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1962 May 11 - New Page 1 [www2.vmi.edu] - Virginia Military Institute

1962 May 11 - New Page 1 [www2.vmi.edu] - Virginia Military Institute

1962 May 11 - New Page 1 [www2.vmi.edu] - Virginia Military

H I . Cab' VOLUME U VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE, LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA, MAY 11, 1962 NUMBER 2IT Banqim^TdB^ Held For Cadet Piihlication Staffs Dudley P. Digges, editrprial writer for the Baltimore Sun, will be the principal speaker^ at the first annual Awards Banquet of the Vir- inia Military Institute Publications f oard here Thursday, May 17. The - banquet, which will be attended by approximatfely 150 .cadets. Institute officials, and guests will be the occasion for the initial presentation of awards and certificates to cadets who have done distinguished or meritorious work on various publications put out by the Corps durii^ the school year. A graduate of VMI in the Class of 1939, Digges has been a member of the Sun staff since World Wan II and spent a year in Europe on assignment to interview leaders ofj the,Western nations and make an assessment of Europe's political! future. During the war he served as a lieutenant colonel of intelligentle attached to the .Allies' Supreme He^dquafters. Two awards ibeing granted this year honor retired VMI faculty members who were closely associated with cadet publications during their active careers. The Colonel John E. Townes award, a silver plate and certificate is named for * a proftissor of history who served for fifteen years as faculty advisor of The VMI Cadet, tt will go ta the member of the cadet^ staff cited for highest achievement in service and leadership. Similarly, a plate and certificate named for Colonel William Couper, Institute historiographer for neariy half a century, will be awarded a member of the staff of the Bomb. - A third mai«r award will be the Superintendent's ^Pubricatiohs - A^ardi' a' silver plate 'and certificate, tb be given the cadfet mirn- • ber of t^ Publications Board who 7 ' (Cdntinu^ Oh Page 7) Senator Tower Speaks To W & L Assembly By Frank Frosch Wednesday night, the Young Republican's Club of Washington »nd Lee University present^ Senaor John G. Tower, Republican rom Texas, who spoke to a partian crowd on the views and future ;^of the Republican Party and the conservative movement in the United States. The Senator lost no time in presen^ihg his credentials— ,a strong conservative in philosophy »and a loyal Rfepubliean in politics. One of the highlights of the First Class Trip came on Friday evening. May 4th, when Major General William B. Rosson, U. S. Army, (above), addressed the class following the Stag Mess at the Folt Myer Officer's Club. At 43, General Rosson is the youngest Major General in the Army and is currently assigned as Special A^sistaynt to ibe Chief of Staff, U. S..Army. for Special Warfare. A graduate of the University of Oregon, and a member of Phi Beta Kappa, tife General saw combat in the European Theatre of World Wal- IX and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross at Anzio. Also, he served as Plans Officer for th* U. S. MiUtary Advisory Group in Indo-China and vns there in this capacity when Dieobienphu fell in 1954. General Rosso begaa by stating his high regard for VMI graduates. He went even further to say that he hoped to see many of the class in the service and that he would consider himself fortunate to have VMI graduates in his command. The General received his loudest applause when he mentioned Col. Glover S. Johns. Jr., class of 1931 and a former Comnumdant, who led the relief Battle Group into Berlin at the height of the Berlin crisis. . The General then spoke on the challanges facing the personnel of Army. He stated that he did not know of a single field t^t offered, % greater challange for a young man than the armed service and he was most explicit in explaiAing the moral, physical, and intelJec^l demands that guerilla warfare has put oa the junior officer. Foreign Conference At Annapolis Relations Held First Classmen Samuel A. Cle^nent and Stanley E. Henning represented VMI at the second annual The Senator, among other top Republican leaders, hopes that-the lext two elections will see the esabjishment of a two-party system ance again the South, thus breakng the monopoly held by the Demo Tats. He asserted that the "Repulican Party represents the true outhern point of view, for it is the >nly true national party." Because of the widespread talk ; over the purposes and philosophies of the conservative movement, Senator Tower digressed from national affairs to define the conservative situation as he regards it. "Conservatives have an inherent desire to preserve those traditions that have made our country great," he opened. The fallacy that conservatives do not beileve in and recognize progress is certainly a falsehood, he assured, for without this progress our country would not'N^val Academy Foreign Affairs have achieved the' status it now j conference, held May 2-5 at the proudly holds. But a conservative, united states Naval Academy In is a person that wUl not throw off j Annapolis. Maryland. The subject our political, social, and economic of the three-day conference was Institutions for more personal, "Problems of United States Foreign power. "We conservatives are the real liberals," he then observed. "Mr. Kennedy and his group are the true reactionaries." He vertiflfed this by stating that it is the clandestine purpose of the New Frontier to sap the power from the people and to entrench themselves in an oligarchy in Washington. This is simply becavse the administration has no confidence in the Amerioan public to make decisions and to • determine the course of their liv^s for themselves. "A ruler should be completely responsible to his people, not the people completely to their ruler,' he continued sagely, "and the Kennedy clan is becoming less and less so because they are concentrated solely on securing only great power for themsOlves and their immediate advisors." Changing to currant events. Seoa- (Continued on Page 7) Policy in Latin America." The conference was attended by more than 140 delegates from over 60 institutions, chiefly in the eastern United States. The conferees were placed in eight roundtable discussion groups, each conferee staying with the same roundtable for the entire conference. Elach roundtable was led by a moderator drawn from a university faculty or a government department. In addition each group was addressed by one or more representatives of the country or countries being dealt with by that particular roundtable. Clement participated in the discussion on Mexico, led by Dr. How ard Cline of the Library of Congress. author of several articles and books on Mexico and Mexican- United States relations. Hennlng participated in the roundtable discussion on southern South America (continued on page 4) First Class Trip Is Deemed A Success By Owen Chambers Shortly after noon on the 1st of May, the members of the Class of 1962 departed on their First Class Trip in lieu of the Corps' annual Field Training Exercises. The trip lasted five days in its entirety and covered a great deal of territory. This excursion gave to all who participated a comprehensive look into many here-to-fore unseen facets of military life. Arriving at Quantico, Va., the Class was the Marine Corps' guest at a Mess Night held at the Basic School. The evening began with the sound of drums and bugles and was followed by a six course meal ser- and terminated at the Calvin A. Lloyd Rifle Range where the ClaiU was given a firepower demonstration of the M-14 rifle by Lt. George Van Orden, of the Class of 'SI. After a quick lunch the group departed from Quantico f9r the NIKE Hercules Site at Lorton, Virginia; home of Battery C of the 71st Artillery Battalion of the Washington-Baltimore Defense Area. After leaving Lorton, the Class proceeded to Washington and Fort Lesley J. McNair, home of the Industrial College of the Armed Forces and the National War College, where they were billeted in the barracks of Company A, Ist ved by scarlet jacketed waiters. Battle Group, 3rd Infantry (The The guest of honor for the evening | Old Guard). When the group's parwas Brigadier General John C. Miller, Director of the Marine Corps Landing Force and Development Center, who addressed the Class following a performance by the Basic School Chorus. Early on Wednesday the Class sonal effects were taken care of, bhey were then treated to a Filet Mignon dinner before departing for Fort Myer, Va., and the "Prelude to Taps" Pageant. This Pageant was given in honor of the Virginia Military Institute started a short but thorough tour; and included "The Army Story", of the U.S. Marine Ck)rps Schools. I "Soliders in Combat", The Old This tour began with an address' Guard Fife and Drum Corps, Tha by Col. Fenton J. Mee, Commanding Honor Guard Drill - Team, "The Officer o? the Training and Test Story of the Stars and Stripes", and Regiment, and a glimpse of the , "The Black Manual" (by the Hoo^ Marine Corp's notorious "0" Course (Continued on Page 3) General Kilboiirne To Receive First VMI New Market Medal Lieutenant General Charles E. Kilbourhe, superintendent emeritus of the Virginia Military Institute, has been named first recipient of the VMI New Market Medal, an award designed to be given to prominent Americans whose own careers reflect the qualities which carried forward the Institute's corps of cadets in their successful charge against Union forces at the Battle of New Market, May 15, 1864. GEN. 15. The event will be a feature of the traditional New Market Day observance. General Kilbourne, who served as VMI superintendent from 1937 to 1946, is holder of the nation's three highest awards for gallantry. A native of Virginia and son of an Army officer, he was graduated from VMI in 1894 witli a degree in Civil Engineering and won the Second Jackson-Hope Medal, one of the Institute's highe.st academic honors. With the outbreak of the Spanish- American War, he volunteered for service and served as a second lieu- . tenant in the Philippines from 189S . to 1899, winning the Congressiorial Medal ®f-Hon®r for gallantry di.^played when he climbed a pole to repair a telegraph wire under heavy fire. In WorW War I wliile on a tour of the Western Front he was badly wounded in the eye by a mortar burst. After his recovery, he re^ turned to duty on the Westera Front and during subsequent .services was awarded the Distinguish- General Kilbourne will receive the medal at a special ceremony to be held on the VMI parade ground at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, May ed Service cross for exceptional heroism, and the Distinguished Service Medal and the French Croix De Guerre. In later years. General Kilbourae was assigned again to the Philippines and was credited before his retirement in 1936 with organizing and constructing the defenses at Corregidor in which United State.? forces held out for months without relief after the beginning of World War II. General Kilbourne now makes hia home in Lexington. The New Market Medal, intended to be awarded to distinguished American citizens, was executed by Pierre I>aura, Spanish^rn artist and sculptor of international rsnown who lives at Rockbridfi® Baths. The bronae medal shows on the reverse side a design related to the famous painting of the charge of the cadets at New Market by Benjamin West Clinedinst, which hangs in Jackson Memorial Hall at VMI. On the other side are the words "Duty, Honor, Devotion, Leadership," surrounded by dogwood bloasonvs. The award of the medal to Gfeaeral Kitboume will be followed immediately by the traditional ceir*» nvony during which the modera cadets pay tribute to the New Mjuv ket Corps and the cadets who fell ia the battle.

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