Ordinary Differential Equations, ODE, Math 3301 ... - Lamar University

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Ordinary Differential Equations, ODE, Math 3301 ... - Lamar University

Ordinary Differential Equations, ODE, Math 3301All information is subject to change. Attend all classes to be informed of the latest. Ifyou give me your email I will notify you when possible. A web site for the course is underconstruction: http://www.math.lamar.edu/faculty/maesumi/ode3301.html.Additional resources available at http://www.math.lamar.edu/faculty/maesumi/list.htmlWhy not to delay differential equations to the last semester before graduation:1- Prerequisites: Math courses are like links in a chain. Once the chain is broken andtime gap introduced between successive courses then additional time and energy has tobe spent to repair the chain. Normally you are to take calculus 1 and 2 in the freshmanyear and calculus 3, linear algebra, and differential equations by the fall of junior year. Ifyou wait until the very end to take ODE then it generally means that you have been outof practice with math for two years. This will create substantial problems, now you haveto review algebra, trig, and calculus to be up to speed with everyone else. The negativeeffect on class is that if the remedial items are not reviewed then students feel the lecturesare too fast, and if they are reviewed then the complaint shifts to statements about lackof interesting material in the course.2- Relevance: If ODE can be delayed to the last semester before graduation then it looks asif the course were not necessary. But every motion is a solution of a differential equation,so every area of science depends on ODE. In other words an ODE is the mathematicaldescription of the law of evolution of a system. The negative effect of delaying this courseon the class is that students who decided to postpone this course may portray it as anartificial roadblock fabricated by the instructor.Coordinates: MATH 3301, Summer I 2009, M-F 8-9:30, June 4 -July 9, Lucas 113.Contact Information: Instructor: Mohsen Maesumi, Room: Lucas 206.Monitored contact line is the e-mail address given in class:Other contact lines are not monitored regularly.If you are coming to office consider bringing exams, notebooks, and supporting material.If you want to leave a message on phone (8766) make it brief and speak clearly. Send yourmessage again by email. Keep a copy of each e-mail. If you do not get a reply within onebusiness day re-send the message. Write ODE in the Subject line and make sure to signthe e-mail by writing your full name.Office Hours: M-F 9:30-11:30. If door is locked knock and wait 30 seconds.Exams and Grading:Monday June 8, quiz on differentiation and integration formulas 10%, 45 min.Monday June 15, 1st test, 30%, 90 min.Monday June 29, 2nd test, 30%, 90 min.Thursday July 9, 3rd test, 30%, 90 min.Tests are sectional. Even though we do not have a cumulative exam some basic conceptsdo show up throughout semester. Students need to know all of the differentiation andintegration formulas and methods on all tests. Low grade on the quiz is a major red flag.Grade scale: A ≥ 90 > B ≥ 80 > C ≥ 70 > D ≥ 60.


Drop Dates: June 15, 25. Get a receipt. There is a maximum-6-drop policy.Text: Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems, by William E.Boyce, Richard C. DiPrima. 8 or 9-th edition.Course Objectives: Successful completion of this course means the students will1. Sketch direction fields and interpret solution behavior for the sketch.2. Solve first order differential equations and use them to model certain physical situationssuch as mixing problems, population dynamics and falling bodies.3. Solve homogeneous and nonhomogeneous second order differential equations and usethem to investigate vibration problems.4. Solve differential equations using Laplace transforms.5. Solve systems of differential equations and sketch the phase portrait for the system.Catalog Course Description:First order equations: modeling and population dynamics, stability, existence and uniquenesstheorem for nonlinear equations, Euler’s method. Second order equations: nonlinearequations via reductions methods, variation of parameters, forced mechanical vibrations,resonance and beat. Laplace Transform: general forcing functions, the convolution integral.Systems of ODEs: eigenvalues and phase plane analysis.Prerequisites and Audience: Calculus II + 1.5 hours of lecture + 4 hours of study perday, if you got a A in calculus II last semester. Course is for math, engineering, physics,and computer science.Test Email: All students are REQUIRED to have a working e-mail address and MUSTsend a test e-mail within three days. Send the test email as:To: email address given in class.Subject: ODEFor text write your information as followsFirst and Last name:Particular circumstances (add any pertinent information I need to know about)Information on the last four math courses: course title/date/university/gradee.g., Calculus 1, Fall 2008, TAMU, BTo protect your personal e-mail address you may arrange for a disposable e-mail addressand give that to me. Also remember that Lamar assigns you an e-mail address when youregister. Every email must contain first and last name as well as course title.Absence and Exam Make Up Policy: If you are absent from an exam let me knowas soon as possible and be prepared to show written proof of emergency. An individualdecision will be made in each case. July 3rd is a holiday.Calculator Policy: You are allowed to use a basic scientific calculator on all tests. Basiccalculators cost about $10-$30, have few lines of display, are not capable of drawing graphs,solving equations, differentiating, or integrating. Use of an advanced calculator will reduceyour exam grade by 50 points. You do need to purchase and practice your calculatorearly on. Do keep the manual or find its web site.

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