate works by American authors. Through this study they will discover

ideas to apply in meaningful ways to their own lives & be able to articulate them through written and verbal expression. A

special focus is on the support & defense of a thesis. A Research Paper, which explores an aspect of American

culture, is a MINIMUM REQUIREMENT FOR PASSING the course. In addition students will prepare for the ACT/PSAE

which is administered junior year. Summer readings will be required. Students must check with the appropriate instructor

before the end of the school year. Students may not drop the course once enrolled in it.

10


ENGLISH 5/6—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 11

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 3/4

Fees: The purchase of supplemental readers may be required.

Required Textbook: The Language of Literature: Grade 11 (McDougal Littell / Houghton Mifflin 2001)

The focus of this full-year course is the exploration of American literature. In it, students will continue to develop their

reading and writing skills as they analyze & evaluate works by American authors. Through this study they will discover

ideas to apply in meaningful ways to their own lives & be able to articulate them through written and verbal expression. A

special focus is on the support & defense of a thesis. A Research Paper, which explores an aspect of American

culture, is a MINIMUM REQUIREMENT FOR PASSING the course. In addition students will prepare for the ACT/PSAE

which is administered junior year.

JOURNALISM

Offered: Year Course

For: 12 (10 & 11 as a general elective only)

NOTE: Juniors may take this course as an elective in addition to the English 5/6 or AP English Language class:

instructor approval is required.

Journalism is a senior English class designed to teach students elements of journalistic writing. A major objective of this

course is to contribute to publications such as the school newspaper and yearbook. The class is writing intensive, and the

main goal is to teach students how to write for different media. Students will also spend time discussing and evaluating

the importance of ethical journalistic behavior. Students will also study libel and press laws, photo caption and headline

writing, and mechanical production. Additional hours before and after school will be required to meet deadlines for

finishing the literary publications.

SENIOR ENGLISH COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

AP ENGLISH: LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

Offered: Year Course

For: 12

Prerequisite:

(1) Credit for English 5/6 or AP English Language and Composition

--OR--

(2) Appropriate grade in English 5/6-Core

Fees: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.


Required Textbook: Riverside Reader, 8 th Edition (Houghton Mifflin/Harcourt 2004)

This course continues the work begun in English 5/6 AP-Honors on critical reading of world literature and analytical

writing. This course includes another major research paper. At the conclusion of the year, students should take the

Advanced Placement test in English for college credit. Summer readings are required. Students should check with the

appropriate instructor before the end of the school year. The student may not drop this course once enrolled in it.

11


COLLEGE PREPARATORY ENGLISH

Offered: Semester Only

For: 12

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 5/6.

Fees: Course fee.

Students examine all areas of language arts: reading, writing, speaking, listening, technology, and research. Heavy

emphasis is placed on vocabulary development, critical reading and comprehension strategies, reading rate flexibility, study

skills, preparation for college classes and college writing.

CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE

Offered: Semester Only

For: 12

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 5/6.

Fees: Course fee.

In this semester-long course students will be exposed to a wide variety of contemporary works with an overarching goal of

enhancing reading for enjoyment. By discussing and analyzing theme-based units, these reading intensive courses aim to

promote literacy while aligning evaluative techniques. Through written and oral reflection, students will extrapolate relevant

parallels between their roles as American teenagers and those of society at large.

CREATIVE WRITING

Offered: Semester Only

For: 12

Fees: Course fee.

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 5/6.

Students write poetry, autobiographical pieces and short stories after reading examples from each genre and being

instructed in various creative-writing techniques. The course is designed to be an outlet of self-expression for students as

they explore how they think and feel about a variety of topics and issues. Students will be expected to submit at least

one piece of work for publication or competition.

HUMANITIES

Offered: Semester Only

For: 12

Fees: Course fee.

Students read and write about significant works of world literature. Special emphasis is placed on examining how these

works fit into various cultural, historical and artistic contexts. Students are challenged to make connections between what

they read and various works of artistic merit in the fields of music and visual arts. Students end the semester with a

research project which incorporates their understanding of the course theme and its connection to a significant work of

literature.

12


LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE

Offered: Semester Only

For: 12

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 5/6.

Fees: Course fee.

In this semester-long course students will focus on examining texts by writers of Latin American ancestry. Students will

read and analyze various genres such as fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. The course will develop each student’s

ability to analyze literature and communicate through both written and oral expression as they develop their own

understanding of Latino perspectives.

JOURNALISM

Offered: Year Course

For: 12 (10 & 11 as a general elective only)

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 5/6.

NOTE: Sophomores & Juniors may take this course as a general elective in addition to the English 3/4 or 5/6 class:

instructor approval is required.

Journalism is a senior English class designed to teach students elements of journalistic writing. A major objective of this

course is to contribute to publications such as the school newspaper and yearbook. The class is writing intensive, and the

main goal is to teach students how to write for different media. Students will also spend time discussing and evaluating

the importance of ethical journalistic behavior. Students will also study libel and press laws, photo caption and headline

writing, and mechanical production. Additional hours before and after school will be required to meet deadlines for

finishing the literary publications.

MULTI-CULTURAL THEMES

Offered: Semester Only

For: 12

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 5/6.

Fees: Course fee.

This course presents multicultural themes and perspectives in literature. This multi-cultural literature is writing that

represents the works of marginalized Americans who illustrate the ethnic diversity of America and the cross cultural

experience that is a part of American life. Emphasis is placed on developing a deeper understanding and awareness of

cultural diversity as reflected in contemporary fiction, non-fiction, and other artistic works.

SCIENCE FICTION

Offered: Semester Only

For: 12

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 5/6.

Fees: Course fee.

In this semester English course, students analyze both science fiction literature and non-fiction writings associated with the

literature. Heavy emphasis is placed on critical reading, higher order thinking skills, technology and research.

13


MATHEMATICS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MATHEMATICS COURSE SEQUENCES

8th Grade Math

Performance,

Assessment, and Teacher

Recommendation

8th Grade Algebra

Performance,

Assessment, and Teacher

Recommendation

FRESHMAN

FRESHMAN

FRESHMAN

FRESHMAN

Algebra - Core

Algebra - H

Geometry - Core

Geometry - H

SOPHOMORE

Geometry - Core

SOPHOMORE

Geometry - H

SOPHOMORE

Advanced Algebra - Core

SOPHOMORE

Advanced Algebra - H

JUNIOR

Advanced Algebra - Core

JUNIOR

Advanced Algebra - H

JUNIOR

College Algebra/

Trigonometry

JUNIOR

Pre-Calculus - H

SENIOR

Pre-Calculus or AP

Statistics or College

Algebra/Trigonometry

SENIOR

Pre-Calculus - H or

AP Statistics

SENIOR

AP Statistics

SENIOR

AP Calculus or

AP Statistics

* Students may be able to pursue an accelerated math sequence by participating in a summer bridge program, if

available.

14


MATHEMATICS COURSES

ALGEBRA—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Placement by 8th Grade Test Score and Teacher Recommendation

Required Textbook: Larson, Bowell, Kanold & Stiff (2008) Algebra 1 IL Edition McDougal-Littell


Students in this course study; the structure and properties of the real numbering system, solving and graphing

equations and inequalities. Students in this course will study the same materials as in Algebra, but at a faster pace.

Topics from Advanced Algebra will also be covered. Acceleration and depth-of-study are characteristic of this program.

ALGEBRA—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Placement by 8th Grade Test Score and Teacher Recommendation

Required Textbook: Larson, Bowell, Kanold & Stiff (2008) Algebra 1 IL Edition McDougal-Littell

Students complete algebra as the first course in their mathematics program. Concepts include the structure and

properties of the real number system, solving and graphing equations, inequalities and systems of equations. Linear,

quadratic, exponential functions are also introduced in this course.

GEOMETRY—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 9, 10

Prerequisite: (1) Algebra—Honors & Teacher Recommendation; (2) Qualifying Grades in Algebra—Core, Teacher

Recommendation and Administrative Approval (3) Completion of 8 th Grade Algebra, Appropriate EXPLORE Exam

Score, and 8 th Grade Teacher Recommendation

Required Textbook: Rhoad, Milauskas, and Whipple (1991) Geometry for Enjoyment & Challenge McDougal-

Littell


Students learn the properties of plane and solid figures, geometric constructions, proof and coordinate geometry. They

will study the nature and structure of a logical system. Geometry is generally required for college admission. Students

will work at an accelerated and in-depth pace.

GEOMETRY—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 9, 10

Prerequisite: (1) Previous enrollment in Algebra; (2) Completion of 8 th Grade Algebra, Appropriate EXPLORE Exam

Score, and 8 th Grade Teacher Recommendation

Required Textbook: Bass, Charles, Johnson, Kennedy (2004) Geometry Prentice Hall

Students will learn properties of plane and solid figures, geometric constructions, proof & coordinate geometry. They

will study the nature & structure of a logical system. This course is generally required for college admission.

ADVANCED ALGEBRA—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11

Prerequisite: For 11 th graders: (1) Earned credit in Geometry—Honors and Teacher Recommendation; or (2)

Qualifying grades in Geometry—Core, Teacher Recommendation and Administrative Approval

Required Textbook: East—Holiday (2005) Algebra 2 Glencoe

West—Collins, Cuevas & Foster (1997) Algebra 2 Glencoe


Students will review beginning algebra with an emphasis on the structure of a mathematical system. They will study

additional topics, which include functional relations, exponents, logarithms, progressions, complex numbers,

permutations, combinations and probability. ACT Preparation activities are included. A graphing calculator is integral to

success in this course.

15


ADVANCED ALGEBRA—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Previous Enrollment in Geometry—Core

Required Textbook: East— Holiday (2005) Algebra 2 Glencoe

West—Larson (2001) Algebra 2 Equations McDougal-Littell

Students will review beginning algebra with an emphasis on the structure of a mathematical system. They will study

additional topics which include functional relations, exponents, logarithms, progressions, complex numbers,

permutations, combinations and probability. ACT Preparation activities are included. A TI-Nspire calculator is required.

PRE-CALCULUS—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Earned Credit in Geometry—Honors and Advanced Algebra—Honors and Teacher

Recommendation

Required Textbook: East—Demana, Waits, Foley, Kennedy (2004) Pre-Calculus: Graphical, Numerical,

Algebraic Pearson Addison-Wesley

West—Larson, Edwards, Hostetler (2001) Pre-Calculus with Limits Houghton-Mifflin


Students are introduced to selected topics to include polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic and

trigonometric functions, rectangular, polar and complex numbers; matrices, limits, vectors, probability and statistics.

This course will prepare students for Calculus in high school or college. A graphing calculator is integral to success in

this course. Students who earned credit in College Algebra/Trigonometry cannot earn credit for this course as well.

AP CALCULUS

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Earned Credit in Pre-Calculus—Honors and Teacher recommendation

Fees: Mandatory AP exam fee.

Required Textbook: Finney, Demana, Waits, & Kennedy (2009) AP Calculus Pearson/Prentice Hall 3 rd Edition


In this course, students will prepare for college mathematics and for the Advanced Placement AB exam. The content

includes differentiation and integration of polynomial functions, circular functions, logarithmic functions and exponential

functions. A graphing calculator is highly recommended; the type of graphing calculator is to be determined by the

teacher. Students are required to take the AP exam in May. The test will require an additional fee.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA/TRIGONOMETRY

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in Advanced Algebra

Required Textbook: East—Stewart, Redlin, Watson (2001) Algebra & Trigonometry Brooks & Cole

West—Brown (1997) Advanced Math—Precalculus w/ Discrete Math & Data

Students study advanced topics in algebra and trigonometry. Content includes simultaneous equations, matrices,

inequalities, relations, algebra functions, polynomial equations, transcendental functions, trig functions of acute angles,

trig functions and identities, solutions of triangles, graphing and complex numbers. Emphasis on stats and data is

supported with the graphing calculator. Students earning credit in Pre-Calc cannot take this course for credit as well.

AP STATISTICS

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra

Fees: Mandatory AP exam fee.

Required Textbook: Yates, Moore, Starnes (2008) Practice of Statistics Freeman

AP Statistics introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions

from data. Students are required to take the AP Exam. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes:

1. Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns

2. Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study

3. Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation

4. Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses

16


SCIENCE

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SCIENCE COURSE SEQUENCES

Honors/AP

Core

FRESHMAN

Biology - H

FRESHMAN

Biology - Core

SOPHOMORE

Chemistry - H

SOPHOMORE

Chemistry - Core

Earth Science - Core

JUNIOR OR SENIOR ELECTIVES

Physics - H

AP Biology

AP Chemistry

AP Environmental Science

JUNIOR OR SENIOR ELECTIVES

Physics - Core

Chemistry - Core

Earth Science - Core

Anatomy & Physiology (1 sem)

Astronomy (1 sem)

17


SCIENCE COURSES

BIOLOGY—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Placement by 8 th Grade Test Score & Teacher recommendation.

Required Textbook: Nowicki, S. (2008). Biology. McDougal Littell.

Fee: Course fee.


Students in this accelerated course will develop the understanding of molecular biology, cell theory, genetics, evolution and

ecology. Work will emphasize critical thinking, writing skills, and mathematical analysis of biological data. Students will be

expected to do independent research and more in-depth lab work than in regular biology. This course is accepted for

college preparation in laboratory science.

BIOLOGY—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Required Textbook: Nowicki, S. (2008). Biology. McDougal Littell.

Fee: Course fee.

Students develop an understanding of laws which govern the existence of all life. Student work emphasizes

experimentation, observation and analysis of experimental data. Concepts involving problem solving, cellular biology,

biochemistry, ecology, evolution, reproduction, heredity, plant and animal physiology and the pattern of unity among living

things are also studied. This course is accepted for college preparation in laboratory science.

CHEMISTRY—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 10

Prerequisite: (1) Earned grade of a “C” or better in both Biology—Honors & Algebra 1/2 & Teacher recommendation; (2)

Earned grade of a “B” or better in Biology—Core & earned grade of a “C” or better in Algebra 1/2 or Teacher

recommendation & Administrative approval.

Required Textbook: West—Herron, J. D., et al. Chemistry. (1996). Heath.

East—Wilbraham, A. C., Staley, D. D., and Matta, M. S. Chemistry, 4 th Edition. (1997). Addison-Wesley.

Fee: Course fee.


This accelerated and in-depth course develops an understanding of the principles underlying chemical changes and their

theoretical applications. Work emphasizes critical thinking skills, writing skills, mathematical analysis and the use of

technology. A scientific calculator is essential. This course is accepted for college preparation in laboratory science.

18


CHEMISTRY—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Earned grade of a “C” or better in Algebra 1/2 or in Essentials of Algebra 3/4 or Teacher recommendation

& Administrative approval.

Required Textbook: West—Herron, J. D., et al. Chemistry. (1996). Heath.

East—Wilbraham, A. C., Staley, D. D., and Matta, M. S. Chemistry, 4 th Edition. (1997). Addison-Wesley.

Fee: Course fee.

Students learn the principles underlying chemical changes and their theoretical applications. Laboratory work emphasizes

techniques of observation, analysis of data and formation of conclusions based on data. A scientific calculator is

essential. This course is accepted for college preparation in laboratory science.

EARTH SCIENCE

Offered: Year Course

For: (1) 10 th Grade Core students who have not successfully completed Algebra 1/2 or Essentials of Algebra 3/4; (2)

11 th Grade Core students; (3) 12 th Grade Core Elective.

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in Biology or Physical Science

Required Textbook: Spaulding, N. E., and Namowitz, S. N. (2005). Earth Science. McDougal Littell

Fee: Course fee.

A study of man's physical environment is the central theme of this course. Student work focuses on the study of

minerals, rocks, volcanology, seismology, plate tectonics, hydrology, meteorology, earth history and interpreting earth

science data. This course is accepted for college preparation in laboratory science.

PHYSICS—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: (1) Earned grade of a “C” or better in both Chemistry—Honors & Geometry—Honors & Teacher

recommendation; (2) Earned grade of a “B” or better in Chemistry—Core & earned grade of a “B” or better in Geometry

& Teacher recommendation & Administrative approval.

Required Textbook: Zitzewitz, P. (2005). Physics: Principles and Problems. Glencoe McGraw-Hill.

Fee: Course fee.


This course will develop a more in-depth understanding of various physics concepts. A higher degree of mathematical

analysis, thinking and writing skills will be emphasized. A calculator with trigonometric functions is essential. This course

is accepted for college preparation in laboratory science.

PHYSICS—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Earned grade of a “C” or better in Geometry or Geometry—Honors or Teacher recommendation &

Administrative approval.

Required Textbook: Zitzewitz, P. (2005). Physics: Principles and Problems. Glencoe McGraw-Hill.

Fee: Course fee.

A general introduction to the fundamentals of time, space, forces, motion, wave, heat motion, energy, electricity,

electromagnetism and atomic physics. Physics is essential for college study in engineering, chemistry and the medical

fields. A calculator with trigonometric functions is essential. This course is accepted for college preparation in lab science.

19


AP BIOLOGY

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Chemistry—Honors and Teacher Recommendation

Required Textbook: Campbell, N. A., and Reece, J. B. (2005). Biology, 7 th Edition. Pearson.

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.


Students are able to further their biological knowledge and skills, as well as prepare themselves to take additional courses

of a biological nature in college. Students are introduced to techniques and equipment normally used in general college

biology. Selected topics such as anatomy, physiology, population genetics and cell chemistry are covered in more detail

than is done in Biology. Individual initiative, study and class discussion are expected. (A “B” average in Biology,

Chemistry and Algebra is highly recommended for success in this course.) Students are required to take the AP exam.

AP CHEMISTRY

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra and Chemistry, or Special Assignment by Administrative approval.

Required Textbook: West—Brown, T. L., LeMay, Jr., H. E., and Bursten, B. E. (2006). Chemistry: The Central

Science, 10 th Edition. Pearson.

East—Brown, T. L., LeMay, Jr., H. E., and Bursten, B. E. (2002). Chemistry: The Central Science, 8 th Edition.

Pearson.

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.


Students in Advanced Chemistry cover material similar to a general chemistry course on the college level. Students work

on chemical calculations, mathematical formulation of principles and extensive laboratory experimentation. Students learn to

think clearly and to express their ideas orally and in writing. (A “B” average in Chemistry, Physics, and Advanced

Algebra is highly recommended for success in this course.) Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

AP ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Offered: Year Course

For: 11,12

Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry (or Physical Science), and Algebra; or Teacher Recommendation and Administrative

Approval

Required Textbook: Miller, Jr., G. T., and Spoolman, S. (2009). Living in the Environment: Concepts,

Connections, and Solutions, 16 th Edition. Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.


This college-level course provides students with scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand

the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made,

to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or

preventing them. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

20


ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY

Offered: Semester Course

For: 11,12

Prerequisite: One credit in Biology, minimum grade “C” or consent of instructor.

Required Textbook: Martini, F. H., and Bartholomew, E. F. (2007). Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology, 4 th Edition.

Pearson.

Fee: Course fee.

An in-depth investigation of human structures and functions is the focus of the course. Students will have the opportunity

to explore the integumentary, muscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous, excretory, endocrine and reproductive

systems. Each system will be studied as an integral component of the human body. Concepts about the system are

supported by the integrated laboratory investigations.

ASTRONOMY

Offered: Semester Course

For: 11,12

Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra 1/2, Essentials of Algebra 3/4, or Sophomore Algebra, with at least a “C”.

Required Textbook: Chaisson, E., and McMillan, S. (2008). Astronomy Today, 6 th Edition. Addison-Wesley.

Fee: Course fee.

Students will conduct laboratory investigations, experiments, and actual work in current areas in Astrophysics, Planetary

Geology, and Cosmology. This course is accepted for college preparation in laboratory science. A scientific calculator is

required.

21


SOCIAL SCIENCE

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSE SEQUENCES

Honors/Advanced

Placement

Core

Social Science

Electives

FRESHMAN

World History - H

AP World History

SOPHOMORE

AP European History

FRESHMAN

World History - Core

SOPHOMORE

Social Science Elective

AP European History

AP Psychology

AP Microeconomics (meets

consumer education requirement)

Latin American History

Legislative Semester - H

Modern History

JUNIOR

AP US History

JUNIOR

US History - Core

or

AP US History

SENIOR

Legislative Semester - H

AP Microeconomics

AP Psychology

SENIOR

Social Science Elective

22


SOCIAL SCIENCE REQUIRED COURSES

ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY

Offered: Year Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Placement by 8 th Grade Test Score and Teacher Recommendation

Required Textbook: Earth and Its Peoples: Global History, AP Edition


AP World History is a college-level course offered to 9th grade students who have shown the academic preparedness to

be successful in a rigorous history course. APWH is designed to help students develop greater understanding of the

evolution of global processes and contacts and interactions between different types of human societies. This understanding

is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. The chronological time

frame is from 8000 BCE to the present.

WORLD HISTORY—HONORS

Offered: Year Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Placement by 8th Grade Test Score and Teacher Recommendation

Required Textbook: Beck, R. and Black L. (2003). World History: Patterns of Interaction. McDougal Littel


Students trace the development of civilization from the Classical Period to the Modern Age. They increase their

awareness of man's role in creating the different societies. Focus is on the development of critical thinking skills,

especially analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Students will be introduced to the use of problem-based learning, primary

and secondary source analysis and Document Based Questions.

WORLD HISTORY—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Placement by 8th Grade Test Score and Teacher Recommendation

Required Textbook: Beck, R. and Black L. (2003). World History: Patterns of Interaction. McDougal Littel

Students trace the development of civilization from the Classical Period to the Modern Age and increase their awareness

of man's role in creating the different societies. Students will be introduced to primary and secondary source analysis and

Document Based Questions, Focus is on developing reading, writing, and critical thinking skills.

AP AMERICAN HISTORY

Offered: Year Course

For: 11

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.

Required Textbook: East - Henretta, J, Brody, J, and Dumenil, L (2004). American: A Concise History3rd Edition.

Bedford St Martin

Required Textbook: West - Kennedy, D, Cohen, L. and Bailey, T. (2003). The American Pageant, 12 th Edition.

Houghton Mifflin


Students learn American History through readings and document-based research. Students are required to complete a

research paper or project. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Exam at the end of the year summer

readings are required. Students may not drop the course once enrolled in it.

23


AMERICAN HISTORY—CORE

Offered: Year Course

For: 11

Required Textbook: Dallek, R, Garcia,J, Ogle,D., and C. Risinger, F. (2005). The Americans. McDougal Littel

Students, review, analyze and interpret various forces and values which have shaped and still influence behavior and

events in the United States from the Colonial era to modern times. Students will be introduced to the use of primary and

secondary source analysis and Document Based Questions. Focus is on developing reading, writing, and critical thinking

skills.

SOCIAL SCIENCE ELECTIVES

AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS ~ LEGISLATIVE SEMESTER

Offered: Semester

For: 12

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.

Required Textbook: Remy, R. (2003). United States Government: Democracy in Action. Glencoe, McGraw-Hill

Prerequisite: Earned Credit in American History or concurrent enrollment

This is a semester long simulation of the law-making process in which students learn about the American political system

by debating current laws and proposing their own ideas for laws. This course is for the student who likes more active

learning that includes group work, class discussions and public speaking. Students are required to take the AP exam

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY

Offered: Year Course.

For: 10, 12

Required Textbook: Remy, R. (2008). A History of Western Society Since 1300. Houghton Mifflin

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.


Highly motivated, successful history students study the history, political and economic development and influence of

European countries. At the conclusion of the year, students are required to take the Advanced Placement test in European

History for college credit. Summer readings will be required, so check with the appropriate instructor before the end of the

school year. Students are required to take the AP exam.

AP MICRO ECONOMICS

Offered: Semester Course

For: 12

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.


The purpose of AP Microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of principles of economics that apply to

the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system. Students

learn why individuals, businesses, governments and societies must make choices to get more of the goods and services

they want. Topics include: supply and demand, market clearing prices, starting your own business, the role of the federal

government in the economy, consumerism and personal investment strategies. Students are required to take the AP

exam. This course fulfills the Consumer Education Graduation requirement.

24


AP PSYCHOLOGY

Offered: Year Course.

For: 12

Required Textbook: Meyers, David G. (2004). Psychology 7 th Edition.. Worth

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.


Highly motivated, successful social science students learn psychology though readings and experiments. At the conclusion

of the year, students are required to take the Advanced Placement Test in Psychology for college credit. Summer

readings may be required, so check with the appropriate instructor before the end of the school year. Students are

required to take the AP exam.

LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

Offered: Semester Course.

For: 10, 11, 12

Required Textbook: Sherman, Dennis. (2003). A History of Latin America. Holt-Rinehart

Students will investigate the history of Latin America, the geography of that region, the cultures of that region (both Native

American and the hybrid cultures which emerged after European settlement), and the relationship of this region to the rest

of the world. During the first semester, material from Pre-Columbian times to the year 1900 will be covered. The second

semester will cover Latin America during the 20th Century.

MODERN HISTORY

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Required Textbook: Sherman, Dennis. (2003). Modern World History: The Human Journey. Houghton Mifflin

In this course students will trace history from World War II to the present. World War II, The Cold War, postwar

independence movements, the Vietnam War, developments in Latin America and the Middle East are among the topics

covered. This course also examines the technological and social changes that have taken place since World War II.

Students will gain an understanding of how these events and changes have shaped the world they now live in.

25


PHYSICAL EDUCATION,

HEALTH, DANCE &

DRIVER EDUCATION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSE GROUPINGS

Freshman PE

Sophomore PE

Junior/Senior PE

Freshman Physical

Education

(1 sem)

Sophomore Physical

Education*

Junior/Senior General

Physical Education

Varsity Physical

Education

Health

(1 sem)

Leadership Training*

Junior/Senior

Crosstraining

Lifesaving

(1 sem)

Movement and Dance

(1 or 2 sem)

Dance Studio

(1 or 2 sem)

Movement and Dance*

(1 or 2 sem)

Junior/Senior Physical

Education Leaders

(1 sem)

Lifeguarding (2 sem)

Lifesaving (1 sem)

* denotes student may

be enrolled for driver

education through this

class

26


PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

(Seven Semesters of Physical Education, one semester of Health are required for graduation)

FRESHMAN PHYSICAL

EDUCATION 1/2

Offered: Semester Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Uniform and Lock (school bookstore)

Physical education is a required 4 year subject and is part of the total education which contributes to the development of

the individual through participation in physical activity. Daily practices are provided in a variety of physical activities with

emphasis on basic skill development in individual and team activities, concentration on improved physical fitness and

awareness for the need of lifetime fitness and sport activity. Freshman physical education activities may include:

Swimming, Track & Field, Basketball, Volleyball, Soccer, Weight Training, Cardio Training, and Fitness Testing

SOPHOMORE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3/4

(Includes 9 weeks of Driver Education Classroom)

Offered: 3 quarters

For: 10

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Uniform and Lock (school bookstore)

Physical education is a required 4 year subject and is part of the total education which contributes to the development of

the individual through participation in physical activity. Daily practices are provided in a variety of physical activities with

emphasis on individual lifelong sports, team activities and individual fitness, concentration on improved physical fitness and

awareness for the need of lifetime fitness and sport activity. Sophomore physical education activities may include:

Lifesaving, Life Guarding, Badminton, Pickle-Ball, Ultimate Frisbee, Wrestling, Swimming, Basketball, Flickerball, Floor

Hockey, Soccer, Softball, Team Handball, Touch Football, Volleyball, Weight Training, Cardio Training, and Fitness

Training/Testing. Students will have Physical Education for 27 weeks and Driver Education Classroom for 9 weeks

during the school year.

JR. /SR. PE LEADERSHIP

Offered: Semester Course

For: 11, 12 (may be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: Recommendation by Sophomore Leadership Training Instructor and Asst. Principal.

Fees: PE Uniform and Lock (school bookstore)

Students apply leadership skills learned in Sophomore Leadership Training classes in order to better assist Physical

Education Instructors and students. Students leadership role includes assistance to other students learn and practice

individual sport skills, lead warm-ups, and assist students in technique practice and individual development. Future

opportunities in this program are dependent on Physical Education Instructor recommendation.

27


HEALTH EDUCATION

Offered: Semester Course

For: 9 (10, 11,12 if needed)

Prerequisite: None

Fees: Possible Field Trip Fee (TBA)

Health Education is a one semester course required for graduation. This class raises each student’s health awareness

and will help attain individual health goals. Students will enhance their potential for self, family, and community. The

course consists of the following health topics as required by the state school code: wellness, growth and development,

nutrition, fitness, stress management, non-infectious and infectious disease education (including sexually transmitted

diseases and HIV/AIDS prevention), personal hygiene, consumer health, basic first aid/safety, drug use and abuse,

mental and emotional health, health related careers, career goal setting, and healthy relationships (including abstinence,

dating violence, and child abuse prevention). A variety of class activities, self assessments, videos, and community

resources/speakers are strategically woven throughout the semester to enhance the student’s learning, their lifestyle

choices, and decision making skills. All topics are per parental consent.

JR. / SR. GENERAL PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Offered: Semester Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: PE Uniform and Lock (school bookstore)

Students receive advanced instruction and participate in 1 quarter each of Team and Individual Sport activities which may

include Badminton, Pickle-Ball, Handball, Swimming, and Outdoor Education for the individual sport section and Basketball,

Soccer, Softball, Team Handball, Korfball, and Volleyball for the team sport section. Students will also receive advanced

instruction and application for 2 quarters in lifetime personal fitness programming, which includes Weight Training,

Cardio/Aerobic Training, Fitness Training and Testing.

JR. / SR. VARSITY PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12 Varsity Athletes

Prerequisite: Must be an active Varsity Athlete

Fees: PE Uniform and Lock (school bookstore)

Students receive advanced instruction and participate in 4 quarters in lifetime personal fitness programming, which includes

Weight Training (Muscle Building Methods for Workout Routines), Cardio/Aerobic Training, Fitness Program Development,

& Diet for Training, Performance and Recovery.

SOPHOMORE LEADERSHIP TRAINING

(Includes 9 weeks of Driver Education Classroom)

Offered: 3 Quarters Course

For: 10

Prerequisite: Recommendation by PE/Health Staff or Asst. Principal, and must meet grade point criteria.

Fees: PE Uniform and Lock (school bookstore) & Driver Education fees

Students learn rules, practice skills and proper officiating techniques in sport and activities offered in the Physical

Education Curriculum. The valuable skills learned and practiced will help prepare students for future leadership roles.

Successful completion of this course will advance students to the possible role of Physical Education leader.

28


ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Offered: Assigned by semester or temporary placement

For: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Physician referral and special assignment by the Administration. If unable to participate in regular Physical

Education for more than 6 weeks, Adapted Physical Education assignment is required. Medical excuses from 1 to 6

weeks will be evaluated by the Administration and may be assigned temporary placement in Adaptive Physical Education.

(pending space availability)

Fees: PE Uniform and Lock (school bookstore)

In compliance with Federal Regulations, Notice is hereby given that: Morton High Schools will provide adapted physical

education to any eligible student with a health impairment or temporary disability, including pregnancy. These students

may not be excluded from participation in any program, class or activity based solely on their health impairment, temporary

disability or pregnancy. Parents and students have the right to request special programs or services. The District requires

students with health impairments and/or temporary disabilities, including pregnancy, to obtain a physician’s referral within

2 weeks that a student is physically unable to continue participation in a regular Physical Education class. If the student

fails to secure such a referral, the student will remain in regular Physical Education as a non-participant until

documentation is received. A physician referral, along with an Adapted Physical Education placement form, must be

submitted prior to enrollment into the Adapted Physical Education Program. The adapted instructor and the student’s

physician will develop an individualized rehabilitation program. Based upon the student’s rehab, the focus of the course

work may be altered.

LIFEGUARDING

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Recommendation by Lifesaving Certification and Special Assignment by the Asst. Principal and Lifesaving

instructor

Students will be assigned as a lifeguard for Physical Education classes and may possibly be responsible for helping

teachers to instruct swim techniques to beginners. Lifeguards will be expected to apply water safety knowledge and keep

CPR certification current. Successful completion and teacher recommendation will secure lifeguarding position in Physical

Education for future semesters.

LIFESAVING

Offered: Semester Course (offered Fall only)

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Recommendation by Physical Education staff and/or Asst. Principal. Must be able to pass a pre-swim test

that includes: swimming 200 yards, treading water for 2 minutes (legs only), and retrieve a 10 pound brick from the

bottom of the pool at a depth of seven feet of water.

Fees: $60.00 fee. ($40.00 for American Red Cross textbook & $20.00 for CPR Mask)

Students will receive extensive training in water safety related to equipment based rescues, spinal injury management,

victim recognition and facility surveillance. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be Red Cross certified

in Lifesaving, CPR, and First Aid. Students will be assigned as lifeguards for swimming classes in the following semesters

pending teacher recommendation. Student may also have the opportunity for off campus life guarding employment.

29


JR. / SR. CROSSTRAINING

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Offered: Semester Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Recommendation of Physical Education Instructor or Asst. Principal.

Fees: PE Uniform and Lock (school bookstore)

Students receive advanced instruction and participate in multiple variations of activities that promote lifetime personal

fitness programming. These activities may include Alternative Cardiovascular & Weight Training Programs & Outdoor

Survival/Fitness Activities.

MOVEMENT & DANCE

Offered: Semester Course (Offered both semesters.)

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: First semester Freshman P.E. or previous experience and consent of the instructor.

This course will explore movement as an expressive tool. It is designed to train students in basic jazz, ballet and modern

dance. Students will learn basic movement skills in various styles, including: social dancing, tap, ethnic dances, Latin

dance and other modern styles. Students will learn vocabularies of movement and dance, as well as investigate videos of

performances by various dancers, dance companies and various cultures.

DANCE STUDIO

Offered: Semester Course (Offered both semesters.) (This course may be repeated for credit.)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Movement & Dance or previous experience and consent of the instructor.

Supplies: Dance shoes, leotards and tights are required.

Students will explore specific dance techniques in modern, jazz, ethnic and classical styles. Students will develop

consistent habits for barre, utilize traditional dance vocabulary and begin to choreograph dances of their own. Dance

history will also be explored as ways to increase movement vocabularies.

DRIVER EDUCATION

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Driver Education Prerequisite:

According to state law, Pursuant to Sections 27-23 and 27-24.2 of the School Code, no student shall be permitted to enroll in a

driver education course provided by a public school district or a nonpublic school unless he or she has either:

1) received a passing grade in at least eight courses (which may include courses completed in grade 8) during the previous two

semesters or, in the case of block scheduling that reduces the number of courses taken per semester, in at least half the courses taken

during the previous two semesters.

Driver Education Fees: a fee is required plus a $20.00 Illinois State permit fee to be paid on the first day of class.

Students must pass the written Driver Education Vehicle Code Permit Test to advance to the

Behind-The-Wheel (BTW) phase. Pending availability of instructors, students are selected in

chronological order by birth date and are given the opportunity to successfully complete the

required 6 hours of training. Students have the option of taking BTW before or after school as the

schedules permit.

30


PHYSICAL EDUCATION EXEMPTION POLICY

It shall be the policy of J.S. Morton High School District 201 that students in grades 11 and 12 may request exemptions

from physical education for the following reasons as stated in Sec. 27-6 of the School Code of Illinois:

Exemption I: For on-going participation in an interscholastic athletic program.

A. Students are to be reassigned to their physical education class once their particular sport season has

ended or when they are no longer a member of the team.

B. The head coach will recommend a grade during the sport season to the Physical Education teacher

when the student returns to Physical Education class from study hall.

Exemption II: For enrollment in academic classes which are required for admission to an institution of higher learning,

provided that failure to take such classes will result in pupil being denied admission to the institution of his or her

choice.

A. Waiver may only be extended provided there are no electives within the student’s schedule.

B. The course must provide the student with 6 core subjects.

Exemption III: For enrollment in academic classes which are required for graduation from high school provided that

failure to take such classes will result in the pupil being unable to graduate.

A. A waiver shall be granted only if a student has made use of all academic alternative programs (summer

school, 0 hour, and night school) to fulfill their graduation requirements.

B. The course taken in lieu of physical education must provide the student with 6 core subjects.

Exemption IV: For a student in grades 9 through 12 enrolled in a marching band program for credit. Students can

request to be excused from physical education for on-going participation in such marching band program.

Regulations:

A. Students requesting approval for an exemption must receive the approval of their parent, athletic coach

(if applicable), counselor, Assistant Principal, and the Principal.

B. Parents will be notified of the student’s exemption approval from Physical Education and a record will

be filed in the student’s guidance folder and in the physical education office.

C. Students will not be allowed to drop a sixth (6 th ) core subject.

D. If a student is allowed six (6) classes in lieu of physical education and is removed from one or more

classes for lack of attendance, the exemption from physical education is voided. The student will have to

make up the physical education class in summer school or subsequent semesters.

31


CAREER & TECHNICAL

EDUCATION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION

BUSINESS EDUCATION ELECTIVES

Business/Marketing/IT/Finance Career Clusters

General Business Courses

Computer Applications 1

Computer Applications 2

Product Marketing Pathway

Networking Pathway

Web Page Design Pathway

Marketing

Accounting 1

Inter-related Co-op

Computer

Programming

or

AP Computer

Science

Networking 1

Web Page & Interactive

Media Design I

Web Page & Interactive

Media Design II

Inter-related Co-op

Networking 2

32


Students who choose CTE to fulfill the flexible academic units must take two semesters, not including

Consumer Education.

Courses in Business Education, Industrial Technology, and Family and Consumer Sciences are in the

Career and Technical Education Division. Any of these courses, except Consumer Education, can count

toward fulfillment of the graduation requirement of 1 unit (2 semesters) of Career and Technical Education

OR 2 units (4 semesters) of the same foreign language.

Options for the Illinois requirement for Consumer Education are listed on page 56.

NCAA Eligibility rules do not approve any computer courses or other Business electives, because they are

not core academic classes.

Business Education Electives

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 Word and PowerPoint Essentials

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

The goal of this course is to encourage college and career bound students to become digital-savvy beyond texting and

instant messaging. Students will develop flyers, MLA research papers, cover letters and resumes using contemporary word

processing software. Using presentation software, students will expand their knowledge in the areas of verbal and written

communication, fundamentals of layout and design, and effective use of graphics as practiced in the workplace.

Instructional strategies will include teacher demonstrations, interdisciplinary and culminating projects, problem-solving

activities and simulations.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 2 Excel and Access Essentials

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

This is an intermediate-level course that continues to cover Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. In Word,

students will review MLA formatted papers, adding additional sources and increasing their types of works cited references;

prepare tables; resumes; and cover letters. In Excel, students will enter and format text and numbers; use formulas;

create a variety of chart sheets; create What-If Analysis worksheets; and Goal Seek worksheets. In Access, students will

create Queries for databases, join tables, perform calculations within databases, and learn how to maintain databases.

PowerPoint will emphasize appropriate design, sounds, and animations for intended audiences while integrating other MS

software applications. Successful completion of Computer Applications 1 is required to take this course.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER SCIENCE (West campus Only)

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, & 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

This course follows the Advanced Placement curriculum issued by the College Board. Topics are taught using the Java

programming language and include objects, data structures, searching, sorting, recursion, reusability of code, data

abstraction, encapsulation and social and ethical aspects of computing. Other general computer topics will be covered

such as the history of computers, computer hardware, and networks.

33


MARKETING

Offered: Semester Course (2nd Semester Only)

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

Students will be exposed to Marketing through four main areas-The Product, Price, Place, and Promotion. The four areas

will be covered through a variety of ways–case studies, videos, computer simulations, and field trips. Students will also

come to recognize the potential job opportunities available in Marketing as they gain an understanding of how products

reach the consumer through the aid of Marketing.

WEB PAGE AND INTERACTIVE

MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 1/2

Offered Year Course

Grade level: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Credit in Computer Applications recommended.

Fees: None

Web Page and Interactive Media Development I is a skill-level course designed to prepare students to plan, design, create

and maintain web pages and sites. Students will learn the fundamentals of web page design using HTML, HTML editors,

and graphic editors as well as programming tools such as JavaScript. Students will work in a project-based environment to

create a working website. Students will learn to create pages, add hyperlinks, make tables and frames, create forms,

integrate images, and set styles. Students will use image-editing programs to manipulate scanned images, computer

graphics, and original artwork. Instruction will include creating graphical headers, interactive menus and buttons, and

visually appealing backgrounds. Students will use hardware and software to capture, edit, create, and compress audio and

video clips.

WEB PAGE AND INTERACTIVE

MEDIA DEVELOPMENT 3/4

Offered: Year Course

Grade level: 11,12

Prerequisite: Credit in Web Page and Interactive Media Development 1/2

Fees: None

Web Page and Interactive Media Development II is a skill-level course for students who have completed Web Page and

Interactive Media Development I. Instruction will include using multimedia authoring applications and programming tools

such as JavaScript to create a web site that combines text, hyperlinks, images, video, and sound. Instruction will include

using hardware and software to capture, edit, create, and compress audio and video clips as well as create animated text,

graphics, and images. Other topics will include using tables to align images with text, creating newspaper-style columns,

and inserting side menus and call-outs. Students will learn how to use templates, cascading style sheets and interactive

elements to enhance web pages. Students will learn to create dynamic forms that include multiple-choice questions,

comment boxes, and buttons. Students will learn how to connect to a database and retrieve and write data.

Students are encouraged to develop a portfolio project that demonstrates their expertise in areas such as multimedia

authoring, web development, audio and video editing, and advanced JavaScript applications to create interactive web

pages.

34


ACCOUNTING 1

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

Students are provided with an understanding of basic accounting concepts and principles. They have an opportunity to

learn about the work-flow of an accounting system, the basic methods of processing business data and financial activities

of a service and merchandising business. Students learn the necessary background for future study in accounting and are

also provided with career and technical skills that contribute to success in entry-level jobs such as bookkeeper, bank teller,

and payroll clerk. Computers are integrated into the course; however, students do not need previous computer experience,

but keyboarding skills are helpful.

COOPERATIVE WORK-STUDY COURSES:

INTERRELATED

CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION

Offered: Year Course (Meets 1 hour per day for 1 credit per semester = 2 credits per year: .5 credit for class work per

semester; .5 credit for employment work per semester.

For: Grade 12 or Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: Successful interview with co-op teacher-coordinator; Special assignment by the AP in charge of the program;

and the successful completion of at least one unit of Industrial, Family Consumer Science, Business, or Horticulture

Education. Students must be on track for graduation.

Fee: None

This class will provide 12 th grade students with the opportunity to participate in CE instruction. Students enrolled in any

CTE occupational area may enroll in Interrelated Cooperative Education. The program will be coordinated by a teacher

coordinator who is qualified in any one of the five occupational areas. Students interested in learning horticulture

occupations, accounting, business/marketing, trade or service occupations will benefit from this program. Students are

expected to work a minimum of (15) hours per week. Students need not be employed to enroll. They will be given

assistance in looking for suitable employment. Students are released from school for their paid cooperative education

work experience. They participate in 200 minutes per week of related classroom instruction focusing on job survival skills,

career exploration skills related to the job, and human relations skills. A qualified CTE instructor is responsible for

supervision and is given appropriate release time to do so. Written training agreements and individual student training

plans are developed and agreed upon by the employer, student and coordinator. The coordinator, student and employer

assume compliance with federal, state and local laws and regulations. Students will be given instruction and experiences

in line with the district reading, writing, math, and critical thinking across the curriculum initiatives. In the classroom

students will learn employment information and study specific topics concerning on-the-job experiences related to their

occupational area. Student organizations will be an integral part of the course. Students are encouraged to attend

periodic meetings for individual and group instruction. Interested students MUST APPLY and be interviewed by teachercoordinator.

35


Available Resources

WORKKEYS

WorkKeys® is a system for measuring the skills required in the everyday workplace. WorkKeys® helps to improve

America's workforce by sharpening the workplace skills of students or employees. Employees are then placed in jobs

where they can be more successful. This system benefits individuals, businesses and educators by providing a common

language for describing basic skills needed for jobs.

WorkKeys is required in Illinois for Day 2 of State PSAE testing for all Juniors. The sections included on the PSAE are

Applied Reading and Applied Math.

KeyTrain® is the complete interactive training system for the WorkKeys® basic workplace skills. KeyTrain provides a

comprehensive learning system for common skills required by all jobs, based on ACT's WorkKeys® employment system.

http://www.keytrain.com/

Ask your teacher or counselor how you can incorporate Keytrain practice for WorkKeys into your high school experience!

DUAL CREDIT

See your counselor for a current list of courses available for Dual Credit with Morton College. Applications and enrollment

qualification requirements are also available through your counselor.

36


INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING ELECTIVES

***NCAA Eligibility rules do not approve any computer courses or other Technology electives,

because they are not core academic classes.***

Architecture & Construction/Transportation/Engineering/Manufacturing

Career Clusters

General Industrial Course

Introduction to Engineering Design

Architectural Drafting/CAD

Pathway

Computer Aided Drafting 1/2

Architectural Drafting 1/2

Architectural Drafting 3/4

Architectural Drafting 5/6

Inter-related Co-op

CAD Pathway

Computer Aided Drafting 1/2

Computer Aided Drafting 3/4

Inter-related Co-op

Graphic Arts Program

Graphic Arts Adobe

Photoshop/Illustrator

Graphic Arts Design &

Printing

Graphic Arts Production

Printing

Inter-related Co-op

Automotive Repair Pathway

Carpentry Pathway

Automotive 1 & 2

Automotive 3/4

Automotive 5/6

Inter-related Co-op or CWT

Carpentry 1 & 2

Carpentry 3/4

Carpentry 5/6

Inter-related Co-op or CWT

37


Industrial Technology & Engineering Electives

Introduction to Engineering Design (Project Lead The Way) (West Campus Only)

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, & 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

The major focus of the IED course is to expose students to the design process, research and analysis, teamwork,

communication methods, global and human impacts, engineering standards and technical documentation. Students use 3D

solid modeling design software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems and learn how to document their

work and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community.

ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 1

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

In this introductory course, students are introduced to elementary CAD commands and accepted professional practices.

Students will learn how architects symbolically communicate building plans to contractors while exploring numerous layout

options and space planning strategies. Additional emphasis will be placed on sketching techniques. The course culminates

with the students applying the aforementioned techniques to complete floor plans of a single level family residence. Related

career activities will be scheduled when available and will include speakers and fieldtrips.

ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 2

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: Architectural Drafting 1

Fees: None

Students continue to elaborate on the units studied in Architectural Drafting 1, focusing on the required software skills to

complete a set of single level residential plans which will include corresponding floor, foundation, and elevation drawings

with a continued emphasis on sketching. Finally, students will be introduced to structural detail drawings. Related career

activities will be scheduled when available and will include speakers and fieldtrips.

ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 3/4

Offered: Year Course

(Meets 1 hour per day for 1/2 credit per semester.)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Architectural Drafting 1 and 2

Fees: None

Students will learn about designing residential dwellings. Work will begin with sketches and diagrams and will continue until

students have designed and drawn a working set of drawings which will include floor, foundation, elevation, plot, and

structural detail drawings of a multilevel residence while utilizing state of the art software.

38


ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 5/6

Offered: Year Course

(Meets 1 hour per day for 1/2 credit per semester.)

For: 12

Prerequisite: Architectural Drafting 3/4

Fees: None

Students design residential and commercial buildings using 3D parametric software. Electrical and mechanical drawings will

be integrated into the course as well. Ultimately, students will create a set of presentation drawings and custom animations

to show case their designs.

AUTO MECHANICS 1

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

Students study and become acquainted with the basic theory and operation of the automobile, its components and related

systems. Areas of study include: engine design and operation, minor engine repair, fuel, cooling, lubrication and emission

control systems. Automotive lab safety and tool usage, career paths and A.S.E. certification requirements will also be

covered. The course will be presented as a combination of classroom activity with accompanying lab activities

AUTO MECHANICS 2

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

Students study and become acquainted with basic theory and operation of the automobile electrical system. Areas of study

include: electrical theory, automotive electrical system design and operation, charging, starting and ignition systems.

Automotive lab safety, electrical testing and instrument usage, will also be covered. The course will be presented as a

combination of classroom activity with accompanying lab activities.

AUTO MECHANICS 3/4

Offered: Year Course (Meets 1 hour per day for .5 credit per semester)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Auto Mechanics 1 & 2

Fees: None

Students apply skills and knowledge, developed in AM-1 and AM-2, to the live repair and maintenance of automobiles.

Students are also introduced to new areas of learning and service, including Braking Systems,

Suspension/Steering/Alignment Systems, advanced Electrical/Electronic Systems, advanced Engine Repair and

Performance and other areas mandated by A.S.E. and N.A.T.E.F. The course will be presented as a combination of

classroom activity with accompanying lab activities.

39


AUTO MECHANICS 5/6

Offered: Year Course (Meets 2 hours per day for 1 credit per semester.)

For: Seniors (12)

Prerequisites: Auto Mechanics 3/4

Students in this Automotive Servicing course obtain hands-on training through classroom and field based work experiences

on a variety of automobiles and systems components using advanced engine testing equipment to identify engine problems.

Included in their course of study are the care of shop tools, shop safety, and careers in Auto Mechanics. An

internship/practicum is available in this curriculum which allows for work-based training hours during the school day for

enrolled students.

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING 1

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

CAD 1 is a beginning drafting course that introduces students to computer aided drafting and its applications in many fields.

Students will begin to learn the language of pictorial representation in accordance to ANSI (American National Standards

Institute) standards. Topics will include sketching, orthographic projection, and pictorial representation including an

introduction to solid modeling. Career opportunities will be emphasized throughout.

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING 2

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: CAD 1

Fees: None

CAD 2 continues to emphasize the principles and techniques taught in CAD 1. Students will continue exploration of

orthographic projection and learn to apply all common sectioning and other detailing techniques. Students will continue to

develop skills in isometric and advanced solid modeling.

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING 3/4

Offered: Year Course (Meets 1 hour per day for 1/2 credit per semester.)

For: 11, 12 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: CAD 1 & 2

Fees: None

CAD 3/4 students develop advanced drafting skills and knowledge that prepare them for entry level drafting jobs or further

study in drafting, engineering, computer-aided manufacturing, and other related fields. Students utilize current CAD software

and modern computer equipment to produce orthographic, sectional, auxiliary, assembly views, pictorial, 3D modeling, and

animation.

CARPENTRY 1

(Taught at East)

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

Students complete units of study in the care and use of selected hand tools, power tools and basic carpentry techniques

associated with the carpentry industry. They also make a plan of procedure and study safety instructions which have

application to laboratory as well as site activities.

40


CARPENTRY 2

(Taught at East)

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: Carpentry 1

Fees: None

Students will improve the skills they learned in Carpentry 1. They will also receive instruction in more advanced applications

of equipment, materials and processes associated with the carpentry industry by studying a variety of construction

techniques.

CARPENTRY 3/4

(Taught at East)

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Carpentry 1/2 or consent of instructor.

Fees: None. Students must provide steel-toe, puncture-resistant safety shoes.

Students will have the opportunity to broaden their skills in the construction industry. Students will take a school bus to job

sites where they will learn hands-on skills such as: framing, trim, carpentry, metal studs, roofing, hanging and taping

drywall, grid ceilings, and concrete work.

GRAPHIC ARTS Adobe Photoshop

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10, 11, 12l

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

This course provides instruction in the use of Adobe Photoshop as it relates to graphic art careers. This beginning Graphic

Communication course will teach students to use artistic techniques to effectively communicate ideas via illustration and

other forms of digital or printed media. Topics covered may include concept design, layout, paste -up and techniques such

as engraving, etching, silkscreen, lithography, offset, drawing, collage and computer graphics.

GRAPHIC ARTS Adobe Illustrator

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

This course provides instruction in the use of Adobe Illustrator while focusing on illustration art as design through computer

software. Software skills will allow students to create logos, icons, illustration art, and advertisements as created by

designers employed within the industry. This course provides learning experiences common to all graphic communications

occupations. Instruction will include use of color, balance and proportion in design; three-dimensional visualization;

sketching; design procedures; layout; selection of type styles; selection of appropriate drawing tools and media; and the use

of the computer as a communication tool. Planned learning activities will allow students to become knowledgeable of

fundamental principles and methods and to develop technical skills related to the graphic arts industry.

41


GRAPHIC Arts Product Design & Production Printing

Offered: Semester or Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Graphic Arts Photoshop and/ or Illustrator

Fees: None

This course provides advanced instruction in the use of Adobe Suite software in product design for the creation of Digitally

Printed T-Shirts and other products. Students will learn the use of digital printing equipment, electronic workflows, small

business concepts, offering accelerated design techniques common to all graphic communications occupations. Planned

learning activities will allow students to become knowledgeable of fundamental principles and methods and to develop

technical skills related to the graphic arts industry. Instruction will expand understanding of color, major design principles;

three-dimensional visualization for school promotional materials; sketching & design procedures along with presentations;

publishing layout; study of typography; participation on design teams for cooperative product design and media applications;

and advanced use of the computer for communication.

GRAPHIC ARTS Production Printing

Offered: Year Course

For: 12

Prerequisite: GRAPHIC Arts Product Design & Production Printing or consent of instructor

Fees: None

This course is for students interested in pursuing a graphics career and wishes to experience real-world activities through a

variety of print services for clubs, staff, and administration. Students will work closely with clients to design, develop, print,

and finish business forms, brochures, flyers, posters, booklets, and more utilizing experiences and practices of the greater

print industries. Adobe Suite skills, Digital Shirt Printing, Heat Transfer, and Digital Color Printing equipment will be

employed. In addition the use of digital cameras, photographic equipment techniques, and digital peripheral devices for

processing electronic images will be explored.

42


CTE COOPERATIVE WORK-STUDY COURSES:

COOPERATIVE WORK TRAINING (CWT)

Offered: Semester/Year Course (Meets 1 hour per day; 1 credit per semester: .5 credit for class work per semester; .5

credit for employment work per semester.

For: 12 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: Students must be 16 years old or will turn 16 within 20 days of their first day of class. Students will be

recommended for the program by counselors, deans or teacher coordinators. The recommendations and placement for CWT

are accepted throughout the school year. Interested students MUST APPLY and be interviewed by the teacher coordinator

of the program and receive a special assignment by the Dean of Instruction.

Fees: None

The activities for this class will vary according to the abilities of the individual students. Students will be given instruction

and experiences that are in line with the district's reading, writing, math and critical thinking across the curriculum

initiatives. Discussions of on-the-job experiences and problems, films, guest speakers, field trips and activities considered

important by the group and/or teacher coordinator will be addressed. Students will be responsible for maintaining a good

attendance record in school and at his/her training station. The development of employability skills which will enable

students to make the transition from school to the world of work will be stressed. It will be the responsibility of the teacher

coordinator to aid the student in securing employment in an approved training station. Students will attend regular classes

and work at a training station for a minimum of 15 hours per week. Students will be available before school for individual

conferences, club meetings and individual or group project

INTERRELATED CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION

Offered: Year Course (Meets 1 hour per day for 1 credit per semester = 2 credits per year: .5 credit for class work per

semester; .5 credit for employment work per semester.)

For: Grade 12 or Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: Successful interview with co-op teacher-coordinator; Special assignment by the AP in charge of the program;

and the successful completion of at least one unit of Industrial, Family Consumer Science, Business, or Horticulture

Education. Students must be on track for graduation.

Fee: None

This class will provide 12 th grade students with the opportunity to participate in CE instruction. Students enrolled in any

CTE occupational area may enroll in Interrelated Cooperative Education. The program will be coordinated by a teacher

coordinator who is qualified in any one of the five occupational areas.

Students interested in learning horticulture occupations, accounting, business/marketing, trade or service occupations will

benefit from this program. Students are expected to work a minimum of (15) hours per week. Students need not be

employed to enroll. They will be given assistance in looking for suitable employment. Students are released from school

for their paid cooperative education work experience. They participate in 200 minutes per week of related classroom

instruction focusing on job survival skills, career exploration skills related to the job, and human relations skills. A qualified

CTE instructor is responsible for supervision and is given appropriate release time to do so. Written training agreements

and individual student training plans are developed and agreed upon by the employer, student and coordinator. The

coordinator, student and employer assume compliance with federal, state and local laws and regulations.

Students will be given instruction and experiences in line with the district’s reading, writing, math, and critical thinking

across the curriculum initiatives. In the classroom students will learn employment information and study specific topics

concerning on-the-job experiences related to their occupational area. Student organizations will be an integral part of the

course. Students are encouraged to attend periodic meetings for individual and group instruction.

Interested students MUST APPLY and be interviewed by teacher-coordinator.

43


F A M I L Y A N D C O N S U M E R S C I E N C E S

ELECTIVES

NCAA Eligibility rules do not approve any computer courses or other Family

Consumer Science electives, because they are not core academic classes.

Hospitality/Human Services Cluster

Child Day Care Pathway

Culinary Arts/ Hospitality

Pathway

Child Development 1/2

Child Development 3/4

Culinary Arts 1/2

Culinary Arts 3/4

Child Development 5/6

Parenting

TIPPS

44


CHILD DEVELOPMENT 1/2

Offered: Year course

For: 10 or by Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

Students study the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of the child from conception through eight years

of age. Students are provided experiences in observing, planning, and working with children in a preschool setting.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 3/4

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Child Development 1/2

Fees: None

Students will have the opportunity to study and apply advanced techniques for teaching children in the preschool setting.

Students will review career opportunities in the child care profession.

CHILD DEVELOPMENT 5/6

Offered: Year Course

For: 12

Prerequisite: Child Development 3/4

Fees: None

This course is recommended for those students who plan to enter fields associated with early childhood. Students will

experience the management side of the early childhood setting: ordering, record keeping, coordinating, and teaching.

CULINARY ARTS 1/2

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fees: There is a fee with this course

Students are trained for work in the food service industry. Special emphasis is on nutrition, kitchen basics, food safety,

customer relations, equipment, business math, and cost control.

CULINARY ARTS 3/4

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Food Service 1/2

Fees: There is a fee with this course

Students will add to the food preparation skills they learned in Food Service 1/2. Special emphasis is on marketing,

inventory control, communication, accounting practices, and the lodging/tourism/retail industries.

PARENTING

Offered: Semester Course

For: 11, 12 or Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

Parenting introduces students to the impact of parenthood by studying the roles and responsibilities involved. Emphasis is

placed on learning experiences which provide knowledge and understanding of the principles of human growth and

development and preparation for parenthood. Special attention is directed to parenting skills needed to guide and

encourage a child’s development. Current issues of concern to parents are studied. This course is designed to help

students think through the relationships, satisfaction and stress (or crisis) of parenthood.

45


T.I.P.P.S.

Offered: Year Course (This course may be repeated for

credit.)

For: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Social Worker/Counselor recommendation.

Fees: None

Priority for this class is for students who are receiving special services in the Infant and Toddler Daycare Center at East.

Other students who are parents or parents-to-be also may request enrollment as space is available. Infant care not

available at West.

CTE COOPERATIVE WORK-STUDY COURSES:

INTERRELATED

CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION

Offered: Year Course (Meets 1 hour per day for 1 credit per semester = 2 credits per year:.5 credit for class work per

semester; .5 credit for employment work per semester)

For: Grade 12 or Administrative Approval

This class will provide 12 th grade students with the opportunity to participate in CE instruction. Students enrolled in any

CTE occupational area may enroll in Interrelated Cooperative Education.

(See Inter-related Co-op complete listing in prior section)

Fulfillment of State Required Consumer Education

Available alternatives to the Illinois State requirement of Consumer Education are:

Successful completion of the semester Consumer Education course

OR

Successful completion of AP Micro Economics (see Social Science course descriptions)

OR

Successful completion of both Introduction to Business 1 & 2

OR

Waiving the Consumer Education requirement entirely by successfully passing the state exam in advance

of course registration. (Inquire in Counseling Office)

CONSUMER EDUCATION

Offered: Semester Course

For: 12 - 10, 11 with Administrative Approval

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

Students learn the consumer education topics required under Senate Bill 977 and will be taught by Business or Family and

Consumer Science teachers. Through the learning experiences in this course, students gain knowledge, buying skills and

understanding in the following areas: advertising, credit, consumer rights and responsibilities, labor unions, transportation,

insurance, savings and investments, taxation, housing, home furnishings, home appliances, foods, clothing, comparison

shopping, budgeting and career exploration. There is special emphasis on developing reading, writing, and critical thinking

skills. This course may not be used to fulfill the CTE requirement for graduation.

46


MICRO ECONOMICS AP

Offered: Semester Course

For: 12

Fees: Workbook and additional Exam Fee


The purpose of an AP in Microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that

apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the larger economic system..

Students learn why individuals, businesses, governments and societies must make choices to get more of the goods and

services they want. Areas of study include: supply and demand, market clearing prices, starting your own business, the role

of the federal government in the economy, consumerism and personal investment strategies. Students are required to take

the AP exam.

This course fulfills the Consumer Education Graduation requirement.

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 1 AND 2

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10

Prerequisite: None

Fees: None

Students are introduced to the business and economic institutions of our free enterprise system and the present-day

problems which affect U.S. and world citizens in buying, budgeting, banking, and borrowing. Students are introduced to the

business and economic institutions of our free enterprise system and the present-day problems which affect U.S. and world

citizens in saving, investing, insuring, and budgeting.

47


FINE ARTS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MUSIC COURSE SEQUENCES

Band

Strings

Choir

FRESHMAN

Concert Band

(PE Waiver Required)

SOPHOMORE

Concert Band

Wind Ensemble

Beginning Instruments

(East Only)

SOPHOMORE

Guitar 1 or 2

Beginning Mariachi

SOPHOMORE

Concert Choir

Advanced Vocal Ensemble

JUNIOR

Concert Band

Wind Ensemble

JUNIOR

Guitar 1 or 2

Performance Mariachi

JUNIOR

Concert Choir

Advanced Vocal Ensemble

SENIOR

Concert Band

Wind Ensemble

AP Music Theory

SENIOR

Guitar 1 or 2

AP Music Theory

Performance Mariachi

Concert Choir

Advanced Vocal Ensemble

AP Music Theory

48


FINE ARTS

Music, Theatre & Visual Art

Students may choose from a variety of year or semester courses to fulfill graduation

requirements. All Fine Arts Division courses involve theory, production and

interdisciplinary experiences. Courses in this Division are usually accepted as electives

in a college-preparatory sequence.

***Fine Arts courses do not count as NCAA Core Courses***

BAND

BEGINNING INSTRUMENTS

(East Only)

Offered: Year Course (This course may be repeated for credit.)

For: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: none

Fee: Course fee.

Beginning Instruments is for students for student with no previous experience. The fundamentals of playing

a musical instrument and accurate music reading are stressed. Individual attention is given to each student.

This class includes different brass, percussion, woodwind and string instruments. Required activities which

take places outside of regular school hours may include attendance at all concerts. Some instruments will

be available for rental; however, students will need to check with the instructor to reserve the rental

instrument. If instruments are not available for rental, students will need to supply their own. Students

enrolled in this course will perform in district concerts.

CONCERT BAND

Offered: Year Course (This course may be repeated for credit.)

For: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Must play a band instrument.

Fee: Course fee.

Concert band is open to all students who have successfully completed beginning band or have gained

experience form other school bands. Concert band is an introduction to the high school band program.

Students in the ensemble will begin to develop the skills needed to participate in other ensembles. Students

improve their techniques and musicianship while performing a variety of musical styles. Areas of development

will take place in tone production, intonation, rhythmic, proficiency, balance, breathing, sight reading, an

music theory All students will participate in Marching Band, Pep Band, concerts and festivals, as well as

audition for the IMEA District Band, state solo and ensemble contest, state organization contest, assemblies,

early morning or afterschool rehearsals and formal concerts. Private lessons are recommended but not

required--and may audition for Jazz Ensemble, Pit Orchestra, and Percussion Ensemble. Attendance at all

performances and rehearsals is expected.

49


WIND ENSEMBLE

Offered: Year Course (This course may be repeated for credit.)

For: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Audition and/or permission of Band Director.

Fee: Course fee.

Wind Ensemble is open through yearly auditions to advanced performers in wind and percussion instruments.

This course is designed for advanced players. Repertoire includes marches, overtures and a variety of

classical, semi classical, and popular music. All students will participate in Marching Band, Pep Band,

concerts and festivals, as well as audition for the IMEA District Band, state solo and ensemble contest, state

organization contest, assemblies, early morning or afterschool rehearsals and formal concerts. Private

lessons are recommended but not required. Students may also audition for Jazz Ensemble, Pit Orchestra,

Percussion Ensemble and Chamber Winds.

GUITAR 1

Offered: Semester

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None.

Fee: Course fee.

STRINGS

This course is for the beginning student who has no prior musical experience. Students will learn the

fundamentals of guitar. Students will be given specific instruction to tune a guitar, read music, play melody

lines, play chords with various strums, and set cords to music. A variety of music will be explored, including

folk, classical, rock, and Latin.

GUITAR 2

Offered: Semester

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Guitar 1

Fee: Course fee.

This is for the intermediate guitar student wishing to learn advanced skills and techniques with include

advanced reading of standard notation, tablature, barre chords, and guitar ensemble. A variety of music will

be explored, including folk, classical, rock, and Latin.

GUITAR ENSEMBLE

Offered: Full Year

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None.(This course may be repeated for credit)

Fee: Course fee.

Guitar ensemble is a year-long, repeatable course designed for the intermediate and advanced guitarist.

Repertoire spans a variety of musical styles and cultures. Students are required to perform in scheduled

concerts or other activities for the class. While guitars are provided for this course, personal guitars are

recommended for at home practice.

50


BEGINNING MARIACHI

Offered: Year Course (This course may be repeated for credit.)

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fee: Course fee.

Students will be introduced to Mariachi music. Students will be introduced to a variety of mariachi songs

and genres including son jalisciense, corridor, cancion, ranchera, bolera, polka, vals, etc. They learn the

basic technique of playing an instrument, vocal technique, and how to properly maintain an instrument.

Students will begin to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to perform mariachi music in a variety of

genres with technical accuracy and stylistic correctness.

PERFORMANCE MARIACHI

Offered: Year Course (This course may be repeated for credit.)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Beginning Mariachi

Fee: Course fee.

Students will develop the skills and attributes necessary for a successful career in mariachi music.

Educational opportunities as related to mariachi music will be explored. Students will be able relate aspects

of the study of mariachi music to other fields and endeavors. As part of this course, students will learn to

perform mariachi songs from various genres including: son jalisciense, corridor, cancion, ranchera, bolera,

polka, vals, while refining the skills necessary to perform mariachi music with technical accuracy and stylistic

correctness.

CHOIR

CONCERT CHOIR

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Placement Audition. (This course may be repeated for credit)

Fee: Course fee.

Concert Choir continues the development of basic vocal skills, music theory and music history taught in

Choir. A wide variety of music will be experienced. Attendance and participation choral concerts, community

performances, school assemblies are required. Placement in this choir is by audition only

ADVANCED VOCAL ENSEMBLE

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Placement Audition. (This course may be repeated for credit)

Fee: Course fee.

This Advanced Vocal Ensemble requires a placement audition. Advanced levels of vocal production, sightreading,

and music theory and music history are developed. Placement in this choir is by audition only. A

wide variety of choral literature will be explored in this ensemble including vocal jazz and madrigals. In

addition, members will be expected to participate in solo and ensemble contests, festivals, community

presentations and other performances. Placement in this choir is by audition only

51


ADVANCED PLACEMENT

AP MUSIC THEORY

Offered: Year Course (This is an honors point course.)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Concert Band, Advanced Vocal Ensemble, Piano and Music Theory, Guitar Ensemble and

Music Theory or Music Theory

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.

The content of the course is prescribed by the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board and is an

honors point course. Students will be expected to master ear training, musical analysis, and part-writing in

various historical contexts. This course emphasizes the basic, intermediate, and advanced musical elements

of melody and harmony, scale construction, key signatures, ear training, basic form and analysis, history and

incorporates MIDI and computer technology. This course is for the serious musician and those planning to

study music after high school. Students will spend extra time during and outside of class practicing and

preparing for the AP Music Theory exam. Score analysis, four part voice writing, chord progression, the

school day will be held to practice the aural sections of the AP exam. Success in these examinations may

entitle the student to college credit. The Advanced Placement Test is required.

52


Theatre Arts

SOPHOMORE

Theatre Arts

JUNIOR

Theatre Arts

Theatre Arts Intermediate

SENIOR

Theatre Arts

Theatre Arts Intermediate

Theatre Arts Studio

53


THEATRE ARTS

THEATRE ARTS

Offered: Year course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fee: Course fee.

Theatre Arts Performance is an introductory course and may be selected by any student. Students explore

elements of drama, through improvisation, theatre games, and scenes from contemporary plays as well as

learning how to create the “magic of theatre” from behind the scenes As part of the course, students

examine scripts, explore acting techniques, develop character, and experience the dynamics of rehearsal

discipline as used in the live and electronic theatre arts. Additionally, students will explore principles of

theatrical design and the jobs that are required to produce successful production in all media. Theatre Arts is

a “hands on minds on” course offers students the opportunity to act, design, and produce a production from

the ground up. There is also opportunity for motivated students to work for outside performing organizations

who rent the Morton theatre spaces Students who take this class will understand the full process of creating

theatre.

THEATRE ARTS INTERMEDIATE

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Theatre Arts

Fee: Course fee.

This is an advanced and in-depth, multi leveled study of skills and techniques introduced in previous classes.

Students will concentrate on performance acting in relationship to character development, monologues and

advanced dramatic presentations. Other activities include group and individual oral interpretations of literature,

mime and storytelling in non-traditional forms. Less emphasis on technical production will occur to afford the

serious theatre student the opportunity to develop performance skills.

THEATRE ARTS STUDIO

Offered: Year Course (This course may be repeated for credit.)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: One year of Theatre Arts

Fee: Course fee.

Theatre Arts Studio is production oriented. In this course are engaged in the production process of a full

length play. Students practice those skills necessary for creating and producing a large scale production.

As directors, designers, business managers, dramaturges, stage managers, and technician, the students will

cover all aspects of production for live and electronic media. As they gain the practical experience of

scheduling and coordinating the efforts of the group, these students experience what it is like to turn a

concept into reality performance.

54


VISUAL ARTS COURSE SEQUENCES

Visual Arts

Photography

Video

SOPHOMORE

Visual Arts

SOPHOMORE

Digital Photo

SOPHOMORE

Video Techniques

JUNIOR/SENIOR

Visual Arts

Paint ing

Advanced Drawing/Design

AP Art Studio

JUNIOR

Digital Photo

Digital Photo Intermediate

SENIOR

Digital Photo

Digital Photo Intermediate

Digital Photo Studio (AP)

JUNIOR

Video Techniques

Video Production

SENIOR

Video Techniques

Video Production

Video Studio

55


V I S U A L

A R T S

VISUAL ART

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Fee: Course fee.

Prerequisite: None

Students in Visual Art 1/2 will work with many materials and techniques, including still-life drawing, color theory,

figure drawing, perspective, painting, printmaking, etc. Three dimensional projects will also be included. The course

is designed to prepare students for more advanced work in the department. A sketchbook is required. Students

are responsible for obtaining necessary supplies.

ADVANCED DRAWING

Offered: Semester Course (Offered semester 1)

For: 10, 11, 12

Fee: Course fee.

Prerequisite: Visual Art 1 and 2 or teacher approval

Students will be encouraged to develop drawing style using large formats, sophisticated imagery, and expression in

their work. Use of drawing materials and techniques are strengthened and refined. Serious students will develop a

portfolio for employment, college entrance or AP credit. A sketch book is required. Students are responsible for

obtaining necessary supplies.

DESIGN

Offered: Semester Course (Offered semester 1 and 2)

For: 10, 11, 12

Fee: Course fee.

Prerequisite: None

Design students will use a variety of media and materials to explore color, positive-negative reversals, symmetry and

other elements of design. Both 2D and 3D experiences will be provided. This course is designed for students who

are considering careers in commercial art, advertising, interior design, product design, architecture, etc. Students are

responsible for obtaining necessary supplies.

PAINTING

Offered: Year Course (May be repeated for credit)

For: 11, 12

Fee: Course fee.

Prerequisite: Visual Art 1 and 2 or teacher approval

Using a variety of media and techniques (water color, acrylic, etc.), students will study many past and present styles

of painting. Basic drawing, painting and compositional techniques will be emphasized to help students find their

individual styles. Students are responsible for obtaining necessary supplies.

56


AP ART STUDIO

Offered: Year Course (May be repeated for credit)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: 1 Credit in visual Arts

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.

This is an Honors Point Course

This course is for students who have a strong interest in art. Students will complete a portfolio that meets the

prescribed requirements set by the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board. The portfolio consists of

three sections that will demonstrate the Quality or Work, Breadth of Work and a Concentration that investigates a

visual interest that is unique to each student. Students can be scheduled with a teacher during an advanced class

and will involve independent coaching by faculty. Students are responsible for obtaining necessary supplies.

PHOTOGRAPHY

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fee: Course fee.

This course provides students with experiences related to the photography field. Planned experiences give students

a clear and concise introduction to the following: safety and housekeeping of a photo studio, photography as a

visual and communicative discipline, and an introduction to the photo industry. Students will explore the basic

concepts of photography from early pinhole cameras to today’s all digital systems. Emphasis will be on the

production of images using digital cameras, Adobe Photoshop will be used to students the process of creating a

completed photographic image, Elements of art, principles of design, and creative approaches to picture-taking will

be stressed in order to prepare students for the demands of the photographic industry. Students will conduct shop

operation, camera work, digitally processing pictures, printing photographic images as well as learning about the use

and selection of cameras, film, lenses, filters and other accessories.

Students must have their own point and shoot digital camera. Various commercial cameras and accessories will

be available for students to use. Students are responsible for obtaining necessary supplies.

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY INTERMEDIATE

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Digital Photography or Teacher Recommendation

Fee: Course fee.

Digital Photography 3/4 is a continuing exploration of the field of photography for the serious photography student.

Students will expand on basic concepts using alternative and experimental digital process to create imagery and

visually communicate ideas. This course provides students with a deeper understanding of photographic images and

their application in design. Students will utilize Digital SLR cameras and Adobe workstations to further create and

expand on a body of work. Students explore more advanced photography and darkroom techniques such as

printing, enlarging, etc. Students will shoot photographs specifically for design layouts and in the process develop

a better visual language, enhance photo selection/editing skills, and learn to visualize the look, form, and structure

of photos they shoot. Finally, students will work to culminate a portfolio for use towards college or technical school

entrance, AP Studio Art submission, or entry into the commercial photography field. An adjustable lens/35mm

camera with a light meter is recommended (Digital SLR) Students are responsible for obtaining necessary supplies.

57


AP 2D DESIGN: DIGITAL PHOTO STUDIO

Offered: Year Course (This course may be repeated for credit.)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Digital Photography Intermediate or Teacher Recommendation

This is an Honors Point Course

Fee: Course fee.

This course is for students who have a strong interest in art. Students will complete a portfolio that meets

prescribed requirements of the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board. The portfolio consists of

three sections that demonstrate Quality or Work, Breadth of Work and a Concentration that investigates a visual

interest that is unique to each student. Photo Studio emphasizes the use of Adobe Creative Suite Four and Digital

photography to explore the emerging field of digital art. Students will push the limits of their creativity as they

explore the full potential of CS4 to develop digital art. Photo Studio is a project-based curriculum that develops

career and communication skills in digital photography, print production and graphic design. Students will use

Adobe tools and technical skills as well as different format cameras, studio lighting situations, and in-depth studies

design. Students will continue to develop their own style and prepare a portfolio which will be submitted for AP

Studio Art 2D Design credit and can be used for college applications. A digital SLR 35mm camera with a light

meter is required. Students are responsible for obtaining necessary supplies.

58


VIDEO

VIDEO TECHNIQUES

Offered: Year Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fee: Course fee.

This course is designed to foster an awareness and understanding of technologies used to communicate in our

modern society. Students will cover the basic elements of video production including script writing, story boarding

and editing. Visual elements and writing skills will be explored. Video projects may include commercials, news,

featured stories, on-line editing and engineering. Students may be involved in school activities such as closed circuit

television, promotional videos, daily announcements, etc. Final Cut Studio Pro as well as Adobe CS4 is used in

this course. Students are responsible for obtaining necessary supplies.

VIDEO PRODUCTION

Offered: Year Course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Video Techniques

Fee: Course fee.

This course focuses more on studio work, on-line editing, digital editing and engineering as well as the audio mixing

and dubbing techniques that are used to enhance video editing. Students will gain a deep knowledge and

understanding of the use of digital editing software. Final Cut Studio Pro as well as Adobe CS4 will be utilized in

production. Emphasis is given to production and technical processes, applications and impact of video Students

will be more involved in school and community video projects. Students are responsible for obtaining necessary

supplies.

VIDEO STUDIO

Offered: Year Course (This course may be repeated for credit.)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Video Production or Teacher Recommendation.

Fee: Course fee.

This studio is designed for the more advanced students and will provide a full production studio experience.

Students will master all equipment functions. School and community projects will also be emphasized. Advanced

students will become involved in interdisciplinary projects as designed by faculty and students. Students are

responsible for obtaining necessary supplies.

59


SPECIAL EDUCATION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Accommodations and modifications will be made to all courses according to the IEP.

The following courses will be offered by special assignment only.

ALGEBRA—CORE

ADVANCED ALGEBRA—CORE

WORLD HISTORY—CORE

AMERICAN HISTORY—CORE

HEALTH EDUCATION

ENGLISH 3/4—CORE

ENGLISH SENIOR ELECTIVES

GEOMETRY—CORE

BIOLOGY—CORE

EARTH SCIENCE—CORE

CONSUMER EDUCATION

ENGLISH 1/2—CORE

ENGLISH 5/6—CORE

60


CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE

Offered: Semester Only

For: 12

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 5/6.

In these semester-long courses students will be exposed to a wide variety of contemporary works with an overarching

goal of enhancing reading for enjoyment. By discussing and analyzing theme-based units, these reading intensive

courses aim to promote literacy while aligning evaluative techniques. Through written and oral reflection, students will

extrapolate relevant parallels between their roles as American teenagers and those of society at large.

MULTI-CULTURAL THEMES

Offered: Semester Only

For: 12

Prerequisite: Previous enrollment in English 5/6.

This course presents multicultural themes and perspectives in literature. This multi-cultural literature is writing that

represents the works of marginalized Americans who illustrate the ethnic diversity of America and the cross cultural

experience that is a part of American life. Emphasis is placed on developing a deeper understanding and awareness

of cultural diversity as reflected in contemporary fiction, non-fiction, and other artistic works.

LIVING SKILLS 1/2, 3/4, 5/6, 7/8

(West Only)

Offered: Year Course

For: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

These courses are block schedule classes that provide students credits towards English and Math requirements.

Students are engaged in a functional curriculum that offers experiences in academic settings, community assimilation,

cooking, speech and language development, and group dynamics to foster social skills development. An integrated

curriculum of English and math provides students with a hands-on academic experience that focus on developing

independent living skills. This course addresses computation, money, time and calendar skills. Living Skills also

concentrates on functional reading and writing, comprehension and vocabulary development. Students in these

courses will focus on developing basic academic skills in all areas. Students in Living Skills courses will build on

knowledge acquired in previous Living Skills courses and learn to apply it independently in more complex situations.

DRIVER EDUCATION

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10, 11, 12

Driver Education Prerequisite:

According to state law, Pursuant to Sections 27-23 and 27-24.2 of the School Code, no student shall be permitted to enroll

in a driver education course provided by a public school district or a nonpublic school unless he or she has either:

1) received a passing grade in at least eight courses (which may include courses completed in grade 8) during the previous two

semesters or, in the case of block scheduling that reduces the number of courses taken per semester, in at least half the courses

taken during the previous two semesters.

Driver Education Fees: a course fee is required plus a $20.00 Illinois State permit fee to be paid on the first day of

class.

Students must pass the written Driver Education Vehicle Code Permit Test to advance to the

Behind-The-Wheel (BTW) phase. Pending availability of instructors, students are selected in

chronological order by birth date and are given the opportunity to successfully complete the

required 6 hours of training. Students have the option of taking BTW before or after school

as the schedules permit.

61


SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 1/2, 3/4

Offered: Year or Semester Course

For: 9, 10, 11,12

Prerequisite: Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

Social Psychology is a class designed to prepare students to function more effectively in society. Emphasis is placed

on the academic, as well as, affective areas. Academic areas addressed are study skills, organizational skills, testtaking

skills, listening skills and higher level thinking skills. Students are provided with skill approaches to assist them

in mastering course work aligned to the Illinois State standards. Affective areas are addressed through weekly group

counseling and curriculum, assistance in social skills, decision-making, problem-solving skills, stress management and

values clarification.

PRE-VOCATIONAL TRAINING (West Only)

Offered: Year Course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

This course objective includes the introduction of the value of work in everyday life. Through functional experiences

students will study and identify and general prevocational skills and attitudes necessary for successful performance

on-the-job.

OCCUPATIONAL SURVEY (West Only)

Offered: Year Course

For: 11

Prerequisite: Individualized Education Plan (IEP) and 16 years of age. Course requires 2 periods per day for 1

credit per semester.

This course is designed to prepare students for competitive employment in the community. Students study and

demonstrate appropriate work behavior and attitudes by attending class and training in a supervised position in

VOCATIONAL SURVEY (West Only)

Offered: Year Course

For: 10

Prerequisite: Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

This course objective includes increasing career and self-awareness, through the study of employment

clusters and interest inventories and functional work experiences. By training in the school setting,

students will experience the relationship between employment and learning. This survey of employment

experiences will help them begin the process of transitioning to the world of work.

PREVOCATIONAL EDUCATION

Offered: Semester Course

For: 10

Prerequisite: Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

Students will increase career awareness and identify vocational interest. Students will study various employment

clusters and job requirements to begin making a career plan. Additionally, students will increase self-awareness by

taking various interest inventories to generally identify personal interests, abilities and values. Through various multisensory

activities and projects, students will be introduced to the process of how to successfully seek and maintain

employment, as well as, establish a career plan.

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RELATED INSTRUCTION 1

Offered: Semester/Year Course (Meets 1 period per day; 1 credit per semester: 0.5 credit for class work; 0.5 credit

for employment work)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

This course is designed for students who are ready for community-based employment. Students will list sources of

employment, complete job applications and participate in job interviews to secure employment. Students are

expected to identify and display the qualities of a good worker. Transition topics covered include fringe benefits,

taxes, banking and worker organizations. The development of employability skills, which will enable students to make

the transition from school to the world of work, will be stressed. The Prevocational Coordinator will assist students

securing employment in an approved training station.

RELATED INSTRUCTION 2

Offered: Semester/Year Course (Meets 1 period per day; for one credit per semester.)

For: 12

Prerequisite: Individualized Education Plan (IEP)

This course is designed for students who are ready for community-based employment. Students continue to enhance

skills learned in Related I. Students will actively seek and maintain employment. Transition topics covered include

social security, insurance, budgeting, major life purchases, problem solving, effective communication and interpersonal

relations in the work place. The development of employability skills, which will enable students to make the transition

from school to the world of work, will be stressed. The Prevocational Coordinator will assist students securing

employment in an approved training station.

RELATED INSTRUCTION/EMPLOYMENT

Offered: Semester/Year Course (Meets 1 period per day for one credit per semester: 0.5 credit for class work per

semester and 0.5 credit for employment/training experience per semester.)

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Individualized Education Plan (IEP). Students must be at least 16 years old. Students will be

recommended for the program by a multi disciplinary team, counselor or teacher.

The activities for Related Instruction will vary according to the abilities of the individual students. Students will be

provided instruction and experiences that are in line with the district’s curricular initiatives. Assignments relating to

on-the-job experiences, films, guest speakers, field trips and activities considered important by the group and/or

teacher coordinator will be addressed. Students will be responsible for learning and demonstrating appropriate workbased

skills and behaviors. The development of employability skills will be stressed to ensure the successful

transition from school to the world of work. Teacher-coordinators will assist students to secure either, part-time

competitive employment or a training position at an approved work-training site and contact employers quarterly for

evaluation purposes. Students will attend academic classes and keep a log of hours worked at an approved site.

Students will be available before or after school for individual conferences, meetings and/or class projects.

Adaptive Academic Classrooms - For students who may present significant levels of developmental delays, multiple disabilities,

functional and pervasive developmental disorders, Autism, and to students exhibiting physical limitations with mobility, vision and

hearing. Teachers incorporate adaptive strategies and supports to encourage student success. Students are presented with daily

instruction in the areas of communication, socialization, daily living skills, vocational skills and recreational activities.

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ENGLISH AS A NEW LANGUAGE AND

BILINGUAL EDUCATION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COURSES FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELLs)

English for English Language Learners (ELLs) courses are offered to limited English proficient students in order

to develop students’ English skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening. ELL courses are designed to

prepare students for mainstream courses. Students are tested to determine which level of ELL instruction best

suits their needs. As students’ skills and proficiency in English improve, they move into higher level courses. It

is the goal of the Morton High School English as a New Language program to provide every student with the

necessary English skills to be successful in mainstream English courses.

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ELL ENGLISH 1

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Placement in this course is determined by W-APT/ACCESS score as well as teacher recommendation

This course is for students who have minimal comprehension of English. Emphasis is on listening, speaking, reading and

writing. Students enrolled in ELL English 1 are also enrolled in ELL Reading 1. This course fulfills one unit of English credit.

ELL READING 1

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Enrollment in ELL English 1

This course provides students with an intensive study of reading and writing skills. Writing skills advance from the sentence

level to paragraph level and eventually to essays and reports. Adapted reading materials are used for identifying main ideas,

details as well as literal and inferential information.

ELL ENGLISH 2

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Placement in this course is determined by W-APT/ACCESS score as well as teacher recommendation

This course is for students who are able to ask questions and respond in English, read and comprehend paragraphs, and

write using simple and complex clauses. Emphasis is on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Students enrolled in ELL

English 2 are concurrently enrolled in ELL Reading 2. This course fulfills one unit of English credit.

ELL READING 2

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Enrollment in ELL English 2

This course provides students with a continued study of English focusing on reading and writing skills. Students will complete

four to six leveled readers throughout the year.

ELL ENGLISH 3

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Placement in this course is determined by W-APT/ACCESS score as well as teacher recommendation

This course is for students who understand and participate in everyday English conversation. Continued attention to speaking

and listening is given. Emphasis is on English language structure. Students enrolled in ELL English 3 are concurrently

enrolled in ELL Reading 3. This course fulfills one unit of English credit.

ELL ENGLISH 4

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Placement in this course is determined by W-APT/ACCESS score as well as teacher recommendation

This course is for students who understand and participate in everyday English conversation as well as in academic settings.

Students will continue to expand and strengthen their reading, writing and speaking skills. This course fulfills one unit of

English credit.

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BILINGUAL CONTENT AREA COURSES

Bilingual courses are available to Spanish speaking ELL students. The language of instruction is

primarily Spanish with academic language development, concept review, and mastery opportunities in

English.

BILINGUAL WORLD HISTORY

Offered: Year course

For: 9

Prerequisite: Enrollment in ELL English 1-4

Students will trace human development from earliest time periods to the Space Age as well as increase their awareness of

man’s role in the creation of various societies. This course is required by most colleges for admission.

BILINGUAL AMERICAN HISTORY

Offered: Year course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4.

Students will review, analyze and interpret the various forces and values that have shaped and continue to influence behavior

and events in American history. Students are expected to complete a research project or paper. This course fulfills the

American History graduation requirement.

BILINGUAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

Offered: Semester Course (offered during the fall semester only)

For: 10, 11, and 12

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4

Students will investigate the history of Latin America, the geography of the region, the cultures of that region (both Native

American and the hybrid cultures which emerged after European settlement), and the relationship of this region to the rest of

the world. Students will study material from Pre-Columbian times to the 20th Century.

BILINGUAL MODERN HISTORY

Offered: Semester Course (offered during the spring semester only)

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4

Required Textbook: Sherman, Dennis. (2003). Modern World History: The Human Journey. Houghton Mifflin

In this course students will trace history from World War II to the present. World War II, The Cold War, postwar independence

movements, the Vietnam War, developments in Latin America and the Middle East are among the topics covered. This

course also examines the technological and social changes that have taken place since World War II. Students will gain an

understanding of how these events and changes have shaped the world they now live in.

BILINGUAL AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

Offered: Semester Course

For:,12

Required Textbook: (2001).American Government, Pacemaker

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4

Students will examine the basic principles and foundations of American Government. A heavy emphasis of study will

be on the Constitution and the role it plays in the day-to-day lives of American citizens. Students will learn about their

basic rights and how to protect them. Students will also gain an understanding of the importance of becoming active

citizens in their communities and in understanding the strengths and weaknesses of the American system of

government compared to that of other nations.

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BILINGUAL ALGEBRA

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4

The basis of study in Algebra is the structure and properties of the real number system as well as solving and graphing

equations and inequalities.

BILINGUAL GEOMETRY

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4. Students must have completed Algebra.

Students in this course will learn properties of plane and solid figures, geometric constructions, proof and coordinate

geometry.

BILINGUAL ADVANCED ALGEBRA

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra and Geometry. Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4.

Students will review beginning algebra with an emphasis on the structure of a mathematical system. Students will study

additional topics, which include functional relations, exponents, logarithms, progressions, complex numbers, permutations,

combinations and probability. ACT Preparation activities are included. A graphing calculator is integral to success in this

course.

BILINGUAL BIOLOGY

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4

Fee: Course fee.

Students will develop an understanding of the principal laws that govern the existence of all life. Student work emphasizes

experimentation, accurate observation and analysis of experimental data. Concepts include: problem solving, cellular biology,

biochemistry, ecology, evolution, reproduction, heredity, as well as plant and animal physiology.

BILINGUAL EARTH SCIENCE

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Completion of Biology or Physical Science. Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4.

Fee: Course fee.

Students enrolled in this course will study man’s physical environment. Student work focuses on the study of minerals, rocks,

volcanoes, seismology, plate tectonics, hydrology, meteorology, Earth’s history and interpreting data. This course is accepted

for college preparation in laboratory science.

BILINGUAL CHEMISTRY

Offered: Year course

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4 and must have completed Biology and Algebra.

Fee: Course fee.

In this course, students will learn the principles that underlie chemical changes and their theoretical applications. Laboratory

work emphasizes techniques of observation, analysis of data and formation of conclusions based on data. A scientific

calculator is essential. This course is accepted for college preparation in laboratory science.

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BILINGUAL HEALTH

Offered: Semester course

For: 9 or administrative approval

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4

This course will help students to view health as a way of life. This course covers the following state-mandated topics:

consumer health, dental health, drug use and abuse, human growth and development, mental health and illness and

environmental concerns. Additional topics include nutrition, fitness, personal care, abstinence, prevention, detection and

control of communicable diseases as well as disaster and safety skills. This course is required for graduation.

BILINGUAL CONSUMER EDUCATION

Offered: Semester course

For: 12

Prerequisite: Students must be enrolled in ELL English 1-4

Students will learn the consumer education topics required under Illinois Senate Bill 977. This course fulfills the Consumer

Education graduation requirement.

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MODERN LANGUAGE

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

MODERN LANGUAGE COURSES

Courses in Modern Language are strongly recommended as part of a college-preparatory sequence. Placement into the Spanish

program is determined by the Modern Language Department placement exam.

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FRENCH/SPANISH 1/2

Offered: Year course

For: 10, 11, and 12

Fee: Course fee.

Students begin to speak, read and write in the language as well as study the culture and geography of

those who speak it.

FRENCH/SPANISH 3/4

Offered: Year course

For: 10, 11, and 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French/Spanish 1/2

Fee: Course fee.

Students will continue to expand their knowledge of the vocabulary and grammar as well as strengthen

speaking, reading and writing skills. Students will continue to study the culture and geography of countries

where this language is spoken.

FRENCH/SPANISH 5//6

Offered: Year course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French/Spanish 1/2 and 3/4

Fee: Course fee.

Students will continue to strengthen their speaking, reading and writing skills in the language at a higher

level. Study of the culture of the countries where this language is spoken will continue at this level.

AP FRENCH 7/8

Offered: Year course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of French 1/2, 3/4 and 5/6

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee for AP French only

By the end of four years of instruction, students will be able to communicate and understand the grammar

of the language. This is an honor point course. Students are encouraged to take the AP French exam

(at an additional cost).

SPANISH FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS 1/2

Offered: Year course

For: 10, 11, and 12

Prerequisite: Placement is determined by the Modern Language department proficiency exam

Fee: Course fee.

This course is designed for native and heritage Spanish speakers. Students will learn to read and write at

a proficient level by studying correct usage of vocabulary and grammar. Students will also study Hispanic

culture through various readings and activities concerning festivities, important historical events and works

of influential authors of Spanish-speaking countries.

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SPANISH FOR SPANISH SPEAKERS 3/4

Offered: Year course

For: 10, 11, and 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish for Spanish Speakers 1/2 or teacher recommendation

Fee: Course fee.

This course is designed for native and heritage speakers. Students continue strengthening Spanish reading

and writing skills.

AP SPANISH LANGUAGE

Offered: Year course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Credit in Spanish (or Spanish for Spanish Speakers 3/4) 1/2, 3/4, 5/6 or teacher

recommendation

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.

By the end of four years of instruction, students will be able to communicate and understand Spanish

grammar. Emphasis is given to the AP Spanish Language exam. This is an honor point course. Students

are required to take the AP exam.

AP SPANISH LITERATURE

Offered: Year course

For: 11, 12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP Spanish Language or teacher recommendation

Fee: Course fee and mandatory AP exam fee.

Students will continue to read, speak and write in Spanish, continue the study of cultures of Spanishspeaking

countries and read a variety of literary works written in Spanish. Emphasis is given to

preparation for the AP Spanish Literature exam. This is an honor point course. Students are required to

take the AP exam (at an additional cost).

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ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL

PROGRAM

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ALTERNATIVE SCHOOL PROGRAM

The Alternative School provides a non-traditional education program housed in a separate building located in Cicero,

IL. Two independent programs are offered to students who have experienced primarily behavior problems at their

home high schools: one program for regular education students and a separate program for special education

students. The objective of the alternative school is to provide a positive, supportive environment that encourages

development of academic and social growth, job skills, and career goals while completing established graduation

requirements.

The Alternative School uses the integrated and interdisciplinary team approach which allows the “teaching team” to

share a common planning and preparation period. The students take four required core courses as well as courses

designed to improve their employability and personal/social adjustment in our society.

Personal Social Development is another component of the program. This program is designed to prepare students to

function more effectively in society. Topics include self-understanding, respecting the rights of others, feelings,

family, relationships, and the future. Two/three days per week the students meet with a professional counselor as

well as the regular classroom teacher. The group experience helps students assume responsibility for their actions,

discuss alternative solutions to negative situations, and develop positive peer relationships. There is also a

requirement for community service one-day per week.

Lastly, the school administers an “open entry-open exit” program, which creates a constant change in the composition

of the student body. Students may seek return to their home high school upon successful completion of their term at

the alternative school.

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COOPERATIVE WORK TRAINING

Offered: Semester

For: 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Sophomores, juniors and seniors may participate in our cooperative work-training program. Students working for a

minimum of fifteen hours per week will receive an extra half credit per semester. The fifteen hours per week

requirement may also be met by documenting time spent in a job search or community service. The coordinator will

maintain contact with the student’s employer to assist the student in staying employed.

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

Offered: Semester Course

For: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Fee: None

Students will experience business concepts (marketing, pricing etc.), in an integrated learning environment in line with

district and state standards. Through the use of an entrepreneurship simulation activity math, reading, writing and

critical thinking skills will be continuously demonstrated. Students will also develop job skills by participating in a

school run business. Classroom activities and self-examination will guide students in developing personal career

goals. These goals will then be developed into a plan of action for implementation.

STUDENT SEMINAR 1/2

Offered: One Year Course

For: 9, 10

Prerequisite: None

Students in this course will learn basic skills and strategies in reading, writing, arithmetic, and problem solving. They

will progress through these topics in order to develop the competencies necessary for the successful completion of

high school.

STUDENT SEMINAR 3/4

Offered: One Year Course

For: 10, 11

Prerequisite: Student Seminar 1/2 (or equivalent)

Students in this course will apply higher order thinking skills to reading, writing, arithmetic, and problem solving.

They will improve strategies in these topics in order to prepare them for life after high school.

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COMPARATIVE ARTS 1/2

Offered: Semester Course

For: 11,12

Prerequisite: None

Fee: Course fee.

This is a general course designed to fulfill the one credit graduation requirement. This course introduces the basic

vocabulary and concepts of a variety of art forms and exposes students to art works of different cultures. Students

will explore the creative processes artists use.

HEALTH & FITNESS EDUCATION

Offered: One Year Course

For: 9, 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite: None

Students will learn the skills in a variety of different sports activities which include basketball, volleyball, flag football,

softball, and many other sports. This course will emphasize the major components of physical conditioning which are

weight training, cardiovascular development, nutrition, stress management, wellness, and stretching routines. Specific

activities for each day will vary depending on the weather and facility availability. To enhance the student’s learning,

they will have a variety of class activities, videos, and class handouts.

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