Will - The Metro Herald

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Will - The Metro Herald

I DO, I DO . . .

OR

YEA! I DID IT!

Our next issue will kick off the month

of June which is Black Music Month,

National Dairy Month, and National

Ice Tea Month. We will also be

highlighting Father’s Day 2006, Juneteenth 2006, the

annual Folklife Festival on the mall, the annual Waterfront

Festival, National Hunger Awareness Day, the BET Awards, the

50th Anniversary of the Interstate System, and the

SILVERDOCS documentary film festival—just to mention a

few. June is also the month of brides and grads, so if you have

either on your agenda, The Metro Herald would like to offer you

our sincere CONGRATS and wish you and your family members

the BESTEST, COOLEST, MOST BLESSED time ever!

Fauquier

County

Carroll County

Howard County

Loudoun

County

Fairfax

County

Prince

William

County

Arlington County

Richmond

Baltimore

Montgomery

County

D.C.

Alexandria

Spotsylvania

County

Stafford

County

Fredericksburg

Annapolis

Anne

Arundel County

Prince George’s

County

Westmoreland

County

Charles

County

VOLUME XV, NUMBER 21 Imaging the Politics, Culture, and Events of Our Times

May 26, 2006

✶✮✶✸✻✲✪✵☎✭✪❂

✻✮✶✮✶✫✻✪✷✬✮☎✖✔✔✚

✽he

Shadow

of

Sunlight

holds

everything

still

in

its

silence . . .

As

it

walks

across

a

carpeted

field

of

grass

painted

in

a

thousand

shades

of

green,

a

boy

moves

towards

the

hallowed

grounds

which

hold

the

man

that

taught

him

how

to

play

baseball

and

to

laugh

from

the

frame

of

his

stomach

and

not

the

back

of

his

throat.

A

man

who

thawed

his

mind

from

being

self-centered

and

non-caring.

A

place

where

love

over-ruled

all

other

emotions . . .

He

is

a

soldier’s

son

who

believed

in

God

and

country

and

family

and

self . . .

He

pinched

the

small

coin

that

his

dad

had

given

him

and

cupped

it

in

Photo Courtesy

Department of Defense

his

other

hand . . .

He

knew

that

there

would

be

no

easy

way

to

start

this

conversation,

but

he

must

talk

about

how

life

had

stopped

and

then

started

again.

He

now

lives

Continued on

page 2

Visit us on the web at www.metroherald.com


THE

METRO HERALD

NEWSPAPER

The Metro Herald, a resource of Davis

Communications Group, Inc., is published

weekly. The Metro Herald is a member of the

National Newspaper Publishers Association, the

Virginia Press Association, and the Newspaper

Association of America.

PUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR/

MANAGING EDITOR

Paris D. Davis

ART DIRECTOR/WEBMASTER

Glenda S. King

EXECUTIVE MANAGER

Gregory Roscoe, Jr.

ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR

Daisy E. Cole

SENIOR BUSINESS & SECURITY

CORRESPONDENT

Rodney S. Azama

Regular subscription rate: $75/year for home

delivery. Single issue price: $.75

For advertising information and rates, call (703)

548-8891, or visit www.MetroHerald.com.

Copyright ©2005 by Davis Communications

Group, Inc. No part of this publication may be

reproduced by any means without prior written

consent from the publisher.

All unsolicited manuscripts should be accompanied

by a self-addressed stamped envelope.

The publisher assumes no responsibility for

unsolicited material.

The Metro Herald is certified by the Maryland

Department of Transportation. Its corporate headquarters

is located at 901 North Washington

Street, Suite 603, Alexandria, VA 22314. Davis

Communications Group, Inc., is certified as a

small and minority business. For additional information,

call (703) 548-8891.

Circulation: 42,000 copies per week

Certified by Dasai Group, CPA

To obtain a one-year subscription, please send a

check or money order for $75 to:

The Metro Herald

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in

a

moment

that

is

not

totally

his

. . . A

foreign

place

that

he

accepts

but

does

not

know

. . . yet

he

is

at

a

place

where

the

past

with

his

past

comes

alive

. . .he

almost

always

start

his

conversations

with

his

dad

by

saying

his

dad

is

love . . .

And

that

now

and

always

he

will

take

care

of

the

family

and

mom . . .

and

you

always

say

that

all

is

all

May 26, 2006

Editorial

and

nothing

is

alone

. . . and

that

our

family

is

now

living

on

our

side

of

the

divide

for

this

moment;

you

and

I.

. . . death

and

life

side

by

side

expressing

the

pain

and

sorrow . . .

beyond

that

look

for

the

good.

. . . then

why

are

you

dead

and

who’s

tomorrow

can

I

steal

. . . I

am

alone

inside

your

thoughts.

Where

can

you

take

tomorrow,

today

with

sails

powered

with

your

dreams

and

my

determination

yet

dad

we

are

not

the

one’s

choosing

the

peace . . .

Iraq

has

now

sucked-out

all

of

my

oxygen

as

it

suffocated

all

of

yours . . .

You

have

always

said

push

the

edge

of

where

you

are

to

where

you

want

it

to

be.

I

am

confused,

yet

I

know

God

is

always

having

us

re-think

our

morality

. . . And

the

will

of

God

may

lie

beneath

many

options

available

to

man . . .

And

where

is

the

road

to

peace.

I

love

you . . .

Every

year

my

conversation

with

you

will

get

easier . . .

but

not

now,

your

death

has

suddened

upon

us,

. . . faith

is

a

way

of

covering

thoughts

. . .you

always

said

to

me,

that

I

could

never

hit

two

curve

balls

in

a

row.

I

didn’t

hit

it

last

night

and

I

never

saw

this

one

coming . . .

PDD

2 THE METRO HERALD


May 26, 2006

THE METRO HERALD 3


AROUND THE REGION/AROUND THE NATION

May 26, 2006

For the 22nd consecutive year,

local students will have an opportunity

to earn money this

summer while providing an array of

community services to improve the

quality of life for area residents

through Operation Brightside.

Each summer, the “Green Team”

takes on a six-week project conducted

by the Jacksonville Urban League with

support from the Anheuser-Busch

Jacksonville brewery. The project

provides jobs for youths from low- to

moderate-level income families.

By joining the Anheuser-Busch Operation

Brightside team, they are improving

the quality of life for area residents,

advancing their education and

earning money while they’re doing it.

One of the core priorities of the Green

Team program is to teach job skills to

the participants.

“Operation Brightside gives these

students a sense of volunteerism and

humanitarianism that will be instilled

in them for a lifetime. It shows the

participants and others around them

that there is joy in helping others,” said

Syl Robinson, plant manager for the

Jacksonville brewery. “Equally if not

more important, however, are the job

skills the participants learn. On the

Green Team, they are taught the importance

of getting along with coworkers,

being punctual and seeing a

job through to completion.”

According to Richard Danford,

Ph.D., Jacksonville area Urban League

president, the Anheuser-Busch Jacksonville

brewery has supported the

Urban League since 1984.

“Like Anheuser-Busch, the Urban

League has a long, proud tradition of

serving the community, and we’re

pleased to be part of Operation Brightside,”

said Danford. “The Operation

Brightside program enables participants

to fulfill self-proposed missions

of giving back to their respective communities

and finding solutions to community

needs.”

To be selected for the Green Team,

each student must complete a written

application and interview, submit a

copy of their transcript or report card,

write a 250-word essay and must have

personal recommendations from their

school or respected members of their

communities.

Team members must be at least 16

year of age. They will be paid $6.15

per hour and work six hours a day Monday

through Friday for six weeks, beginning

June 26, 2006. The Green

Team activity ends Aug. 4, 2006, with a

commemorative luncheon and a career

day that helps team members learn how

PROJECT TO HELP IMPROVE HEALTH

OF CHESAPEAKE BAY COMPLETED

Officials at The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission

announced that the major maintenance project on an existing

storm water management pond in Sligo Creek Stream Valley

Park in Silver Spring, designed to improve environmental runoff into the

Chesapeake Bay, has been completed and the trail has been reopened.

Located upstream of University Boulevard behind the Kemp Mill Shopping

Center, the pond provides water quality and flood control benefits to the

downstream sections of Sligo Creek.

Over time, the pond collected material generated from upstream erosion

and ensures those materials does not end up in the Chesapeake Bay. The

project removed the collected sediments and modified the control systems for

improved efficiency.

To protect trails around the surrounding area and maintain pedestrian access

during construction, the contractor installed wood mulch paths and safety

fencing along the existing hiker/biker trail between University Boulevard and

the pond. Materials generated from the project were used to grade an open

space within Evans Parkway Neighborhood Park to improve drainage and usability.

“Nearby residents and trail users were very patient with the construction

process which took longer than expected due to weather and limited work

areas, but the trail is now reopened and the pond function has been improved

dramatically in terms of protecting Sligo Creek,” said project manager Andy

Frank.

M-NCPPC’s award-winning 32,695-acre park system in Montgomery

County includes 395 parks, 274 playgrounds, 305 tennis courts, 360 athletic

fields, more than 200 miles of trails, two ice rinks, 133 picnic areas, nature

and equestrian centers, lakes and marinas, recreation buildings and more.

Visit us on the web at

www.metroherald.com

OPERATION

BRIGHTSIDE 2006

to prepare a resume and search for a job.

This year, Anheuser-Busch will

contribute almost $500,000 to sponsor

Green Team programs in the cities in

which it operates breweries. The company

also has sponsored Green Teams

at summer and winter Olympic competitions,

entertainment events and major

sports events, including the 2006

NCAA Final Four in Indianapolis.

For more information, visit www.

anheuser-busch.com

CIVIC FORUM ON

GERMANTOWN

MASTER PLAN

To begin updating the 1989

Germantown Master Plan,

the Montgomery County

Department of Planning invites the

public to participate in a civic

forum on Wednesday, May 31

from 7:30p.m. to 9p.m. with discussion

by community and business

leaders. The forum will take

place at the Black Rock Center for

the Arts, 12901 Town Commons

Drive, Germantown.

Montgomery County Councilmember

Michael Knapp (District

2, Upcounty) will moderate

the discussion on the future of the

employment corridor identified in

the 1989 Germantown Master

Plan. Panel participants include:

• Allison Bryant, Ph.D., Montgomery

County Planning Board

• Royce Hanson, former Planning

Board Chairman for the

1974 Germantown Master Plan

• Steve Poteat, former Upcounty

Regional Services Center Director

• John Carter, Chief, Community-Based

Planning Division.

The panel will discuss the past,

present and future of the area along

the I-270 High Technology Employment

Corridor in Germantown.

Participants will explore

the relationship between transportation

infrastructure and land

use planning in a community

where residential and retail elements

are nearly built out.

By 2030, The Maryland-National

Capital Park and Planning

Commission’s Research and Technology

Center projects that Germantown

will achieve 57 percent

of the employment capacity

planned in the 1989 Master Plan.

At that point in time, 93 percent of

the housing capacity would be

reached.

The May 31 civic forum will

also provide input to a panel of

land developers from the Urban

Land Institute of Washington, DC.

The Urban Land Institute worksession

on June 26-30, 2006 is sponsored

by the Germantown-

Gaithersburg Chamber of

Commerce, 301-840-1400, and

various property owners.

More information, including

the current Germantown Master

Plan, is available at www.mcmncppc.org/community/plan_ar

eas/I270_corridor/master_plans/

germantownmp0789/germantown0789.shtm.

THOMAS ISAAC LOG CABIN

HOLDS HERITAGE FAIR

The Thomas Isaac Log Cabin located at 8398 Main Street and Ellicott’s

Mills Drive, Historic Ellicott City, MD 21043 will host a variety of vendors

celebrating Maryland history from 10am until 5pm on Friday

and Saturday; June 2nd and 3rd. Sunday’s hours are from 11am until 5pm,

June 4th, 2006. Local authors will be selling and signing books on local and

Maryland history. Traditional crafters will offer their wares; living historians—

their gently used re-production 17th–20th Century clothing and accoutrements

as well as local gardeners selling plants and cuttings. The Heritage Fair is just

one of many participants in Historic Ellicott City’s National Road Yard Sale

Days held in the restored 19th Century village. Don’t miss Catonsville’s National

Road Yard Sale Days, just five miles, east of Ellicott City, June 2–4th ,

the Catonsville Strawberry Festival on June 3rd and the yard sales in Poplar

Springs, West Friendship and Mt. Airy (Route 144), just West of Ellicott City,

Maryland. All these charming towns are from seven to 20 miles from Baltimore

and about 25 miles from Washington, DC on Route 144, An All American

Scenic Byway.

The First Annual Historic National Road Yard Sale Days will be held from

May 31-June 4, 2006 in celebration of our nation’s first interstate highway’s bicentennial.

Individuals, families and businesses are invited to hold their own Independent

yard, garage and sidewalk sales all along the Historic National Road

from Baltimore to St. Louis. That’s 824 miles of treasure hunting. The Historic

National Road is also known as Route 144, Main Street and Frederick Road in

Baltimore and Howard Counties. For more information on The First Annual Historic

National Road Yard Sale Days and the Thomas Isaac Log Cabin Heritage

Fair contact 301-371-7531 or kkair@starpower.net For more information on

Historic Ellicott City’s National Road Yard Sale Days and Howard County yard

sales contact: Ed Lilley at 410-313-1905 or Edward@visithowardcounty.com.

For more information on Catonsville’s National Road Yard Sale Days, contact

Patsy Anderson at 410-744-4042 or womenonfire@hotmail.com

RED CROSS SHOPPERS PROGRAM

SEEKS VOLUNTEERS

For some seniors and individuals with disabilities, shopping for groceries

presents major challenges. But, help is available through the

Volunteer Shoppers Program of The American Red Cross of the National

Capital Area.

The program currently needs volunteers to provide escort and non-escort

grocery shopping services for seniors and individuals with disabilities

throughout Montgomery County, but especially in the Bethesda, Rockville

and Silver Spring areas.

Each volunteer is matched with a client whom they either escort to the grocery

store or shop for on a regular basis. By donating two hours of time each

week, every two weeks, or once a month, volunteers assist those who are not

able to drive or carry groceries. Being able to meet their own nutritional

needs enables clients to continue to live in their own homes. The client-volunteer

relationship also offers the client regular social connection, helps to alleviate

isolation and loneliness, and promotes good health through adequate

nutrition.

All volunteers under the age of 18 must have parental permission to participate.

Those 16 years and over may participate on their own, but younger

volunteers-who must be at least 14-must be accompanied by a parent when

shopping.

Training is provided for volunteers who also have the opportunity to take

other Red Cross courses-such as First Aid and CPR-free of charge.

For additional information, contact the Montgomery County Volunteer

Center at 240-777-2600.

CITY OF ALEXANDRIA HOLDS THE

ANNUAL ARMENIAN FESTIVAL

The Annual Armenian Festival is scheduled for Saturday, June 3,

from noon to 6pm at Market Square, 301 King St. The festival will

be held rain or shine, and admission is free.

The festival will feature traditional Armenian folk dancers; instrumentalist,

soloists, and performing arts groups; displays showcasing Armenian

paintings and arts and crafts; and several exhibits depicting ongoing earthquake

and relief projects. Armenian food and pastries will be available for

purchase.

The Armenian Festival is an annual charity event that benefits Gyumri,

Alexandria’s Sister City, in Armenia. Proceeds from the festival assist with

the humanitarian and educational needs of Gyumri’s citizens. The City’s Department

of Recreation, Parks and Cultural Activities and the Alexandria-

Gyumri Sister City Committee are co-sponsoring the event.

For additional information, call the City’s Events Hotline at 703-883-4686

or visit alexandriava.gov.

Visitors to the historic district are encouraged to take the Metro yellow or

blue lines to the King Street Metro Station in Old Town, take DASH or Metro

buses, or park in one of the convenient parking garages or lots. For a parking

map, contact the Alexandra Convention and Visitors Association at 703-838-

4200.

4 THE METRO HERALD


AROUND THE REGION/AROUND THE NATION

May 26, 2006

UNDERGROUND RAILROAD:

MARYLAND’S NETWORK

TO FREEDOM MAP GUIDE

The Underground Railroad:

Maryland’s Network to Freedom

map guide showcases a

collection of sites, programs and facilities

that have witnessed or interpret

the stories of freedom seekers along

the Underground Railroad. Most of

these places are part of the National

Park Service’s Network to Freedom.

Maryland is the first state in the nation

to publish a map guide of its sites in

the program. The Network to Freedom

was mandated by Congress in

1998.

“This map guide, Underground

Railroad: Maryland’s Network to Freedom,

resulted from the need to bring

the dramatic stories of these freedom

seekers to light, and we are very proud

to be the first in the nation to do so,”

said Governor Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr.

“We are also pleased with the joint efforts

of the National Park Service, state

and local government, and private entities

to preserve, interpret and present

Maryland’s African-American history

and heritage to the traveling public.”

The state also recently released a

new booklet called Maryland’s

African-American Heritage Guide, a

32-page publication that serves as an

introduction to the Maryland African-

American experience from Colonial

times up to present-day.

Map guides will be distributed by

the Maryland Welcome Centers, local

tourism visitor centers, and at sites in

the collection. Visitors may also call

800-719-5900 or order via www.visitmaryland.org.

NEW EIDTION OF

COMMUTER GUIDE

Anewly-updated edition of

“Getting There,” a free guide

to facilities and services accessible

by public transportation in the

North Bethesda, Rockville, Gaithersburg,

and Germantown areas, is now

available. The guide shows how easy

it is to get around without a car and

features information on both transit

and bike trails.

The Guide offers both employees

and residents in the Maryland Route

355 and I-270 corridors information on

Ride On, Metrorail, Metrobus, and

MARC Commuter Rail, and includes

maps showing the public transportation

connections to major retail centers,

recreation and community facilities,

medical centers, post offices, local

government offices, public libraries,

and other areas of interest.

The Guide provides addresses, telephone

numbers, and websites for public

transportation options, and lists

helpful hints for taking public transportation.

For copies of the guide, contact or

NEW AREA GUIDES NOW AVAILABLE

visit the Montgomery County Commuter

Services Office, Department of

Public Works and Transportation, 8401

Colesville Road, Suite 150, Silver

Spring 20910, or call (301) 770-POOL

(7665). You can also email your requests

for the guide to: commuter.

express@montgomerycountymd.

gov.

For more information, go to www.

montgomerycountymd.gov/commute.

RECREATIONAL TRAILS

GUIDE

Many Washington area residents

enjoy hiking and biking

the popular W&OD trail

which stretches more than 45 miles between

Arlington and the Town of Purcellville.

However, many residents

may be unfamiliar with 23 other trails

in Northern Virginia. Nineteen maps,

information on each location and types

of facilities nearby are included in “An

Introductory Guide to Recreational

Trails in Northern Virginia” published

by the Northern Virginia Regional

Commission.

Each separate, trail-by-trail map insert

includes three primary types of information:

a narrative description of

the trail, a map, and a trail elevation

profile. An index map identifies the

location of the facility/park in Northern

Virginia as well as directions to the

primary access point or the park in

which the trail is located. The narrative

also includes a qualitative assessment

of the level of difficulty; identification

of the major sites or attractions

along the trail, surface type, parking

and trail length.

The Guide is published in an attractive,

easy to use format that allows the

user to carry the individual map with

them while hiking, biking or horseback

riding. Tri-folded maps fit easily into

saddlebags, hip pockets or back packs.

Maps illustrate the location of trailheads,

parking, connecting trails, and

facilities along the trail. Elevation

profiles give the user a sense of the terrain

that the trail traverses as well as

the general level of difficulty.

The Introductory Guide to Recreational

Trails in Northern Virginia can

be ordered from NVRC by mailing an

order form available on the website

www.novaregion.org (click on publications)

or by visiting the NVRC offices,

3060 Williams Drive, Suite 510,

Fairfax, VA 22031. All orders must be

prepaid by cash or check only. Call

703-642-0700 for more information.

Each Guide costs $9.95 each plus shipping

and handling and discounts are

available when multiple guides are

purchased. The Recreational Trails

Guide is also sold at area bicycle

stores.

For more information about

NVRC, visit www.novaregion.org or

call 703-642-0700.

NORTHERN VIRGINIA

QUICK GUIDE

The Northern Virginia Regional

Commission has published the

15th edition of the Quick

Guide, an index to more than 1,000

public and private agencies offering a

variety of human services to Northern

Virginians. The 2006 Guide provides

information about services including

abuse and neglect of children or adults,

alcohol and drug abuse, budget counseling,

consumer complaints and protection,

day care for children and

adults, disability issues, emergency

needs, multi-cultural services, health

care information, in-home services, rehabilitative

services, shelters, and senior

and youth services.

The Quick Guide helps case managers,

social workers, school guidance

counselors, mental health outreach

workers, police personnel, and others,

to quickly find the services that their

clients need. The comprehensive

index lists services provided by the

City of Alexandria, the counties of Arlington,

Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince

William, as well as regional agencies

and other organizations.

Copies of the Quick Guide cost

$3.50 each plus shipping and handling.

Multiple copies are available at a discount.

To request a copy call 703-642-

0700 or download the order form from

www.novaregion.org. The printed

Quick Guide is portable—just 4x6

inches and less than 100 pages long.

The Quick Guide can also be

viewed on line, where updates are

posted throughout the year. Go to

www.novaregion.org/qgonline.htm.

Lake Anne Village was dedicated

forty-one years ago

marking the beginning of what

is now recognized as the world-class,

planned community of Reston. At a

time when suburban areas outside the

nation’s capital were focused on the

size of the house and the yard, Reston’s

plan was about creating a community.

Robert E. Simon’s seven goals were

the foundation of the plan and will sustain

the community into the future.

Guided by these goals, a community

was created where we find diversity of

housing types; pedestrians taking priority

over vehicles; a mix of uses connecting

people and places; the environment

being primary in all

development; and economic stability.

Today Reston’s Master Plan is reality

as cranes around Reston Town Center

signal the development of the last

parceled sites. Just as it took decades for

a Plan developed forty years ago to create

today’s community, planning must

guide Reston’s future. The changes that

will take place in the future will address

the redevelopment of the Industrial Corridor,

Lake Anne Village, and the building

of rail to Wiehle Avenue and on to

Dulles Airport. Reston citizens were involved

in the early planning and development

of the community and citizens

will continue to play a similar role in

planning Reston’s future.

A citizen task force participated in

the 2001 re-planning of the Industrial

Corridor along the Dulles Toll Road.

“BIKE THROUGH TIME” ON

NATIONAL TRAILS DAY WITH

ALEXANDRIA ARCHAEOLOGY

Celebrate National Trails Day with a 15-mile bike tour of a loop of

the Alexandria Heritage Trail, guided by staff from the Alexandria

Archaeology Museum. The ride includes some street bicycling,

gravel trails, a few hills and a guided tour of some of Alexandria’s lesser

known prehistoric archaeological sites. The tour will stop in Old Town to

see the Godspeed and for an optional lunch. Bring a bike lock and some

money for lunch.

This bicycle tour is free and open to the general public. Tour takes place

on Saturday, June 3, 2006 from 10a.m.–1p.m. at the George Washington

Masonic National Memorial located at 101 Callahan Drive, Alexandria

Pre-registration and helmets are required. Children under 16 years old

must be accompanied by a participating adult. Sponsored by Alexandria Archaeology

and BikeWalk Alexandria..

For more information contact the Alexandria Archaeology Museum at

703-838-4399.

KEEPING THE UNITY IN

COMMUNITY . . .

CATHY M. HUDGINS

Special to The Metro Herald

REMEMBER

OUR VETS ON

MEMORIAL

DAY

The task force made recommendations

using many of the original principals

of early Reston, and the Comprehensive

Plan was changed accordingly: tapered

density around transit station

areas, a diversity of housing in pedestrian

friendly neighborhoods, open

space and public art, and pedestrian access

to the transit station.

The county-owned Wiehle Avenue

parking lot was subject to a Request for

Proposal (RFP) for joint development

with the private sector. The desire is to

develop the nine-acre parcel meeting

Federal Transit Administration requirements

to provide parking, but incorporating

the parking in a mixed-use development

on the site. Design principals for

the RFP were developed with citizen

input, consistent with the Industrial Corridor

change. The final results of the RFP

will be announced in the near future.

Lake Anne Village Center is still

considered the heart of Reston by

many; however, forty years after its

dedication, this scenic area needs updating.

The 2005 Lake Anne Charrette

developed guidelines for Lake Anne

revitalization. An RFP has been issued

to identify consultant services to develop

design guidelines to assist in

moving forward.

The most significant changes to the

Reston community and the Dulles Corridor

will come with the Dulles Corridor

Metrorail Project (DCMP). Phase

I, ending at Wiehle Avenue, is scheduled

to receive the final approval to

begin construction in 2006 and project

completion is scheduled for 2011. In

preparation for rail, a Wiehle Avenue

Station Management Plan will be developed

to determine how to effectively

manage vehicular and pedestrian

traffic in and around the Wiehle Avenue

Station. A Project Advisory Committee

(PAC) comprised of community

stakeholders will work to establish and

provide oversight of the Plan. A series

of community meetings will be conducted

to obtain input and comments

from the public.

Recent agreement by the Commonwealth

to transfer the management of the

DCMP to the Metropolitan Washington

Airports Authority (MWAA) is one of

the most positive decisions made offering

the most assurance to the successful

completion Phase II. With MWAA managing

the project, the possibility of a

long delay between the completion of

Wiehle Avenue station and the Reston

Parkway station is less likely than believed

earlier. The sooner the DCMP is

completed, the less impact the construction

will have on the community.

The opening of the Reston Transit

Center at Town Center is another important

change that will provide enhanced

transportation services for resident,

retail, and commercial patrons, as

well as the entire community. Bus service

now, and upon completion of rail, is

critical to improving transportation.

The last forty years have been

about creating a community based

upon a well defined Reston Master

Plan. Undoubtedly, Reston is one of

the most recognized communities by

planners all around the world. More

importantly, the building of Reston has

created a sense of place and community

for over 65,000 residents and

more than 60,000 employees. Elements

of Reston’s planning have been

emulated within Fairfax County, the

country and abroad. Planning for the

next forty years must complement the

successful community of today.

I invite the community to stay

tuned and involved as we move forward

on these many changes.

THE METRO HERALD 5


AFRICA UPDATE/ASIA PACIFIC AMERICAN MONTH/POTPOURRI

May 26, 2006

AFRICAN CULTURE CENTER TO BREAK

GROUND IN NAMIBIA, AFRICA IN 2006

The first African Culture Center (ACC)

(www.africanculturecenter.com/project.html), an entertainment village for

tourists visiting Africa, is scheduled to break ground in the Republic of

Namibia in 2006. The ACC features Namibia’s indigenous people creating

native crafts, a traditional Namibian feast and a sunset stage performance that

includes live tribal dancing.

The ACC was created by The PAL Project, Inc., a minority-owned development

company based in California. “Our top priority right now is to raise

investment capital. The ACC staff had a successful year raising investment

dollars in 2005 and we are looking forward to an even better year in 2006,”

said company president Karen Crumlin. Crumlin added, “Timing is crucial!

Currently, one U.S. Dollar is worth 6.39 Namibian Dollars. This means that

investment money from the U.S. goes a long way in Namibia. As Africa prepares

for the 2010 World Soccer Cup, this is the perfect time to build a tourist

project, such as the ACC.”

When tourists arrive at the ACC they will have the opportunity to walk

through the African village and interact with natives demonstrating some of

the traditions of their tribe. The highlight of the evening is a sunset dinner

filled with the traditional foods of Africa. During dinner, guests are entertained

with a live stage performance featuring song and dance from representatives

of some of the countries 11 different tribes. According to Crumlin,

“It’s like having an African tribesman invite you home for dinner.”

The ACC has been endorsed by the Embassy of the Republic of Namibia

in Washington, D.C. as well as representatives from the Namibian government.

Representatives from the various tribes, including the King of Ondonga,

are excited about the opportunity for economic growth in the rural

areas of Namibia. “The ACC is a humanitarian effort that gives the Namibian

people a place to tell their story and provides the traditional villager with the

opportunity to earn a respectable salary in a safe environment,” said Crumlin.

The PAL Project Inc. is a Mountain View, California-based development

company with offices in the Republic of Namibia, Africa. PAL stands for Project

African Luau. The company takes the concept behind the traditional

Hawaiian Luau and redefines it with the traditions of the tribes of Africa. Future

plans include an African Culture Center in Ethiopia.

UGANDA’S DEFENSE MINISTER

PRESENTS TESTIMONY ON

“ENDANGERED CHILDREN”

In written testimony presented on April 26, 2006, to the House International

Relations Subcommittee on Africa, Global Human Rights, and International

Operations, Ugandan Minister of Defense Amama Mbabazi

told Members of Congress about the terrorist threat faced by his country and

its neighbors from the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA):

The Lords Resistance Army (LRA) is one of the most brutal terrorist organizations

the world has known in recent history. This criminal group has

orchestrated a terror campaign against the people of Northern Uganda for the

last 19 years. The nature and extent of the heinous crimes perpetrated against

innocent civilians is unparalleled. Atrocities meted out by this group; large

scale massacres, abductions, maiming, mutilation, looting of properties, rape

and defilement of young girls caused untold human suffering. . . . Women

and children bore the brunt of this LRA terror campaign.”

The hearing explored the topic “The Endangered Children of Northern

Uganda.” Minister Mbabazi said that the Ugandan government has responded

to the threat both militarily and through humanitarian and social programs

designed to rescue and rehabilitate the children who have been victimized

by the terrorists.

“One of the most successful aspects of Uganda People’s Defence Forces

(UPDF) operations against the LRA is the rescue of children this terrorist organisation

has abducted in Northern Uganda. Today over 20,000 children

have been rescued from the LRA by the UPDF. Among the newest are 55

children rescued in different UPDF operations in Pader district who reported

to the Christian Children’s Fellowship (CCF) on Tuesday, 25th April 2006.

These are now receiving psychosocial support and other immediate bodily

needs from the CCF.”

Summarizing his government’s response, Minister Mbabazi stated: “The

Government of Uganda has a triple challenge in relation to getting these children

back into normal society. The first challenge is that of receiving them

and meeting their bodily needs. The second challenge is that of re-orienting

the minds of the children many of whom were made to commit atrocities

while the girls were for the most part turned into sex slaves. The third challenge

that Government and her partners face with the rescued children is to

provide them with the skills necessary to start a new life.”

Noting that the conflict in northern Uganda is often characterized as “a

forgotten war,” the new Ugandan Ambassador to the United States, Perezi

Kamunanwire, commended the subcommittee chairman, Representative

Christopher Smith (R-N.J.), “for sponsoring a hearing on this important but

often overlooked issue.” He added: “Increased attention in the United

States and other countries,” he said, “can only result in the channeling of

greater resources to address the conflict and to deal with the rehabilitation of

the region when the terrorist threat has been eliminated.”

For more information, visit www.ugandaembassy.com/.

ETHIOPIAN

ENVOY GIVES

“REASONS FOR

OPTIMISM”

TO U.S.

CONGRESSIONAL

COMMITTEE

At a congressional hearing

recently, Ethiopia’s acting

ambassador to the United

States said he is “convinced there

are reasons to be optimistic about

the future.”

In oral testimony and a prepared

statement, His Excellency

Fesseha Asghedom Tessema,

chargé d’affaires at the Ethiopian

Embassy in Washington, told

members of the Subcommittee on

Africa, Global Human Rights, and

International Operations of the

House International Relations

Committee that “democratization

has taken a center stage in the development

discourse of today’s

Ethiopian politics. Despite challenges,

Ethiopia is moving on the

right direction towards democratization.”

Ambassador Fesseha added

that “Ethiopia is experiencing

strong economic growth. Our

gross domestic product grew by

11.5 percent in 2004 and 9 percent

in 2005. Despite drought, the agricultural

sector has grown by 15

percent and exports have grown by

24.5 percent in the past year. The

primary school enrollment rate,

which was 61 percent in 2000-

2001 grew to 79 percent in 2004-

2005. Coverage of health services

at about the same time grew from

52 to 70 percent. The infant mortality

rate (under age five), which

was 167 per 1000 in 2002-2003,

declined to 97 per 1000. There is

a construction boom in Addis

Ababa and other cities, with residences,

offices, retail shops, and

manufacturing facilities being built

at an unprecedented rate.”

Despite aggressive questioning

by members of the subcommittee

about the current political situation

in Ethiopia, Ambassador Fesseha

responded emphatically to concerns

about human rights, democratization,

and the Ethiopian judiciary.

“Ethiopia is learning, through

experience,” he said, about “how

to become a better democracy.

We are pleased that international

observers, such as those from the

Carter Center, agree that Ethiopia

is on the right path. The fact that

opposition parties increased their

seats in Parliament from 12 to 172

is evidence of progress, since a robust

democracy depends in large

part on the participation of an active

and loyal opposition, engaging

the majority party in debate, respectfully

challenging the positions

of the Prime Minister and his

cabinet, and helping to hone proposed

legislation into good, strong,

and effective law for the benefit of

all the people.”

The full prepared statement of

Ambassador Fesseha is available

for viewing online at www.

ethiopianembassy. org.

HOYER CELEBRATES ASIAN PACIFIC

AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH

Congressman Steny H. Hoyer (D-MD), a member of the Congressional

Asian Pacific American Caucus, recently released the following statement

in recognition of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month,

which is being celebrated throughout the month of May.

“Earlier this month, I was honored to attend the first ever Congressional

Democratic Asian and Pacific Islander American Leadership Summit, where

House and Senate Democrats met with over 100 Asian Pacific American leaders

from across the nation.

“Under the leadership of Chairman Mike Honda (D-CA), the Congressional

Asian Pacific American Caucus has been an instrumental and influential

partner in working with the Democratic Caucus and leadership here in

Congress.

“During this month, we commemorate the significant contributions that

the Asian American and Pacific Islander community has made to our country.

There are more than 14 million Asian American and Pacific Islanders in

the United States, including about 300,000 in my home state of Maryland.

Asian Pacific Americans also have the most diverse background of any minority

population, tracing their roots to almost fifty different countries and

ethnic groups.

“Today, Asian Pacific Americans play an important role in every aspect of

American life - as authors and artists, as business leaders, as political leaders,

as military leaders, as scientists and innovators, as athletes, and in virtually

every other aspect of American society.

“In addition to recognizing the important role that Asian Pacific Americans

play in our country, this month’s celebration is also a time to remember

significant historical contributions that Asian Pacific Americans have made to

our nation. From the construction of our transcontinental railroads to defending

the United States in times of war, Asian Pacific Americans have contributed

greatly to the American tapestry.

“I am pleased Americans have so much to benefit as a result of our diverse

society. We continue to learn from each other and share each other’s traditions,

history, and culture.

“That is why it gives me great pleasure today to recognize the significant

advances and contributions made by the Asian Pacific American Community

to our country during Asian Pacific Heritage Month.”

UNIVERSOUL CIRCUS 2006—

DISCOVER THE JOY

UniverSoul Circus is staging its

largest most ambitious production

ever in its 13th touring

season, breaking new ground once

again with the premier of soulful center

ring Ice Skaters, a brand new Ringmaster,

the return of Ringmaster’s

sidekick Zeke. UniverSoul Circus

plays the Washington area at Capital

Plaza Mall in Landover Hills, Md.,

May 31-June 18.

“It’s cool, it’s fresh, its urban,” explains

UniverSoul Founder and President

Cedric Walker. “It’s more than a

satisfying experience.”

UniverSoul Circus opens in Landover

Hills May 31 thru June 18 at

Capital Plaza Mall, 6200 Annapolis

Rd. Tickets, ranging from $10 to $35,

are on sale now via Ticketmaster.

Group sales are available by calling

800-316-7439. Show times: Opening

night 7:30p.m.; Tuesdays thru Fridays

10:30a.m. and 7:30p.m.; Saturdays

12 noon; 4:30p.m. and 8p.m.;

Sundays 1p.m., 4p.m. and 7p.m.

With acts

from North

America,

South America,

Africa, Asia, Europe, and the

Caribbean, UniverSoul has sought to

infuse center ring with a new energy

and vitality that appeals to urban (and

suburban) America. The array of cultures

and talent underneath the Univer-

Soul Circus big top includes new acts

from China, Ethiopia and France.

New in 2006, UniverSoul Circus

welcomes Tony Tone, one of the fastest

rising comedians in America today—

as its new Ringmaster. Tone, a master

impressionist, has opened for Jamie

Foxx, Chris Rock and Dave Chapelle,

among many others. He has appeared

on such shows as HBO’s Def Comedy

Jam and BET’s Comicview.

Zeke, an original member of UniverSoul

Circus, is returning to a familiar

role—as the beloved Ringmaster’s

Sidekick.

“This is a show created especially

produced for everyone’s enjoyment,”

said Walker. “Good, clean, fast paced,

non-stop, family fun does not discriminate.

My worldwide search for young,

cross cultural talent continues to reap

great rewards for the circus and its audience.

These acts are amazing!”

For more information visit www.

universoulcircus.com.

6 THE METRO HERALD


CAPITAL COMMENTS/INSIGHTS & VIEWPOINTS

May 26, 2006

ALEXANDRIA MAYOR AND

ENTIRE INCOMING CITY

COUNCIL ENDORSE HARRIS

MILLER FOR U.S. SENATE

U.S. Senate candidate Harris

Miller today received the endorsements

of Alexandria

Mayor Bill Euille and all six other

members of the newly elected Alexandria

City Council.

Mayor Euille, Councilman and

Vice-Mayor-Elect Andrew Macdonald,

Council members Ludwig Gaines, Rob

Krupicka, Del Pepper, and Paul Smedberg,

and Councilman-elect Tim Lovain,

all announced their support for

Miller in the June 13th Democratic

Primary for U.S. Senate. With these

endorsements, Harris Miller has the

support of all seven incoming members

of the Alexandria City Council,

who were elected on May 2nd.

“I am proud to endorse Harris

Miller for the United States Senate,”

said Mayor Bill Euille. “There is a

deep need for real change in the direction

of our country, and Harris has the

experience, the knowledge, and the

commitment to Democratic values to

make that change happen.

“We need a Virginia Democrat we

can count on in the U.S. Senate to get

this country turned around and create a

better future for Virginia families.

Harris Miller will be that candidate and

he will be that U.S. Senator.”

Mayor Euille served on City Council

from 1994 to 2003, including service

as Vice-Mayor. He has served as

Mayor since 2003.

“Harris has been traveling around

Virginia, showing that he is the candidate

making the effort to reach out to

voters across the Commonwealth,”

said Councilman and Vice-Mayor

Elect Andrew Macdonald. “I am impressed

with his hard work and his

commitment to improving life for Virginians,

and that’s how I know he’ll

win in June and November.”

PATTI LABELLE HONORED

FOR PROFESSIONAL AND

CHARITABLE

ACHIEVEMENTS

Lt. Governor Michael S. Steele

surprised renowned entertainer

Patti LaBelle during her recent

concert here and honored her on stage

for her 40 years of professional work

and efforts to promote various charitable

organizations.

The people of Maryland join in

expressing our admiration for your

’lifetime of achievement; as a gifted

and generous woman who has enriched

the music world and inspired audiences

for the past 40 years,” said Lt.

Lt. Governor Michael S. Steel (on left) preents Pattie

LaBelle achievement award

“Harris

Miller best represents

the

ideals and principles

of the Democratic

Party,”

said Councilman

Ludwig

Gaines. “His

Harris Miller

commitment to

equality and opportunity

are unrivaled in this election,

and I know that he’ll be the best candidate

against George Allen in November.”

“Harris knows Virginia, Capitol

Hill, and the importance of technology

to Virginia’s economy, and he shares

our values,” said Councilman Rob

Krupicka. “He is a leader that can hit

the ground running and will serve Virginia

well.”

“Harris Miller has the understanding

and knowledge of policy that we

need in a U.S. Senator,” said Councilwoman

Redella “Del” Pepper. “He will

be a strong partner for Alexandria and

communities across the Commonwealth,

and that’s why I’m supporting

Harris in the June 13th primary.”

“Harris Miller has the results-focused

message that Virginia Democrats

have won on in all areas of Virginia,”

said Councilman Paul

Smedberg. “He will work for equality,

opportunity, and fairness for all Virginians,

and that’s why I know he’s the

best person to represent Virginia in the

U.S. Senate.”

“Harris Miller’s hard work and

longtime service with the Virginia Democratic

Party makes him the

strongest and most credible challenger

to George Allen,” said Councilmanelect

Tim Lovain. “He will bring the

Virginia Democratic way to Washington,

and that’s why I’m supporting him

in the primary.”

The primary election to choose Virginia’s

Democratic nominee for the

Senate race will be held on June 13th.

Governor

Steele, in presenting

Ms. La-

Belle with a

State of Maryland

Governor’s

Citation.

Ms. LaBelle,

a two-time

Grammy-Award

winner, began

her career with

Lt. Governor

Michael S. Steele

(R-MD)

the legendary

60s quartet, Patti

LaBelle & the Bluebelles, before going

on to perform with the retro 70s trio,

LaBelle and more recently a solo artist.

Off the stage, Ms. LaBelle has been

a spokeswoman for the National

Medical Association

that administers a scholarship

in her name, the National

Minority AIDS

Council’s “Live Long,

Sugar” campaign and the

American Diabetes Association.

Patti also serves on

the Boards of the National

Alzheimer Association and

the National Cancer Institute.

In addition, the University

of Miami’s prestigious

Sylvestri

Comprehensive Care Center

dedicated a special research

laboratory in her

honor for her work on behalf

of cancer awareness.

MORAN-

DAVIS

SECURE

$13 MILLION

FOR FORT

BELVOIR

EXTENSION

Northern

Virginia

C o n -

Rep. Jim Moran

(D-VA)

gressmen Jim

Moran (D-VA-

08) and Tom

Davis (R-VA-11) successfully secured

$13 million in funding to continue the

construction of a proposed Woodlawn

replacement extension through Fort

Belvoir. The appropriation is included

in the FY 2007 Military Quality

of Life Appropriations bill (H.R. 5385)

which passed the House recently.

“This appropriation gets the Woodlawn

project moving even further down

the road,” said Moran. “Rep. Davis and

I will continue to push for this much

needed thoroughfare until residents in

the area get some traffic relief.”

“With the BRAC realignment

bringing 20,000 new employees to the

Belvoir area in the next five years, we

need to look at every option to alleviate

traffic,” Davis said. “Rep. Moran

and I will continue to fight for every

dollar to fund the necessary infrastructure

improvements, including this crucial

project.”

The $13 million appropriation is for

construction of phase 2 of a defense

access road through Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

This money will help continue

construction of the extension of Old

Mill Road through Fort Belvoir to

Telegraph Road, creating an East-West

transit route that was eliminated with

the closure of Woodlawn Road after

9/11. The ensuing traffic disruptions

caused by this closure have adversely

impacted military readiness, local traffic

patterns and the local economy.

To date, Moran and Davis have authorized

and appropriated more than

$27 million for construction of the

Woodlawn Road extension. Last

week, Moran and Davis secured funding

in the FY ’07 Defense Authorization

bill, which cleared the path for inclusion

of today’s appropriations

funding in the FY ‘07 Military Quality

of Life Appropriations bill.

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to

The Metro Herald!

WITH GAS PRICES

SKYROCKETING, HOYER

DISCUSSES THE

IMPORTANCE OF

TELECOMMUTING

With the average cost of a

gallon of gas now over

$3.00, Congressman Steny

H. Hoyer (D-MD) visited the Bowie

State University Telework Center to

meet with federal and private teleworkers

from Maryland.

“One of my proudest achievements

in Congress has been leading the charge

to make telecommuting the official policy

of the federal government,” Hoyer

said. “As we enter an era in which energy

conservation will be more important

than at any other time in our nation’s

history, teleworking is central to a

smart energy independence program.”

Ever wonder what it would be

like to be invisible You

could go around and nobody

would see you. Nobody would

know you existed. Do you remember

playing hide and seek Wow. If

you were invisible you could always

win the game because no one would

be able to find you. “Ollie Ollie

ump fee. I’m coming to find you.”

What a game. Those who could

hide the best always won the game.

It was great being invisible until you

discovered that if no one cared to

find you, you really did not win.

Regrettably, there is a similar game

being played in the Gulf Coast. Our

children appear to be invisible. But

it is no game. It is a situation of life

and death. And right before our

eyes we are witnessing the most

devastating reality of what it means

to be invisible in the richest country

in the world. Right before our eyes

we are losing our children.

We are literally losing our children

due to the lack of adequate

health care, public education and

housing. There are over 125,000

displaced families in the Gulf

Coast. In a Red Cross shelter north

of Birmingham, Alabama there are

over 2,000 children who have lost

their parents. In a FEMA trailer

park outside of Baton Rouge 700 of

the 1,670 residents are children. In

the richest nation in the world one

fifth to one fourth of our children

are growing up in poverty. Of the

1.9 trillion dollars of tax cuts, which

will give the richest one percent of

all tax payers $57 billion each year,

we could instead provide health

care for all 9 million uninsured children

and end child poverty in

America. Wow! Centuries ago

Jesus said, “Let the little children

come to me, and do nothing to hinder

them, for the kingdom of

heaven belongs to such as these.”

(Matthew 19:14). Maybe we missed

Jesus’ request.

Sometimes I wonder where our

priorities are. A wise man once

said: “Where your heart is there

also is your treasure.” Are our children

our treasure It is extremely

painful to note that one in three

sheltered children in the Gulf Coast

region has some type of chronic illness.

Are our children our treasure

In 1993, Hoyer joined with Rep.

Frank Wolf (R-VA) to steer the Treasury-Postal

Appropriations Act through

Congress, which included $5 million in

funding for three telework centers in

the Washington Metropolitan area.

The Bowie State University Telework

Center is one of fourteen GSA

telework centers in the region. The

centers serve over 570 federal and private

sector employees. Other Maryland

centers are located in Frederick,

Hagerstown, Laurel, Prince Frederick

and Waldorf.

Joyce Larrick, director of the Bowie

State University Telework Center, said

Hoyer is the single biggest reason there

is a telecommuting center in Bowie

today. “We are grateful to Congressman

Hoyer for his career long dedication to

teleworkers and their families,” she said.

Hoyer said telework reduces traffic

INVISIBLE PEOPLE

BY CARL P. WALLACE

EXECUTIVE ASSOCIATE

In the Gulf Coast region one half of

the children who had some level of

health coverage do not have any

now. Are our children our treasure

Did the need for health care coverage

just disappear Have a heart. I

guess invisible people don’t need

health care.

Let’s think about it. Perhaps our

children are invisible because they

do not vote, lobby or pay taxes.

Let’s think about another point.

Can you imagine what it must be

like to be undocumented and in this

situation Is there such a thing as

double invisibility

The Children’s Defense fund released

a “Call to Action for Katrina’s

Children.” It calls in part for:

immediate emergency mental

health and health services for children

and their families; quality public

education and after-school and

summer education; as

much attention focused on constructing

levees of support for

strong health care, family and public

education as they will for the

construction of the physical levies

that will hold back the water in future

storms; and, prayer for Katrina

children and families and for leaders

who work for justice. Prayer

and action will make a difference.

Our children must be made visible.

Maybe, just maybe, if we lift our

voices to make their needs known

our children will not disappear right

before our eyes. Maybe, just maybe

if we take action we will not loose

the least of these. Maybe, just

maybe we will find our treasure.

The invisible can be made visible.

“Ollie, Ollie ump fee. We’re

coming to find you!”

• • •

The United Church of Christ has

more than 5,700 churches throughout

the United States and Puerto

Rico. Rooted in the Christian traditions

of congregational governance

and covenantal relationships, each

UCC setting speaks only for itself

and not on behalf of every UCC

congregation. UCC members and

churches are free to differ on important

social issues, even as the

UCC remains principally committed

to unity in the midst of our

diversity.

congestion, promotes

conservation

and reduces

America’s dependence

on

foreign oil, improves

the envi-

Rep. Steny Hoyer

(D-MD)

ronment, inc

r e a s e s

productivity, enhances

the security

of government,

and most importantly,

strengthens families by reducing commuting

times.

“Telecommuting answers the challenge

of today’s fast-paced workplace

while allowing employees to work

much closer to home,” Hoyer said. “As

Marylanders continue to face pain at

the pump, I will continue to promote

this viable and successful alternative.”

THE METRO HERALD 7


CAPITAL COMMENTS

May 26, 2006

GOVERNOR KAINE’S

STATEMENT ON

DOD INSPECTOR

GENERAL’S RULING

Governor Timothy M. Kaine released

the following statement

recently, regarding the

announcement of the Department of

Defense Inspector General’s ruling that

Virginia is not in compliance with the

BRAC Commission’s requirements to

address encroachment around Oceana

Naval Air Station in Virginia Beach:

“I was disappointed to learn today

that the Department of Defense Inspector

General has ruled Virginia not in

compliance with the requirements laid

out by the BRAC Commission for

keeping the Oceana Naval Air Station

in Virginia.

“Although the Navy asked for

Oceana to remain open, the BRAC

Commission has ignored the value of

this installation to the community and

to the nation.

“In response to the BRAC Commission’s

order issued late last year,

state and local officials in Richmond,

Virginia Beach and Chesapeake put together

a plan that meets each of the

Commission’s six requirements for

maintaining operations at Oceana.

Our plan fully and fairly addresses the

requirement to prevent further encroachment,

while protecting the rights

of Virginia families who own property

in the area.

“We disagree with the Inspector

General’s ruling, and we will, in consultation

with Virginia Beach, Chesapeake,

our Congressional delegation,

the Attorney General’s Office, and our

legal counsel, carefully consider our

next steps.”

APPOINTMENTS TO THE

CIVIL RIGHTS MEMORIAL

COMMISSION

Governor Timothy M. Kaine recently

announced appointments

to the Civil Rights

Memorial Commission. Launched in

July 2005 by former First Lady Lisa

Collis, the Commission was established

to create a memorial to honor

Virginians who fought for equal rights

for African Americans.

The memorial will primarily commemorate

the 1951 student-led protest

at the Robert Russa Moton High

School in Prince Edward County, Virginia.

Sixteen-year old Barbara Johns,

a junior at the school, led the protest

against the deplorable conditions of the

racially segregated school. Richmond

attorneys Oliver Hill and Spottswood

Robinson later represented the students

and their parents in Davis v. County

School Board of Prince Edward

County, one of the four cases consolidated

into the Brown v. Board of Education

case of 1954, declaring separate

but equal to be unconstitutional.

The memorial is being created by

sculptor Stanley Bleifeld and will be

built in Capitol Square. It is expected

to take approximately two years to

complete.

Lisa Collis of Alexandria will continue

to serve on the Commission.

Collis is the former First Lady of Virginia.

Leroy R. Hassell, Sr. of Richmond

has been reappointed to serve as a

member on the Commission. Hassell

is Chief Justice of the Virginia

Supreme Court.

Judith C. Anderson of Richmond

will continue to serve as a member on

the Commission. Anderson previously

served as a deputy secretary of the

commonwealth and is currently retired.

Dr. “Woody” Holton of Richmond

will serve as a member on the Commission.

Holton is a professor of history

at the University of Richmond.

Rita O. Moseley of Farmville will

serve as a member on the Commission.

Moseley has been employed with

Prince Edward County High School

for 25 years.

The Honorable William J. Howell,

Speaker of the House of Delegates and

the Honorable Thomas K. Norment,

Senator of Virginia will continue to

serve on the Commission.

ACTION ON LEGISLATION

FROM RECONVENED

SESSION

Governor Timothy M. Kaine

announced recently that he

has signed comprehensive energy

legislation successfully amended

during the 2006 General Assembly Reconvened

Session. The Governor also

announced the vetoes of eight other

measures.

The energy bill, SENATE BILL

262, strengthens the state’s energy policy,

promoting energy efficiency in appliances

and state buildings, and supporting

federal efforts to determine the

extent of natural gas resources 50 or

more miles off the Atlantic coast.

“We must determine the potential

size of the natural gas reserves off the

coast of the Commonwealth before

there is any meaningful discussion of

offshore drilling. Otherwise, it is impossible

to fairly weigh the benefits of

offshore energy against the concerns

expressed by the public, the U.S.

Navy, and NASA. I am pleased the

General Assembly agreed with me that

my amendments to Senator Frank

Wagner’s bill promote energy efficiency

and energy independence while

protecting our natural resources.”

In addition, the Governor announced

the following vetoes:

HOUSE BILL 350 and SENATE

BILL 676, which would consolidate

the two Schools for the Deaf and Blind

into one school in Staunton, provide

for a continuing regional program in

Hampton, and convey the existing

Hampton property to a specific nonprofit

entity.

The issue of consolidation has

been debated for a number of years.

While a consensus exists on consolidation

at Staunton, there is disagreement

on the appropriate approach going forward

for the Hampton property,” Governor

Kaine said. “The enrolled bills,

while good faith efforts, do not achieve

the necessary consensus about future

use of the Hampton school and associated

programs. Thus, I am vetoing

this legislation, but I will continue to

work with the patrons and all stakeholders

to craft a consensus during the

ongoing budget discussions and in the

future.”

HOUSE BILL 370, which would

take away existing local government

authority to regulate firearms along

public highways.

“I am reluctant to take away local authority

without a substantial reason, and

there has been no demonstrable problem

with the existing law,” Governor Kaine

said. “I proposed that this bill not become

law until it was passed again by

the 2007 General Assembly, which

would have afforded an opportunity for

further study of the bill’s effects. Unfortunately,

the House of Delegates rejected

this amendment. Accordingly, I

am vetoing this

measure.”

HOUSE BILL

1185, which would

significantly alter

protection for riparian

rights in the

Commonwealth.

The common

law of Virginia establishes

a framework

that protects

the riparian rights

Tim Kaine (D)

Governor-Elect of

Virginia

of those who use our waterways for

agricultural, municipal, industrial,

recreational and other beneficial uses.

This bill would single out agricultural

use in a way that could have significant

long-term consequences for downstream

uses,” Governor Kaine said.

“My administration is working with

farmers in a cooperative spirit to make

sure that new regulations address the

concerns of all stakeholders, and that is

the appropriate way to address this

subject.”

HOUSE BILL 1290 and SENATE

BILL 260, which would have addressed

machinery and tools taxation

of manufacturers by local governments.

The previous standard required

that machinery and tools must have

been idle for 12 months in order to be

exempt from taxation, but this bill establishes

a much shorter standard of

three months,” said Governor Kaine. “I

am concerned that this significant

change will have a revenue impact on

localities. That is one reason why

local governments oppose this bill.”

The bill also called for a working

group on machinery and tools taxation.

While Governor Kaine has vetoed this

legislation, he will convene a working

group, led by the Secretary of Commerce

and Trade and the Commissioner

of the Department of Taxation,

and to include members of the manufacturing

community, as well as local

government, that can address this and

other issues.

SENATE BILL 429, which would

remove from the Governor the authority

to appoint the Secretary of the

Board of Elections.

“I support the patron’s stated intent

of ensuring that the Board of Elections

operates in the most efficient and evenhanded

manner,” said Governor Kaine.

“While I do not believe that this bill is

needed to accomplish that result, I will

work with the patron and all interested

parties to accomplish that goal.”

SENATE BILL 689, which would

reduce the membership of the Virginia

Workforce Council by four members,

and the number of Governor’s appointees

to the Council by eight.

“Our global economy demands that

we dedicate significant resources to

educating and training our present and

future workforce, and I am committed

to working with the General Assembly

during my term to give this important

issue the attention that it deserves.

However, I do not believe that this bill

in its current form advances that goal,”

said Governor Kaine.

“I am disappointed that the House

of Delegates rejected my good faith

amendments, which would have restored

to the Council two additional

members and required that four other

members be appointed in consultation

with the General Assembly leadership,”

the Governor said. “Absent that

compromise, I conclude there is no

reason for the executive branch to cede

this appointment power.”

MFUME SUPPORTS BLACK CAUCUS EFFORT

IN ADDRESSING ENERGY CRISIS

Former U.S. Representative Kweisi Mfume applauded

the Maryland Legislative Black Caucus recently, for

raising their influential voice on behalf of Maryland

consumers regarding the proposed BG&E rate increase.

The Maryland Black Caucus recognizes the pain the rate

hike will have on their constituents,” Mfume said. He further

stated “I am encouraged by the Caucus leadership calling for

a special session to address this critical matter. I campaign in Kweisi Mfume

every corner of the State and the people are calling out for

government to take action.”

Rep. Mfume had described the proposed rate hike as “obscene” and has called

for all candidates in the race for U.S. Senate to speak out on behalf of consumers

against the rate hike.

NAGIN WINS

NEW ORLEANS ELECTION

Mayor Ray Nagin, whose shoot-from-the-hip

style was both praised and scorned after Hurricane

Katrina, narrowly won re-election over

Lt. Gov. Mitch Landrieu on Saturday in the race to oversee

one of the biggest rebuilding projects in U.S. history.

With 93 percent of precincts reporting, Nagin had

52.9 percent, or 56,068 votes, to Landrieu’s 47.1 percent,

or 49,884 votes.

Results from Louisiana’s Secretary of State’s Office

signaled the Nagin victory. Absentee and early votes went

slightly for Nagin. And while the results showed Nagin Mayor Ray Nagin

carrying majority black precincts and Landrieu winning

in majority white ones, Nagin pulled a significant crossover vote in some heavily

populated predominantly white precincts in Uptown New Orleans.

Nagin, a former cable television executive first elected to public office in

2002, argued the city could ill-afford to change course just as rebuilding gathered

steam. His second term begins a day before the June 1 start of the next

hurricane season in a city where streets are still strewn with rusting, mud-covered

cars and entire neighborhoods consist of homes that are empty shells.

“I want the city to come back,” said 61-year-old Alice Howard, an evacuee

who returned by bus from Houston to cast her ballot. “This is my city. This is

home to me. ... I want to make sure the correct person takes care of home.”

Howard and 250 other evacuees wearing “Displaced Voter” T-shirts were

greeted by a jazz band at a City Hall rally with Nagin and Landrieu.

The candidates embraced when they met while campaigning Saturday, reflecting

the civil tone of a race where there has been little disagreement on the

major issues: the right of residents to rebuild in all areas and the urgent need

for federal aid for recovery and the best possible levee protection.

That has turned the closely watched race into a referendum on leadership

styles: the brash newcomer incumbent vs. the political establishment challenger.

Nagin, a self-styled maverick, portrayed himself as a political outsider

brave enough to stand up to federal officials when necessary. The former cable

television executive, first elected to public office in 2002, argued the city

could ill-afford to change course just as rebuilding gathered steam.

The janitor’s son from a black, working-class neighborhood is known for

his improvisational, some say impulsive, rhetoric. After Katrina plunged his

city into chaos, Nagin was both scorned and praised for a tearful plea for the

federal government to “get off their (behinds) and do something” and his nowfamous

remark that New Orleans was intended to be a “chocolate” city.

Landrieu, who served 16 years in the state House before being elected to

his current post two years ago, says his strength is his ability to bring people

together and get things done.

The scion of a political dynasty known as Louisiana’s version of the

Kennedys, he’s the brother of Sen. Mary Landrieu and would be the first white

mayor in a generation, since his father, Moon Landrieu, left office in 1978.

Landrieu supporters note New Orleans will largely be rebuilt with federal dollars,

and an established politician could have more success in dealing with the

leaders who control the purse strings.

Nagin, who had widespread support from white voters four years ago, lost

much of that support in last month’s primary but was predicting a stronger

showing this time.

The reaction we’re getting from out on the streets is very positive among

all demographics, all races,” he said after voting at his neighborhood precinct.

“It’s pretty amazing.”

Fewer than half of New Orleans’ 455,000 pre-Katrina residents are living

in the city, and a large number of blacks scattered by the storm have yet to return.

Evacuees arrived by bus from as far as Atlanta and Houston to vote.

More than 25,000 ballots were cast early by mail or fax or at satellite polling

places set up around Louisiana earlier in the month—5,000 more than were

cast early in the primary. Secretary of State Al Ater said late Saturday afternoon

that turnout appeared to be on-par with the April 22 primary, when about

37 percent of eligible voters cast ballots.

David Postel, a retired Air Force colonel voting in a relatively untouched

part of town, said he went with Landrieu because he considers him “the lesser

of two evils.”

“We’re hoping Landrieu has enough political pull to get a little more attention,”

he said.

Among the first to vote was Willie Solomon, who moved back into the

Eighth Ward home where she rode out Hurricane Katrina, even though flood

water reached her knees. Her vote was going to Nagin.

“I’m not going to see one family run the whole city,” she said.

8 THE METRO HERALD


CAPITAL COMMENTS

May 26, 2006

DUNCAN RECEIVES

FOUNDERS AWARD FROM

CULTURAL ALLIANCE;

In recognition of his distinguished

service to the arts, Montgomery

County Executive Douglas M.

Duncan has received the Annual

Founders Award from the Cultural Alliance

of Greater Washington. The

award is being presented this evening

at the Alliance’s annual Founders

Award Gala held at the JW Marriott

Hotel in Washington, D.C.

“Mr. Duncan’s support, endorsement

and investment in the construction

and renovation of new cultural facilities

make the arts central to

community development,” said Executive

Director Jennifer Cover Payne.

“His actions have identified arts and

humanities as a focal point for county

identity and community livability.”

“We are very proud of the investments

and partnerships we have made to

grow Montgomery County into a diverse

and dynamic center for the cultural arts,”

said Duncan. “The obvious benefits to

the quality of life in our county have

been more than matched by the beneficial

impact on our economy. A strong

cultural arts community not only has a

positive impact on the related businesses

such as retail and dining, but throughout

the entire community.

“Today’s knowledge-based economy

needs a highly educated workforce,”

Duncan said, “and those professionals

are attracted to areas that

offer a wide variety of opportunities to

enjoy the cultural arts. Thanks in part

to our investment in the arts, we are attracting

and retaining the kind of highquality

jobs we need to keep our community

growing and prospering.”

The Cultural Alliance of Greater

Washington is dedicated to sustaining

and increasing regional leadership, appreciation,

support and resources for

arts and culture.

Tonight’s other honorees include

Target Corporation with the Business

Patron Award and Howard Shalwitz,

Founder and Artistic Director of the

Woolly Mammoth Theatre, with the

Arts Founder Award.

DUNCAN WELCOMES NEW

AGE SECURITY SOLUTIONS

TO MONTGOMERY COUNTY

Bolstering Montgomery County’s

dynamic technology industry,

County Executive Douglas M.

Duncan today welcomed the homeland

security firm New Age Security Solutions

(NASS) to his jurisdiction. A

leader in the counter-terrorism protection

and preparedness solutions field,

NASS is relocating from Tyson’s Corner,

VA to its new offices in Rockville.

NASS brings 10 new jobs to the

County with further expansion plans in

the near future.

“We are very proud to be the new

home of such an important cuttingedge

and prestigious company,” said

County Executive Duncan. “New Age

Security Solutions is exactly the type of

innovative company we work hard to

attract to our County and we look forward

to working with them to ensure

they continue to grow and prosper here.

With more than 2,000 firms flourishing

in the County, Montgomery is a leading

center for the information technology

sector, as well as the ideal location for

any advanced technology firm.”

NASS provides innovative protection

and preparedness solutions created by

some of the world’s leading counter-terrorism

experts, especially in the fields of

aviation, maritime, mass transportation

and high profile sensitive installations

security. NASS

also provides security

design and

engineering services

to its clients

and helps them to

supervise the implementation

of

the security technologies

NASS’

clients decide to

adopt.

Montgomery County

Executive

Douglas M. Duncan

“We are

pleased to be able to locate our international

headquarters in Rockville. It’s

a wonderful community in which to

work,” states Rafi Ron, president of

NASS. Ron has 30 years of securityrelated

experience, including serving

as Chief Security Officer at Ben Gurion

Airport in Tel Aviv.

NASS works with security officials

or local law enforcement to implement

state-of-the-art security methodologies

and operations for all environments

where a high level of security is a must

by adapting recommended plans, practices,

or training to the regulations of

local aviation, maritime, and police authorities.

NASS bases its program on

the proven track record of Israeli security.

It applies the experience gained in

facing Israel’s security challenges to

better prepare government and private

organizations throughout the world

against new and traditional threats.

NASS provides security assessment

and training for law enforcement,

aviation and port authorities in the

United States, as well as internationally

aligned countries. Behavior Pattern

Recognition training programs are

implemented in federal, regional and

local government security-related

agencies, arming members with the

most effective counter terrorism tactics

available today. The company’s professional

team is comprised of law enforcement

and counter terrorism experts

with hands-on experience both

nationally and internationally. NASS is

led by Rafi Ron, an internationally recognized

thought leader in the fields of

counter terrorism, transportation and

aviation security. NASS was founded

in October 2001 in Washington D.C.

“NASSCorp. is one of the top

homeland security consulting companies,

using knowledge and techniques

developed in Israel’s long struggle in

the war on terror. We’re proud to have

them in Maryland,” said Barry Bogage,

Executive Director of the Maryland/Israel

Development Center, a

public-private partnership of Israel’s

Ministry of Industry and Trade, Maryland’s

Department of Business and

Economic Development, and The Associated:

Jewish Community Federation

of Maryland.

LABOR UNIONS SUPPORT

DUNCAN–SIMMS TICKET

Doug Duncan and Stuart Simms

recently received endorsements

from seven labor unions. Representatives

from American Federation

of State, County and Municipal Employees

(AFSCME) Local 2462; AF-

SCME Local 2735; AFSCME Local

4007; IAFF Local 1715; IAFF Local

1605; Montgomery County Association

of Administrative and Supervisory

Personnel (MCAASP); and Montgomery

County Federation of Teachers

(MCFT), Local 1670 stood with Duncan

and Simms in Laurel outside the

Headquarters of the Operative Plasterers

& Cement Masons International

Association to announce their support

for the ticket and its commitment to

bring effective leadership that works

for families across the state.

ALLEN HAILS COMMITTEE

PASSAGE OF CAPTAIN

JOHN SMITH WATER TRAIL

U.S. Senator George Allen (R-

VA) recently praised the unanimous

vote of the Senate Committee

on Energy and Natural

Resources to approve legislation designating

the route of Captain John

Smith’s exploration of the Chesapeake

Bay and its tributaries as a National

Historical Water Trail. Senator Allen

introduced the legislation with his colleagues,

Senators John W. Warner (R-

Va), Paul Sarbanes (D-MD), and Barbara

Mikulski (D-MD).

“In Virginia, we are all so proud

that we are coming up next year on the

400th anniversary of the founding of

America’s representative democracy at

Jamestown, the oldest permanent English

settlement in the New World. As

part of that celebration we should remember

the fascinating, exploratory

voyages of Captain John Smith and his

vital charting and mapping of the

Chesapeake Bay and its rivers including

the Potomac, Rappahannock, York

and James,” said Senator Allen. “As

we move closer each day to this historic

Jamestown anniversary I am

happy to see this legislation has moved

one step closer to final passage.”

Captain John Smith was a key

founder of the settlement in

STATE TEACHERS

ENDORSE TOM

PEREZ FOR

ATTORNEY

GENERAL

The Maryland State Teachers

Association, representing

64,000 teachers from

every Maryland County, this weekend

endorsed former federal prosecutor,

civil rights lawyer, and

Montgomery County Councilmember

Tom Perez in his campaign

for the Democratic Party

nomination for Maryland Attorney

General.

Perez, who seeks to replace the

retiring Joe Curran, received 89

percent of the ballots cast by

statewide teachers meeting in Columbia.

“I am honored to be supported

by so many teachers who want the

same things for the kids they teach

as I want for my kids in that they

are able to go as far as their Godgiven

gifts can take them,” said

Perez, who has been recognized as

one of the ‘rising young stars of

Maryland politics.’

“Our schools are our future and

good schools begin with good

teachers.”

“Marylanders want an attorney

general who will fight for access to

health care and affordable prescription

drugs; to protect our environment;

for good schools for all;

for safe streets and communities;

to hold corporations, big utilities

and oil companies accountable;

and to aggressively defend our

rights as consumers.”

Perez is scheduled to officially

open his campaign on Tuesday

with news conferences in Silver

Spring, Baltimore, and Hyattsville.

Jamestown, VA. He spent three years

(1607-1609) exploring the Chesapeake

Bay in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania

and Delaware covering some 3,000

miles. To this day, these maps are

some of the most accurate maps of the

Bay region.

Last year, the Senate approved legislation

sponsored by Senators Allen,

Warner, Sarbanes and Mikulski that requested

a study by the U.S. Parks Service

as to an appropriate route for such

a trail. That study is near completion.

ALLEN TO KEEP FIGHTING

FOR OCEANA

Senator George Allen (R-VA) recently

responded to the announcement

by the Inspector

General of the Department of Defense

that Virginia Beach has not met the

federal BRAC requirements to keep jet

operations fully functional and the

Master Jet Base open at Naval Air Station

Oceana. Below is Senator Allen’s

statement:

The Deputy Inspector General has

examined this situation with very strict

scrutiny and has not allowed much latitude.

There were six criteria and five

and half of those six criteria were met.

I think Virginia Beach took an extraordinarily

creative approach, sticking to

the principles that really reflect the

views of the people of Virginia Beach,

and actually put together and adopted,

working with the

State government,

a very effective

plan to

acquire the property

around

Oceana. Most

importantly as

far as the criteria

that are in this

agreement, they

have come up

Sen. George Allen

(R-VA)

with the 15 million dollars a year to

voluntarily purchase those properties.

The legal saga of the BRAC

process and Oceana continues but the

base remains open and fully operational.

One other thing that’s going to continue

will be my efforts to ensure that Oceana

stays open for generations to come. I

will join the entire Virginia Congressional

delegation, the State legislature,

the Governor, and the Attorney General

in doing whatever we can to keep

Oceana open as the Master Jet Base for

the Eastern part of our country. It is colocated

perfectly close to the fleet and

the Navy wants to stay there and those

facts and attributes do not change with

today’s ruling. Neither does our resolve

to do whatever we can to keep Oceana

serving the national security of our

country, training the next generation of

U.S. Naval Aviators and also being the

neighbor that all of us appreciate in the

South Hampton Roads area.”

AFRICAN AMERICANS EXCEED

VOTER TURN OUT PROJECTIONS IN

NEW ORLEANS RUN OFF LECTIONS

The nonpartisan National Coalition on Black Civic Participation

(NCBCP) praised the tenacity of African American voters casting

ballots during the May 20th Run-Off elections in New Orleans.

Displaced by Hurricane Katrina in far greater numbers than any other

group, African American voters demonstrated that they wanted to be actively

involved in the city’s future. Initially projected by analysts not to

match voter participation in the April 22nd Primary Election, African American

voters surpassed the expectation and cast ballots in record numbers

making up more than one-half of the 40 percent of the voting electorate.

“If there is a good news story for New Orleans, it is that African Americans

are a part of the ongoing dialogue that’s shaping the city’s renaissance,”

said Melanie L. Campbell, Executive Director and CEO of the 80-

organization member National Coalition on Black Civic Participation. In

the months leading up to the election, the NCBCP along with a number of

national and local organizations working under the umbrella of the Rebuild

HOPE Now Campaign, convened a four-city series of voter empowerment

and candidate forums. The sessions targeted African Americans forced

away from their homes and living out-of-state in Houston, TX, Atlanta,

GA, Baton Rouge, LA, or in temporary housing in New Orleans.

Vincent Sylvain, local convener of NCBCP’s, Louisiana Unity ‘06

Coalition stated, “African Americans claimed their voting rights in New

Orleans. All The National Coalition had to do was provide support, accurate

information, and an opportunity for displaced Katrina survivors to

make their Election Day choices,” Coordinated by Louisiana Unity ‘06,

NCBCP volunteers initiated an aggressive “Get-Out-The-Vote” effort in

partnership with the National Urban League, the NAACP Legal Defense

Fund and other local and national organizations. Combined, the groups

worked to ensure that African American voters could anticipate an incident-free

Election Day.

Only 15 percent of the original African American residents have returned

because the poorest areas of New Orleans remain completely uninhabitable.

The National Coalition believes that to choose a future for

their city, all New Orleanians regardless of race or economic background

need to be involved in the discussions addressing how the city will be rebuilt.

“On Primary Day in April and again on the May 20th Run Off election,

African American voices were heard. Our hope now is that the

newly elected city officials act upon the issues of greatest concern to this

constituency,” Campbell stated.

The National Coalition on Black Civic Participation (NCBCP) is a national,

nonprofit, nonpartisan coalition of over 80 member organizations

dedicated to enhancing the full participation of the Black community in

all levels of civil society. Over its 30-year history, NCBCP has served as

an effective convener and facilitator at the local, state and national levels

of efforts to address the disenfranchisement of African Americans and

other marginalized communities. For more information visit www.

ncbcp.org

THE METRO HERALD 9


MEMORIAL DAY REMEMBRANCE 2006

May 26, 2006

The 2006 National Memorial Day Parade will take place on May 29

starting at noon; parade starting point will be Third and Madison

Streets, NW, Washington, DC. The National Memorial Day Parade

was discontinued due to the outbreak of World War II. In 2004, the National

Memorial Day Parade in Washington, DC was formally reinstated to

coincide with the promotion of the 60th Anniversary of D-Day and the

unveiling of the World War II Memorial.

Parade participants will include military units, marching bands, veterans

groups, military vehicles, flag teams, and many other exciting and colorful

units.

For more information, call 202-777-7272 ext. 220.

THE 2006 NATIONAL MEMORIAL DAY PARADE

The National Memorial Day Concert, held on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol

on Sunday, May 28, 2006 at 8:00PM in Washington, DC, is a free concert,

open to the public. No tickets are necessary for admission. Taking the

Metro to the concert site is strongly advised due to traffic volume and street closings

put in place for the event. The nearest stations are Capitol South, Federal Center SW

(Orange/Blue line) and Union Station (Red line).

The program is also broadcast live nationally on PBS at 8:00PM Eastern Standard

Time (check local listings). Please allow extra time for travel if you are planning to

attend The National Memorial Day Concert, as space will be limited and heightened

security measures will be in place. Checkpoints will be set up for search of bags and

parcels. Guests will be required to enter through a metal detector. Access is at the

Southwest corner of the Capitol grounds.

This year's concert will focus on two major themes: honoring the contributions of

the “citizen soldiers” serving in the National Guard, and paying a tribute to the brave

pilots who flew with the Air Force during World War II—including the more than

90,000 combat casualties and more than 30,000 men who lost their lives.

Co-hosted by acclaimed actors Gary Sinise and Joe Mantegna, the concert will

also feature performances by Lee Ann Womack, Dianne Wiest, Charles Durning,

Big & Rich and Frederica von Stade, who'll be joined by the National Symphony Orchestra

under the direction of Erich Kunzel. General Colin L. Powell, USA (Ret.) will

will lead the nation in reminding us all of the true meaning of Memorial Day. The U.S.

Joint Chiefs of Staff will also play a special role in the concert along with a Joint

Armed Forces Color Guard and color guard teams from each branch of the armed

services provided by the Military District of Washington, the U.S. Army Herald

Trumpets, U.S. Army Chorus and U.S. Army Chorale, the U.S. Navy Sea Chanters,

the U.S. Air Force Ceremonial Brass and the U.S. Air Force Singing Sergeants.

The Concert can also be heard in stereo over National Public Radio and can be

seen overseas by U.S. military personnel in more than 135 countries on American

Forces Radio and Television Network.

Bed a little lumpy

Toss and turn any

Wish the heat was

higher, or maybe the

A/C was lower Had to

go to the john, or need

a drink of water

Picture yourself

sleeping here. Count

your blessings,

especially those hardwon

blessings paid for

by our men and women

in uniform. Pray for

their safe return.

Photos shown are from previous year’s parade.

SLEEP WELL LAST NIGHT

THE PURPOSE/MISSION

The National Memorial Day Concert

features uplifting musical

performances, documentary

footage and dramatic readings that

honor all Americans who have served or

made the ultimate sacrifice for our country.

It is the nation's premier Memorial

event, using the powerful medium of television

to reach out to millions and it

provides an outlet for loved ones to remember,

grieve and begin to heal.

The Concert’s mission is to unite the

country in remembrance and appreciation

of the fallen and to serve those who

are grieving. Executive producer Jerry

Colbert said, “We think of the agony of

the mother or father who lost a child,

the spouses and children left behind, the

people who are wounded in body and

soul. And we do this memorial service

to remember and reach out to them.”

THE PERFORMERS

The 2006 National Memorial Day

Concert will feature a host of

award-winning stars and wellknown

personalities. See below for

thoseincluded in this year’s program.

CONCERT FEATURES

Each year, the National Memorial

Day Concert presents a unique

program honoring the valor and

patriotism of Americans who have

served our country in times of conflict.

This section features the highlights of

the 2006 show, in which we bring to life

the experiences of individual servicemen

and women and their families and

pay a collective tribute to their sacrifice.

CITIZEN SOLDIERS: A

TRIBUTE TO THE ARMY

NATIONAL GUARD

The National Guard the oldest component

of the U.S. Armed Forces and

one of the nation's longest enduring institutions

celebrates its 370th birthday

in 2006. An elite group of warriors, the

Guard traces its lineage to the earliest

North American colonies, which drew

on English military traditions to organize

citizen militias.

Today’s National Guard continues its

historic dual mission, providing the

states with units trained and equipped to

protect life and property and the nation

with forces ready to defend our country

and its interests around the world. The

Guard's unprecedented level of involvement

in Iraq far greater than the mobilization

of both World Wars has hit

towns hard all over America, with losses

that resonate throughout communities.

The 2006 National Memorial Day

Concert will pay special tribute to the

“citizen soldiers” serving in the National

Guard, and recognize the impact

that their service and sacrifice has had

on their families at home.

AIR FORCE PILOTS OF WWII

For the young pilots who flew the

World War II missions, the air war in

Europe was daring, dramatic . and extremely

dangerous. More than half the

planes were lost, with 95,000 casualties,

and more than 50,000 airmen ended up

in POW camps.

On the eve of the 60th anniversary

of the United States Air Force, the 2006

National Memorial Day Concert on

PBS will pay tribute to the brave pilots

of World War II who fought in the

European theatre particularly those who

were captured as POWs.

ATIME FOR UNITY

Memorial Day has always been a day

of unity a time for Americans to come

together in remembrance of our fallen

heroes from wars past and present. It is,

in the words of Abraham Lincoln, a call

“to bind our nation’s wounds, to care for

him who shall have borne the battle, and

for his widow, and his orphan.”

At the 2006 National Memorial Day

Concert, Gen. Colin Powell USA (Ret.)

will share his thoughts on Memorial Day

then and now and how the holiday’s

deeper meaning continues to inspire us as

we struggle for ways to heal at a time

when “there is immediacy to our sorrow”

and “the wounds of war are new again.”

SALUTE TO SERVICES

It is traditional at patriotic events to

honor each branch of the Armed

Services with its own service song,

and for the members of each branch to

assume the position of “attention” during

the duration of their song.

In 1986, National Memorial Day

Concert producer Jerry Colbert commissioned

American composer Henry

Mancini to create a special medley

arrangement to serve this purpose in the

National Memorial Day Concert.

ABRAKADOODLE

ON PARADE

Abrakadoodle will be participating in

the City of Bowie Memorial Day Parade.

The parade is scheduled for

Saturday, May 27th at 11:00 am (rain or

shine). Parade begins at the Bowie High

Annex (on Belair Drive) and ends at Acorn

Hill Park (on Stonybrook Drive).

To register for this free event visit http://

app.jackrabbitclass.com/reg.aspid=

120697. For more information: email:

lcox@abrakadoodle.com; phone: 301-464-

3007 or toll free 866-464-3007; or visit

www.abrakadoodle.com.

Joe Mantegna Gary Sinise Big and Rich Colin Powell Charles Durning Fredrica vonStade Lee Ann Womack Erich Kunzel

Dianne Wiest Military District of Wash. Army Herald Trumpets Army Chorus Army Chorale Navy Band Sea Chanters USAF Ceremonial Brass USAF Singing Sergeants

10 THE METRO HERALD

THE METRO HERALD 11


MEMORIAL DAY REMEMBRANCE 2006

May 26, 2006

IWO JIMA FILM RELEASED FOR

MEMORIAL DAY SCREENINGS

T

he League of Grateful Sons, a new documentary chronicling the journey

that sons and grandsons took last March to the black sands of Iwo

Jima in honor of their fathers who fought there in 1945, is being released

for screenings in churches and other venues across America this

Memorial Day.

The Trinity Broadcasting Network will host the world television premiere

of The League of Grateful Sons, at 7pm PST on Monday, May 29.

“This Memorial Day, we are encouraging churches, veteran’s organizations,

and other groups to screen The League of Grateful Sons in their communities,”

explained Doug Phillips, executive producer of the film and president

of Vision Forum Ministries. “We must honor the veterans of the Second

World War, and screening our film is one way of doing that. It is our prayer

that this documentary will be a tool that will inspire the younger generation

to connect with the WWII vets—to ask their stories, to hear their heart, and

above all, to show them honor.

On March 12, 2005, Phillips journeyed with his two eldest sons to Iwo

Jima for the sixtieth anniversary of the battle. With him came fathers who

fought on the island, joined by their sons and grandsons. Other sons came

whose fathers never left the volcanic ash during the bloody conflict with the

Japanese in 1945. The League of Grateful Sons, a powerful new documentary,

tells the stories of these men.

The League of Grateful Sons was produced as part of The Faith of Our Fathers

Project, an ongoing work of Vision Forum Ministries to tell the stories

of the providence of God through the families that make up American history.

Shot on location on Iwo Jima, Texas, Hawaii, and Guam, and featuring an

original score, the film premiered last October at the San Antonio Independent

Christian Film Festival and is now being distributed on DVD through

various retails outlets nationwide.

The League of Grateful Sons is not just another war film,” observed

Phillips. “It is the true story of how faithful fathers and honoring sons unearthed

generational lessons for the sons and daughters of our day within the

context of the defining battle in Marine Corps history—the epic battle for Iwo

Jima.”

For more information visit www.leagueofgratefulsons.com.

ROLLING THUNDER’S 19TH ANNUAL “RIDE FOR FREEDOM”

The 19th Annual Memorial Day Run paying homage to the nation’s veterans and POWs/MIAs includes

motorcycles, cars, and flags, and thousands of people lining the streets along the parade route. Rolling

Thunder, a class 501 C-4 non-profit organization with chapters throughout the United States, actively

promotes legislation to increase veteran benefits and resolve POW/MIA issue from all wars. In addition, volunteers

provide food, clothing, education and support to veterans in their communities year-round.

PROGRAM AND TIMELINE

Friday, May 26—Arrival at Headquarters Hotel Hyatt Regency Crystal City 3:00PM, 2799 Jefferson Davis Highway

Arlington, VA; Candlelight Vigil—Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, DC—9:00PM

Sunday, May 28—Assemble North Pentagon Parking Lot for the Ride for Freedom and Demonstration—6:45AM;

Procession leaves Pentagon over Memorial Bridge to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial—12:00PM; Program at the

Reflecting Pool—1:15PM; Musical tribute to veterans—3:00PM—Paul Revere and the Raiders; Nancy Sinatra;

and Connie Stevens

CITY OF ALEXANDRIA HOSTS ANNUAL

MEMORIAL DAY JAZZ FESTIVAL

The City of Alexandria will host its Annual Memorial Day Jazz Festival on Monday,

May 29, from 1:00-7:00PM, at Fort Ward Park, 4301 W. Braddock Road.

Admission is free.

Tom Grooms of WJZW “Smooth Jazz” 105.9 FM will serve as this year’s master of

ceremonies. The festival will feature music from Juanita Williams, Kevin “Stixx”

Marshall, Al Williams, Keith Kilgo, and the James Bazen Big Band.

The park features amphitheater and grass seating. Lawn chairs and blankets will be allowed.

Vendors will provide food for purchase, and attendees can bring picnic baskets.

Grills are available in the park at picnic sites. No alcoholic beverages are allowed, and

pets should be left at home.

Parking will be available on both sides of West Braddock Road. Additional parking

will be located at the Minnie Howard School, 3801 West Braddock Road., and T. C.

Williams High School, 3330 King St.

In case of inclement weather, the festival will be relocated to the Lee Center’s Kauffman

Auditorium, 1108 Jefferson St.

For additional information, call the City’s Events Hotline at 703-883-4686.

PBS TO AIR

LINCOLN AND LEE

AT ANTIETAM—

THE COST OF FREEDOM

Inecom Entertainment Company is pleased

to announce that Lincoln and Lee at Antietam—The

Cost of Freedom will air nationally

on the PBS HD Channel during the

Memorial Day weekend. Distributed nationwide

since its release in January 2006, the

award-winning Lincoln and Lee at Antietam—

The Cost of Freedom DVD is available at

video stores, Internet retailers, educational and

institutional distributors and retail chains

nationwide.

Narrated by Ronald F. Maxwell (director of

Gettysburg and Gods and Generals) and written,

directed and produced by multiple-award

winner Robert Child (Gettysburg: Three Days

of Destiny and Gettysburg: The Boys in Blue

and Gray), Lincoln and Lee at Antietam—The

Cost of Freedom vividly brings to life the story

of America’s fight for freedom during the

bloodiest day in American History.

Nearly twice as many Americans died at the

Battle of Antietam than had fallen in the American

Revolution, the War of 1812, the Mexican

War and the Spanish-American War combined.

In striking comparison, American losses on D-

Day were a quarter of those at Antietam.

Lincoln and Lee at Antietam—The Cost of

Freedom is presented by Penn State Public

Broadcasting (PSPB) and distributed by American

Public Television (APT). Local stations

that offer digital broadcast services will broadcast

the film in high-definition format on the

following May dates (check local listings):

• May 28, 2006 7:00pm (EDT)

• May 29, 2006 4:00pm, 8:00pm and

11:00pm (EDT)

For more information visit www.

AntietamConflict.com or www.Inecom.com.

BEAT THE HEAT AND

TAKE THE PLUNGE

AT AREA POOLS

Come out Memorial Day weekend at

any one of the Park Authority’s four

community swimming pools or two

waterparks for the grand opening of the

2006 season! With the heat wave approaching,

it’s time to purchase your pool passes,

and make your plans to take a dip in one of

their cool pools for the summer.

Admission fees for community pools do

not exceed $4.00 during peak hours with discounts

for children and seniors. Evening

discounted rates of $1.50 to $2.50 are available

after 4:00p.m. Admission fees for Waterworks

Waterpark do not exceed $5.75,

and admission fees for Splash Down Waterpark

do not exceed $13.25. Evening discounts

and discounts for children are available

at both waterparks. Discounts for

seniors are also available at Waterworks.

Guests should also check their calendar of

events on line for specialty nights, family

events, and upcoming activities.

Check out the summer issue of Leisure

magazine for a Prince William County Park

Authority Community Pool Pass Order

Form. Passes are available for all four community

pools and Waterworks. Visit the

Splash Down website www.splashdownwaterpark.com

or the Waterworks website

www.waterworkswaterpark.com to get

complete details for their limited hours

through June 15. Splash Down swim lessons

are also available by calling Ben

Lomond Community Center at (703) 361-

7126.

Call (703) 792-7060 for information on

how to purchase season passes by phone

using a credit card, or mail in the form in

Leisure magazine. You can also purchase

admission tickets and Season Passes to

Splash Down Waterpark at a discounted rate

using the Click-n-Print system online.

12 THE METRO HERALD


HEALTH & WELLNESS

May 26, 2006

LILLY OFFERS TIPS FOR

DISASTER PREPARATION FOR DIABETES

With hurricane season starting

June 1 and tornado season

in full force, Eli Lilly and

Company, the worldwide leader in diabetes,

is offering tips for people with diabetes

to help limit interruption of their

medical treatment if disaster strikes.

People with chronic medical conditions

that require daily medications are

among the most vulnerable victims of

natural disasters, as access to their

homes, medical supplies and even

medicines may be interrupted or compromised.

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina

last summer, people with diabetes faced

particular challenges, especially patients

using insulin, a hormone that the

body needs for the correct use of food

and energy. People using insulin need to

take their medicine every day, often

multiple times, to keep blood sugar levels

in balance; meals and therapy routines

are often carefully planned.

Stress and erratic eating patterns

can change blood sugar levels, and the

chaos of a disaster or catastrophic

event can confuse these routines and

potentially seriously affect the health

of people with diabetes. Diabetes affects

an estimated 194 million adults

worldwide and more than 20 million in

the United States.

“Patients with diabetes, especially

those taking insulin injections, should

make sure to have a reserve supply of

medication and supplies for a period of

several weeks in the event of a major

disaster or evacuation,” said Dr. Carlos

R. Hamilton, past president, American

Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.

“Experience with Hurricanes Katrina

and Rita in 2005 taught us that medical

services, including pharmacies, may

not be available and emergency care in

shelters may lack the ability to give insulin

injections. These emergency supplies

should include equipment for selfmonitoring

of blood glucose, including

test strips and monitor batteries.”

As a service to help people with diabetes

and their caregivers prepare for

a natural disaster, Lilly—one of the

world’s leading manufacturers of insulin—offers

special tips for Diabetes

Disaster Preparation. These helpful

suggestions can be applied no matter

where you live, whether in a hurricane

region, tornado alley, earthquake zone

or elsewhere, and can be applied

broadly to any medical condition.

• Ensure that your medications and

supplies are stored in a defined location

and can be easily gathered if

you must quickly evacuate your

home or place of work

• If you use insulin, keep cool packs

or ice in your freezer that can be

easily reached to keep your medicine

cool while on the go

• Compile an easy-to-identify, easyto-reach

kit that includes:

• Extra medical supplies, such as syringes,

cotton balls, tissues, alcohol

swabs, blood glucose testing strips,

blood glucose meter, lancing device

and lancets, urine ketone testing

strips and any other items relevant

to your therapy and blood sugar

monitoring

• An empty hard plastic bottle to dispose

of syringes and lancets

• Small cooler to store your insulin

while away from refrigeration

• Pen and small notebook to record

blood sugars

• Extra pair of glasses (if you wear

glasses)

• Extra copies of prescriptions and

health insurance cards

• Emergency medical information

and emergency contact list, including

your caregiver’s and physicians’

names and phone numbers. If

you are a parent of a child with diabetes,

keep a copy of the physician’s

orders for your child’s care

on file with the school, as well as in

your disaster kit

• Up-to-date glucagon emergency kit

(if using insulin) and fast-acting

carbohydrate (such as glucose

tablets or orange juice)

• Non-perishable items such as granola

bars, unsweetened cereal, hard

candies, peanut butter and crackers,

and water

• Typical emergency items such as a

First Aid kit, flashlight, whistle,

matches and candles, radio with

batteries, and work gloves

• Keep the kit up-to-date and ensure

you have enough supplies to last at

least a week

• Keep something containing sugar

with you at all times in case you develop

low blood sugar

• Maintain your meal plan to the best

of your ability and keep hydrated.

However, food and water supplies

can often become contaminated

during a disaster and it may be necessary

to boil water before drinking

• Monitor your blood sugar frequently

and record your numbers

• Increase your food intake during

periods of excessive physical exertion

(such as lifting heavy objects

or walking longer-than-usual distances)

by eating appropriate

snacks between meals

• Wear shoes at all times and examine

your feet often, as people with

diabetes are more vulnerable to developing

infections. If you have a

foot wound, seek medical attention

immediately

• If you are relocated or affected by a

disaster, call your doctors as soon as

possible to touch base and maintain

the continuity of your medical care

• If you are a parent of a child with

diabetes, make sure that you clearly

identify which school staff members

will assist your child in the

event of an emergency

• If you are displaced or need to

evacuate, identify yourself immediately

as a person with diabetes and

report any related conditions so that

authorities can provide for proper

medical care

“No one can anticipate the effect of

a natural disaster, but with proper

preparation and care, people with diabetes

can survive and manage their disease

with limited interruption while

dealing with the aftermath of a disaster,”

said Dr. Sherry Martin, medical

advisor, Eli Lilly and Company. “Taking

the time to prepare now may make

a huge difference in an emergency.”

For more information, visit

www.lilly.com.

GIVING VOICE TO PEOPLE

WITH SCLERODERMA

The third volume of the Voices of Scleroderma book series continues

to educate and inform readers through both world-renowned medical

experts and more than 100 short stories of people with scleroderma.

Scleroderma is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the connective

tissue and is characterized by excessive fibrosis of the skin and internal

organs. The disease, which targets mostly women, affects about 30

people in a million a year. It is called the “disease that turns people into

stone,” because the illness causes hardened scar tissue throughout the

body. The illness can be catastrophic if organs are impacted. There is no

cause and treatments are limited.

“My life flashed in front of me,” described Naomi, a scleroderma patient

from New Jersey, in her first-hand account in Voices of Scleroderma

Volume 3.

“Here I was in my early 30s with three little children at home and this

doctor is telling me that within two years I could be dead. I looked at her

and I remember telling her that there was no way I was going to die! I had

children to raise.”

These touching short stories—written by the patients like Naomi or

loved ones—were originally written for the nonprofit International Scleroderma

Network’s website at www.sclero.org/. The stories are an interesting

study of the progression of the disease from the patient point of view,

and how it impacts individuals in so many different ways.

In Naomi’s case, the disease began 20 years ago, and she now has

scarred lungs, and deformed hands. She has excruciating hand pain in the

cold, an irregular heart beat and acid reflux, but her fighting spirit keeps

her alive. She recently married off her two sons, and brought her sons to

tears when she was able to dance her mother and son dance—oxygen tank

and all. “I will fight this battle until my body cannot take it anymore. Do

not give up! Fight the battle! We may not win but we will not be brought

down easily.”

The book is an easy read as well. Editors Judith Thompson Devlin and

Shelley L. Ensz divided the book into four parts: systemic scleroderma, juvenile

and localized scleroderma, autoimmune and overlap, and an international

section published in five different languages. These were the original

languages written by scleroderma patients across the world. The

website itself uses 22 languages through hundreds of volunteers throughout

the world.

Professor Marco Matucci-Cerinic and Dr. Irene Miniati note in Chapter

1 that systemic scleroderma was called “the most terrible of human ills” by

Sir William Osler, and that many doctors lack the expertise to suspect or

detect scleroderma early.

The books are readily available worldwide through Amazon.com.

THE NATIONAL

GRANGE FIGHTS

THE METH PROBLEM

IN RURAL AMERICA

Methamphetamine, commonly

referred to as meth, is a highly

addictive drug that is affecting

every segment of society, especially rural

America. In response to this growing crisis,

the National Grange, an agriculture

and rural advocacy organization, is

spreading awareness about the dangers of

meth in its DVD, “Methamphetamine: A

Menace to Rural America.”`

The 15-minute DVD highlights the

problems with meth in rural areas, explains

who is affected, and gives advice

on how rural Americans can combat meth

labs in their areas.

“Meth producers are attracted to farming

areas because it affords them a privacy

that urban areas do not provide,”

said William Steel, president of the National

Grange. “As a result, farmers,

many financially-disadvantaged, have to

assume the burden of costly toxic cleanups

and stolen farming chemicals that aid

producers with the creation of meth. The

average clean-up cost is $25,000 to

$30,000.”

Several surveys, report that meth lab

seizures in rural areas increased by 62

percent in 2005, meth abuse among rural

Americans increased by 82 percent in

2005 (5.3 percent of those users were

under 12 years old), 60 percent of children

taken from homes with meth labs

had the drug in their systems in 2005, and

more than 3,000 children living in rural

areas become “meth orphans” in 2005.

For more information visit www.

nationalgrange.org.

Archive issues are available at www.metroherald.com!

THE METRO HERALD 13


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT/KATHERINE DUNHAM DIES AT 97

May 26, 2006

WOLF TRAP’S SUMMER SEASON KICKS OFF AND THE 17TH ANNUAL SWAP ROMP BEGINS

Lynyrd Skynyrd jump starts the

month of June at Wolf Trap

with a sold out Thursday,

June 1 show, while the New York

Gilbert & Sullivan Players perform

The Pirates of Penzance on Friday,

June 2 and Saturday, June 3, and

Marcia Ball, Rebirth Brass Band, Chris

Ardoin & Double Clutchin’, and

Charivari share the stage for Wolf

Trap’s 17th Annual Louisiana Swamp

Romp on Sunday, June 4.

LYNYRD SKYNYRD AT THE

FILENE CENTER; THURSDAY,

JUNE 1 AT 8P.M.

This show is now sold out. Patrons

can call (703) 255-1868 on the day of

the performance to check for last

minute ticket availability.

Classic rockers Lynyrd Skynyrd return

for their second performance at

the Filene Center, having been together

for more than three decades and recognized

as the enduring rock band of the

working class. All Music Guide’s

Stephen Thomas Erlewine describes

Lynyrd Skynyrd as “the definitive

Southern rock band, fusing the overdriven

power of blues-rock with a rebellious,

Southern image and a hard

rock swagger.”

GILBERT AND SULLIVAN’S

THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE

AT THE FILENE CENTER;

FRIDAY, JUNE 2 AT 8 P.M. &

SATURDAY, JUNE 3 AT 8 P.M.

Performed by the New York Gilbert

and Sullivan Players; Tickets range

JANICE LYTHCOTT HILL

NAMED EXECUTIVE

DIRECTOR OF THE

LINCOLN THEATRE

from $10 to $38. Wolf Trap begins the

summer musical theatre season with the

New York Gilbert and Sullivan Player’s

The Pirates of Penzance. Hailed as one

of the company’s most popular performances,

The New York Times calls

the show “exquisitely inventive...effervescent

and beautifully crafted.”

A comic opera in two acts, with

music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto

by W. S. Gilbert, The Pirates of Penzance

was first performed at the Fifth

Avenue Theatre in New York City on

December 31, 1879, and is the only

Gilbert and Sullivan opera to premiere

in the United States. The story centers

on the predicament of young Frederic,

who, as a child, was mistakenly apprenticed

to the pirates until his

twenty-first birthday. Although Frederic

has a moral objection to piracy, he

must remain a pirate until 1940 because

he was born in a leap year on

February 29. Throughout the opera, a

cast of characters assist Frederic in surviving

his dilemma.

17TH ANNUAL LOUISIANA

SWAMP ROMP AT THE

FILENE CENTER; SUNDAY,

JUNE 4 AT 2 P.M.

Featuring Marcia Ball, Rebirth

Brass Band, Chris Ardoin & Double

Clutchin’, and Charivari. Tickets are

$20 in advance and $25 on the day of

the show.

The Louisiana Swamp Romp returns

to Wolf Trap for its 17th year,

celebrating the legendary music of

Louisiana in the exciting environment

of the Filene Center. Past Swamp

Janice Lythcott Hill

Janice Lythcott Hill, who has

spent more than 25 years as an

executive and producer in the

recording and entertainment industry,

has been named Executive Director of

the historic Lincoln Theatre. The announcement

was made by Rick Lee,

Chairman of the U Street Theatre

Foundation, which has management

responsibility for the New Lincoln

Theatre.

Most recently, Mrs. Hill served as

Director of Marketing and Event Management

for the Congressional Black

Caucus Foundation, Inc. (CBCF),

where she was responsible for the

planning and implementation of all

marketing initiatives and production of

CBCF events.

In making the announcement, Rick

Lee said, “The Lincoln Theatre Board

of Directors had its search committee

identify the most qualified person

available for the challenging position

of Executive Director of the Lincoln

Theatre. We are pleased to have such a

nationally experienced person as Mrs.

Hill to serve in this capacity”.

Janice first became associated with

the CBCF during the 16 years she

worked with pioneering recording executive,

the late LeBaron Taylor, at

CBS Records and Sony Music Entertainment,

first as Manager of Administration

for CBS Records and later as

Director, Project Development for

Corporate Affairs at Sony Music Entertainment.

She has also served as

Project Director for the International

Jazz Academy and Hall of Fame; Producer

of President Bill Clinton’s Birthday

Bash in l994; and Producer of Beyond

the Music Makers for WETA-TV.

In speaking about her new appointment,

Mrs. Hill said she was thrilled

about being a part of the renaissance of

the “new” U Street and the “new” Lincoln

Theatre. “It is my personal honor to

be able to build on the Lincoln’s rich

legacy by capturing the multicultural energy

of the community through vibrant

and exciting programming. It is inspiring

to participate in the revitalization of

such a dynamic area - what’s good for

The Lincoln is good for U Street!”

At the Lincoln Theatre, Mrs. Hill is

responsible for all administrative and

artistic aspects of the theatre. She indicated

that her immediate priorities include

“reinstituting the Artist-in-Residence

Program, initiating

programmatic quality control mechanisms

and broadening marketing efforts.”

Built in l922, the Lincoln Theatre

was a popular venue hall for legendary

jazz artists like Duke Ellington, Billie

Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Ella

Fitzgerald and others in the l930s and

l940s. The theatre has undergone extensive

renovation and is presently

owned by District of Columbia government.

Romps have featured artists such as

BeauSoleil, The Iguanas, and Steve

Riley and the Mamou Playboys. This

year’s show features a rich collection

of talent straight from the Bayou, playing

Cajun, zydeco, and funk.

Marcia Ball was raised in Vinton,

Louisiana, an area known for its Gulf

Coast rhythm and blues. Ball absorbed

the region’s unique culture, as she took

formal piano lessons while growing up.

Known for a piano style that incorporates

elements of zydeco, swamp blues,

and boogie woogie, Ball released several

well-known recordings on Rounder

Records in the 1980s and early 1990s. A

three-time Grammy-nominee, Ball was

also the recipient of Blues Music

Awards (formerly the W.C. Handy

award) and was inducted into the Austin

Music Hall of Fame in 1990.

Since 1983, Rebirth Brass Band has

been committed to upholding the tradition

of brass bands while at the same

time incorporating modern music into

their shows. Their signature brand of

heavy funk has placed them among the

world’s top brass bands and they remain

a favorite among the younger

generation. Rebirth Brass Band includes

Stafford Agee (trombone),

Shamar Allen (trumpet), Glen Andrews

(trumpet), Keith Frazier (bass drum),

Philip Frazier (tuba), Derrick Shezbie

(trumpet), Herbert Stevens (trombone),

and Derrick Tabb (snare drum).

A third generation accordionist of

Louisiana’s most famed southern region

musical dynasty, Chris Ardoin

followed in the traditions established

by his father and grandfather. A child

prodigy, Ardoin played Carnegie Hall

by the time he was 9 years old and

formed Double Clutchin’ at age 13,

with his brother, cousin, and a family

friend. Blending Creole music with

WILL DOWNING

DISCUSSION &

BOOK SIGNING

Will Downing, singer,

photographer and now

author, will discuss and

sign his new book “Unveiled” on

Friday, June 2nd from 6:30-

8:30PM at Bowie Town Center,

15624 Emerald Way, Bowie, MD

20716.

Unbeknownst to many listeners,

Will is a noted photographer

and has captured the images of his

contemporaries, such as Al Jarreau,

Chaka Khan, Jill Scott and many

more. “Unveiled” is a compilation

of over 9 years of work as well as

a showcase for the creations of

seven up and coming artists.

For more info: 301/352-4110.

About Will Downing

Just one note . . . and you instantly

know ‘That Voice”! Will

Downing has been entertaining sophisticated

soul fans with his sensual

baritone voice for over 16

years. He has been recognized by

the Grammy Awards and the

NAACP Image Awards for his excellence

on the stage and in the studio

and has been embraced by

radio stations across the R&B,

Smooth Jazz, and Adult Contemporary

dial. He is also noted for his

duets with noted singers, Chante

Moore, Rachelle Farrell, and Mica

Paris.

Rebirth Brass Band

KATHERINE

DUNHAM DIES

AT 97

everything from R&B, rock, and jazz,

to blues, country, and gospel, Ardoin

continues to tour and will release his

newest album, Whose Da Boss, in the

summer of 2006.

Charivari has worked on establishing

itself as the premier concert and

dance band in Cajun music today, delivering

high-energy performances that

blend the best of traditional compositions

with vibrant original works. With

roots deep in the heart of the Cajun

prairies of Southwest Louisiana, the

band continues the legacy of waltzes,

two-steps, fiddle tunes, and stories

about the lives of the Cajun & Creole

peoples. Charivari is driven by the

unique vocals of Randy Vidrine and

rip-roaring fiddling of Mitchell Reed.

Through adding Jonno Frishberg on

fiddle and accordion, the band explores

the origin of fiddle in Cajun

music. Alfred “Bo” Ledet on bass and

Matt Swiler on drums provide a full,

rich, mystical sound to the group.

Tickets can be purchased by calling

Tickets.com at 1-877-WOLFTRAP;

or online at www.wolftrap.org. For

more information, call Wolf Trap at

(703) 255-1868.

Katherine Mary Dunham

passed away in her sleep in

New York City on Sunday,

May 21.

Dunham was a dancer, choreographer,

and songwriter who was trained

as an anthropologist. She was an innovator

in African-American modern

dance as well as a leader in the field

Katherine Dunham

of Dance Anthropology, or Ethnochoreology.

Dunham was born in Glen Ellyn, Illinois. She studied both dance and anthropology

while an undergraduate and graduate student at the University of

Chicago during the 1930s. She showed great promise in her ethnographic

studies of dance and studied under the great anthropologists of the day, Robert

Redfield, A.R. Radcliffe-Brown, Edward Sapir, and Bronislaw Malinowski.

In 1936, she was awarded a Rosenwald Travel Fellowship to conduct ethnographic

study of the Vodun in the West Indies, a path also followed by fellow

anthropology student, Zora Neale Hurston.

While working on her masters, she was told by her advisors that she had

to choose between anthropology and dance. Much to their regret, she chose

dance, left her graduate studies before finishing her doctorate, and departed

for Hollywood, where she made a number of films before forming her own

company.

Dunham married producer John Thomas Pratt, who managed her career.

She also began the Katherine Dunham Company, a troupe of dancers, singers,

actors and musicians, which was the first African American modern dance

company. The company toured worldwide and in the then segregated South,

where Ms. Dunham once refused to hold a show after finding out that the

city’s black residents had not been allowed to buy tickets for the performance.

Dunham later directed the Katherine Dunham School of Dance in New

York City and was an artist-in-residence at Southern Illinois University. Dunham

was also known for her anthropological work in studies into Haitian and

Caribbean culture.

In 1967, Dunham opened the Performing Arts Training Center (PATC) in

East St. Louis, Illinois as an attempt to use the arts to combat poverty and

urban unrest. The PATC drew on former members of Dunham’s touring company

as well as local residents for its teaching staff.

Known for her many innovations, the Dunham Technique is now taught as

a modern dance style in dance schools, including at the Harkness Dance Center

of the 92nd Street Y.

AWARDS

• In 1989, Dunham was awarded a National Medal of Arts, an honor shared by

only two other University of Chicago alumni, Saul Bellow and Philip Roth.

• Dunham has her own star on the St. Louis Walk of Fame.

14 THE METRO HERALD

Charivari


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

May 26, 2006

COME TO WASHINGTON:

THE ART PROJECT

From June 1 through September

30, Sonnig Records, the

Come to Washington: A Song

for the City host committee, and four

charming venues bring you the “Come

to Washington: A Song for the City”

painting exhibition tour. Love Cafe

will kick off the tour between June 1–

29 in Northwest at 1501 U Street.

Next, the painting travels to Southeast

with Mr. Henry’s Capitol Hill displaying

it from July 1–30 at 601 Pennsylvania

Avenue. Then it is on to the Market

Inn in Southwest at 200 E Street

from August 1–30. The tour ends at

Colonel Brooks Tavern in Northeast at

901 Monroe Street, being on display

there from September 1–30.

On March 24, 2006, Sonnig

Records hosted the launch event for

“Come to Washington: A Song for the

City”, a campaign to name Lincoln

Ross’ “Come to Washington” as DC’s

unofficial song. During the event, artist

J. Anthony (www.jamesdesigns.net)

installed a canvas onsite for guests to

sign, draw, and doodle on. He painted

the campaign title in an elegant, gold

script and added a street sign of a

Southeast intersection that has Washington’s

most breathtaking view.

March 24th guests filled the canvas

with color, sayings, and objects.

After the campaign launch event,

Washington notables added their mark

to the “Come to Washington: A Song

for the City” painting. Visit the tour

to see contributions made by sports

anchor Glenn Harris, celebrity chef

Warren Brown, news reporter Pat

Collins, LOVE nightclub owner

Marc Barnes, organic chef Nora

Pouillon, Chuck Brown, news anchor

Maureen Bunyan, 9:30 Club

co-owner Rich Heincke, radio personality

Al Santos, Artistic Director

for Arena Stage Molly Smith,

WPFW-89.3 FM General Manager

Ron Pinchback, radio personality

Jeannie Jones, Black Cat owner and

manager Dante Ferrando and G.

Bernard Wandel, news anchor Gordon

Peterson, and music mogul Marcus

Johnson.

In the fall, the painting will be auctioned

at the “Come to Washington: A

Song for the City” gala. Sonnig

Records is donating 25% of the winning

bid to the DC Music Center, a

non-profit organization that provides

affordable music lessons for inner city,

low income and minority youths and

adults. Details on the gala will be released

mid-summer.

“Come to Washington: A Song for

the City” painting viewers can lounge

with Washington’s most delicious cupcake

while at Love Cafe. And for the

warmth of a cozy neighborhood pub

and restaurant, art and culture lovers

can catch the painting at Mr. Henry’s

or Colonel Brooks Tavern. Daters can

examine the piece while indulging in a

succulent seafood dinner and hearing

live jazz at the Market Inn.

The “Come to Washington: A Song

for the City” painting exhibition tour is

sponsored in part by Mickelson’s Fine

Art Framing. Join Sonnig Records in

this effort to bring the four sections of

Washington together through song. Go

to www.lincolnross.com for more information

about the campaign and to

purchase the catchy “Come to Washington”

anthem, or call Sonnig

Records at (202) 210-2427.

CHILDREN’S FILM

PROGRAM AT

NATIONAL GALLERY

OF ART

All shows are in the East Building

Auditorium of the National

Gallery of Art on a first-come,

first-seated basis. For details visit www.

nga.gov/programs/flmchild.htm

PELICAN MAN

(LIISA HELIMINEM,

FINLAND, 2004, 89 MINS.)

JUNE 3, 7, AND 14 AT

10:30AM/JUNE 4 AT 11:30AM

AGES 7 AND UP

A pelican takes human form, rents

an apartment, and gets a job, and no

one notices that he is actually a bird —

except ten-year-old Emil. Find out if

they can keep the pelican man’s true

identity a secret. In Finnish with English

subtitles.

REEL FUN

JULY 8 AND 19 AT 10:30AM AND

11:30AM JULY 9 AT 11:30AM

AGES 3 AND UP

See stories about a young worm, a

monster family, and an Indian princess

in this series of short films. Films include

Armonia (Lauren Grieman,

Canada, 2004, 3 mins.), Cartoon Animal

Kingdom (David Katz, USA,

2005, 3 mins.), Sundae, Sunday (Eva

Saks, USA, 2005, 3 mins.), Maya the

Indian Princess(Kavita Ramchandran,

USA, 2004, 3 mins.) Diary of a Worm

(Gene Deitch, USA, 2004, 10 mins.),

Ish (Weston Woods, USA, 2005, 8

mins.), and Little Monsterette (Ted

Sieger and Alexandra Schatz, Germany/Smitzerland,

2004, 9 mins.).

Pelican Man

MAGICAL MÉLIÈS

JULY 28 AND 29; AUGUST 11

AND 12 AT 11:00AM AND 1:00PM

AGES 6 AND UP

As producer, director, actor, and designer,

Georges Méliès used the magic

of film to create fantasy worlds. A selection

of his silent films, including A

Trip to the Moon and The Magic

Lantern, will be shown with live piano

accompaniment.

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS

(VINCENTE MINNELLI,

MGM STUDIOS, USA,

1951, 113 MINS.)

JULY 28; AUGUST 11 AT 2:30PM

AGES 10 AND UP

This musical romance stars Gene

Kelly as a struggling young painter

who finds love on the Left Bank. The

film’s climatic ballet sequence features

art direction inspired by French masters,

including the paintings of Henri

Rousseau.

SHORT STUFF

AUGUST 5, 9, AND 16 AT

10:30AM AND 11:30AM

AUGUST 6 AT 11:30AM

AGES 6 AND UP

Join us for a series of live-action

and animated short films from around

the world. Films include Wind (Erik

van Schaaik, The Netherlands, 2004, 5

mins.), Gopher Broke (Blur Studio,

USA, 2005, 5 mins.), The Mantis Parable

(Josh Staub, USA, 2005, 8 mins.),

A Song for Daniel (Jason DaSilva,

Canada/Iraq, 2005, 9 mins.), and Charlotte’s

Red (Colin McIvor, Northern

Ireland, 2005, 15 mins.).

REAGAN NATIONAL AIRPORT HOSTS

7TH ANNUAL D.C. PUBLIC SCHOOLS

ART EXHIBIT

The Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority is pleased to host the

D.C. Public Schools 7th Annual Citywide Student Art Exhibition at

Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport.

The work of more than 300 students from 75 elementary, junior high and

high schools is displayed in the baggage claim level of Terminal B/C. This

year’s theme is “Creating Meaning, New Ideas and New Views, ” and includes

drawings, paintings, collages, prints and mixed media. The exhibit

runs until May 31.

“Art plays an important role at Reagan National Airport,” said James E.

Bennett, President and CEO of the Airports Authority. “The work of more

than 30 professional artists is actually built into the design of Terminal B/C.

We are pleased to complement our permanent collection with the artwork

from these talented young people.”

THE METRO HERALD 15


EDUCATION/SPORTS & RECREATION

May 26, 2006

OP-ED

When you’re a new mother or

father, you learn quite

quickly that your child has

been born into a world filled with hidden

dangers. You have to make sure

that the stuffed animal you place in

your baby’s crib doesn’t represent a

choking hazard...that your child doesn’t

fall out of his high chair...that your

two-year-old doesn’t stray into the

street while chasing a bubble.

Once your child graduates from the

toddler years, you have to be concerned

about whether he’s wearing a

helmet when cycling through your

neighborhood...or whether she’s

spending enough time doing her homework.

You have to be focused on what

your child is eating...how your child is

sleeping...and how your child is dealing

with stress.

And, in this age of digital technology,

you have to be absolutely obsessed

with what your child is doing

online.

Sure, you may know enough to

keep your child from browsing through

porn sites, but did you know that your

EIGHT ALEXANDRIA CITY PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS RECEIVE

EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION AWARDS

Eight Alexandria City Public

School (ACPS) teachers will

be honored on Tuesday, June 6,

at the Excellence in Education Awards

dinner sponsored by the Alexandria

Education Partnership (AEP), a nonprofit

organization that supports ACPS

with community resources and career

preparation.

Principals, colleagues, parents and

students from six elementary schools,

George Washington Middle School

and T.C. Williams High School nominated

the following award recipients

for their abilities to inspire students to

appreciate learning and attain maximum

potential; create classrooms that

promote diversity, individual talents

and self esteem; and serve as positive

role models.

Wanda Bridget Allen, a kindergarten

teacher at Lyles-Crouch Traditional

Academy since 1993, educates

her students through a variety of fun

activities, from using teddy bears in

lessons to performing in costume to

encourage students to read. A participant

on numerous leadership and planning

teams, Allen recently served as

the ACPS kindergarten preparatory coordinator.

Allen was a finalist for The

Washington Post’s 2006 Agnes Meyer

Outstanding Teacher Award.

Terrell LeVaughn Ambrose, an

ACPS instrumental music teacher

since 1999, serves as the T.C. Williams

High School music department chair

and director of Symphonic Bands I and

II, Concert Band, Marching Band, Jazz

Combo and Jazz Ensemble. Under

Ambrose’s leadership, the band program

has grown and students have performed

at a variety of local venues, including

the John F. Kennedy Center for

the Performing Arts. Ambrose is

known for making sure that all his students

receive equal opportunities and

individual attention.

Anika Buster-Singleton, a sixthgrade

language arts teacher at George

teenager could easily become a victim

of a sexual THE predator-just LATEST by occupying

a place in cyberspace

DANGERS IN

The problem is mySpace.com, a

supposedly innocuous Internet website

CYBERWORLD

Nathan Tabor

Special to The Metro Herald

where people can post their pictures,

chat, and post their musings about the

universe. The trouble is, mySpace attracts

individuals who want to sexually

exploit teenagers. Newspapers are carrying

headlines showing the troubles

with mySpace: a 15-year-old runs

away from home to be with a man she

met on the Internet...a 24-year-old man

is arrested for having sex with a 14-

year-old girl he knew from my-

Space...a 32-year-old man is accused

of soliciting sex from a 13-year-old

through mySpace.

In short, your Internet connection

could easily become a pathway for a

predator.

In such a situation, what can a parent

do Some parent activists have decided

to arm themselves with information.

They’re educating themselves

about the dangers of mySpace.

They’re learning about what their

teenage sons and daughters are doing

online. And they’re taking action to

reduce the risks to their children.

At one point, these parents might

have never thought that anything bad

could happen to their child from his or

her exposure to the World Wide Web.

In fact, they might have encouraged

their teens to spend time on the Internet

in order to polish their computer

skills and broaden their horizons. But

now they’ve come to realize that no

teen is immune to the lure of a clever

predator in cyberspace.

Apparently, teens can become easy

targets because they have a tendency to

reveal too much information on the

‘Net. They’re naïve enough to believe

that the people they meet through my-

Space share their values as well as

their interests. The teens may be looking

for affirmation from their cyberfriends...especially

if they have difficulty

making friends at school.

Because they’re often entering cyberworld

through the safety of their parents’

homes, they may not realize that

danger could be just a click away.

Fortunately, though, caring adults,

including school officials, are awakening

to the threat posed by mySpace.

The rapid growth of the site has some

school leaders taking concrete steps to

protect children, which is considered

to be the site’s main audience. In addition

to the threat of sexual predators,

the site may also attract drug dealers,

child porn dealers, and a host of other

troubled souls. If you wouldn’t want

your child to interact with such people

in your neighborhood, why would you

let him or her communicate with such

Washington Middle School since 1999,

promotes a family-type classroom atmosphere

where students practice the

slogan Each One Teach One. Buster-

Singleton, who leads the 6-3 Trailblazers

team, incorporates activities that

address her students’ varied learning

styles. She places a strong emphasis on

developing reading abilities, honing

writing skills and promoting strong

work ethics.

Maria Fletcher, a teacher at Mount

Vernon Community School since

1985, is known for setting high standards

in her second-grade classroom.

Amentor for new teachers, she is quick

to offer her time and ideas to colleagues.

Fletcher specializes in nurturing

students who are low achievers or

have behavioral problems, and makes

a practice of highlighting students’

achievements. Fletcher has served as

grade-level chairperson and as a member

of many school committees.

Arthur Harris, physical education

teacher at Douglas MacArthur Elementary

School from 1983 to 1985 and

from 1992 to the present, serves as the

department’s lead teacher. “Coach

Harris” stresses self-improvement over

competition in his classes and challenges

his students with skill-building

activities - such as learning to walk and

eventually run the mile - that carry

over from year to year. Harris coordinates

the school’s annual field day and

Hoop it Up event for Character

Counts.

Mara Mellody, fourth-grade teacher

at Matthew Maury Elementary School

since 2003, boosted the school’s Virginia

Studies Standards of Learning

(SOL) test scores from 34 percent in

2002-2003 to 86 percent in 2003-2004

and 81 percent in 2004-2005. Mellody

co-authored a Teaching Historical

Places lesson plan on segregation in

Alexandria, participated in the ACPS

Teaching American History grant program

and directs the school’s 21st Century

tutoring program. She was a finalist

for the 2006 Agnes Meyer Outstanding

Teacher Award.

Noemi Rivera, third-grade teacher

at Jefferson-Houston School for Arts

and Academics since 2003, is known

as the school’s “Science Lady.” Her accomplishments

include raising Jefferson-Houston

third-grade science SOL

scores 38 percent and managing a Science

Resource Room stocked with materials

teachers can borrow. Nominated

for a Presidential Award for Excellence

in Mathematics and Science Teaching,

Rivera encourages independent learning

by providing free-choice as well as

mandatory assignments.

Donna Schmidt, an ACPS teacher

since 1990, has taught first grade at

Samuel Tucker Elementary School

since 2000. Schmidt serves as Primary

Team Leader, has conducted districtwide

math workshops for kindergarten

teachers and is a candidate for National

Board Certification. She is known for

helping students learn by offering special

attention, from helping a youngster

practice self control through use of

an hourly behavior chart to visiting a

bedridden parent to discuss home

learning ideas for a troubled child.

Two Alexandria private-school

teachers also will be honored at the

event. Robert Davis teaches the eighthgrade

Principles of Science class at St.

Stephen’s & St. Agnes School, and

Kenneth A. Risley teaches Advanced

Placement and Regular U.S. History at

Episcopal High School.

The recognition event on June 6 at

the Hilton Alexandria Mark Center,

5000 Seminary Road, Alexandria, features

a mixer at 5:00PM followed by

dinner at 6:00PM. For more information

about the event or sponsorship opportunities,

contact AEP Executive Director

Kerri Rogers at krogers@

alexchamber.com or 703-549-1000,

extension 208.

people on the Internet

As a parent, you need to ask yourself

some tough questions, such as how

much time your children spend on line

and whom they’re talking to. You also

have to determine if they appear to be

heading down a path that could lead to

danger.

When our children are little, it’s so

much easier. We simply have to hold

their hands while crossing the street to

make sure that they get safely to the

other side. When they’re teens, we

need to guide them safely to adulthood.

And that might involve unplugging

the computer once in a while.

• • •

Nathan Tabor is a conservative political

activist based in Kernersville,

North Carolina.

TWO SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS

RECEIVE HARRY BURKE AWARDS

Stacey Broderick, a special education teacher at Samuel W. Tucker Elementary

School, and Amy Cable, who teaches sixth graders with

emotional disabilities at George Washington Middle School, received

the 2006 Harry Burke Outstanding Achievement in Special Education

Awards.

The Alexandria Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) presents

the honors annually to two Alexandria City Public Schools (ACPS)

employees, one secondary and one elementary, who demonstrate outstanding

ability and excellence in doing their jobs and a deep commitment

to educating children with disabilities. Broderick earned the Elementary

Division honor and Cable received the Secondary Division prize during

the 20th annual ceremony, held on May 11 at Minnie Howard School.

Broderick, who has taught at Tucker since 2002, implemented the school’s

inclusion program for third and fifth graders. Her peers call her “a very enthusiastic

and conscientious teacher” who places a high priority on her students’

success and rewards the children’s efforts with movie outings. Her students

say she “is a great teacher and makes learning fun” through such

activities as concocting chocolate mud pies and writing about the cooking experience.

Cable, a teacher at George Washington since 2003, runs a classroom

that her peers describe as “a visual, kinesthetic and auditory learning laboratory.”

She carries her dedication to her students outside the classroom,

by starting after-school activities, such as a tennis club, for students with

disabilities and mentoring adolescent girls in the “Space Of Her Own”

program. Her students describe her as “funny, helping, out-spoken and

giving.”

Seven nominees also received recognition at the ceremony, emceed by

SEAC co-chairs David Cordell and Jonathan Friedman. The Elementary

Division nominees include Kerri Buonamico, Life Skills teacher at John

Adams Elementary School; Susan Doyle, intermediate teacher of students

with learning disabilities at Maury Elementary School; Beverly Harris,

special education teacher at Jefferson-Houston School for Arts and Academics;

Karen Reekie, special education teacher for students with emotional

disturbances at Charles Barrett Elementary School; and Jill Taylor,

special education teacher at Mount Vernon Community School. Secondary

Division nominees include Theresa Foley, reading specialist at

Francis C. Hammond Middle School; and, as the first ever team nominee,

Hammond Team 6-3, consisting of Team Leader Pat Williamson, Scott

Berkowitz, Eric Grutza, Juliana Petraia, Colette Brown, Rochelle Johnson,

Beverly Cannizzaro and IEP Coordinator Jennifer Masood.

Harry Burke, the first ACPS director of special education, and the

awards’ namesake, was among several past award winners who attended

the 20th anniversary celebration. Participants also paid tribute to Marylou

Wall, the soon to be retiring ACPS director of Student Services.

For more information, contact the ACPS Department of Information

and Outreach at 703-824-6635.

SOUTH LAKES HIGH TO ESTABLISH

SPORTS HALL OF FAME

South Lakes High School will introduce its first inductees into

the school’s Sports Hall of Fame at a banquet at Hidden Creek

Country Club in Reston on Wednesday, May 31 at 6 p.m.

South Lakes High School is a Fairfax County public school.

Inductees—including administrators, coaches, and athletes—will

be honored for helping to create and sustain school pride and sportsmanship.

Inaugural inductees include:

• Kendyl Baugh, track and field athlete, class of 1989.

• George Felton, principal from 1978 to 1984.

• Bob Graumann, football coach from 1991 to 1999.

• Grant Hill, basketball athlete, class of 1991.

• Paul Kaplan, tennis coach from 1980 to 1997.

• Dave Morgan, activities director from 1989 to 2001.

• Wes Suter, gymnastics athlete, class of 1982.

• Christy Winters-Scott, basketball athlete, class of 1986.

• Carl Zaleski, activities director from 1978 to 1989.

For more information, contact South Lakes High principal Bruce

Butler at 703-715-4500 or bruce.butler@fcps.edu .

16 THE METRO HERALD


SPORTS & RECREATION

May 26, 2006

Barry Bonds

Bonds tied Babe Ruth for second

place on the career home run

list Saturday, ending a ninegame

homerless stretch with a shot

into the first deck of the elevated

stands in right-center during San Francisco’s

4-2, 10-inning victory over the

Oakland Athletics.

“This is a great accomplishment because

of Babe Ruth and what he

brought to the game of baseball and his

legacy in the game of baseball,” Bonds

said. “This and a World Series ring to

me would be the ultimate. He changed

the game of baseball. ... It’s just great

to be in the same class.”

The second-inning drive landed

about eight rows up in the seats overlooking

the high fence just to the left of

the out-of-town scoreboard. Though

the A’s don’t provide estimated distances

on home runs, this one appeared

to travel about 400 feet ó far from

being one of Bonds’ trademark behemoth

drives.

Booed when he was introduced before

the game, the Giants’ star received

a long standing ovation after his home

run, and the game was delayed about

90 seconds.

Next up is Hank Aaron’s record of

755.

“This took a lot off me. It’s good,”

Bonds said. “A lot of relief. Well, until

something else comes up.”

Bonds, dogged by allegations of

steroid use and repeated taunts on the

road, was immediately greeted by his

teammates after circling the bases.

They surrounded him at the top of the

dugout as Bonds tipped his cap and

blew a kiss to his wife and two daughters

sitting in the first row.

Bonds had gone 29 at-bats without

a homer since hitting No. 713 with a

450-foot shot May 7 in Philadelphia.

His teenage son, Nikolai, a Giants bat

boy, was waiting for him at home plate

and they embraced.

“I like the fact that ball was hit, that

ball was crushed,” San Francisco manager

Felipe Alou said.

The Giants plan to commemorate

No. 715 in their own ballpark. Major

League Baseball has said it won’t do

anything special to celebrate Bonds

moving into second place, and a commissioner’s

office spokesman said

baseball had no comment Saturday.

The ball was caught on the fly by

19-year-old Tyler Snyder of nearby

Pleasanton, who was cheered by fans

around him and quickly left the Coliseum

with his souvenir. When Bonds

was told Snyder is an A’s fan, he

quipped: “I, um, forgive you. If he

doesn’t like me, give me the ball.”

Left-hander Brad Halsey became

the 420th pitcher to allow a homer to

Bonds, who was San Francisco’s designated

hitter in an interleague series

against the A’s.

BARRY BONDS HITS 714TH HOME RUN,

TIES BABE RUTH’S CAREER TALLY

The seven-time NL MVP was

booed when his name was announced

before the game and again the moment

he began walking to the batter’s box.

He connected on a 1-1 pitch from

Halsey, making history with his sixth

home run this season.

“It’s a pretty unbelievable thing,”

Astros reliever Brad Lidge said in

Houston, where the Giants swept a

three-game series earlier in the week.

“No matter what kind of controversy

surrounds him and no matter what side

of the fence you are on as far as what

he did or didn’t do with performanceenhancing

drugs, you’ve got to admit

that it’s a pretty impressive number.”

Bonds came to the plate in the third

to chants of “Barry! Barry!” and struck

out looking. He flied out to left leading

off the sixth and was intentionally

walked in the eighth and again in the

10th with none out and runners on second

and third.

Bonds had hoped to reach his latest

milestone home run at home in San

Francisco, where he hit Nos. 500, 600

and 700 along with 660 and 661 to tie

and pass his godfather, Willie Mays. In

2001, Bonds hit the final three of his

73 homers at home to break Mark

McGwire’s single-season record of 70.

“I’m just glad it happened in the

Bay,” Bonds said. “East Bay, West

Bay. I’m just glad it happened here.”

Still, the slugger had to be happy to

hit No. 714 back in the Bay Area in

front of his family and friends. Only

six days earlier, Bonds suggested he

was being haunted by “two ghosts” ó a

reference to Ruth and Aaron.

Ruth passed Sam Thompson to

move into second place on June 20,

1921, when he hit his 127th home run.

Aaron passed Ruth in April 1974 ó and

now Hammerin’ Hank’s mark is the

only one left for Bonds to chase.

Yet Bonds has said that could be a

long shot considering he turns 42 on

July 24, is playing on a surgically repaired

right knee and with bone chips

floating around in his left elbow.

In his 21st major league season,

Bonds has hit nine career home runs as

a designated hitter ó and realizes his

future could be in the American

League as a DH if he returns in 2007.

Bonds had 40 plate appearances between

Nos. 713 and 714. He had been

4-for-29 (.138) with 10 walks, three intentional,

six runs scored, two RBIs

and four strikeouts since his last homer.

“He finally hit it It’s about time,”

Ken Griffey Jr., who entered the night

with 539 career homers, said in the

Cincinnati Reds’ clubhouse in Detroit.

“Now I don’t have to keep watching

TV to see him do it.”

Bonds was destined for greatness at

an early age. The son of three-time All-

Star Bobby Bonds and the godson of one

of the game’s greatest players in Mays.

Bonds spent his childhood years roaming

the clubhouse at Candlestick Park,

getting tips from Mays and other Giants.

In a matter of years, Bonds went

from a wiry leadoff hitter when he

broke into the big leagues with Pittsburgh

in 1986 to the most feared slugger

of his generation and possibly ever.

It was a transformation many-including

federal prosecutors in the

BALCO case-believe was fueled by the

use of performance-enhancing drugs.

Bonds has long denied ever knowingly

taking steroids, though the new book

“Game of Shadows” reveals his alleged

longtime doping regimen the authors

say began after the 1998 season when

Bonds saw the attention McGwire and

Sammy Sosa generated in their race for

the single-season home run record.

Bonds’ personal trainer, Greg Anderson,

pleaded guilty to his role in a steroid

distribution ring, and a federal grand jury

is looking into whether Bonds perjured

himself when he testified to the separate

grand jury that indicted Anderson and

three others in the Bay Area Laboratory

Co-Operative scandal.

One fan in the front row behind

home plate Saturday sported a No. 25

Bonds jersey with BALCO on the back

where Bonds’ name should be.

Partly because of his prickly relationship

with fans and the media,

Bonds was never a beloved superstar

even before the steroid allegations. He

was not voted by fans onto baseball’s

All-Century team, losing out to Griffey,

among others.

But the latest accusations have hurt

his reputation even more, and the anticipation

as he neared Ruth’s mark

was tempered for that reason. Just as

when Aaron passed the Babe in 1974,

there is resentment among those who

believe Ruth is the greatest player ever,

although this time it’s more because of

steroids than racism.

The allegations of cheating have put

a cloud over Bonds’ rapid rise up the

home run chart. He hit his 500th homer

on April 17, 2001, on the way to a

record 73 that season, and reached 700

on Sept. 17, 2004, a stretch unmatched

by any player at the end of his career.

Before the bottom of the 11th inning

in the Yankees’ 5-4, 11-inning win over

the Mets at Shea Stadium, a message

on the scoreboard announced Bonds’

714th homer, and the crowd booed.

“I still remember Barry Bonds as a

great player, regardless of steroids or

what,” Yankees manager Joe Torre

said. “How many home runs would he

have hit without whatever people are

saying is going on I don’t know. I

know one thing: That player-wise, he’s

pretty good.”

Bonds has said his many milestones

won’t mean as much later if he doesn’t

win a World Series ring, the only thing

missing from a decorated resume featuring

the record seven NL MVP

awards, 13 All-Star selections and

eight Gold Gloves in left field.

The Giants fell six outs short of

winning it all in 2002 when they blew

their lead in Game 6 and lost in the deciding

seventh game to the Angels.

While Bonds was at his best that postseason,

with eight homers and 27

walks, it was his struggles in his first

five trips to the playoffs with Pittsburgh

and San Francisco that characterized

his career before he became a

record-setting home run hitter.

No matter the controversy, his home

fans still adore him, chanting his name

when he comes to bat and waving yellow

rubber chickens whenever an opposing

manager makes the most unpopular

choice to intentionally walk him.

It is Bonds, after all, who is the

biggest reason 3 million fans a year pack

the seats at the Giants’ sparkling waterfront

ballpark, which opened in 2000.

When responding to an ad, tell them you saw it in The Metro Herald

2006 USA BASKETBALL

WOMEN’S WORLD

CHAMPIONSHIP TEAM

Continuing on its past success of

building gold medal winning

teams around a core group of

internationally experienced players,

USA Basketball, which has claimed

gold at the last two FIBA World Championships

and past three Olympic

Games, announced today that threetime

Olympic gold medalists Lisa

Leslie (Los Angeles Sparks) and Sheryl

Swoopes (Houston Comets), twotime

Olympic gold medalist Katie

Smith (Detroit Shock), 2000 Olympic

gold medalist DeLisha Milton-Jones

(Washington Mystics), and 2004

Olympic gold medalists Sue Bird

(Seattle Storm), Tamika Catchings (Indiana

Fever) Diana Taurasi (Phoenix

Mercury) and Tina Thompson (Houston

Comets) have been selected as the

first eight members of the 2006 USA

Women’s World Championship Team.

The selections were made by the USA

Basketball Women’s Senior National

Team Committee and approved by the

USA Basketball Executive Committee.

“USA Basketball’s senior women’s

program has a proud history of success

in international competition, including

five consecutive gold medals over the

past ten years,” said USA Basketball

President Val Ackerman. “The 2006

World Championship player roster

once again represents an impressive

blend of youth and veteran leadership,

and with coach Donovan at the helm,

we are in an outstanding position to

continue our unparalleled run and solidify

the domination of American

women in the sport of basketball,”

These eight players have contributed

to the success of the USA Basketball

women’s program over the past

two decades,” said Committee chair

and WNBA Chief of Basketball Operations

and Player Relations Renee’

Brown. “You not only have three- and

two-time Olympians, but you have

some talented young players who are

hungry to compete alongside our veterans

and help continue to build upon

USA Basketball’s past successes. Not

only have all of them have competed

together in international competitions,

but the Committee also knows that

they all have a respect for each other’s

games and they are willing to collectively

come together to compete and

win for the USA.”

“This is a tremendous group of core

players, with extensive experience in

bringing home the gold,” said USA

and Seattle Storm head coach Anne

Donovan. “With this group, I know we

are assured of going to battle in the

World Championship with our best and

most proven veterans. These players

understand the drive, preparation and

commitment that we need to stay on

top. I am confident that these experienced

Olympians will set the pace for

yet another gold.”

The Donovan-led U.S. squad will

look to defend its World Championship

title at the 15th FIBA World

Championship, scheduled to be played

September 12-23 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Behind the play of 2002 FIBA World

Championship MVP Leslie, as well as

Bird, Catchings, Milton-Jones, Smith

and Swoopes, the United States captured

the ‘02 gold medal, successfully

defending it’s 1998 World Championship

crown.

The U.S. owns a record seven gold

medals, one silver and one bronze at

the World Championship, while compiling

an 80-20 (.800 winning percentage)

record, including a 19-0 winning

Amember of the historic 1995-96 USA

Basketball Women’s Senior National Team

and 1996 Olympic Team, Sheryl Swoopes

continues to help the U.S. in its quest for

gold medals. (photo by USA Basketball)

streak that dates back to the 1994

bronze medal game.

The Committee, chaired by WNBA

Chief of Basketball Operations and

Player Relations Reneé Brown, will

use part of the WNBA season to evaluate

players for the final four roster positions,

which will be announced later

this summer.

Donovan will be assisted on the

sidelines by Connecticut Sun head

coach Mike Thibault and collegiate

head coaches Gail Goestenkors of

Duke University (N.C.) and Dawn Staley

of Temple University (Pa.).

The eight core members possess a

wealth of international experience having

played in a combined 777 international

games. Not only do they own 13

Olympic gold medals between them,

they also have nine World Championship

golds and a pair of World

Championship bronze medals as Leslie

and Smith were members of the 1998

USA World Championship Team; the

pair teamed with Bird, Catchings, Milton-Jones

and Swoopes in aiding the

U.S. to gold in 2002; while Leslie and

Swoopes were on the 1994 USA team

that finished with the bronze medal.

Further, in major international competitions,

they boast a combined 35

golds, four silvers and three bronze

medals. Underscoring their successful

histories with the red, white and blue,

USA teams with any of these eight

players as a member have rolled to a

striking 749-41 overall record for a

94.8 winning percentage.

Not only are the core members familiar

with one another on the court,

they have all been coached by Donovan

in the past. Donovan, an assistant

coach for the 1998 and 2002 World

Championship teams that featured

Leslie, Milton-Jones and Smith in ‘98

and all but Thompson and Taurasi in

‘02, was also an assistant on the sidelines

in Athens where all eight core

members helped lead the U.S. to gold.

Additionally, Bird has played for

Donovan in Seattle since the 2003

WNBA season.

Most recently, Smith featured on all

three rosters during the 2006 USA Basketball

Women’s National Team’s

spring training and exhibition tour,

which was headed by Donovan, assisted

by Thibault in all three segments

and Staley in Australia. Bird, Milton-

Jones and Taurasi joined Smith on the

first tour, which saw the U.S. claim a

3-0 record in Europe March 2-9; the

second tour of Europe, March 17-27,

saw Swoopes and Smith give veteran

leadership as the United States again

went 3-0; while on the third training

segment the USA posted a 4-1 record

and won the April 7-12 Australiahosted

Opals World Challenge behind

the play of Smith and Thompson.

THE METRO HERALD 17


CLASSIFIED ADS/BIDS & PROPOSALS

May 26, 2006

Only $250 buys a

25-word classified ad in

98 newspapers across Virginia.

Call: The Metro Herald at

703-548-8891

OR

Virginia Press Services at

804-521-7571

to place your ad in the

AD NETWORK CLASSIFIEDS

AUCTIONS

5000+/- sq. ft. commercial building on

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counts. Currently leased. 3000 Old

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800-780-2991 (VAAF93)

AUTOMOTIVE

$500 Police Impounds, Cars from

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Call 1-800-298-4150 ext. 2846.

BUSINESS/FINANCIAL SERVICES

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EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

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FARM/LIVESTOCK

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HELP WANTED

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Local stores, restaurants & theaters.

Training provided. Flexible hours. Email

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FUNERAL DIRECTOR: Tidewater

Independent firm seeking Virginia

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Ken Bell 757-274-1702 or e-mail

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Box 12406, Norfolk, VA 23502.

Diesel Mechanic Needed. International

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SALES

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NEW: Guaranteed Acceptance

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TRUCK DRIVERS

DRIVER TRAINING—GET YOUR CDL!

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Local and O-T-R jobs available for CDS

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Call 1-877-284-3332, Kenly,

NC.

COMPANY DRIVERS AND OWNER

OPERATORS WITH MINIMUM 1 YEAR

OTR EXPERIENCE, EAST COAST OP-

ERATION, CALL FOR DETAILS,

WILLIAM EDWARDS, INC. 1-800-876-

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Driver—FLATBED DRIVERS can earn

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great benefits & equipment. CDL-A.

Students welcome. Call 866-838-3559.

Make more money in 2006 with our

GREEN MILE$ pay raise! Drivers with

just 1 year experience can average

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more! Heartland Express 1-800-441-

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Drivers/Driving school graduates

wanted. Tuition reimbursement. No

waiting for trainers. Passenger policy.

NO NYC. Guaranteed hometime. Dedicated

and regional available. USA Truck

866-483-3413.

Drivers—Pay Increase! $1,000 Sign

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Teams & CDL grads welcome. USA

Truck 866-483-3413.

DRIVERS—OTR Quality of Life “We

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401K Plan, 15K Life Insurance,

Good Family Time, Average $64K PLUS

YEAR “What We Need” CDL-A 3 Years

Experience—Hazmat, 3 points or less

on MVR. P&P Transport 800-499-0464.

Drivers—$55,000+ to start. Short Haul

Premium Pay, Benefits + Increases

every 6 months. CDL-A & T/T experience

required. Call Anytime. 800-546-

0405 or 800-444-1272 x3005.

LAND FOR SALE

20 acres & larger parcels—Deeded

river access. 3 state views, hardwoods,

minutes to town & interstate. 2 hours DC

Beltway. Ready to enjoy for recreation or

build LandinWV.com.

21 Acres w/private, deeded river

access. 360° views! The complete pinnacle

w/sunrise, sunset & river views!

Very private w/ driveway. Priced at

$399,900. Call 1-800-888-1262.

40+ Acres w/Deeded River Access.

Very rare! Usable mountain property

w/50 mile views! Exc. financing available.

Priced at $349,900. Call to see!

1-800-888-1262.

ELKINS, WV STREAMFRONT—

2 acres on the Middle Fork trout stream,

just $69,500. Located in historic Elkins,

WV—gateway to Snowshoe ski resort.

Incredible waterfront views. Fish, tube,

swim . . . relax. Call owner today—866-

794-9670.

For Sale by Owner. 24+ acres—

$139,900. Incredible views & over

900 ft. on seasonal creek! Bonus: Has

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financing. Call (304) 262-2770.

George Washington National Forest

Access 30+ Acres $87,990/STREAM

—Build your cabin on this secluded

acreage close to 1 million acres of the

George Washington National Forest.

Close to Lexington & Clifton Forge.

Perked, utilities. Call Owner: 866-363-

2697.

LEXINGTON VA AREA ACREAGE—

Pre-season land sale. $5,000 Discount /

FREE closing costs. Spectacular

parcels ready to build on minutes from

historic Lexington. 2 acres to 6 acres in

size with awesome mountain views,

perked, underground utilities. Ready for

your home or cabin getaway! Offer extended

for the month of May '06. Call

Owner today 866-363-2697.

Mountain Land for Sale. 20+ acres

w/private, deeded river access- only

$179,900. Has 2 state mountain view!

Close to town. New road, survey, perc.

Call (304) 262-2770.

MISCELLANEOUS

AIRLINE MECHANIC—Rapid training

for high paying Aviation Career. FAA

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qualify. Job Placement Assistance.

CALL AIM 1-888-349-5387.

POOLS $688—New 2006 Factory

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18 THE METRO HERALD


CLASSIFIED ADS/BIDS & PROPOSALS/POTPOURRI

May 26, 2006

•Medical • Business • Paralegal • Computers

• Criminal Justice. Job placement

assistance. Computer provided. Financial

Aid if qualified. Call 866-858-2121.

www.OnlineTidewaterTech.com.

HOMEOWNERS WANTED! Kayak

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display new maintenance free Kayak

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opportunity! 100% financing available.

1-877-377-7665.

ABSOLUTELY NO COST TO YOU!!

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opportunity! 100% financing available.

1-800-510-5624.

REAL ESTATE

BANK FORECLOSURES! Homes from

$10,000! 1-3 bedroom available! HUD,

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Listings call 1-800-298-5309 ext. 4672.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Lake Gaston VA/NC 350 miles

shoreline, FREE Lake Map/Buyers

Guide. Tanglewood Realty, Box 116,

Bracey, Virginia 23919. www.

TanglewoodRealty.com 1-800-338-

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Owner's Liquidation Sale by Sealed

Bid. New homes and acreage homesites

in the Blue Ridge Mountains of VA.

Sold “As Is,” 30-day close. Restrictive

Covenant Community. Deadline May

27th. For details 800-420-2278 or visit

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STEEL BUILDINGS

ALL STEEL BUILDING SALE! “Plus

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25x32 $5800. 30x42 $9200. 40x62

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Heritage Mortgage Brokers

Can you imagine life without

lemons From iced tea to icebox

pie, lemon adds a spark of

flavor that is simply irreplaceable.

“Good cooks everywhere recognize

the culinary value of lemon—not only

for its own refreshing taste, but also for

the way it brings out flavor in other

foods,” observes Linda Carman,

Martha White® baking expert.

There may be no more versatile

fruit than a lemon. Valued for its undeniably

refreshing flavor, lemon pies,

cakes, cookies and sauces are among

our favorite desserts. But lemon also

enhances the flavor of breads, salads,

salad dressings, fish, chicken, vegetables

and even other fruits like melons.

Nor can we forget how a squeeze of

lemon juice enlivens beverages like

iced tea, tomato juice and, of course,

its namesake, lemonade. And as a natural

antioxidant, lemon prevents

browning of fruits and vegetables.

BAKING WITH LEMONS

For all the wonderful uses of

lemons, baking has to be high on the

list. Making something sweet out of a

naturally tart fruit is simply magic.

Lemon curd and the filling for a lemon

pie are basically thickened and sweetened

lemon juice. A little lemon juice

and grated peel contribute a more subtle

flavor to cakes, cookies and breads.

And sometimes lemon is the secret ingredient

in a fruit cobbler or pie that

provides a special little flavor boost.

Even convenient mixes get a new

twist with some lemon juice or peel.

Luscious Lemon Berry Muffins are

easy to make and will provide the perfect

accent to a spring brunch or luncheon.

And Lemon Poppy Seed Loaf is

great to have on hand for breakfast or

to pair with fresh fruit for a casual

dessert.

Of course, you can never go wrong

with lemon bars. Lemon Cheesecake

Bars feature a buttery cookie crust

topped with a lemony cream cheese

layer — the perfect refreshing finish to

a spring get-together.

LEMON LORE

The following tips will help you become

better acquainted with how to

use lemons to add zest to your favorite

meals and recipes.

• Lemons warmed just to the touch,

give up juice more easily. Warm in

a microwave for 30 to 40 seconds

depending on microwave wattage

and size of lemon. Then press and

roll around on tabletop a couple of

times.

• For grated zest or peel, grate only

the yellow peel—the white part is

unpleasantly bitter. A fairly new

kitchen gadget, the micro plane

grater which looks like a rasp, is

very sharp and makes grating a

snap.

• If your recipe calls for peel or zest

and juice, don’t forget to grate the

peel first. It’s much easier.

• If you have too many lemons on

hand, freeze measured amounts, 1

to 2 tablespoons, in an ice cube

tray. Store cubes in a plastic bag.

• To prevent browning, rub lemon

juice on the surface of bananas, apples,

pears or avocados, or add to

the cooking water of vegetables

like potatoes or cauliflower.

• One medium lemon will yield

about 3 tablespoons of juice and

about 1 tablespoon of grated peel.

MARTHA WHITE’S ZEST FOR SUMMER BAKING

LUSCIOUS LEMON LEMON POPPY

BERRY MUFFINS SEED LOAF

Muffins

2 (7 oz.) pkgs. Martha White®

Blueberry, Blackberry,

WildBerry or Strawberry Muffin

Mix

2/3 cup milk

1 egg, beaten

1 tablespoon lemon juice

2 teaspoons grated lemon peel

Glaze

1⁄2 cup confectioners’ sugar

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Heat oven to 425º F. Lightly spray

12 muffins cups with nonstick cooking

spray.

Combine muffin ingredients in

medium mixing bowl; stir just until

moistened. Fill muffin cups about 2/3

full.

Bake at 425º F. for 12 to 16 minutes

or until golden brown and toothpick inserted

in center comes out clean. Cool

2 to 3 minutes in pan. Remove to wire

rack.

Combine glaze ingredients in small

bowl; stir until blended. Drizzle over

warm muffins. Makes 12 muffins.

Loaf

2 (7.6-oz.) pkg. Martha White®

Lemon Poppy Seed Muffin Mix

2/3 cup milk

1⁄4 cup Crisco® oil

2 eggs, beaten

Glaze

1 cup confectioners’ sugar

2 tablespoon lemon juice

Heat oven to 350° F. Grease bottom

only of a 9x5-inch loaf pan. In

large bowl, combine all ingredients;

mix well. Pour into greased pan.

Bake at 350° F. for 45 to 50 minutes

or until toothpick inserted in center

comes out clean. Cool in pan 10 minutes.

Remove from pan; place on wire

rack. Cool 1 hour or until completely

cooled.

For glaze, combine powdered sugar

and lemon juice in small bowl; mix

well. Drizzle over cooled loaf. Wrap

tightly and store in refrigerator. Makes

one (16-slice) loaf.

Go to www.marthawhite.com for more recipe ideas,

such as Wonderful Waffles with Fresh Fruit and Luscious Lemon Sauce.

LEMON

CHEESECAKE BARS

Crust

2 cups Martha White® All-Purpose

Flour

1⁄4 cup sugar

1⁄4 teaspoon salt

1⁄2 cup butter, melted and cooled

Filling

2 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese,

softened

1 cup sugar

4 eggs

1 teaspoon grated lemon peel

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Lemon slices, fruit and mint, if

desired

Heat oven to 350° F. Grease 13x9-

inch pan. In medium bowl combine the

crust ingredients. Beat with electric

mixer until crumbly. Press mixture in

bottom of greased pan. Bake at 350°

F. for 20 minutes or until light golden

brown.

Meanwhile, in a medium bowl,

combine cream cheese and sugar.

Beat with electric mixer until blended.

On low speed of mixer, beat in eggs,

lemon peel and juice just until smooth.

Remove partially baked crust from

oven. Pour filling over crust. Bake an

additional 20 to 30 minutes or until

filling is set. Cool. Cut into bars.

Garnish with lemon slices, fruit and/or

mint, if desired. Store in refrigerator.

Makes 24 bars.

THE METRO HERALD 19


May 26, 2006

20 THE METRO HERALD

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