JULY EDITION

eight2o

4

WHAT WE COULD DO

BETTER

Requirements for site

notice boards

6

YOUNG PEOPLE

How we can protect young

people on our works

7

IN THE COURTS

Latest environmental

prosecution

8

TOPIC OF THE MONTH

Working near watercourses

10

HAND ARM VIBRATION

How to protect yourself

11

CONTACT DERMATITIS

How to prevent this

CONTENTS

12

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Basingstoke CHP

14 16

CA TRAINING

Silt buster training

SMB REPORTING

Latest SHE statistics

18

SAFETY ALERTS

Latest safety alerts for

dissemination


SHE NOTICE-BOARD REQUIREMENTS

We need to ensure that the relevant information

is displayed in our compounds and welfare

cabins, to ensure the right message is recieved

by all personnel.

We understand that space can be limited and

so we have put together a guide for different

types of sites.

Templates are available - speak to the SHE

Team to get this

WHAT

WE

COULD

DO

BETTER

MANDATORY REQUIREMENTS

• CSIM Escalation Chart

• IEMP Poster (if applicable )

• Site Map (with environmental constraints)

• Map showing directions to nearest hospital

• First Aider details

• F10

• Eight2¬O H&S Policy

• Eight2O Environment Policy

• Eight2O Sustainability Policy/ Poster

• HSE Poster

NOTE - smaller schemes with small cabins or no welfare do not need to display this, but must have

access to this

Other things to consider

• Communication updates/ newsletter

• Recent Toolbox Talks

• Insurance certificates

• Environmental Posters (search ENV POS on twexnet)

• TOCOP (if required)

• Top 5 hazards


YOUNG

PEOPLE

ON OUR

WORKS

eight2O have a growing number of ‘Young Person’s’ (over school

leaving age, but not yet 18) working across its sites. We must

ensure that we are managing their site involvement and protect

them from potential hazards.

It is generally accepted that a ‘Young Person’ will not have the

same level of hazard awareness as others in your team. Therefore,

the following must be considered before putting them to work;

• The layout of the workplace;

• How they will handle work equipment;

• How the work and processes are organised;

• The extent of health and safety training needed/recieved

• Risks from particular agents, processes and work.

Young Persons: An Assessment of Risk

A risk assessment covering all activities must be carried

out before allowing a young person to work on your site.

Once complete this must be reviewed by your H&S Advisor.

When completing this, consider;

• The inexperience and immaturity of the young person;

• Their lack of awareness of risk;

• The nature and exposure to COSHH;

• The range and use of tools and equipment

• Any health and safety training e.g. site induction and TBT’s

• The tasks they are expected to carry out.

For more information speak to your H&S Advisor and make sure

they are aware of any ‘young persons’ starting on site.

IN THE

COURTS

Record

breaking fine

£1 million

A sewage treatment company has been fined for failing to prevent

incidents occurring, after 6 million litres of sewage spilled into the River

Ouse.

The works require 3 pumps to cope with the volume of sewage and a

backup in case these fail. For 5 months in 2013 the backup pump was out

of action. As a result, in August 2013, when one of the pumps failed, the

remaining pumps could not support the volumes.

The Environment Agency followed the incident up in 2014 and

discovered that again the backup pump was out of action and had not

been replaced. This led to the courts fining the company for failing to

implement pollution prevention measures.


TOPIC OF THE

MONTH:

Working near

watercourses

This includes rivers, lakes, ponds, reservoirs, canals, drainage ditches, estuaries

and coastal waters. If we are working near these, we have the potential to cause

pollution, which could lead to prosecution and clean-up costs.

How to manage working near a watercourse

• Prevent water contamination e.g. cover excavations during rainfall, ensure roads

are kept clean;

• Store materials, machinery and waste at least 10m’s away from any watercourse;

• Ensure containment processes and spill response measures are in place – spill

kits should be located in any high risk area (e.g. storage areas, working areas, near

machinery etc.)

• Refuelling should occur at least 10m away from the watercourse and drip trays

should be used;

• Ensure daily briefings and RAMS include mitigation measures;

• DO NOT wash anything down into a watercourse or surface water drain without

permission from your Environmental Advisor

Case Study 1: Hornsey Emergency Scheme

Following a recent main burst in Hornsey, SMBJV were on site to fix the pipe and reinstate

the area around the burst.

The burst sent clean water flowing across a grassed area, along a footpath and into the

adjacent New River, causing an area of the river bank to collapse.

Work to repair the bank will take place later this year. This work will involve working in the

river and so all appropriate controls will be followed.

What the teams did;

• The work area was cordoned off

• All plant and material were kept at least 10m from the edge or the river

• TBT on working near watercourses was given

• All liquids and plant when not in use, were stored away from the river to prevent any

contamination from spillages.

REMEMBER – Your Environmental Advisor is there is provide advice and

guidance on how to mitigate these risks.


HAND ARM VIBRATION SYNDROME

Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (referred to as HAVS) is caused by the over exposure to vibration in the

hands, fingers, wrists and arms.

If you use hand-held power tools, be aware that over-use can affect your ability to work and enjoy a normal

home and social life.

What is it?

What are the symptoms?

HAVS can occur where the nerves, blood

vessels and/or joints are damaged by vibration.

Whilst uncommon, symptoms can occur in the

short or long term. Early detection is crucial

and if ignored can become more serious and

in some cases permanent.

You may be more at risk if:

• You regularly operate hammer action tools

(such as breakers, drills, needle guns etc.) for

more than about 15 minutes per day

• You operate some rotary and other action

tools for more than about an hour per day

• You smoke

• You grip vibrating tools too tight

• Pins and needles

• Loss of sense of touch

• Difficulty in everyday tasks (e.g. tying shoelace)

• Tips of your fingers going white, particularly in cold

and wet conditions, and becoming red and painful on

recovery

If exposure continues there may be:

• Loss of manual dexterity making it difficult to pick up

small items

• Severe pain and numbness

• Symptoms which appear more frequently and spread

to more of the fingers

What can I do?

• Stay aware and follow good practice

• Don’t exceed the maximum safe working times

• Swap between tasks that involve vibration and those

that don’t

• Massage your hands and fingers

• Keep your hands warm in cold weather

• Make sure your protective gloves fit properly.

If you are worried that you are suffering from the symptoms of HAVS, it is important that you discuss this at

the earliest opportunity with your GP or Healthcare provider.

PREVENTING CONTACT DERMATITIS

Contact dermatitis occurs when your skin reacts to a particular substance. This can be either;

an irritant – a substance that damages the skin

an allergen – a substance that can cause the body to react abnormally

Common irritants include:

• soaps and detergents

• antiseptics and antibacterials

• perfumes and preservatives in toiletries

• solvents

• oils used in machines

• disinfectants

Avoid contact where possible, but if this is not;

• acids and alkalis

• cement

• powders, dust and soil

• water – especially chlorinated water

• many plants

1. Clean your skin

Rinse the affected skin with warm water and a soap substitute (such as an emollient – see below).

2. Use protective clothing (especially gloves)

You may find it useful to wear cotton gloves underneath rubber gloves, if the rubber irritates you.

Take your gloves off every now and again, as sweating can make any symptoms worse.

3. Change products if you show any signs of dermatitis

Check products ingredients to make sure it does not contain any irritants or allergens.

4. Use emollients to keep your skin hydrated and protect it

This is better than bar or liquid soaps which can dry out your skin. This is particularly important if

you need to wash your hands frequently at work.

5. Use of barrier creams to create a barrier between you and the irritant

6. Apply after-work creams to reduce frequency and symptom severity


Works located next to drainage channel leading to the River Lodden -

On returning to site after the Christmas break the site was found to be flooded. This washed away

temporary roads and turned the site into a mud bath.

To cope with the heavy rainfall, the team have installed a french drain which filters the water through to

one of the on-site structures that is acting as a holding tank. It is then pumped to a settlement tank and

discharged to an area of land agreed with Thames Water (via a TWOSA).

Management techniques

• Water sampling - to ensure minimal silt accumulation

• RAMS - specific to dewatering

• Recorded using the Permit to Pump form - the site records pictures of settled out sample bottles

and test the pH.

Traffic Management

• Due to space constraints, efficient traffic management has been imperative. The use of a one way

system for deliveries to site, as well as clear pedestrian walkways and barriers have been effective

in reducing the risk moving vehicles pose to site personnel.

• Banksmen are also used to negate any potential problems caused during the operation of

excavators, dumpers and rollers.

No Injuries on site in over 67,800 man hours

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

BASINGSTOKE CHP

The Basingstoke Thermal

Hydrolysis Plant (THP) that

includes additional digester

capacity and CHP generation

is part of the AMP6 strategy to

eliminate lime sludge treatment.

The end goal is that after start-up,

the THP and generation system will

be self-sufficient. Surplus power

generated, will be consumed by the

rest of the works and any surplus

above this will be exported to grid.


In June, a selection of CAJV’s SHE team, Site

Managers and Foremen undertook a training

course on silt management delivered by Siltbuster.

This training was arranged due to a number of

recent silt related incidents, in an effort to increase

awareness and to ensure the implementation of

best practice.

The day was well-received by all attendees and

feedback is currently being gathered on the training

to enable the environmental team to produce

some targeted training for site teams on this topic.

If you would like to arrange this training

for yourself or your site teams, inform your

Environmental Advisor.

Day 1

• Silt pollution legislation and prosecution case studies

• Disposal of water and filtration techniques of silt laden waters

• Permits and Consents

• Erosion control

• Practical solutions for silt removal

• Methods for the treatment of Concrete Wash Water

• Practical experiments to separate silt particles from silty water.

SILT BUSTER TRAINING

Day 2

• How to estimate groundwater flows

and treat hydrocarbons and dissolved

metals.

• Importance that silt and water

pollution management is given early

consideration at the design stage,

including;

- site set up to include water attenuation

areas

- appropriate location of stockpiles

- the need to undertake land re-profiling

to reduce the speed of any potential

surface water to limit erosion.

• The importance of adopting a phased

approach to excavation works to limit

the extent of soil exposure (e.g. reinstate

and stabilise exposed surfaces as you

work).


JUNE’S SMB

REPORTING

3

Near miss - utility

Noise

Asbestos

Trip or slip hazard

1

1

2

FIGURES

Every month reporting data is extracted from Safeguard and the BB

Hotline.

Whether a service strike, incident, near miss or hazard, it is all

incredibly important to us.

63%

98%

100%

Diversion of Excavated

Material from landfill

vs Target

90%

Recycled aggregate use

It is the responsibility of the

construction team to ensure that our

subcontractors are using facilities

which maximise recycling.

Please ensure that you are

completing your inspections on

safeguard. These are crucial in

identifying hazards and reducing

the risk of an incident on site.

We are getting better ... but we are

not reaching our target yet!

62

170

COMPLETED H&S

INSPECTIONS


SAFETY ALERTS

SAFE WORKING

AROUND

FLOODS

Select each safety alert to download to your device. If you

are briefing out to your colleagues download DW01F04, fill

out and return to the H&S safety team.

DW01F04

ELECTRICITY

STRIKE

FAILURE OF

EMERGENCY STOP

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