Wine Guide 2005

northwestmagazines.com

Wine Guide 2005

2005/2006

Presented by

NORTHWEST TRAVEL


MONTANA page 4

IDAHO page 6

Idaho Panhandle

Snake River Valley

WASHINGTON page 8

Puget Sound

Columbia Valley

Yakima Valley

Red Mountain

Walla Walla Valley

Columbia Gorge

OREGON page 21

Willamette Valley

Umpqua Valley

Southern Oregon

Rogue Valley &

Applegate Valley

T

HE

NORTHWEST WINE Country is

illustrated above with the various

American Viticulture Areas (AVAs

or appellations) and other grape and fruit

growing areas color-coded.

In Washington, the Puget Sound area is

highlighted from the Canadian border to the

area about 20 miles south of Olympia. In

Eastern Washington, things become more

complicated. Three smaller appellations are

within the boundaries of the huge Columbia

Valley appellation indicated in blue. The

Yakima Valley AVA is outlined in the western

part of the Columbia, and within its boundaries,

the tiny Red Mountain AVA is illustrated,

appropriately in burgundy. Just a few miles east

of the confluence of the Snake and Columbia

Rivers is Walla Walla Valley. Both the Columbia

Valley and Walla Walla Valley appellations

extend a short distance into Oregon. New this

year is the Columbia Gorge AVA which

Washington and Oregon share.

Oregon’s largest and most famous wineproducing

area shaded in green is the

Willamette Valley, which extends from

Portland south to the Eugene area. The AVA is

nestled between the Pacific Ocean, just 50

miles west, and by the Cascade Mountains on

the east. In milder and drier Southern Oregon

are four more appellations, and although

much smaller than the Willamette Valley, the

areas have distinguished themselves in the

state’s wine industry. Heading south, the first

appellation is Umpqua Valley near Roseburg.

Next are the Rogue and Applegate valleys.

During the past year, the Southern Oregon

appellation, encompassing these three

growing areas, was designated an official AVA.

In Idaho, most wineries and vineyards

are along the Snake River Valley indicated in

a peach tone. The largest concentration is in

the fruit-growing area west of Boise. A few

have emerged east of Boise in South Central

Idaho and Northern Idaho’s Panhandle is

home to a few more. Montana “does wine” in

the protected Bitterroot Valley from Flathead

Lake south along Hwy 93 to the Darby area.

Both fruit and grape wines are produced with

many of the grapes being imported from

neighboring states.

2 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


Northwest Wine Country Vacation Guide

T

HE

By Staff of Northwest Travel

Discover the wineries, vineyards, and tasting rooms

of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana.

UNITED STATES is fourth for world wine production, behind

Italy, France, and Spain, but California isn’t the only state

helping the nation toward that distinction. Wines from Washington, Oregon,

Idaho, and even Montana are gaining national and international attention from

experts and connoisseurs, as well as from those who can just appreciate the

grape and the beautiful region in which it is grown.

This is our third annual Wine Country Vacation Guide. Last year, we noticed the “wine

bar phenomenon” that has sprouted in the Northwest and is growing rapidly. This year, it is

events—so many that a visitor could spend virtually every weekend attending some kind of

festival. There are regional, city, county, and statewide events. The substantial growth in events

involves those organized by individual wineries, mostly featuring food and wine pairings.

Wine bars continue to emerge and are

This guide is published by

also heavily involved with food and wine

Northwest Travel pairings. At these establishments, wine tasting has evolved to include “wine

4969 Hwy 101 #2

Florence, OR 97439

flights” — a selection of four to six varieties served in two-plus ounce portions

800-348-8401

and tagged with clever names such as “Southern Hemisphere Flight.”

Reproduction of editorial

In Portland and Seattle, we found more than a dozen wine bars in each city

or advertising content without

and many more throughout both the Willamette Valley in Oregon and

the written permission of the

publisher is prohibited.

Washington’s Puget Sound area. Idaho has a few and Montana’s first wine

Copyright 2005/2006.

Printed in USA.

bar opened in 2004 in Bozeman.

For subscription and advertising

New wineries continue to sprout with Oregon and Washington each welcoming

information visit our Web site at

http://www.northwestmagazines.com about 100 entrepreneurs in the past year, many of them fledgling and not yet

To request information from open to the public. We have done our best to map those wineries that have

advertisers featured in this guide

visit http://www.ohwy.com/r.htm tasting rooms open to the public but the growth of the industry makes it a

Cover Photo:

continual work in progress.

Vineyard near Newberg, Oregon.

For your next wine tasting venture, take this friendly guide along with a

—Photo by Bob Pool

designated driver and hit the road!

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 3


MONTANA

Most of the wineries in Montana’s fledgling industry are scattered in and around the picturesque Bitterroot Valley.

BIG SKY COUNTRY is known for many

wonderful things, but wine traditionally

has not been one of them.

Today, a collegial group in the cosmopolitan

town of Missoula is working diligently to

improve Montana’s reputation for wine-making,

plus at least two wineries have demonstrated

admirable ingenuity in developing respectable

fruit wines.

“This is not your grandfather’s fruit wine,”

says Judy Chapman of Lolo Peak Winery,

Montana’s second winery, which began selling

fruit wines in 1999. “It’s not like drinking syrup.”

Judy and husband Mark Chapman are changing

the way people think about fruit wines.

The Chapmans have specialized in refined

fruit wines and do not produce grape wines.

Their fruit and honey wines are favorites with

Montana residents. The difference between

creating a wine with grapes and one with

berries is that the tart, highly concentrated

flavor of the berries must first be diluted and

then sweetened with sugar or honey.

At Rattlesnake Creek Vineyard, Andy

4 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006

MONTANA

Sponseller and Connie Poten are turning out

organic dry dinner wines. Rattlesnake’s

Flathead Cherry Dry is a hit among the locals.

The cherries come from the orchards that

surround Flathead Lake, north of Missoula.

“When most people think of a cherry wine,

they think of some medicinal sweet concoction,”

says Sponseller.“We have defied that

notion completely.”

In the past three years, two new wineries

and one vineyard have been established in

Western Montana to join Lolo Peak and the

granddaddy of Montana’s wine industry,

Mission Mountain. Dr. Thomas Campbell and

his son, Tom Jr. planted their first grapes in

1979 to establish Mission Mountain at Dayton.

Their first vintage was released in 1984.

There may not be many winemakers in

Montana, but the seven now in business are a

dedicated lot.Winemakers and farmers are

experimenting with grape, fruit, and honey

wines and are likely to apply for winery permits,

so expect more wineries, vineyards, and tasting

rooms to emerge in the next few years.

93

Mission

Mountain W•

90

Dayton

Ronan

Missoula


Lolo Peak W

Darby

IDAHO

Flathead

Lake

93

CANADA

MONTANA

WINERIES


Flathead

Lake W

THE FRUIT

Pinot noir and Pinot gris are grown in the

most quantity in the few vineyards in Montana.

The newest vineyard in Missoula also grows the

type of cold hardy varietals one would expect to

find in other cold weather states like Minnesota:

Marechal Foch, St. Croix, and Leon Millot. They

are the kind of grapes that can outlast a long,

cruel winter.

15

15

Missouri

Butte

River

Great

Falls

• Clearwater W

• Rattlesnake Creek V

Helena

90

WY

Photo by AbleStock


MONTANA

But the big story in the Montana wine

industry is the fruit and honey wines. The varieties

of fruits used for wine usually have high

amounts of acid, low amounts of sugar, and

high concentrations of flavor. They are fruits

that thrive in a short but intense growing

season. Examples of such fruit include apples,

berries, and rhubarb. Some wineries are even

considering using elderberries and chokecherries,

which are too bitter to eat alone.

WHEN TO VISIT

Winter lasts longer in Montana than in

other parts of the Northwest, so visits during

the spring months of March, April, and May

could mean having to deal with snow. (This is

bad for driving but great for skiing.) The

growing season at the vineyards starts in May

and ends with the crush in October. Most summertime

visitors flock to Flathead Valley

between July 4 and Labor Day.

TOURS/ROUTES

The Hwy 93 route is the key to finding

western Montana’s wineries. Missoula makes a

nice starting point with three properties in the

area. Next, head north on Hwy 93 to Ronan,

then up the west side of Flathead Lake to

Dayton. Driving to the winery at Culbertson in

eastern Montana is slightly more than a day

trip. It is 500-plus miles from Missoula along

I–90, which splits at Billings with I–94 leading

to North Dakota.

AREA ATTRACTIONS

Missoula, the Garden City, is bustling with

activity all year. In addition to being a great

spot to learn about Lewis and Clark’s journey

through the area with the Corps of Discovery, it

is home to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation

and A Carousel for Missoula in Caras Park. The

carousel was hand-carved by volunteers. The

Missoula Convention and Visitors Bureau Web

site has a wealth of information on attractions

and important information on how to get to the

Missoula area (www.missoulacvb.org). The

Flathead Convention and Visitors Bureau Web

site (www.fcvb.org) also has good information

on the seasonal activities in the area, which

include skiing Big Mountain, sailing and

fishing on Flathead Lake, exploring Glacier

National Park, and camping beneath the Big Sky.

MONTANA WINERIES

see map pg. 4

MISSOULA

LOLO PEAK WINERY

406-549-1111 • www.lolopeak.com

2506 Mount Ave., Missoula, MT 59804

Our wines are made exclusively from

Montana agricultural produce, apples from

the Bitterroot Valley, cherries from Flathead

Lake and rhubarb and plums from family

gardens of Missoula. Raspberries from the

Mission Valley make a Gold Medal winning

wine. Free wine tasting during regular hours

and tours are available by appointment.

10 A.M. to 6 P.M. Monday through Saturday.

RATTLESNAKE CREEK VINEYARDS

406-549-8703

www.rattlesnakecreekvineyard.com

email:rattlefarm@aol.com

4175 Rattlesnake Drive, Missoula, MT

59802. We grow hardy French–American

hybrid grapes at 46 degrees, 7 minutes

latitude, and 3450 feet altitude, at the base of

Montana’s Rattlesnake Wilderness Area. Our

wines prove the maxim: the best fruit grows

as far north as it will grow. They are certified

organic with no added sulfites. Bottoms up!

VISITOR INFORMATION

TRAVEL MONTANA

800-VISITMT • www.visitmt.com

MISSOULA CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

800-526-3465 • www.missoulacvb.org

FLATHEAD CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

406-756-9091 • www.fcvb.org

PHILIPSBURG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

406-859-3388

www.philipsburgmt.com

MONTANA

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Call in advance for dates and locations

of these events. Individual wineries are

likely to host additional events. Contact

local chambers of commerce and visitors

bureaus for more information.

JULY

Dayton - Fourth of July

at the Winery

406-849-5524

AUGUST

Philipsburg - Art, Jazz,

and Wine Festival

August 22, 2005

406-859-0016

SEPTEMBER

Dayton - Dayton Days

406-849-5524

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 5


IDAHO

84

Pend Oreille W •

WASHINGTON

OREGON

See

Detail

Snake

• Camas Prairie W

95

95 55

Winery At Eagle Knoll

River

Sandpoint

Lake

Pend

Oreille

Coeur d'Alene

Moscow

Eagle

POPULAR OPINION among folks in the

Northwest is that Idaho is “the new

kid on the block” in the wine industry. Not so

advises former University of Idaho Professor

John Thorngate (now at University of California,

Davis) who says Idaho was actually first among

the Northwest states to have wineries. His information

dates back to a September 1865, article

in Boise’s Idaho Statesman about a vineyard of

Royal Muscadine cuttings planted the previous

spring that had survived the winter and was

beginning to produce grapes. Robert Wing, who

has a vineyard in Lewiston (the lowest elevation

in Idaho at 738 feet), says grapes were introduced

there in 1872 by one German and two French

90

Boise


Carmela V

BRITISH COLUMBIA

IDAHO

Glenns Ferry

Blue Rock V & Wines LLC •

95

20

26

Bitner V •

S n ake River

Williamson V • Koenig Distillery W •

Twin Falls

Parma

Wilder

Ste. Chapelle W

78

MONTANA

IDAHO

19

84

30

55

84

69

Nampa

Silver Trail W

45 Indian Creek •

• Sawtooth W (Stowe) W Kuna


Lake Lowell

86

SNAKE RIVER

VALLEY (Detail)

Caldwell

Butte

15

Helena

Pocatello

Business Name

Abbreviations

V = Vineyards

W = Winery

immigrants. One of them, Robert Schleicher,

went on to win gold medals for his wines at

expositions in Omaha, Buffalo, St. Louis, and

Portland. Like everyone else, prohibition took

its toll on Idaho’s wine industry. It resurfaced in

1972 when the Symms family, second generation

fruit growers at the time, planted their first

vineyard adjacent to the apples near Caldwell.

Ste. Chapelle wines were born.

But the industry didn’t take off at that

point because there was still a law in Idaho

prohibiting wineries from selling directly to the

public—not in tasting rooms, retail establishments,

or taverns. So although more wineries

started popping up in the late 1970s and ’80s, it

90

wasn’t until 1988 that Idaho vintners were able

to sell to anyone other than distributors.

What worked for the apples worked with

the grapes, and now most of Idaho’s 19

wineries are not too far from that area called

Sunny Slope in Southwestern Idaho. The state’s

northern panhandle has a few and some in

southern Idaho have ventured a short distance

east to the Glenns Ferry and Twin Falls areas

where the climate is relatively mild compared

with Eastern Idaho where the state’s famous

potatoes grow best.

Though it has not been designated an

official appellation by the government, the

Snake River area near Caldwell is the state’s

best known wine region.

Today, Idaho wines are again claiming

awards for varieties such as Riesling and

Chardonnay. Like many other Northwest wine

regions, the majority of Idaho’s wineries are considered

boutique wineries, producing wonderful

products, most of which stay within the state’s

borders. But there’s no reason that Idaho wines

should be just for Idahoans to enjoy. The Idaho

wine industry is coming of age and the rest of

the country, if not the world, is taking notice.

The key to growing grapes in Idaho is

the Snake River. The river helps to balance

extreme weather conditions, cooling hot

summer evenings and warming potentially

frosty spring mornings. Idaho winemakers are

able to produce Johannisberg Riesling, Merlot,

Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, and Pinot

noir,as well as Semillon,Lemberger,Pinot gris,

and Cabernet franc, plus fruit wines and meads.

SNAKE RIVER REGION

The Snake River Basin runs across

southern Idaho, making a shallow but wide

U-shape. The river divides Idaho and Oregon

along the western border of the state. I–84 runs

along or near the river all the way through the

state so the communities close to the vineyards

are easily accessible from the main interstate.

The Sunny Slope growing area, about 25 miles

west of Boise, is close to Caldwell, Nampa,

Meridian, and Kuna.

An application has been sent to the Bureau

of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms nominating

this Snake River Region in southwest Idaho as

an American Viticulture Area. If the designation

is granted, it will be the first and only

appellation in Idaho. But the area certainly

doesn’t need a special title to be an inviting

place to visit. The views of the famed Snake

River Valley are worth the trip from spring

through late fall, and many geology buffs

will recognize outstanding geologic features

throughout the region.

6 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


IDAHO

THE GRAPES

In the Snake River Valley, Chardonnay,

Riesling, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and both

red and white Pinot noir are produced. A few of

the wineries in Idaho also buy fruit from

Washington; likewise, some Washington

wineries buy fruit from Idaho vineyards.

WHEN TO VISIT

Wine tasting events and festivals, such as the

Boise State University Gene Harris Jazz Festival,

take place in southwestern Idaho throughout the

spring, but harvest time for Idaho wineries is in

August. New wine and barrel-tasting events are

often planned during November.

AREA ATTRACTIONS

Visitors to southwest Idaho can enjoy all

that Boise and the surrounding area has to

offer. The capital city is home to 15 museums,

seven major parks, a zoo, and the Old Idaho

State Penitentiary. About 16 miles north of

town is the Bogus Basin Ski Resort, a bonus for

those who go wine tasting during the winter. In

the Nampa and Caldwell area, in addition to

wineries, the Warhawk Air Museum, the Snake

River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area,

and the Peregrine Fund’s World Center for Birds

of Prey are worth checking out. A handy guide

to the region is Northwest Travel’s annual

Vacation Guide to the Columbia and Snake

Rivers Region, which highlights attractions and

roadside geology in southern Idaho (available

at many visitor information centers and by

calling 800-348-8401, ext. 110).

OTHER AREAS OF INTEREST

Several wineries and wine tasting rooms

have popped up in the northern part of the

state, although there is no designated AVA here

either. This area along Hwy 95 includes

Moscow, Coeur d’Alene, and Sandpoint. From

the Boise valley, you can drive to northern

Idaho on Hwy 95 through Weiser, Cambridge,

and Council or take Hwy 55 through Banks,

Cascade, and McCall to New Meadows where

Hwys 55 and 95 join and become Hwy 95 for

the journey farther north. It’s a beautiful but

long drive so plan to spend more than a day

exploring this area and the sweet treats it has in

store. When the weather cooperates, winemakers

in this area make ice wines, which are

usually served with desserts. Also, brandies and

fruit wines, including honey wines (or meads),

are gaining popularity in the north country. For

more information, contact the Coeur d’Alene

Area Chamber of Commerce.

IDAHO WINERIES

SNAKE RIVER VALLEY

see map pg. 6

KUNA

INDIAN CREEK WINERY

208-922-4791

1000 N McDermott Rd., Kuna, ID 83634

Bill and Mui Stowe planted their grapes in

1982 and are still the people you’ll meet at

one of the oldest wineries in Idaho. Bill’s

specialty is Pinot noir (red and white),

however, you can sample many popular

varieties. Tasting room is open on Weekends,

12 to 5 P.M. Their lovely operation is but

a few minutes drive from Boise, Meridian,

and Nampa.

IDAHO

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Call in advance for dates and locations

of these events. Individual wineries are

likely to host additional events. Contact local

chambers of commerce and visitors bureaus

for more information.

JULY

Sun Valley - Sun Valley Center for the

Arts Wine Auction

July 21–23, 2005

208-726-9491

AUGUST

Boise - Taste of Idaho

Boise Centre on the Grove

August 27, 2005

208-332-8530

OCTOBER

Caldwell - Taste of the Harvest

Albertson College of Idaho

October 1, 2005

208-459-5300 www.albertson.edu

NAMPA

SAWTOOTH WINERY

208-467-1200 • www.sawtoothwinery.com

13750 Surrey Lane, Nampa, ID. Sawtooth

Winery invites you to sample our awardwinning

wines at our Tasting Room,

overlooking picturesque estate vineyards,

the Owyhee Mountains, and Boise Valley.

Bring a picnic and enjoy the beautiful winery

grounds. Our Tasting Room is open from

noon until 5 P.M. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

You can also reserve the Winery for your

special event.

VISITOR INFORMATION

IDAHO GRAPE GROWERS & WINE

PRODUCERS COMMISSION,

1123 12th Ave. S, Nampa, ID 83651

208-467-4999/888-223-WINE

www.idahowines.org

BOISE CONVENTION AND VISITORS BUREAU &

SOUTHWEST IDAHO TRAVEL ASSOCIATION

312 S 9th, Suite 100

Boise, ID 83702

800-635-5240 • www.boise.org

COEUR D’ALENE VISITOR

& CONVENTION SERVICES

1621 N 3rd

Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814

877-782-9232 • www.coeurdalene.org

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 7


WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON

T

HE WORLD OF Washington wine

continues to grow by leaps and bounds,

not only the physical size of the industry, but the

extent to which it promotes itself—a visitor

could easily keep busy every weekend of the

year attending a wine event, and usually would

have to decide which one, or two, or three. The

industry is also busy working on its export

trade, which generated $3.5 million in 2004,

up 40 percent over the previous year.

As the second-largest wine producer in the

United States, and the fastest-growing producer

as well, Washington conceivably could pass

up its number-one competitor, the state of

California. This past spring, an hour-long

documentary,“The Making of Washington

Wine Country” was produced drawing parallels

between the growth of Washington’s wine

industry and that of Sonoma County,

California, which lived for decades in the

shadow of its more famous neighbor, the

Napa Valley.

Washington has long been famous for its

apples and cherries, and now grapes rank

among the state’s most important fruit crops.

In the past decade, production of Washington

wines has nearly tripled. In just the past year,

the number of wineries has grown to approximately

350—up 100 from a year ago. Grape

growers number 350, with 30,000 vineyard

acres, 1000 more than last year. The industry

contributes $2.9 billion annually to the

state’s economy.

Washington wines have a distinct personality

that dates back to the region’s first

winemakers who arrived in the early 19th

century. By the late 1800s, European settlers

had planted vineyards at Fort Vancouver, on

Stretch Island in Puget Sound, and in the Walla

Walla Valley, where the plants truly blossomed.

The boon to the fledgling industry came

with the railroad’s large-scale irrigation

projects, which fostered commercial farming.

Wineries and vineyards continued to flourish

through World War I, led by such notable

growers as William Bridgman and Elbert

Blaine in the Yakima Valley. These pioneers

brought in experts and sold plant cuttings

throughout the valley to boost production.

But it was Dr. Walter Clore who is regarded as

the father of Washington’s wine industry. The

state’s potential as a wine-growing region was

revealed through Dr. Clore’s extensive agricultural

research. By 1970, Washington wines were

recognized as a serious challenge to

Washington’s vineyard acreage climbed to 30,000 last year— now a close second to the

35,000 acres grown in California’s Napa Valley.

California’s. Clore predicted wine’s continuing

upward trend in popularity, and a new generation

of winemakers saw to the industry’s

expansion. In 1981, there were 19 wineries in

the state. By 2001, there were about 170.

More than 15 types of grapes thrive in the

state’s variety of microclimates and growing

conditions, including Cabernet Sauvignon,

Merlot, Chardonnay, Chenin blanc,

Gewürztraminer, Grenache, Lemberger, Merlot,

Pinot noir, Riesling, Sangiovese, Sauvignon

blanc, Sémillon, and Syrah.

Long, warm summer days, cool nights, and

rich volcanic soils create prime growing conditions

in Eastern Washington, home to four of

the state’s six designated viticultural regions or

appellations: the Walla Walla,Yakima Valley,

and Red Mountain appellations which are

within the Columbia Valley.

The beautiful Cascade Mountain range,

running from north to south, separates the dry,

rolling lands of the east from the lush, moist

western region. The Puget Sound appellation,

with its cool, temperate climate, is the only

officially recognized wine region west of the

Cascades. New this past year is the Columbia

Gorge appellation which Washington shares

with neighboring Oregon. The new American

Viticultural Area (AVA) comprises Skamania

and Klickitat counties in Washington and Hood

River and Wasco counties in Oregon.

PUGET SOUND

Though early American settlers were

planting vineyards in the Puget Sound area

more than 100 years ago, the region was designated

an AVA only in 1995. The region stretches

from the Canadian border to the Puget Sound

Islands and the Olympic Peninsula.

To many, Seattle typifies the greater Puget

Sound area with its booming downtown and

complex system of freeways and waterways. In

every direction however, Seattle is surrounded

by forests, mountains, and clusters of islands

that form natural playgrounds. After you’ve had

your fill of the town’s renowned coffees and

microbrews, use the spreading city as a base

from which to visit many of the local wineries,

ferry over to Bainbridge,Vashon, and Whidbey

islands, or head west on Hwy 101 across the

peninsula’s sun belt to such towns as Port

Townsend and Sequim. The landscape of these

towns and islands is a far cry from the bustle

of the big city.

North from Seattle along I–405 and I–5,

wineries are clustered around Woodinville and

all the way up to Bellingham and Mount Baker.

THE GRAPES

Many of Puget Sound’s wineries use coolclimate,

early-to-ripen varieties of vinifera

grapes, producing Madeleine Angevine and

Madeleine Sylvaner, Müller-Thurgau, and

Photo by Jamie and Judy Wild

8 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


WASHINGTON

Siegerrebe. Pinot noir and Pinot gris also are

grown here. Luscious fruit wines are produced

from local berries. Much of Yakima Valley’s

annual crop also is shipped to Puget Sound

wineries for production.

WHEN TO VISIT

Two “must do” festivals happen during

springtime in the Puget Sound region. Taste

of Washington in Seattle and Passport to

Woodinville, both in April, are feasts for the

wine lover’s soul.

At Passport to Woodinville, a single fee

buys a “Passport” filled with labels, a glass, and

a unique opportunity to tour local wineries,

many of them not regularly open to the public.

Sales are limited to 3000 in an effort to prevent

overcrowding. Proceeds are used for educational

materials about the area’s wine industry.

During the summer, the 18th annual Auction

of Washington Wines is billed as a weekend

featuring “three rings of exciting events” held

August 11 through 13, this year. Under the Big

Top at Chateau Ste. Michelle in Woodinville, the

auction is the wine industry’s annual gift to its

community benefiting uncompensated care at

Children’s Hospital & Regional Medical Center

and the Washington Wine Education Fund. The

event includes PICNIC, a fun and casual silent

auction featuring a gourmet feast, carnival

games, and live music; an exclusive winemakers

dinner, and the black-tie gala auction with

starstudded entertainment.

Throughout the year, weekends are filled

with events large and small, nonstop festivals

and concerts celebrating the seasons.

October is grape-picking season and

some wineries welcome visitors to join in the

tasks that become a party and a feast. Such

“harvest parties” are the highlights of a mild

and lingering autumn.

Several larger wineries have tasting rooms

that are open throughout the year. Many of the

smaller sites may be closed in winter. Always

call ahead to confirm the hours of any of the

wineries’ operations.

TOURS/ROUTES

Puget Sound’s winery loop, North Sound

Wineries, includes 10 wineries, and a wine

specialty shop. Some of the wines in this

region are in limited production and may not

be available outside the community.Visit

www.wineryloop.com. Most of the wineries on

the loop are open all year and participate in

special tours such as Spring Barrel Tasting, the

Autumn Tour November 11 through 13, and

Red Wine and Chocolate February 18 through

20, 2006. A ferry trip from Seattle or Edmonds

12

Victoria

Business Name

Abbreviations

V = Vineyards

W = Winery

101

San Juan V •

5


Lopez

Island V

Camaraderie

Cellars


Port Angeles

Port Townsend

Black • • Fairwinds W •

Olympic


Diamond

Cellars


Sorensen

W

Lost

Cellars

Mountain W

Novelty Hill W

Januik W

Austin Robaire Vintners



Betz Family W •


Baer W •

405 Woodinville

Wine Co

Di Stefano W 522

• •

Woodinville

202

Matthews

Facelli W

Cellars

Woodhouse • • •

Family Cellars


Silver Lake W

Columbia W

• • •

DeLille Cellars/

Chaleur Estate

Chateau Ste. Michelle

Hoodsport

Hoodsport W •

12

Samm

amish

Shelton

River

8

To Vancouver

SAN JUAN ISLANDS

PUGET SOUND

Olympia


• Widgeon Hill W


Chuckanut Ridge W •

Greenbank

Cellars


Pasek

Cellars


• Samson Estates W

Everett

Whidbey Island W •

Bainbridge Island W •

Chatter Creek

Lacey

Bellingham

Market Cellar •

Jardin Wines •

Owen Sullivan W •

E.B. Foote W •

Vashon W •

Hoodsport

Tasting Room •

Tacoma

• Classic Winemakers

To Bethany V W, English Estate W,

Morchella Wine Cellars,

RMV Cellars & Salishan V

BRITISH COLUMBIA

PUGET

SOUND

Mt. Vernon

Seattle

7

Sedro-

Woolley

• Mt Baker W


Eagle Haven W

• Carpenter Creek W

Lake


Washin


gton

5

• Vino Aquino W

405

20

Challenger

Ridge V


Concrete

Sky River

Meadery


Woodinville


Hedges

Cellars

To Glacier

Peak V

2

The Tasting Room:

Apex, Camaraderie,

Harlequin, J.M. Cellars,

Wineglass Cellars,

Wilridge W

90

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 9


WASHINGTON

Benson W

Big Pine W

Wapato Point Cellars

Lost River W


Mazama

Lake

Chelan Estate W

Lake Chelan W •

Tsillan Cellars V W

Vin Du Lac W


Chelan

2

Chelan Wine Co •

Eagle Creek W •

Leavenworth


Icicle Ridge W • La Toscana W

Wedge Mountain W •

• Wenatchee

Chateau Faire Le Pont

Saint Laurent W • • Ryan Patrick V

97

• White Heron Cellars

Quincy

• Cave B W

Ellensburg

Chelan

82

90

Yakima

Winthrop

Mattawa

97

• Gold Digger Cellars

Okanogan

COLUMBIA

VALLEY

Columbia River

BRITISH COLUMBIA

395

l u mbia

Co

River

90

• China Bend V

Kettle Falls

395

Townshend Cellar 2

Mountain Dome W •

Grande Ronde Cellars •


Arbor Crest Wine Cellars

Caterina W/Barrister W • ••

Lone Canary W


Robert Karl Cellars


2 Spokane •

Knipprath Cellars

Latah Creek Wine Cellars

WASHINGTON

Zillah

YAKIMA

VALLEY

Benton Richland

(See Detail) Sunnyside City

Pasco

Prosser

Kennewick

97

221

COLUMBIA

Walla Walla

GORGE

Columbia Crest • 395 Lowden

(See Detail)

Paterson

Canoe Ridge •

WALLA WALLA

Columbia Gorge W

(See Detail)

Estate V

Marshal's W

Hermiston

84

14

•• • • •

Waving Tree V W

Pendleton OREGON

Hood Maryhill W

River Cascade Cliffs

• Hood River V

La Grande

• Flerchinger V

Moses


Fries Family W

Lake

26

21

20

Snak e

River

12

Pullman


Patit Creek Cellars

Business Name

Abbreviations

V = Vineyards

W = Winery

• Microwaves, Refrigerators

• Mini-suites with whirlpool tubs

• Indoor pool / Outdoor spa

• Free continental breakfast

• Wireless Internet

www.cedarshotels.com

will take you to Bainbridge Island or Whidbey

Island wineries.

Near Woodinville, off Hwy 202, some of the

largest and oldest wineries in the state include

luxurious chateaus that host wine-tasting

rooms, shops, and tours.

AREA ATTRACTIONS

The region’s attractions are so diverse that

the Puget Sound area is a destination unto

itself. Follow one of the most recognizable landmarks

on the planet and the symbol of Seattle,

the Space Needle, a restaurant and observation

10 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006

deck perched 500 feet above the street with

endless views. Explore the waterfront, historic

districts, and museums and galleries, and shop

to your heart’s content in the retail district surrounding

the colorful Pike Place Public Market.

Olympic National Park and National Forest

spread across the peninsula. The lush rain

forest is a great place to hike and camp from

May through September; Hurricane Ridge

has a small ski area open weekends from

mid-December until early spring.

Leave Seattle in your rearview mirror and

head north on I–5 to Bellingham with its historic

neighborhoods, waterfront, and parks. East of

Bellingham stands Mount Baker towering 10,775

feet, it is known for its world-record snowfalls.

Mount Baker Hwy 542 is a scenic route that rolls

past farms, gardens, and vineyards.

Inns and resorts across the peninsula offer

seasonal packages that highlight romantic

weekends, golf, and wine tours, and are worth

investigating for a complete and easily

planned getaway. Take along a copy of

Northwest Travel’s Vacation Guide to Western

Washington (available at many visitor centers,

or call 800-348-8401, ext. 110) to plan your

Puget Sound getaway. Or contact the North

Olympic Peninsula Visitor & Convention

Bureau (800-942-4042 or

www.northwestsecretplaces.com)

or Kitsap Peninsula Visitor Bureau.

(800-416-5615 or www.visitkitsap.com).

COLUMBIA VALLEY/GORGE

Eastern Washington’s Columbia Valley is

the largest wine region in the state, producing

more than 95 percent of Washington’s wine

grapes. The region is huge—extending from

northern Washington and a hilly area known

as the Okanogan Lobe all the way south into

Oregon. On the west, it is bordered by the

Cascade Mountains and extends east to the


WASHINGTON

Just a few hours from Seattle or

Spokane, yet worlds away from

stress and worry: Lake Chelan.

With 300+ annual days of sunshine,

enjoy teeing off at world-class golf

courses in the valley. After, relax

and enjoy our shopping, dining,

scenic boat tours, apple orchards

and numerous local wineries.

Fill your senses—and your score

card, at Lake Chelan.

FILL

YOUR

SENSES.

Visit ComeToTheLake.com

for packages and specials or

call for a Free Travel Planner:

1-800-875-5399.

W A S H I N G T O N

Palouse plateau. Geologists claim the region is

the remains of an ancient volcano. Within the

Columbia Valley are four of Washington’s six

AVAs. The largest is the Columbia Valley AVA

and within its boundaries are the three others:

the Yakima Valley AVA, the Walla Walla Valley

AVA, and the Red Mountain AVA.

Farther west is the newest, Columbia Gorge

AVA, officially designated in July 2004 with its

boundaries including parts of Washington and

Oregon close to the Columbia River. The

Columbia River Gorge enjoys summers

tempered by Oregon’s Willamette Valley.Winds

and more rain along the Gorge introduce variables

that affect the grapes’ ripening process and

result in distinctive wines. Hwy 14 is a scenic

route that follows the north side of the Columbia

River, and it leads to several wineries that boast

high-quality wines to be enjoyed in the spectacular

setting of the Gorge. Each AVA defines a

unique climate, soil, and physical features distinguishing

it from the surrounding areas.

About 200 wineries make their home

within these five appellations. The location, at

approximately the same latitude as France’s

famous Bordeaux and Burgundy regions, partially

accounts for Columbia Valley being so

well-suited for producing premium wines.

Wind River Cellars • 141

White Salmon

• Syncline Wine Cellars

14

Bingen

Hood River

White Salmon

River

• •

Hood Cathedral

River V Ridge W

Pheasant

Valley VW

35


Hood River

COLUMBIA GORGE

84

Mosier

• Mt. Hood W

OREGON

Lyle

The Dalles

Klickitat River

WASHINGTON

Marshal's

WV •

197

14

Maryhill

Cascade WV

Cliffs WV •


De s

chutes River

Waving

Tree W


Business Name

Abbreviations

V = Vineyards

W = Winery

North Central Washington’s recently

formed Columbia Cascade Winery Association

now involves 20 wineries (www.columbiacascadewines.com).

Another organization, 40

members strong promoting wineries as well as

Washington’s fruit-growing industry in the

North Central area, is the Cascade Foothills

Farmland Association (509-548-6784 or

www.visitwashingtonfarms.com). New vineyards

keep sprouting and grapes are abundant in this

area with several of the large vineyards growing

for Yakima Valley, Spokane, and Tri-Cities

wineries, as well as for the Puget Sound AVA.

A large portion of Columbia Valley is irrigated

desert with the southern reach tempered

by the Columbia River. The Tri-Cities area—

Richland, Kennewick, and Pasco—forms

almost a triangle that serves as a base from

which to visit some of the state’s finest vineyards

and wineries, as well as the state’s largest

producer in rural Paterson.

THE GRAPES

The most widely grown varietal in the

Columbia Valley is Merlot, a grape considered

by some as the source of the tastiest, bestbalanced

wine in America. The “king of red

wine grapes,” Cabernet Sauvignon, plus the

97

84

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 11


WASHINGTON

Running Springs Wine’s Tasting Room


Mattawa

Hightower Cellars

Tapteil V W

Naches

• Oakwood Cellars W

Hedges Cellars

Fox Estate W

82

Terra Blanca • •

Kiona V W

Sandhill W

Benton City •

Buckmaster Cellars



Seth Ryan W

Blackwood Canyon


Kana W

Selah Heights W • Yakima


Exit 96 to 224

82

Desert Hills •

Sagelands V

Wineglass Cellars

Yakima Cellars

To

Windy Point V Hyatt V

Spokane

Masset W Two Mountain W


Silver Lake at Roza Hills

Piety Flats W •

••

• Maison de Padgett W

• Paradisos del Sol

RED

• •

• • • Portteus V

Wapato Bonair W

MOUNTAIN

• Zillah

AVA

395

YAKIMA

••

Claar Cellars

Horizon’s Edge W

Sheridan V • Eaton Hill W

VALLEY

Tefft Cellars

240

• •

Preston

Sunnyside

Premium Wines •


• Willow Crest W

Granger

• • Tucker Cellars • VineHeart Benton

Goose Ridge V • Cowan V J Bookwalter W

• Pontin Del Roza W City

Apex Cellars

Richland & Barnard Griffin

Chandler Reach V •

Gordon

Grandview

Brothers V

82

• •• Kestrel Vinters

• •

Manchego Real • •

Prosser •

• Pasco

Thurston Wolfe W Tagaris W

Yakima River W•

• • • C.R. Sandidge Wines

Alexandria Nicole Cellars

Hogue Cellars


• • Kennewick 12

Destiny Ridge W

Chinook Wines

97

Hinzerling W

Powers W

To Walla Walla

Snoqualmie V

Badger Mountain W

McKinley Springs V •

Moonlight Sparkling Wine Cellar

Yakima River

Columbia River

Yakima River





Business Name

Abbreviations

V = Vineyards

W = Winery


To Goldendale

82

white Chardonnay follow in production

volume. Riesling, one of the original varieties

planted in the state, and Syrah, one of the state’s

newest varieties, are also widely planted.

WHEN TO VISIT

The Columbia Valley boasts 300 days of

sunshine a year, allowing all kinds of vacation

possibilities. Winery organizations sponsor

major events throughout the year—the Sweet

Retreat in the spring, and Columbia River Wine

Expo, and Catch the Crush at harvest time.

These events are celebrated at more than a

dozen wineries around the Tri-Cities area and

are ideal times to visit and sample unique

vintage selections.

TOURS/ROUTES

The Tri-Cities area dominates the southern

Columbia Valley for fine dining and accommodations.

Tri-Cities wineries, ranging in size

from small, family-owned cellars to the

Northwest’s largest wine production facility, are

easily accessible in this immediate area.

Major expansions are underway at some

wineries in the area. One small winery is adding

a huge tasting room along with a wood-fire pizza

and grill facility.Another has been storing wines

in underground caves as the Europeans do and is

in the process of creating a wine-tasting facility

12 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006

with this European cave atmosphere as well as

building an outdoor amphitheater.

Several dozen wineries are within a 50-

mile radius. Most can be reached by driving

I–182 and I–82.Visitors can take self-guided

or guided wine tours throughout the valley.

Contact the Tri-Cities Visitor & Convention

Bureau (800-254-5824; www.visittri-cities.com)

in Kennewick for detailed maps to wineries or

contact local driving and tour services.

AREA ATTRACTIONS

Eastern Washington is known as one of the

most agriculturally bountiful regions in the

United States. Farms and orchards cover the

rolling hills from the top of the valley to the

shores of the Columbia River. U-pick farms

make seasonal visits a real treat.

Lewis and Clark and the Corps of

Discovery left their mark on this land in the

early 1800s. This year, October 14 through 17,

the Tri-Cities hosts Lewis and Clark Heritage

Days at Columbia Park in Kennewick and

Sacajawea State Park and Interpretive Center in

Pasco.“Corp of Discovery II,” a traveling exhibit

hosted by the National Park Service, will be a

part of the event. In Richland, the “Columbia

River Exhibition of History, Science, and

Technology” displays the story of the

Manhattan Project alongside two- and threedimensional

exhibits. They illustrate the

history of the region and allow visitors to travel

from the prehistoric age to the nuclear age.

Water sports abound on the Snake River as it

winds through the Tri-Cities to its confluence

with the Columbia River at the edge of town.

YAKIMA VALLEY

& RED MOUNTAIN

Yakima Valley, within the boundaries of the

Columbia Valley, was the first designated AVA in

Washington. The region has a climate generally

more temperate than its neighbors to the north

and south, and its rich soils are the result of an

ancient series of floods. Commercial irrigation

transformed the valleys into rich farmlands,

and the grape growers followed.

Yakima Valley is considered the “fruit

basket” of the state, home to orchards abundant

with apples, cherries, peaches, pears, nectarines,

and plums in addition to the expanses of vineyards.

The region also produces about 75

percent of the hops used by U.S. breweries.

Rattlesnake Hills and Ahtanum Ridge

outline the northern boundary of the valley

while Horse Heaven Hills serve as the southern

boundary, and the greatest concentration of vineyards

and wineries in the state are nestled here.


WASHINGTON

Within the Yakima Valley borders lies the Red

Mountain appellation, the smallest of the state’s

wine regions and home to a dozen wineries.

Though not exactly a mountain, the Red

Mountain AVA ranges in elevations from 500 to

1500 feet over 4040 acres, much of it once

covered with grasses known to turn red with the

seasons. Red Mountain is a tiny region located in

the easternmost tip of the Yakima Valley. The area

is positioned for ideal growing conditions: it has

longer days, warmer temperatures, and unique

soil. Many of the state’s first award-winning

Cabernet Sauvignons were produced with the

grapes from Red Mountain’s slopes, and the

region continues to produce distinctive fruit

used by wineries throughout Washington.

A new wine association, the Rattlesnake

Hills Wine Trail, was formed in 2004 by 15

wineries in the Zillah area.Visitors can rest

assured that the only rattlesnake they will find

is the shape of the hills. One of the organizers,

winemaker Gail Puryear of Bonair Winery, says

the area enjoys a high visitor load because of its

central location two and one-half hours from

Seattle and three hours from Portland.Visit the

Web site to obtain directions for a self-guided

tour of this area. A printable map and winery

hours are also available at this site.

(800-829-6027 or www.rattlesnakehills.com)

THE GRAPES

Yakima Valley is credited with growing the

most award-winning varieties of grapes in

Washington, and wineries here compete successfully

against other regions of the state as well as

California.At one time the Yakima Valley was

known in particular for its white grape vineyards

that produced Riesling, Gëwurztraminer, and

Chenin blanc in addition to its popular

Chardonnays. Like the Columbia Valley,Yakima

now specializes in distinctive varietals of a

crisper Chardonnay, as well as Merlot and

Cabernet Sauvignon. Riesling and Syrah are

also widely planted.

Throughout the small area of the Red

Mountain AVA, Chardonnay, Cabernet

Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah varietals flourish.

WHEN TO VISIT

The Yakima Valley celebrates its wine

industry from April through October when the

valley is rife with festivals promoting the region’s

bounty. The annual Spring Barrel Tastings are

held in prime fruit blossom time and one of

the biggest weekends in the Yakima Valley.

August in Prosser means plenty of sunshine

and the annual Wine and Food Fair. The last

full weekend in September brings the Great

Prosser Balloon Rally, September 23 through

• 24 Hour Pool & Spa

• FREE Continental

Breakfast Buffet

• FREE 24 Hour

Airport Shuttle

• In-Room Coffee &

Mini-Refrigerators

• Hot Tub Suites

• Explore Nearby Wineries!

(509) 943-4400

1-800-HAMPTON

486 Bradley Blvd. • Richland, WA 99352

“Take a Grand Tour at www.northwestinns.com”

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 13


WASHINGTON

A record harvest of 100,500 tons of grapes was set in Washington in 2004.

Photo by Jamie and Judy Wild

25, this year. Backcountry roads are a traveler’s

delight in the fall as the light shifts and the land

changes colors.

TOURS/ROUTES

Yakima Valley and Red Mountain wine

growers mark the season with a trio of events

during which visitors can share in all the

traditions of wine tasting. In February over

Presidents’ Day, wineries open their cellars for

Red Wine and Chocolate. In April wine flows

with the annual Spring Barrel Tasting.

Thanksgiving in the Wine Country in

November marks the end of the season. The

area’s wineries are easily accessible from I–82

(exits 40 to 96), which slices through the valley

from east to west following the Yakima River.

Red Mountain AVA wineries are clustered just

north of I–82, east of Prosser.

Some of the most popular events and tours

are hosted by Wine Yakima Valley, an association

of growers and wineries (800-258-7270 or

www.wineyakimavalley.org) and some wine

tours include local shops and art galleries.

Visitor information can be obtained by

contacting the Yakima Valley Visitors &

Convention Bureau (800-221-0751

or www.visityakima.com), which offers

seasonal Wine Country Getaway packages.

AREA ATTRACTIONS

Wine touring along I–82 means access to an

abundance of farms and produce. Shop for the

freshest and sweetest fruits at the stands and

shops, or enjoy a meal at restaurants

that take advantage of the local bounty. In

Sunnyside visit the Darigold Dairy Fair

(509-837-4321) for free self-guided cheese tours

and stop by the tasting room for free samples of

cheese and ice cream. One-of-a-kind shops and

art galleries throughout the area round out a day

trip across the valley. Toppenish is known for its

western flair and historical murals decorating the

downtown. It is also home to the Yakama Nation

Cultural Center, a community center, museum,

library, and restaurant that serves authentic

American Indian foods.

WALLA WALLA VALLEY

Walla Walla Valley blossomed about the

same time as its well-known neighbor,Yakima

Valley. The Walla Walla AVA lies within the

Columbia Valley appellation, in Washington

and in the northeast tip of Oregon. More than

50 wineries call the appellation home, and this

year, the appellation welcomes a new winery,

Zerba Cellars in Milton-Freewater, Oregon.

Geologists say such cataclysmic events as

floods, volcanoes, and glaciers shaped the basin

and plateaus of the region, leaving a landscape

prime for farms and vineyards amid a climate

14 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


WALLA WALLA VALLEY

Amavi Cellars

Canoe Ridge W

L'Ecole No 41 & Whitman Cellars

Woodward Canyon W

Walla

Walla

12 •

• •




• •

Touchet Lowden


Latitude 46 N

& Harlequin

Wine Cellars

Business Name

Abbreviations

V = Vineyards

W = Winery

Three Rivers W




Lowden Hills W • Zerba Cellars

Basel Cellars Milton-Freewater

Estate W

125

Buty W

Cougar Crest W

Dunham Cellars

Nicholas Cole Cellars

Bergevin Lane V

El Mirador W

Forgeron Cellars

Patrick M. Paul V

Spring Valley V

Beresan

Colvin V

Dusted Valley Vintners

Glen Fiona

Isenhower Cellars

Five Star Cellar

Reininger W

Russell Creek

Stephenson Cellars

SYZYGY

Tamarack Cellars

Trey Marie W

Abeja

K Vintners

Walla Walla Vintners

Fort Walla Walla Cellars

James Leigh Cellars

Morrison Lane W

Seven Hills W

Walla Walla Village W

Waterbrook W

Northstar W

Pepper Bridge W

Rulo W

Saviah Cellars

Yellow Hawk Cellar

WASHINGTON

A

Winning ward

Merlot

©2005 Canoe Ridge Vineyard, Walla Walla WA

www.CanoeRidgeVineyard.com

1102 WEST CHERRY ST.

WALLA WALLA, WA 99362

Ph: (509) 527–0885

Please Enjoy Our Quality Responsibly.

more temperate than the greater Columbia

Valley’s. French and Italian immigrants started

cultivating vineyards in the late 1850s, and at

one time, as many as 80 varieties of grapes

were grown. Prohibition ended the region’s

wine industry, much the same way it affected

the rest of the state, and vineyards saw little

commercial success until the 1970s. The first

winery wasn’t established until 1977. Now

growers and winemakers have a revitalized 30-

year history of tending and experimenting and

are confident in the world-class potential of

their products.

THE GRAPES

White wines from Walla Walla Valley are

known to be excellent. But the region is best

known for its excellent, full-bodied reds. Today

the most widely planted varietals in the valley

are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Syrah.

Cabernet franc and Sangiovese also grow here.

White wine varietals include Chardonnay,

Semillon, Gewurztraminer, and Viognier.

WHEN TO VISIT

Walla Walla boasts plenty of sunshine

along with a reputation for its rich farmlands.

A visit in the springtime means mild weather

while the region celebrates its Spring Release

Weekend in May and Vintage Walla Walla in

June. The region is known for its Balloon

Stampede, also in May. Holiday Barrel Tasting

is celebrated in December.

TOURS/ROUTES

Some of the wineries in Walla Walla Valley

are open daily to the public and others require

appointments. Some can accommodate groups

and tour buses, but reservations should always

be made in advance. Several of the boutique

wineries are located in historic buildings that

provide charming environments for tasting and

ideal environments for aging and storing wines.

Hwy 12 out of the Tri-Cities and out of

Hermiston, Oregon, runs through the town of

Walla Walla and leads to many wineries.

The Walla Walla Valley Wine Alliance

(509-526-3117or www.wallawallawine.com)

provides information about local wineries.

AREA ATTRACTIONS

Walla Walla was once a booming trading

center and has a rich history that dates to the

1800s, when explorers Lewis and Clark paid a

visit to the area and gold was discovered in

northern Idaho. Its historical architecture is

highlighted in downtown art galleries, antique

shops, and fine and eclectic restaurants. Bird

watching and bike touring are also popular

around the area. The town is about a half-day’s

drive from Seattle or Portland. Contact the

Walla Walla Valley Chamber of Commerce or

Tourism Walla Walla. (877-WWVISIT or

www.wwchamber.com)

MORE WASHINGTON

WINE COUNTRY

SPOKANE

A few vineyards grow at the higher elevations

around Spokane, but most of the wineries

that have sprouted up in this region since the

1980s use grapes purchased from the Columbia

Valley. Most of the wineries are near I–90 and

within the city limits. An experimental

vineyard east of Spokane grows premium

grapes for sparkling wines. The estate, a

national historic landmark, is a Mediterraneanstyle

villa perched on a promontory over the

Spokane Valley. Another winery grows organic

foods alongside its grapes and has a bed-andbreakfast

inn on its lakeside grounds.

Because of its location, the area has yielded

some distinctive wines, including one of the

first 50–50 blends of Cabernet and Merlot.

Chardonnay, Riesling, Cabernet Sauvignon, and

Syrah are also prominent.

Visitors to Spokane appreciate the gardens

and parks, especially Riverfront Park, the site of

a world’s fair, Expo ’74. Outdoor enthusiasts

might head for scenic Centennial Trail, which

follows the Spokane River into Coeur d’Alene,

Idaho, and the Lake Roosevelt National

Recreation Area. The area is most popular with

travelers during the summer months.

More information about Spokane is available

from the Spokane Regional Convention

& Visitors Bureau. (888-776-5263 or

www.visitspokane.com)

OTHER KEY VITICULTURE AREAS

A number of areas in Washington produce

wines of exceptional quality but are not located

within designated appellations. In Eastern

Washington, hillsides near the Columbia River

have excellent southern exposure and soils conducive

to growing fruit and grapes. Cold Creek,

in the Columbia Valley, is a viticultural area that

has a long growing season and is noted for its

Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon.Vineyards

located in the area surrounding the Tri-Cities

near the Snake River and in the Columbia Basin

have achieved recognition for their Merlot,

Sauvignon blanc, and Semillon.Alder Ridge,

Canoe Ridge, and Zephyr Ridge, part of the

Horse Heaven Hills in Yakima Valley, are warm

regions with little rainfall and produce a number

of distinctive wines. Other good growing areas

have been found on a plateau, the Wahluke

Slope, on the north side of the Columbia River,

and on the cliffs overlooking Wallula Gap, also

along the Columbia.Wahluke Slope is noted for

its Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon and the

Wallula area is known for its Bordeaux varieties.

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 15

Photo by Nathaniel Dain


WASHINGTON

NATAPOC LODGING - MORE THAN A ROOM

On The Banks of the Wenatchee River

6 Cabins - Kitchens - Hot Tubs - Fireplaces

TRI-CITIES HOSTS

HARVEST FESTIVAL

HONEYMOONS-RETREATS-FAMILIES-CATERING

888-NATAPOC

Leavenworth, WA

888-628-2762 In the Plain Valley

info@natapoc.com

www.natapoc.com

Photo by Donald Gruener/iStockphoto

THE WASHINGTON WINE COMMISSION

celebrates the crush and the harvest

this year in the Tri-Cities with “Taste

Washington Harvest,” on September 9,

at the new Three Rivers Convention Center,

7016 Grandridge Boulevard, Kennewick,

from 7 until 10 P.M.

This public food and wine tasting event

is expected to draw more than 1000 people,

who must be 21 and older, according to event

director Lisa Toomey.

Visitors are invited to join Chef Greg

Bagnuk from Anthony’s at Columbia Point in

Richland, Chef Charles Ramseyer from Ray’s

Boathouse on Puget Sound, Chef John Sarich

from Chateau Ste. Michelle in Woodinville,

and Chef Tom Black to sample regional

cuisine as well as taste wines from 120

wineries throughout Washington State.

Cheese aficionados can sample Yoke’s Fresh

Markets Gourmet Cheese and Antipasto Bar.

The more adventurous can try their luck at

the Wheel of Wine or Royal Raffle.

Admission is $50 per person and

tickets can be purchased at Yoke’s Fresh

Markets in both Pasco and Kennewick,

or on the commission’s Web site

(www.tastewashington.org). For those

wanting to spend the night, the Hilton

Garden Inn (509-735-4600) adjacent to the

convention center is offering a special rate

for the weekend.

“Taste Washington Harvest” is being

held in conjunction with the Washington

State Wine Expo Harvest Tour, a five-day

wine buyers’ tour beginning in Seattle

on September 6, and progressing to the

Tri-Cities in the heart of Washington’s

wine-grape growing region. More than 40

buyers from major markets in the United

States will visit the vineyards, meet the

winemakers, and taste the wines. For more

information about the expo,

(www.washingtonstatewineexpo.org). ■

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 17


WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Call in advance for dates and locations of these events. Individual wineries are likely to host additional events.

Contact local chambers of commerce and visitors bureaus for more information.

FEBRUARY

Tri-Cities - Art & Wine

Charity Fundraiser

February 4, 2006

509-586-3820

North Olympic Peninsula & Islands

Wineries - Red Wine & Chocolate

February 18 – 20, 2006

800-785-5495

Yakima Valley- Red Wine and Chocolate

February 18 – 20, 2006

800-258-7270

MARCH

Tri-Cities - Sweet Retreat Wine Festival

March 11 & 12, 2006

800-360-6611

Richland - Annual Bacchus

Blues Wine & Food Festival

March 17, 2006

509-946-1651

APRIL

Passport to Woodinville

April 1 & 2, 2006

425-424-2902

Seattle - Taste Washington

April 7 & 9, 2006

206-667-9463

Yakima Valley - Spring Barrel Tasting

April 28 – 30, 2006

509-965-5201 or 800-258-7270

MAY

Walla Walla - Spring Release

Tasting Weekend

May 6 & 7, 2006

Balloon Stampede

May 13 & 14, 2006

509-526-3117

Spokane - Spring Barrel Days

May 13 & 14, 2006

800-528-2427

Tri-Cities - Wine Society

“Perfect Harmony” Mid-Columbia

Symphony Fundraiser

May 21, 2006

509-943-6602

Friday Harbor - San Juan Vineyards

Barrel Tasting

May 27, 2006

360-378-9463

North Olympic Peninsula & Islands

Wineries - Spring Barrel Tasting

May 2006

800-785-5495

Chelan Valley Wine Festival

509-548-6784

JUNE

Walla Walla - Vintage Walla Walla

June 3, 2006

509-526-3117

Leavenworth - Leavenworth Wine Walk

June 3 & 4, 2006

508-548-5807

Yakima - Sunshine & Wine

June 24, 2006

509-248-7160

Spokane - Taste Washington

888-776-5263

JULY

Wenatchee- Ohme Gardens Wine Festival

July 30, 2005

509-662-5785

AUGUST

Woodinville - Auction of

Washington Wines

August 11– 13, 2005

206-667-9463

Prosser - 24th Annual Prosser

Wine & Food Fair

August 13, 2005

800-408-1517

Leavenworth - Wine Tasting Festival

August 20 & 21, 2005

509-548-5807

Maryhill Museum - 2nd Annual Arts,

Wine & Food Festival, Columbia

Gorge/Goldendale

August 20 & 21, 2005

509-773-3733

Vancouver - Wine & Jazz Festival

August 26 – 28, 2005

360-906-0441

www.vancouverwinejazz.com

Statewide - Washington Wine Month

www.washingtonwine.org

SEPTEMBER

Tri-Cities - Taste Washington

September 9, 2005

509-546-0760

Klickitat County Wineries - Fall Harvest

in Klickitat County,Wind River Cellars

September 24 & 25, 2005

509-493-2324

Tri-Cities - Catch the Crush Wine Festival

September 24 & 25, 2005

866-360-6611

OCTOBER

Walla Walla - Entwine

Arts, Wine & Education Fundraiser

October 14, 2005

509-527-4275

NOVEMBER

Spokane - Cork & Keg Festival

November 11, 2005

509-467-7744

North Olympic Peninsula & Islands

Wineries - Autumn to Autumn Wine Tour

November 11 – 13, 2005

800-785-5495

Spokane - Holiday Wine Festival

November 19 & 20, 2005

800-528-2427

Klickitat Wine Alliance

Holiday Open House

November 25 – 27, 2005

509-493-2324

Yakima Valley - Thanksgiving

in Wine Country

November 25 – 27, 2005

800-258-7270

DECEMBER

Walla Walla - Holiday Barrel Tasting

December 2 – 4, 2005

509-526-3117

Woodinville - Saint Nicholas Day

Open House

December 3 & 4, 2005

425-424-2902

18 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON WINERIES

COLUMBIA VALLEY see map pg. 11

GOLDENDALE

MARYHILL WINERY

877-627-9445 • www.maryhillwinery.com

9774 Hwy 14, Goldendale, WA 98620

Maryhill wines have earned an impressive

120 medals from California to New York,

over their short two-year history. A unique

microclimate, and 25 years of winemaking

experience come together to create the ideal

elements for winemaking. These winning

ingredients have helped Maryhill set

standards with the growing Washington

wine industry. Perched on the cliffs of the

Columbia River Gorge, the wine-tasting room

and an expansive deck offer unprecedented

views of the mountains and Columbia River

Gorge. Hours 10 A.M. to 6 P.M.; Seven days

a week. It’s the perfect way to end the day.

LEAVENWORTH

EAGLE CREEK WINERY

509-548-7668 • www.eaglecreekwinery.com

email: eaglecreekwinery@earthlink.com

10037 Eagle Creek Rd., Leavenworth, WA

98826. In our beautiful Old World tasting

room you feel you are being transported back

to Tuscany while tasting our premium Estate

Wines. For an in-depth experience, stay in our

cottage at the winery which sleeps up to 8

people in the comfort and elegance of European

style and surroundings. Open 11 A.M. to 4 P.M.

Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays.

OROVILLE

GOLD DIGGER CELLARS WINE SHOPPE

509-548-9883 • www.golddiggercellars.com

285 Hwy 2, Leavenworth, WA 98826

The Leavenworth Tasting Room offers FREE

wine tasting daily and gifts galore! The

winery and vineyards are located in Oroville,

where they produce Washington’s only

Okanogan Valley wines. Going North on Hwy

97 Stop by the Tasting Room on Main Street

in Oroville for wine, gifts and fresh local fruit.

WASHINGTON WINE COMMISSION

93 Pike, Suite 315

Seattle, WA 98101

206-667-9463

www.washingtonwine.org

CASCADE FOOTHILLS FARMLAND ASSOCIATION

PO Box 462

Peshastin, WA 98847

509-548-6784

www.visitwashingtonfarms.com

COLUMBIA CASCADE WINERY ASSOCIATION

301 Angier Ave. #B

Cashmere, WA 98815

509-782-0708

www.columbiacascadewines.com

COLUMBIA GORGE

WINEGROWERS ASSOCIATION

415 W Steuben #2

Bingen, WA 98605

866-413-WINE

www.columbiagorgewine.com

COLUMBIA VALLEY WINERY ASSOCIATION

866-360-6611

www.columbiavalleywine.com

KITSAP PENINSULA VISITOR BUREAU

Port Gamble, WA 98364

800-416-5615 • www.visitkitsap.com

VISITOR INFORMATION

www.winesnw.com

NORTH OLYMPIC PENINSULA VISITOR

& CONVENTION BUREAU

338 W 1st St., Suite 104

Port Angeles, WA 98362

360-452-8552

www.northwestsecretplaces.com

PULLMAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

415 N Grand Ave.

Pullman, WA 99163

800-365-6948

www.pullmanchamber.com

SPOKANE WINERY ASSOCIATION

800-528-2427

www.spokanewineries.net

TOPPENISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

5A S Toppenish Ave.

Toppenish, WA 98948

800-569-3982

www.toppenish.net

TRI-CITIES VISITOR & CONVENTION BUREAU

6951 W Grandridge Blvd.

Kennewick, WA 99336

800-254-5824

www.visitTri-Cities.com

WALLA WALLA VALLEY WINE ALLIANCE

509-526-3117

www.wallawallawine.com

PUGET SOUND see map pg. 9

HOODSPORT

HOODSPORT WINERY, INC.

800-580-9894 • www.hoodsport.com

23501 N Hwy 101, Hoodsport, WA 98548

email: wine@hoodsport.com

One of Washington state’s oldest premium

wineries located on the Olympic Peninsula.

LAKE CHELAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

& VISITORS CENTER

102 E Johnson

Chelan, WA 98816

800-875-5399

www.ComeToTheLake.com

LEAVENWORTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

940 Hwy 2, Ste. B

Leavenworth, WA 98826

509-548-5807 • www.leavenworth.org

WENATCHEE VALLEY CONVENTION

& VISITORS BUREAU

25 N Wenatchee Ave., Ste. C-111

Wenatchee, WA 98801

800-572-7753

www.wenatcheevalley.org

YAKIMA VALLEY WINEGROWERS ASSOCIATION

800-258-7270

www.wineyakimavalley.org

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 19


WASHINGTON

WALLA WALLA VALLEY

see map pg. 15

WALLA WALLA

BASEL CELLARS ESTATE WINERY

509-522-0200 • www.baselcellars.com

2901 Old Milton Hwy,Walla Walla,WA

99362. Basel Cellars Estate Winery and

winemaker Troy Rusch produce premium

award-winning wines with a focus on

Bordeaux-style reds. The 85-acre estate

offers the perfect venue for private events

and luxury overnight accommodations,

continually striving to provide the

“never-ending wine experience.”

CANOE RIDGE VINEYARD

509-527-0885

www.canoeridgevineyard.com

1102 West Cherry St. Located in the heart

of Washington state’s preeminent wine

region, Canoe Ridge Vineyard is a small

winery that specializes in estate-grown

Merlot. We grow our grapes at our unique

estate vineyard and use traditional French

cellaring to produce an elegant, classic Merlot

with the suppleness of Pinot noir.

YAKIMA VALLEY see map pg. 12

BENTON CITY

KIONA VINEYARDS AND WINERY

509-588-6716 • www.kionawine.com

44612 N Sunset Rd.,

Benton City, WA 99320 Kiona Vineyards

pioneered the widely acclaimed Red

WINERY

Oregon

1998

Pinot Noir

unfiltered

alc 13.0% by volume

* Please note that region, vintage,

and grape variety requirements are

based on federal law and may

differ from state to state.

Mountain growing region in the upper

Yakima Valley. The Williams family cordially

invites you to visit our tasting room overlooking

the 65 acres of vineyards. We feature

a full range of handcrafted, premium varietal

wines. Tasting Room Hours: Noon to 5 P.M.

seven days a week.

PROSSER

COWAN VINEYARDS

509-788-0200

email: cowanfrt@bentonrea.com

2880 Lee Rd., Ste. E, Prosser, WA 99350.

New Estate Winery opened April, 2005.

Family owned and operated Merlot Cabernet

Franc, Cabernet Sauvingnon and Red Head

Rosé. Tasting room open Friday through

Sunday 10 A.M. to 5 P.M. or by appointment.

RICHLAND

TAGARIS WINERY

877-862-7999/509-628-0020

www.tagariswines.com

844 Tulip Lane Richland, WA 99352.

A three-generation estate winery with over

200 acres of 16 varieties of wine grapes producing

both white and red award-winning

wines with big bold fruit flavors. The Taverna

features a, bistro, wine bar and rooms for

private events. Serving gourmet pizzas and

Pacific Northwest fare beginning at 4 P.M.

Patio dining features a 33-foot. fountain, live

music and delicious grilled fare. Open daily

from 11 A.M.

HOW TO READ A WINE LABEL

Producer of the wine.

Region–At least 85 percent* of the grapes must come

from the region listed.

Vintage/harvest year–At least 95 percent of the wine

must come from the year listed.

Grape variety–At least 75 percent of the grapes used

should be from this variety.

Other terms you might see:

Unfiltered means some particles are settling naturally,

and no effort has been made to extract them. This does

not affect quality.

ALC refers to percent of alcohol content by volume, which

ranges between 7 and 14 percent.

Premier Cru means “first growth”—so the grapes are

older and the vintage is higher in quality.

Reserve often means you’re getting closer to the vintner’s

favorite vintages but doesn’t have to mean there is

anything special about the vintage.

ZILLAH

TWO MOUNTAIN WINERY

509-829-3900

www.TwoMountainWinery.com

2151 Cheyne Rd., Zillah, WA 98953

Nestled in the rolling hills of the Yakima Valley,

Two Mountain’s name was inspired by the

breathtaking view of Mount Adams and Mt.

Rainier. Two Mountain Winery believes that

the wines can only come from the best grapes.

We are very proud of our vineyard and are

continually striving to produce the highest

quality grapes. Zillah on the Rattlesnake

Hills Wine Trail. Exit 52, off of I-82. North

on Cheyne Road. Fresh, seasonal fruit. Any

size combination of car/motor home. Tasting

Room Hours: 10 A.M. to 6 P.M. Friday through

Monday or any day by appointment.

WHERE TO STAY

EAST WENATCHEE

CEDARS INN

509-886-8000/800-358-2074

www.cedarshotels.com

LEAVENWORTH

BAVARIAN LODGE

509-548-7878/888-717-7878

www.bavarianlodge.com

BEST WESTERN ICICLE INN

509-548-7000/800-558-2438

www.icicleinn.com

ENZIAN INN

509-548-5269/800-223-8511

www.enzianinn.com

LINDERHOF MOTOR INN

509-548-5283/800-828-5680

www.linderhof.com

NATAPOC LODGING

509-763-3313/888-NATAPOC

www.natapoc.com

RICHLAND

HAMPTON INN RICHLAND

509-943-4400/800-HAMPTON

www.northwestinns.com

WALLA WALLA

MARCUS WHITMAN HOTEL

866-826-9422

www.marcuswhitmanhotel.com

YAKIMA

HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS

509-249-1000/800-HOLIDAY

www.hiexpress.com

TRAILER INNS RV PARK

509-425-9561/800-659-4784

www.trailerinnsrv.com

20 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


OREGON

More than 40 wine varietals are produced in Oregon—Pinot noir, the most famous, among them.

I

N

THE 1950S, when the California wine

market began to completely overshadow

all other American wine markets, many smaller

vineyards were forced out of business. This was

the case in Oregon where many winemakers

made and sold small amounts of their product.

It was a big blow to the state’s wine industry,

which had already suffered from Prohibition and

the Depression. In general, it was hard for the

wine industry to recoup from the two major

events, and after the 1950s, it appeared that

Oregon particularly would never be able to

rebound. In fact, many winemaking experts

doubted that Oregon could ever be a significant

grape-growing and wine-producing region.

The experts were wrong.

Many would-be wine producers moved

from California to Oregon in the 1960s and

started experimenting with growing grapes.

Among them, three men are considered

pioneers of the modern wine industry in the

state: Richard Sommer of Hillcrest Vineyard in

Roseburg, Dick Erath of Erath Vineyards in

Dundee, and David Lett of Eyrie Vineyards, also

in Dundee. They helped to establish which

grapes could grow best in each climate and soil

type around the state and encouraged others to

OREGON

put down roots in Oregon, too.

Their perseverance has paid off—Oregon

is now the fourth largest wine producer in the

United States. There are now more than 300

wineries producing wine in Oregon and nearly

14,000 acres planted in grapes.

Although many of the wineries and vineyards

operate with small-scale distribution,

their wines are high quality and awardwinning.

It is also interesting to note that

Oregon has some of the strictest wine labeling

laws in the country: 100 percent of the grapes

used to make Oregon wines must come from

the appellation indicated. The quality of the

wines is starting to attract wine lovers from all

over the world who are pleasantly surprised by

Oregon’s hospitality and remarkable scenery.

The majority of wineries and vineyards in

Oregon are located in the Willamette Valley.

Within the Willamette Valley AVA, three new

sub-regions received official AVA status late in

2004 and early in 2005. The McMinnville,

Dundee Hills, and Yamhill-Carlton areas sought

AVA designation to better distinguish the

micro-climates of their growing areas.

Late in 2004, the Southern Oregon AVA

was also officially designated as the viticultural

area encompassing the Umpqua, Rogue, and

Applegate valleys. Rogue and Applegate were

approved in 1991 and Umpqua in 1994.

Oregon also has a brand new place to

call “wine country.” During the past year, the

Columbia Gorge obtained official AVA designation.

The appellation is located about 60 miles

east of Portland and includes land in Washington

as well. The official growing area comprises

Hood River and Wasco counties in Oregon and

Skamania and Klickitat counties in Washington.

Appellations are important for the wine

industry because they signify distinct winegrowing

regions based on climate and soil

conditions. Oregon shares two other officially

recognized appellations with Washington. The

boundaries of the Columbia Valley and the

Walla Walla Valley AVAs extend into Oregon

where a substantial amount of the grapes are

grown for the wineries in these AVAs.

During the past year, Zerba Cellars winery

has opened in Oregon’s small town of Milton-

Freewater, northeast of Pendleton and close to

the Washington border. It joins the Gilstrap

Brothers Winery to form Eastern Oregon’s wine

country. Located in tiny Cove just east of La

Grande, Gilstrap’s first commercial production

was in 2000.

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 21

Photo by Norman Eder / iStockphoto


OREGON

To Nehalem Bay

Wine Co.

26

Business Name

Abbreviations

V = Vineyards

W = Winery

RMV Cellars •

• Salishan V

• Bethany V

• English Estate

Vancouver, WA Morchella

Tualatin

Bishop Creek Cellars/

Wine Cellars

Estate V

Urban Wine Works


Shafer V • •

To Tillamook

47

David Hill V W •

Clear Creek Hip Chicks Do Wine

84

6

Distillery •

Forest Grove 8


Beaverton • •

Carlton Wine-

Montinore •

Portland

• Oak

Makers Studio:

Lion •

Edgefield W

Elk Cove •

Knoll W

Andrew Rich, Baedecker

Valley V • Cooper 205

26

Cellars, Bryce, Domaine Kramer V • • Beran V Mountain V

Wasson

Meriwether, Dominio IV,

Freja •

• Raptor

Brothers W •

Hamacher, Lazy River,

• Ponzi V

Yamhill (Detail Ridge W

Ribbon Ridge, Scott Paul

• Below)

Oregon City

Cuneo Cellars •

• Chehalem

Carlton

Newberg

• Champoeg Wine Cellars

Panther Creek W

Dundee

Anthony Dell W • Walnut City


McMinnville • Wineworks

99 213

E

Brooks • • Kristin Hill W 5

Yamhill Valley V • Coelho W Amity V

• St. Josef's

Maysara Estate •

• •

Witness Tree V Amity • Hauer Of The Dauen

Cristom V

• Stangeland V


Marquam Hill V

Bethel Heights V


Bryn Mawr V •

Chateau Bianca W • Dominio • Redhawk V

Van Duzer V • • Stone Wolf V

22

Firesteed W •

Orchard Heights W



Rickreall ••

Mystic Wines

To Flying Dutchman W

Kathleen V • St. Innocent

Dallas

Depoe Bay Wine Co. •

• Salem

AnneAmie Eola Hills W Honeywood W

Monmouth


Airlie W • Ankeny

22

V W

• Willamette

Valley V

99

W

• Springhill Cellars

To Newport

Albany

20

Corvallis

Pheasant Court W •

LaVelle V •

Secret House •

126


Tyee Wine

Cellars

Benton Lane W •

Veneta

Territorial Hwy

Iris Hill W •

King Estate W •

Chateau Lorane •

UMPQUA

VALLEY

WILLAMETTE VALLEY


Territorial V


Eugene

Silvan

• Ridge/

Hinman V

Lorane

5

To Roseburg


• Saginaw V

Cottage

Grove

Willam ette River


5

To Shallon W

20

Columbia

River

To Bend

WILLAMETTE VALLEY

The Willamette Valley is often divided into

north and south. There are close to 200 wineries

in the north valley, which consists of every small

agricultural community from Portland to Salem,

including Multnomah,Washington,Yamhill,

Clackamas, Polk, and Marion counties. The

south valley includes the communities from

Monmouth to Cottage Grove, including Linn,

Benton, and Lane counties.

The Willamette River and I–5 run through

the heart of the valley. The climate is heavily

influenced by the cool marine air of the Pacific,

which is an hour’s drive away. The mild temperatures

have proved to be as good for growing

grapes as they are for attracting visitors. People

from around the state and from around the

country enjoy retreating to the valley for mild

winters and warm summers.

THE GRAPES

The Willamette Valley has helped introduce

Oregon wines to the rest of the world, most

specifically, the quintessential Oregon wine:

Pinot noir. In April 2002 Bon Appetit stated:

“With its difficult growing requirements, Pinot

noir can be a very moody grape. Traditionally,

that has made the resulting wines, especially

those from Burgundy, very pricey. But Oregon’s

Willamette Valley has produced four outstanding

vintages (1998 through 2001) and has

emerged as the de facto—and affordable—

Pinot noir capital of the New World.”

Other varietals that grow well in the valley

include Pinot gris, Pinot blanc, Riesling,

Cabernet Sauvignon, Gewürztraminer, and

even Müller-Thurgau. To a lesser extent, warmweather

varietals, such as Marechal Foch,

Merlot, and Cabernet franc, have been known

to do well in the southern part of the valley.

WHEN TO VISIT

Harvest time statewide is around October

and many wineries have special holiday tasting

47

Willakenzie

• Lawton

Estate Map Detail


• Bergstrom

Yamhill Helvetia W

• Adelsheim V

99

• Laurel Ridge W

W

• •

Belle Pente V W • Ribbon Ridge V

Lange W V



Rex Hill V August Cellars/

• Torii Mor

Clare Cellars

Carlton

Erath V •

• Newberg

Domaine

Domaine

• Duck Pond Cellars

Drouhin

Serene V W • •

Dundee Springs &

Perry Bower V

Chateau

Dundee

Benoit

• •

• • • Argyle W

Archery Summit W

99 Sokol Blosser W

W

Winter’s Hill V

22 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


OREGON

Best Western

Columbia River Inn

Exceptional river & mountain view.

Guest-rooms located

in historic Cascade Locks.

Continental breakfast, indoor pool,

spa and fitness room.

Close to all Gorge attractions.

www.bwcolumbiariverinn.com

(800) 595-7108

events from November to January, but there

really isn’t a bad time to visit the valley, because

wine tasting can be enjoyed indoors even on

the rainiest afternoons.

TOURS/ROUTES

Washington County Scenic Loop, a 75-mile

loop through Tigard, Beaverton, Forest Grove,

and Hillsboro area includes 14 wineries.

Contact Convention and Visitors Bureau of

Washington County. (800-537-3149 or

www.countrysideofportland.com)

Hwy 99 West through Yamhill County,

southwest of Portland, takes visitors to the

heart of the north Willamette Valley’s wine

region. Approximately 100 wineries dot the

rolling hills around Newberg, Dundee,

Lafayette, McMinnville, and Amity. Contact the

Willamette Valley Wineries Association.

(503-646-2985 or www.willamettewines.com)

The Territorial Hwy route is near Eugene

and covers the south Willamette Valley

wineries.Visitors can take I–5 south of Eugene

to exit 162 at Curtin and follow Territorial Hwy

north toward Hwy 126, passing three wineries,

with two more near Elmira. Contact the

Convention and Visitors Bureau of Lane County

Oregon. (800-547-5445 or

www.travelLaneCounty.com)

The Spirited Urban Walking Tour in

Portland begins at Urban Wineworks, a tasting

room at 407 NW 16th and Flanders and owned

by Bishop Creek Farms in Yamhill, then goes

to a distillery, and a brewery. The Portland

Streetcar also helps shuttle visitors from point

A to point B to point C. Contact Urban

Wineworks. (503-226-9797)

AREA ATTRACTIONS

The Willamette Valley is an easily accessible

destination all year, especially since I–5 runs

right through the middle. During spring and

summer visit the many gardens in bloom with

iris, tulips, azaleas, and rhododendrons. Minor

league baseball is played in Portland, Salem, and

Eugene throughout the summer. Hundreds of

lakes and parks are open all year for swimming,

fishing, hiking, camping, and picnicking. During

the winter, snow bunnies find themselves at

home in the Cascade Mountains, where skiing

and snowboarding is about an hour’s drive away

from most valley towns.

UMPQUA VALLEY

I–5 continues its journey from the

Willamette Valley through the Land of

Umpqua, which is entirely in Douglas County

and includes such towns as Sutherlin,

Brandborg V W

Elkton •

38

River’s •

Edge

U mpqua River

Henry

9 Estate W


Hillcrest •

Palotai V & W •

Melrose V •


Champagne

Creek Cellars

Abacela W •

Winston

Girardet •

Wine Cellars


42

To

Coos Bay

UMPQUA

VALLEY

Business Name

Abbreviations

V = Vineyards

W = Winery

Roseburg, and Winston. The terrain rolls with

dozens of small hillsides—creating the

“hundred valleys of the Umpqua”—the soils

of which add to its grape-growing capabilities.

There are 10 wineries in this region, and

although that number doesn’t seem very high

compared with the Willamette Valley, it in no

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 23

5

99

MarshAnne

• Landing W

Sutherlin

N Fork Umpqu a

Roseburg

S Fork

Umpqua R

Cottage

Grove

ive r

River


OREGON

Wine Terminology

ACIDITY occurs naturally in grapes and indicates

the quality of tartness, sourness, and sharpness of a

wine. Acids in proper proportion give wine balance

and character. Generally, the cooler the region, the

higher the level of acid in the grapes.

APPELLATION a recognized wine growing region

governed by regulations established by its federal or

local government. In the United States, appellations

are referred to as American Viticultural Areas

(AVAs). In British Columbia, they’re referred to as

Designated Viticultural Areas (DVAs).

BALANCE the interplay between sugar, acid, tannin,

and alcohol. In a well-balanced wine, none of these

elements dominate the wine.

BODY the sensation of weight on the palate, ranging from light to heavy.

BRIX the measurement of sugar content in unfermented grape juice,

which is used to indicate the estimated alcohol a wine will produce on

fermentation.

DRY/OFF-DRY indicates a style of wine: no sugar = dry, a little

residual sugar = off-dry.

FERMENTATION (primary) the process by which grape juice

becomes wine: a chain reaction of chemical processes whereby sugars

in the grape juice are converted by the enzymes in yeasts into alcohol

and carbon dioxide. This process is called primary fermentation; some

wines undergo a secondary fermentation process.

FERMENTATION (secondary) also called malolactic fermentation, a

secondary fermentation turns malic acid (think apples) into lactic acid

(think cream, vanilla, butter, and milk) adding another dimension to

the wine. While all red wines undergo malolactic fermentation, white

wines do not. This is essentially a stylistic preference accorded the

winemaker, who may choose for the wine to undergo a full or partial

secondary fermentation or none at all.

FRUIT the single most important quality, it is the winemakers goal to

capture the true essence of the variety used.

ICEWINE is made from grapes frozen on the vine and then pressed

before they thaw. The juice from these grapes is very concentrated and

high in sugar and acid, with the resulting wines sweet, intense, and rich

in flavor with excellent aging potential.

LATE HARVEST grapes picked late in the season for maximum sugar

content and typically for sweet or dessert wines.

OAK wines aged or fermented in oak barrels take on toasty qualities and

flavors of butter and vanilla for white wines, coffee and tobacco for reds.

RESIDUAL SUGAR natural grape sugar that is either unfermented at the

end of the fermentation process or added back into the wine as with

dosage for sparkling wine. Residual sugar (r.s.) ranges from 0.1 to 0.2

percent in dry wines to as high as 28 to 30 percent in late-harvest wines.

STEEL wines fermented or aged in steel tanks emphasize fresh fruit in

clear bright flavors.

TANNIN comes from the skins, seeds, and stems of the grapes; adding

longevity, structure, and complexity to the wine.

VARIETAL refers to the type of wine grape variety: Merlot,

Chardonnay, etc.

VINIFERA premium wine grapes as opposed to table grapes. Vitis

vinifera is the vine species that produces wine grapes. ■

—Courtesy of the Washington Wine Commission.

(www.washingtonwine.org)

way diminishes the region’s standing in the

Oregon wine industry.

THE GRAPES

The Umpqua Valley is warmer and drier

than the Willamette Valley, but not as warm as

the Rogue Valley, so cool-weather and warmweather

varietals flourish in the area. All the

popular Pinots, Cabernets, and Rieslings are

grown in the Umpqua Valley, but such rare

varietals as Baco noir and Seyval blanc can also

be found there. Up and coming varietals in the

area include Tempranillo, Syrah, and Viognier.

WHEN TO VISIT

During the spring and fall, visitors who

drive from winery to winery in the Land of

Umpqua pass roadside produce stands, an

added treat to a day of wine tasting. Many of

the wineries are closed from late December

until mid-to-late January and a few are open by

appointment only, so call ahead. For links to all

things Umpqua, visit www.landofumpqua.com.

TOURS/ROUTES

The Umpqua Wine Tour Route starts about

5 miles south of Roseburg at exit 119 off I–5.

Head west toward Tenmile and pass three

wineries on roads just off this main artery.

Then head north toward Melrose and the

Garden Valley area to visit more, and finally

north along the Umpqua River to the final two

in Elkton. For a map and more information,

contact the Roseburg Visitors and Convention

Bureau. (800-444-9584)

AREA ATTRACTIONS

Historical districts, covered bridges, waterfalls,

recreational lakes, and the Seven Feathers

Hotel and Casino Resort in Canyonville all

await visitors to the Umpqua Valley. And

Wildlife Safari in Winston doesn’t have to be

fun just for the kids; drive through the 600-acre

park and see the exotic animals as they roam

freely in their natural habitats. Roseburg also is

the starting point for the 172 miles of the

Rogue–Umpqua National Scenic Byway.

24 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


OREGON

See All of Oregon

in Lane County

Savor the flavors of Lane County.

From wine to chocolate to

farmer’s markets and beyond.

Lane County’s culinary delights

spread from the Pacific Coast

to the Cascade Mountains.

For getaway packages and specials,

visit our Web site or call

(800) 547-5445.

Eugene OREGON

TravelLaneCounty.org

ROGUE VALLEY

Named for Oregon’s most famous wild

river, the Rogue Valley is bordered by the

Klamath Mountains to the west, the Cascade

Range to the east, and the Siskiyou Mountains

to the south, and includes the major towns

of Grants Pass, Medford, and Ashland. I–5

continues its journey from the Willamette and

Umpqua valleys south to the Rogue Valley and

is the main artery of the region. Within

Oregon’s oldest wine region, there are more

than 10 wineries and vineyards.

THE GRAPES

The Rogue Valley is warm and dry with

little influence from the cool marine air of the

Pacific. Some of the highest temperatures in

the western part of the state are recorded in the

cities of the Rogue Valley. Warm-weather varietals,

the kind that one might expect to see in

the Bordeaux region of France, grow well here.

The most popular varieties grown in the Rogue

Valley include Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon,

Chardonnay, and Pinot noir.

WHEN TO VISIT

October statewide is harvest time, and

there are several wine-related events from

March through July.

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 25


OREGON

Illinois

Riv

Rog u e

er

River

199

Cave

Junction

Bridgeview V •

• Bear Creek W

• Foris V

ILLINOIS

VALLEY

TOURS/ROUTES

The Oregon Wine and Farm Tour takes

visitors through wineries and farms throughout

Southern Oregon. For information, contact

RoxyAnn Winery. (541-776-2315 or

www.OregonWineandFarmTour.com)

AREA ATTRACTIONS

Southern Oregon is known for many

Wine Appreciation

T

HE

5

Applegate River

APPLEGATE

VALLEY

Grants Pass

• Del Rio W

Wooldridge John Michael

• Roxyann W

Creek W Champagne

Troon V Cellar

Medford

• Jacksonville

• Paschal W

238 •

• •

Applegate Eden Vale W Rising Sun Farms




5 • Ashland V

Valley View

The Academy

Ashland


Weisinger's of Ashland

S i s k i

y o u M

ENJOYMENT OF WINE is a very

personal thing.You don’t have to be an

expert, you just need to trust your own

taste. Each time you taste a new wine your awareness

of the character and subtle differences will be

expanded. Tasting wine is like a sport: the more

you practice the better you become. To enhance

your appreciation and enjoyment of wine, follow

the five simple steps below:

LOOK

The first step is to hold the glass by the stem and look through the wine

against a white background to enjoy the true color. The wine should be

clear, not hazy or cloudy. While contemplating the wine, notice whether

it’s thick or thin, whether the color is bright or mellow. White wines

range in color from a very faint almost clear to a golden yellow. Red

wines range in color from a dark, intense red to a very light pale red.

SWIRL

To get the full aroma of the wine, fill a large wine glass halfway and

swirl the wine around in the glass. This releases the aromas to the top

of the glass.

Rogue River

Bear Creek

t n s

ROGUE

VALLEY

Business Name

Abbreviations

V = Vineyards

W = Winery

things: Mt. Ashland and Ashland’s Oregon

Shakespeare Festival as well as the First Friday

Gallery Walk held rain or shine year-round.

Don’t miss historic Jacksonville and the Peter

Britt Music Festival, jet boat trips on the wildand-scenic

Rogue River, and the crown jewel

of the state—Crater Lake National Park. In

Medford, stroll through historic downtown.

Close by, you may visit an alpaca ranch, a “fiber

farm” where Angora goats are raised and the

Dogs For The Deaf Center in tiny Central Point.

In recent years, medical and health services

have become Medford’s leading industries. In

the picturesque Rogue Valley, visitors can enjoy

themselves any time of year.

APPLEGATE VALLEY

The Applegate Valley was long considered a

western sub-appellation of the Rogue Valley,

but in 2001, the valley was officially designated

as its own AVA. As I–5 heads south toward

California, it shifts to the east just south of

Grants Pass. Hwy 199 at Grants Pass heads

south too, but also west, pulling away from the

main interstate. Turn off Hwy 199 onto Hwy

238 and into the Applegate Valley. In this area

are several wineries with tasting rooms open

to the public. Head back to Hwy 199 and turn

southwesterly to Cave Junction and onto Hwy

46 to Holland Loop Road where you will find

three more wineries to visit.

THE GRAPES

The Applegate Valley is closer to the coast

range than the Rogue Valley so it is influenced

by the cool marine air, but it is still a very warm

region. Pinot noir, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot,

and Cabernet franc grow in the Applegate

Valley. The vineyards here often harvest at least

a week before the other vineyards statewide

because of the warm climate.

SMELL

Inhale and try to identify what you smell. Do you smell fruit or spices

Does it remind you of mom’s apple pie or a cobblestone street after a

rainfall You might find hints of familiar smells, including tobacco,

citrus,apple,chocolate,plums,pineapple,flowers,or raspberries.

TASTE

Roll the wine around in your mouth to reach all your taste buds. Then,

breathe air through your lips to bring up the aromas. If the wine makes

you pucker, it may be a little tart (high in acids) or tannic (think dry,

like banana skins and tea leaves); if it feels hot and burns a little, it may

have high alcohol content. If none of these elements overwhelms you, it

is very likely well-balanced. Notice how it feels in your mouth; this is

called the texture.

SPIT

It sounds funny and may make you a little uncomfortable, but if you are

tasting several wines, it is essential to spit. It provides you with the

opportunity to taste several wines in one sitting. If you are just trying a

few, go ahead and swallow. A wine that lingers in your mouth and throat

after you spit is a sign of good length and body. ■

—Courtesy of the Washington Wine Commission

(www.washingtonwine.org)

26 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


OREGON

OTHER AREA ATTRACTIONS

The most well-known attraction in this

neck of the woods is the Oregon Caves National

Monument on Hwy 46 east of Cave Junction.

The underground caves are a natural phenomenon

worth seeing, and above ground there are

hiking trails that meander through the

towering firs of an old-growth forest, which is

also worth exploring. Speaking of big trees, the

Redwoods are just a hop, skip, and a jump from

the Applegate Valley. Also worth investigating is

the Illinois River State Park (day-use area) and

Lake Selma Recreation Area. ■

OREGON WINERIES

see map on this page

COVE

GILSTRAP BROS. WINERY

541-568-4646

69789 Antles Lane. We are a small

boutique vineyard and winery located in

the picturesque community of Cove in

Northeast Oregon. We offer a beautiful

venue for weddings and events. Our tasting

room is open Saturday and Sunday noon to

5 P.M. through September. Our fall harvest

festival is the last Saturday of September.

COLUMBIA GORGE, OREGON

see map pg. 11

HOOD RIVER

PHEASANT VALLEY

VINEYARD & WINERY

541-387-3040/866-357-WINE

www.pheasantvalleywinery.com

email: wine@pheasantvalleywinery.com

3890 Acree Dr., Hood River, OR.

One mile south of the Hood River Airport

Welcome to Hood River Valley’s premier

winery. Our beautiful tasting room with a

view of Mount Hood features wine tasting

and gift items for your enjoyment. For tasting

or buying by the bottle or case, we feature

theses fine award-winning wines: Pinot noir,

Pinot gris, Gewürztraminer, Chardonnay,

Cabernet Sauvignon,Riesling,Syrah,Merlot,

and our special Pear Wine. Tastings Daily

11 A.M. to 6 P.M.

ROGUE & APPLEGATE

VALLEYS see map pg. 26

ASHLAND

WEISINGERS WINERY

541-488-5989

www.weisingers.com

CAVE JUNCTION

BRIDGEVIEW WINERY

877-273-4843

www.bridgeviewwine.com

FORIS WINERY

541-592-3752

www.foriswine.com

GOLD HILL

DEL RIO WINERY

541-855-2062

www.delriovineyards.com

WASHINGTON

Walla Walla

Zerba Cellars • Milton-Freewater

11

Pendleton

84

EAST

OREGON

WINERIES

204

La

Grande

237

Gilstrap

Bros. W


Cove

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 27

82


OREGON

ROGUE & APPLEGATE

VALLEYS (CONTINUED)

see map pg. 26

JACKSONVILLE

VALLEY VIEW WINERY

800-781-9463

www.valleyviewwinery.com

A place that boasts half of

Oregon’s six official wine

regions with dozens of

wineries offering awardwinning

Pinot Gris,

Merlot, Chardonnay

and Syrah wines...

A region that offers you a

dozen live theatre options

including America’s

premiere regional theatre

company...

Cities with year-round

music and art festivals

featuring world-class

entertainment and

quality art...

Farmers and crafters

that sell locally grown

food and specialty gifts...

Oh, and did we mention that

we are also the home of

Crater Lake National Park

SEE PAGE 29 FOR ANSWERS

MEDFORD

EDENVALE WINERY

866-512-2955

www.edenvalewines.com

UMPQUA VALLEY

see map pg. 23

ROSEBURG

CHAMPAGNE CREEK CELLARS

541-673-7901

www.champagnecreek.com

GIRARDET WINE CELLARS

541-679-7252

www.girardetwine.com

HILLCREST VINEYARD

541-673-3709

www.hillcrestvineyard.com

PALOTAI VINEYARD AND WINERY

541-464-0032

OAKLAND

MARSHANNE LANDING

541-459-8497

www.marshannelanding.com

WILLAMETTE VALLEY

see map pg. 22

GASTON

KRAMER VINEYARDS

503-662-4545 • www.kramerwine.com

26830 NW Olsen Rd. Gaston, OR 97119.

Open Hours: Noon to 5 P.M.March through

December, Daily June through September.

Trudy and Keith Kramer welcome you to our

friendly tasting room nestled in the foothills

of the Coast Range. Surrounded by majestic

fir, oak, and maple, our deck is very popular

for picnics. Wines include: Pinot noir, Pinot

gris, Dijon Chardonnay, Müller-Thurgau,

Merlot,Syrah,Carmine,Sparkling,and Dessert.

Go online or call to order a full-color

Guide to our special part of Oregon.

Toll-free 800-448-4856

www.SeeSouthernOregon.com

28 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


OREGON

OREGON CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Call in advance for dates and locations of these events. Individual wineries are

likely to host additional events. Contact local chambers of commerce and

visitors bureaus for more information.

FEBRUARY

Newport - Seafood and Wine Festival

February 24–26, 2006

800-262-7844

MARCH

McMinnville - Wine & Food Classic

503-472-4033

www.macwfc.org

MAY

Forest Grove - Tour and Taste

Monthly on a Saturday

503-992-9533

Bandon - Irish Festival

Memorial Day Weekend

541-347-9616

Washington County - Wineology Weekend

Memorial Day Weekend

800-537-3149

www.gatewaytooregonwines.com

Willamette Wineries - Memorial Day

Weekend in Wine Country

Willamette Valley Wineries Association

503-646-2985

Gold Beach - Wild Rivers Coast Seafood,

Art & Wine Festival

541-247-0923

JUNE

Carlton - Oregon Wine & Art Auction

AnneAmie Winery

June, 2006

503-883-0323

JULY

Eugene - Art & the Vineyard

Maude Kerns Art Center

July 1–4, 2005

541-345-1571

Roseburg - Umpqua Valley

Arts & Wine Festival

July 16 & 17, 2005

541-672-2532

McMinnville - International

Pinot Noir Celebration

July 29–31, 2005

800-775-4762

Eugene - Winetasia - Silvan

Ridge\Hinman Vineyards - Children’s

Miracle Network Fundraiser

July 30, 2005

541-686-6456

Rockaway Beach - Wine, Cheese

& Jazz Festival

503-355-8108

AUGUST

Grants Pass - Winemaker Dinner

Troon Vineyard

August 13, 2005

541-479-5258

SEPTEMBER

Medford - Taste of Harry & David

September 3 & 4, 2005

541-864-4268

Medford - World of Wine

Del Rio Vineyards

September 9 & 10, 2005

541-770-7933

Salem\Turner - Oregon Grape Stomp

Championship & Harvest Celebration

September 24 & 25, 2005

800-344-9463

www.willamettevalleyvineyards.com

OCTOBER

Medford - Harvest Festival

Jackson County Expo

October 1 & 2, 2005

541-774-8270

NOVEMBER

Welches - Resort at the Mountain

Wine & Art Festival

November 12 & 13, 2005

800-669-7666

Washington County - Wineology Weekend

Thanksgiving Weekend

www.gatewaytooregonwines.com

Willamette Wineries - Wine

Country Thanksgiving

Winery Association

Thanksgiving Weekend

503-646-2985

Of the six official wine

regions in Oregon, half are

located in Southern Oregon.

Our 80-page, full color

Guide offers you detailed

maps and information on all

our wineries. Can’t wait for a

Guide Go online to tour

our best wineries.

Southern Oregon Winery Assoc.

www.sorwa.org

Umpqua Valley Winegrowers Assoc.

www.umpquavalleywineries.org

WINERIES

Bridgeview Winery

877-273-4843

www.bridgeviewwine.com

Champagne Creek Cellars

541-673-7901

www.champagnecreek.com

Del Rio Winery

541-855-2062

www.delriovineyards.com

EdenVale Winery

866-512-2955

www.edenvalewines.com

Foris Winery

541-592-3752

www.foriswine.com

Girardet Wine Cellars

541-679-7252

www.girardetwine.com

Hillcrest Vineyard

541-673-3709

www.hillcrestvineyard.com

MarshAnne Landing

541-459-8497

www.marshannelanding.com

Palotai Vineyard and Winery

541-464-0032

Valley View Winery

800-781-9463

www.valleyviewwinery.com

Weisingers Winery

541-488-5989

www.weisingers.com

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 29


OREGON

WILLAMETTE VALLEY

(CONTINUED) see map pg. 22

HILLSBORO

OAK KNOLL WINERY

503-648-8198 • www.oakknollwinery.com

29700 SW Burkhalter Rd. Hillsboro, OR

97123. Located in the beautiful northern

Willamette Valley, Oak Knoll is one of the

oldest wineries in the state and remains

family owned and operated. Producing a

large variety of award-winning wines, we

have a wine for every taste, every palate, and

every occasion. Private tours by appointment.

May through September: 11 A.M. to 6 P.M

(Monday through Friday) 11 A.M. to 5 P.M.

(Saturday through Sunday). October through

April: 11 A.M. to 5 P.M. (Open daily). We are

closed on New Year’s Day, Easter,

Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.

WILLAMETTE VALLEY WINERIES ASSOCIATION

PO Box 25162, Portland, OR 97298

503-646-2985

www.willamettewines.com

WILLAMETTE VALLEY VISITORS ASSOCIATION

800-526-2256 / 866-548-5018

www.willamettevalley.org

CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

OF WASHINGTON COUNTY

800-537-3149

www.countrysideofportland.com

SALEM CONVENTION & VISITORS ASSOCIATION

1313 Mill St. SE

Salem, OR 97301

800-874-7012 • www.scva.org

CONVENTION & VISITOR ASSOCIATION

OF LANE COUNTY

115 W Eighth, Ste. 190

Eugene, OR 97401

800-547-5445

www.travellanecounty.com

ROSEBURG AREA VISITORS CENTER

410 SE Spruce

Roseburg, OR 97470

800-444-9584

www.visitroseburg.com

SOUTHERN OREGON VISITORS ASSOCIATION

800-448-4856 • www.sova.org

VISITOR INFORMATION

SOUTHERN OREGON WINERY ASSOCIATION

www.sorwa.org

GRANTS PASS VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER

1995 NW Vine St.

Grants Pass, OR 97526

800-547-5927

www.visitgrantspass.org

MEDFORD VISITOR INFORMATION CENTER

1314 Center Dr., Ste. E

Medford, OR 97501

800-469-6307

www.visitmedford.org

ASHLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

110 E Main St.

Ashland, OR 97520

541-482-3486

www.ashlandchamber.com

OREGON WINE AND FARM TOUR

RoxyAnn Winery

3285 Hillcrest Rd.

Medford, OR 97504

541-776-2315

www.oregonfarmtours.com

UMPQUA VALLEY WINEGROWERS ASSOCIATION

3829 Colonial Rd.

Roseburg, OR 97470

541-673-5323

www.umpquawines.com

MOLOLLA

MARQUAM HILL VINEYARDS

503-829-6677

www.marquamhillvineyards.biz

Beautiful 60-acre estate.A family-run vineyard

founded on a dream of vivifying estate-grown

grapes into premium, high-quality, varietal

wine. Proudly presents Pinot noir, Cabernet,

Chardonay, Reisling, Gewürtztramir, Muller

Thrugan, Pinot gris, Sparkling Chardonay, Late

Harvest Chardonnay, and Pinot Port. Tasting

room and gift shop. Open daily Memorial Day

through October 10 A.M. to 6 P.M.Winter

Weekends only 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.

RICKREAL

EOLA HILLS WINE CELLARS, INC

503-623-2405 • www.eolahillswinery.com

501 S. Pacific Hwy W Rickreall, OR 97371.

Selected by Wine & Spirits magazine as one of

the United States’ Top 20 Producers of Wines

of Value. Award-winning Pinot noir, Pinot

gris, Chardonnay, Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet,

Zinfandel, and Dessert wines. RV friendly.

Home of “Oregon Wine Country’s Best Sunday

Brunch.”Open Daily 10 A.M. to 5 P.M.

YAMHILL

WILLAKENZIE ESTATE

888-953-9463 • www.willakenzie.com

email: tastepinot@willakenzie.com

19143 NE Laughlin Rd.Yamhill, OR 97148.

WillaKenzie Estate is a family-owned winery

dedicated to making great wines from all the

Pinot varietals including Pinot gris, Pinot

blanc, and a selection of vineyard-designated

Pinot noirs.Visit the winery and sample

these acclaimed wines in a delightful tasting

30 Northwest Wine Country 2005/2006


OREGON

room that overlooks spectacular hillside

vineyards. Hours: Memorial Day through

September; open daily 12 to 5 P.M. Otherwise:

open 12 to 5 P.M.on Friday,Saturday,and

Sunday or by appointment.

WHERE TO STAY

CASCADE LOCKS

BEST WESTERN COLUMBIA RIVER INN

541-374-8777/800-595-7108

bwcolumbiariverinn.com

HOOD RIVER

COLUMBIA GORGE HOTEL

541-386-5566/800-345-1921

www.ColumbiaGorgeHotel.com

SOUTHERN OREGON

WINDMILL INNS

800-547-4747 • www.windmillinns.com

Ashland 541-482-8310

Medford 541-779-0050

Roseburg 541-673-0901

We’ve got you covered for your Southern

Oregon Wine Tours! Welcome to Windmill

Inns & Suites, where 110% hospitality is

guaranteed! Complimentary full breakfast,

fitness room, and so much more!

110% Hospitality Guaranteed!

Complimentary...

• Full continental Breakfast -or- choose

to have our lighter “Windmill Inn Good

Morning” TM featuring hot beverage, juice,

muffin and newspaper delivered to your

room each morning

• Children under 18 stay free in adult’s room

• Pets welcome at no additional charge

• Fitness Room

• Coffee and apples 24 hours a day

• Use of guest bicycles

• “Best Seller” lending library

• Local phone calls

• Cable TV with premium

movie channel

• Airport shuttle in

Medford and Ashland

Enjoy Wine Country...

When your travels take you

to Southern Oregon stay with

Windmill Inns. View the splendor

of cascading rivers, take the family

on “safari”, ski, fish,

golf, or even

experience a

Shakespearean Play.

Whatever your

plans; there is a

Windmill Inn

nearby . . .

Ashland - Exit 14

(541) 482-8310

Medford - Exit 30

(541) 779-0050

Roseburg-Exit 125

(541) 673-0901

WINDMILL INNS

(800) 547-4747

www.windmillinns.com

2005/2006 Northwest Wine Country 31

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