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TANIA GARBE<br />

<strong>portfolio</strong><br />

WORK SAMPLES | GRID Impact


EDUCATION + FIELDWORK<br />

UC Berkeley 2003<br />

BA Architecture<br />

BA Psychology<br />

UT Austin 2009<br />

Masters in Architecture<br />

My experience in social<br />

impact and public interest<br />

design, has included<br />

working with Alejandro<br />

Aravena in Chile, leading a<br />

Design-Build program in<br />

the Himalayas of Ladakh,<br />

field research for a Care<br />

Center in the Gobi Desert of<br />

Mongolia, building a straw<br />

bale Day Care on a N.<br />

Cheyenne Indian reservation<br />

in Montana, planning<br />

for an orphanage bakery in<br />

Haiti, and founding a social<br />

enterprise in NYC.<br />

Social<br />

Edu + Fieldwork Impact<br />

Lame Deer, MT<br />

UC Berkeley<br />

Arcosanti<br />

UT Austin<br />

Santiago<br />

New York<br />

Haiti<br />

Ladakh<br />

Byankhongor<br />

Sydney


I am the founder + director<br />

of Design With Benefits, a<br />

social enterprise at the<br />

intersection of design and<br />

social impact. We curate<br />

design from small businesses<br />

that are making a<br />

difference environmentally,<br />

socially, and ethically.<br />

Products can be filtered by<br />

their positive impact, in<br />

categories like environment,<br />

poverty, education,<br />

equity, and animal welfare.<br />

Our creative director and I<br />

are jointly responsible for<br />

all of the web and graphic<br />

design throughout the site.<br />

In 2012, we won a grant to<br />

participate in Start-Up<br />

Chile, a well respected<br />

international tech accelerator<br />

in Santiago.<br />

Design With Benefits Social<br />

Enterprise


As a social enterprise, an<br />

important part of our<br />

business model is donating<br />

a portion of our net profits<br />

to social programs. These<br />

are typically creative<br />

non-profits and organizations<br />

which are welding<br />

design as a tool to solve<br />

social or environmental<br />

issues.<br />

Each month we feature 3 of<br />

these organizations and<br />

our visitors vote on which<br />

they would like to see<br />

receive our next donation.<br />

The organization with the<br />

most votes receives 7% of<br />

our total net profits from<br />

the following two months.<br />

Design With Benefits Social<br />

Enterprise


Right:<br />

I created all the graphics<br />

and marketing materials for<br />

Design With Benefits, like<br />

the Gift Guide shown here,<br />

featuring product design<br />

that gives back.<br />

Far Right:<br />

The Dish is a section of<br />

Design With Benefits<br />

dedicated to news in the<br />

realm of public interest<br />

design. Here we feature<br />

stories, projects, and<br />

organizations that are<br />

using design for social<br />

impact.<br />

Design With Benefits Social<br />

Enterprise


At ELEMENTAL in Chile, I<br />

worked on several low<br />

income housing reconstruction<br />

projects following<br />

the major earthquake of<br />

2010. Alejandro Aravena’s<br />

philosophy is to select sites<br />

closer to the city center,<br />

spending more of the<br />

budget on a site with direct<br />

access to social services of<br />

the city.<br />

Next, instead of building a<br />

cheaply constructed larger<br />

home, we built 1/2 of a high<br />

quality one, specifically the<br />

portions that are difficult<br />

for families to build on their<br />

own. When they are able to<br />

afford it, they can add on to<br />

their homes in various ways<br />

to complete the footprint.<br />

Alejandro Aravena<br />

ELEMENTAL<br />

Social Housing<br />

TYPOLOGY 5 AS BUILT<br />

TYPOLOGY 5 WITH ADDITIONS


Building only half of each<br />

house from the outset, and<br />

allowing families to design<br />

and construct the remainder,<br />

assures that housing<br />

developments are vibrant,<br />

not sterile or monotonous.<br />

Families take pride and<br />

ownership of houses which<br />

they have helped build.<br />

Each housing development<br />

includes one or more<br />

community centers. These<br />

are public buildings<br />

available for various shared<br />

uses, such as neighborhood<br />

meetings, gatherings,<br />

volunteer medical and<br />

dental services, and child<br />

care, for example.<br />

Alejandro Aravena<br />

ELEMENTAL<br />

Social Housing<br />

COMMUNITY CENTERS


I created a construction and<br />

maintenance manual for<br />

new homeowners with<br />

step-by-step graphic<br />

instructions to clearly and<br />

simply communicate often<br />

complex info.<br />

Alejandro Aravena<br />

ELEMENTAL<br />

(a)<br />

(b) (c) (d)<br />

The construction portion of<br />

the manual includes<br />

detailed descriptions and<br />

graphic depictions of<br />

construction steps for<br />

various additions.<br />

The maintenance manual<br />

lays out a schedule which<br />

owners can follow to<br />

ensure proper upkeep and<br />

timely repairs on their first<br />

home.<br />

Social Housing<br />

(e) (f) (g) (h)


We ran workshops to show<br />

families various options for<br />

the portion of their homes<br />

they build themselves.<br />

Workshops covered design<br />

possibilities, construction<br />

steps, and the do's + don’ts<br />

of building additions.<br />

I designed and produced a<br />

template for making a scale<br />

paper mock up of a housing<br />

block that participants<br />

could cut and fold from a<br />

single sheet of paper, and<br />

then draw on to test out<br />

various possibilities.<br />

Alejandro Aravena<br />

ELEMENTAL<br />

Social Housing<br />

CUT<br />

FACADE<br />

FOLD FORWARD<br />

FOLD BACKWARD<br />

FOLD 180˚ AND PASTE


Alejandro Aravena<br />

Santiago, Chile<br />

Workshop participants test<br />

out various facade options,<br />

building additions, and<br />

green areas.<br />

Social Housing


In 2014, I co-founded<br />

MAKINGOODESIGN (with<br />

Rachel Crawford of<br />

desigNYC). Held during<br />

NYCxDesign (a city-wide<br />

celebration of design in<br />

NYC), the event series aims<br />

to celebrate and honor the<br />

innovative people and<br />

organizations in NYC using<br />

design for social good.<br />

The series is now in its 2nd<br />

year and working in collaboration<br />

with AIANY’s New<br />

York Emerging Architects<br />

Committee + AFHny.<br />

MAKINGOODESIGN Social<br />

Impact


Pop-Up Shop<br />

A 3-day pop-up shop of<br />

socially conscious designs<br />

at the BKLYN DESIGNS Fair<br />

in DUMBO. Passers-by were<br />

invited to participate in<br />

NYC’s first “Bench Diary”.<br />

Panel Discussion<br />

Co-hosted with Pratt<br />

Institute and entitled New<br />

Models in the Business of<br />

Design for Social Change.<br />

Moderated by Wendy<br />

Goodman, Design Editor of<br />

New York Magazine.<br />

Good-Maker Awards<br />

Party celebrating NYC’s<br />

design-for-good organizations,<br />

+ the winners of our<br />

Good Maker Awards. Profits<br />

made from live illustrated<br />

sketchbooks go towards NY<br />

social impact initiatives.<br />

MAKINGOODESIGN Social<br />

Impact


NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION<br />

Jessica Braun and I spent 6<br />

weeks of fieldwork in<br />

Mongolia, designing a Care<br />

Center for disabled<br />

children. Our site was a<br />

town on the edge of the<br />

Gobi desert, a 13-hour drive<br />

on dirt roads from the<br />

capital. Our charge was to<br />

design a facility to support<br />

both disabled children and<br />

the parents struggling to<br />

care for them.<br />

The end product was a<br />

30-page book we produced<br />

to inform and educate the<br />

local population on the<br />

design and construction of<br />

the proposed building,<br />

while garnering international<br />

support to fund the<br />

project. A solo exhibit of<br />

our work took place at the<br />

University of Texas, Austin.<br />

Disabled Children<br />

Bayankhongor, Mongolia<br />

Care Center<br />

For<br />

Монгол Улс


The book we produced for<br />

this Mongolian community<br />

outlined the details of our<br />

design, and graphically<br />

depicted how to use<br />

inexpensive and abundant<br />

materials such as rammed<br />

earth, glass bottles and<br />

gabion construction, as<br />

well as other applicable<br />

sustainable building<br />

practices.<br />

The design was largely<br />

driven by harsh local conditions<br />

including high winds,<br />

debilitating dust storms,<br />

high-altitude desert, very<br />

little ground water + no<br />

vegetation.<br />

Disabled Children<br />

Bayankhongor, Mongolia<br />

Care Center<br />

For<br />

evening light grazes the floor of a ger<br />

low-angle evening light due to unobstructed horizon<br />

same light condition recreated<br />

construction detail<br />

Гэр Ger Light<br />

The construction of the ger<br />

allows stack ventilation by raising<br />

the felt covering in warm<br />

weather. This functional<br />

modification has the added<br />

benefit of capturing the grazing<br />

light of Mongolia’s long summer<br />

evenings. The design of the Care<br />

Center features low windows that<br />

will wash the floor with light and<br />

illuminate the realm of children.<br />

raised felt flaps admit both air and light<br />

Чулуун хана Gabion Walls<br />

Portions of the perimeter fence will be gabion walls.<br />

Rocks are plentiful and free in Bayankhongor, especially<br />

at the site of the new Center. Wire mesh is used to<br />

create 80 by 30 cm baskets that can be filled with rocks.<br />

These baskets are then stacked like bricks, one course<br />

overlapping the next to form a wall. The rocks will<br />

collect heat from the sun during the day and provide a<br />

warm place for a bench.<br />

river rocks in BK<br />

site cross section<br />

Book Pages: Ger Light (left) + Gabion Construction (right)<br />

80 cm<br />

wire mesh<br />

30cm


Behavioral Design<br />

The Center’s program<br />

addresses the physical and<br />

emotional needs of the<br />

children, while educating<br />

their parents on proper<br />

care.<br />

Countering dust storms,<br />

wind, and long winters, the<br />

design attempts to mediate<br />

the extremes of the<br />

Mongolian experience.<br />

The intimacy and warmth<br />

of the Mongolian hearth<br />

offers respite from the<br />

harsh Gobi landscape,<br />

while vernacular, nomadic<br />

building traditions are<br />

incorporated into the<br />

existing Soviet-influenced<br />

infrastructure.<br />

Disabled Children<br />

Bayankhongor, Mongolia<br />

Care Center<br />

For<br />

Care Center Plan<br />

men’s<br />

side<br />

altar<br />

hearth<br />

door<br />

women’s<br />

side<br />

Mongolian Ger (yurt)<br />

Зуух<br />

Hearth<br />

The hearth is the locus of ger life. Warmth<br />

through long winters and food preparation are<br />

not its only functions. Life’s daily rituals, from<br />

household chores to tea drinking, happen here.<br />

Likewise in the Care Center, the hearth will<br />

provide residents and visitors with a warm,<br />

social space. As the heart of the building, the<br />

hearth occupies the center of the main activity<br />

room around which children play and group<br />

functions are held.<br />

Book Pages: Hearth (left) + Typical ger (right)


Extensive in-country field<br />

research led us to discover<br />

untapped resources such as<br />

a local sewing collective that<br />

generates heaps of beautiful<br />

fabric scraps we incorporated<br />

into our design:<br />

The courtyard is enclosed by<br />

a fence welded from local<br />

scrap rebar. Each bay is<br />

designed with 2 u-sections<br />

for children to attach small<br />

art projects utilizing the<br />

fabric scraps.<br />

The bright panels catch the<br />

frequent wind, acting as a<br />

colorful marker for the<br />

Center, and record the<br />

children passing through its<br />

doors. The design was<br />

inspired by local rock shrines<br />

that are draped in blue silk.<br />

Disabled Children<br />

Bayankhongor, Mongolia<br />

Care Center<br />

For<br />

Xашаа<br />

location in plan<br />

15cm<br />

100cm<br />

Fence Design<br />

The fence surrounding the care center will be<br />

welded from local scrap rebar. Each bay has 2<br />

u-sections where children can attach ribbon + cloth<br />

panels. These small art projects will utilize fabric<br />

scraps generated by the Sewing Ger and give<br />

children pride in their contribution to the fence.<br />

The fence will constantly change as pieces are<br />

added and removed. The bright panels will catch<br />

the wind-- acting as a colorful marker for the center<br />

and as a record of the children that pass through its<br />

doors. The design was inspired by local ovoos (rock<br />

shrines) to which Mongolians often tie silk scarves.<br />

60cm<br />

18cm<br />

rebar<br />

fabric scraps<br />

75cm<br />

5cm<br />

10cm<br />

Concept Diagrams<br />

south wall -<br />

Thermal mass provides seating, storage<br />

and visual interest.<br />

solar orientation -<br />

Indoor + outdoor play spaces capture<br />

southern light and warmth.<br />

west wall -<br />

Frames views while blocking wind<br />

and dust.<br />

core -<br />

Services grouped in a central core.<br />

Book Pages: Fence Design (left) + Concept Diagrams (right)<br />

wnw<br />

w<br />

wnw<br />

nw<br />

nw<br />

nnw<br />

nnw<br />

heat wall -<br />

Gabion cavity water-wall<br />

provides radiant heat .<br />

n<br />

s<br />

nne<br />

sse<br />

courtyard -<br />

ne<br />

se<br />

ene<br />

e<br />

ese<br />

Building shields courtyard from<br />

dominant western winds.


I co-founded and led an<br />

academic design-build<br />

program in India for 26<br />

students of Portland State<br />

University and UT Austin.<br />

Built upon my work at the<br />

Druk White Lotus School<br />

the previous year, we<br />

worked closely with the<br />

school’s teachers and Arup<br />

Associates to design and<br />

construct a greenhouse,<br />

tensile outdoor classrooms,<br />

a traditional yak hair<br />

nomadic dwelling, and<br />

willow shade structures for<br />

this small Buddhist primary<br />

school in the Indian<br />

Himalayas.<br />

Druk White Lotus<br />

School:Ladakh<br />

India Design Build


Right:<br />

We modified an existing<br />

structure into a greenhouse<br />

that included<br />

compost bins, shelving for<br />

seedlings, gravity fed drip<br />

irrigation, and a space for<br />

informal classroom lessons.<br />

Far Right:<br />

We employed popular<br />

superheros in a series of<br />

comic book style lessons to<br />

explain the sustainable<br />

features of the greenhouse<br />

and their school.<br />

Druk White Lotus<br />

School:Ladakh<br />

India Design Build


With the help of Ladakhi<br />

nomads, we procured and<br />

erected an authentic rebo,<br />

or traditional yak-hair<br />

nomadic dwelling, teaching<br />

students about a<br />

rapidly vanishing way of<br />

life. The rebo included an<br />

elaborate sunken stone<br />

foundation with shelving,<br />

traditional hearth, altar, and<br />

food storage areas.<br />

A celebration was held<br />

where the rebo was consecrated<br />

and students were<br />

led inside to learn about<br />

this ancient way of life<br />

directly from Ladakhi<br />

nomads.<br />

Druk White Lotus<br />

School:Ladakh<br />

India Design Build


This lamp was inspired by<br />

the desire to create something<br />

new from the used<br />

cutting blades that collect<br />

in architecture studios. It is<br />

made from 150 discarded<br />

blades, arranged so that<br />

the light illuminates the<br />

negative space between<br />

blades.<br />

150<br />

Sharp Lamp Exacto Discarded<br />

Blades


I have a strong background in<br />

psychology and behavioral<br />

science, including research. I<br />

completed my BA in Psychology<br />

from UC Berkeley in 2003<br />

Relevant Coursework in<br />

Behavioral Science:<br />

Physical Anthropology<br />

Archaeology<br />

Brain, Mind & Behavior<br />

Socio/Cultural Anthropology<br />

Cognitive Science<br />

Buddhist Psychology<br />

Clinical Psychology<br />

Exploring the Brain<br />

Cognitive Neuroscience<br />

Cultural Psychology<br />

Social + Cultural Factors in<br />

Design<br />

Statistical Analysis<br />

Behavioral Science Psychology<br />

Cognition + Action Lab | Lab Assistant<br />

In 2000, I was a research assistant in the lab of Dr.<br />

Richard Ivry, Director of the Institute of Cognitive<br />

and Brain Sciences, and Vice-Chair of the Department<br />

of Psychology UC Berkeley.<br />

I conducted experiments on Stimulus-Response<br />

learning and Implicit Learning in humans, while<br />

collecting and organizing data for review. Our aim<br />

was to determine whether learning in serial<br />

reaction time tasks is predominantly stimulusbased<br />

or response-based.<br />

Napa State Mental Hospital | Intern<br />

I held a one-year mental health internship at the<br />

Napa State Hospital in California, the 2nd largest<br />

forensic psychiatric hospital in the country.<br />

Napa State Hospital is classified as a medium<br />

security inpatient hospital, where 75% of the<br />

patients are hospitalized under criminal commitments<br />

(Not Guilty By Reason of Insanity NGRI)<br />

Treatment is based on a recovery model using<br />

biopsychosocial rehabilitation principles. I worked<br />

with patients on various pro-social activities.<br />

Susannah Paletz | Research Assistant<br />

Assisted in research which looked at differences<br />

in the definition, value, and expression of<br />

creativity across cultures.<br />

Humberto Cavallin | Research Assistant<br />

Assisted in research which explored the role<br />

that architectural models (both physical +<br />

digital) have in the framing and solving of<br />

design problems.


Thank You.<br />

tania@designwithbenefits.com<br />

I would absolutely love to work at GRID Impact. I haven’t been able to stop thinking about it since I found the job listing! Tania Garbe

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