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INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR FORENSIC PSYCHOTHERAPY<br />

ANNUAL CONFERENCE<br />

RAGE<br />

AND<br />

MOURNING<br />

MAY 25 | 28 2017<br />

Catania | Aula Magna - Palazzo Univesità<br />

Catania | Benedictine Monastery<br />

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM<br />

con il patrocinio di


SCIENTIFIC COMMETEE<br />

RICHARD CUREN<br />

RONALD DOCTOR<br />

REENA KAPOOR<br />

TILMAN KLUTTIG<br />

LESLIE LOTHSTEIN<br />

CATERINA MARCHETTI<br />

DAVID MILLER<br />

ELENA MUNDICI<br />

KATYA ORRELL<br />

FRANCESCO SPADARO<br />

ESTELA WELLDON<br />

LOCAL ORGANIZERS<br />

FEDERICA GUAGLIARDO<br />

FRANCESCO SPADARO


INDEX<br />

RAGE AND MOURNING............................................................... pag. 4<br />

ATTENDEES............................................................................... pag. 5<br />

IAFP INFORMATION................................................................... pag. 6<br />

IAFP PRESIDENT'S WELCOME..................................................... pag. 7<br />

IAFP BOARD MEMBERS.............................................................. pag. 8<br />

GILL MCGAULEY AWARD............................................................. pag. 10<br />

IAFP PAST CONFERENCE............................................................. pag. 13<br />

IAFP ONE-DAY SEMINARS........................................................... pag. 14<br />

MAIN TOPICS............................................................................ pag. 16<br />

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS.................................................................. pag. 17<br />

SPEAKERS................................................................................ pag. 18<br />

CHAIRS.................................................................................... pag. 19<br />

GENERAL INFORMATION............................................................. pag. 20<br />

INFORMATION FOR PRESENTERS................................................ pag. 21<br />

BENEDECTINE MONASTERY........................................................ pag. 22<br />

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM............................................................... pag. 27<br />

ABSTRACTS.............................................................................. pag. 35<br />

PARALLEL SESSION................................................................... pag. 45


RAGE AND MOURNING<br />

Rage and Mourning are powerful affects that deeply disturb the human<br />

soul and interrupt the course of our existence. They are difficult to manage,<br />

to contain, to elaborate, and to overcome. They often underlie the<br />

principal suffering that human beings experience or inflict on others at<br />

an individual, group, or societal level.<br />

These affects are interconnected, and this interconnection is at the<br />

source of serious psychopathologies, as well as violent uncontrolled<br />

and/or uncontrollable acts. The Conference aim is to investigate the<br />

presence of these psychopathological and deviant behaviours, to try to<br />

understand their origin, to consider how to handle them, and to identify<br />

possible ways to prevent them.<br />

For the ancients, it was impossible to avoid rage and mourning (and<br />

their consequences) even for the Gods: Greek tragedies always deal<br />

with these issues. They were and are still performed in Syracuse, which<br />

is close to Catania, and we invite you to join us in a unique opportunity<br />

to elaborate on and experience, at a cultural and emotional level, the<br />

wealth of topics we will discuss at the Conference panels.<br />

4


ATTENDEES<br />

The 26 th IAFP Conference is an international scientific event focused<br />

on bringing together clinicians and also any professional or volunteer<br />

that works and/or collaborates in the forensic field, such as in the<br />

forensic academic world. We anticipate attendees coming from many<br />

different countries of the world, including psychiatrists, psychotherapists<br />

(group, individual and art therapists), psychologists, trainees, social<br />

workers. But also lawyers, judges and nurses interested in this area<br />

and in the issue and in the topics of the Conference.<br />

5


IAFP INFORMATION<br />

WHO WE ARE<br />

The International Association for Forensic Psychotherapy (IAFP) exists to<br />

promote the health of offenders and victims through the use of psychotherapeutic<br />

understanding, risk assessment and treatment techniques and to<br />

advance understanding about forensic psychotherapeutic practice. The International<br />

Association for Forensic Psychotherapy was formed in June 1991<br />

in Leuven, Belgium at a meeting held during the 17th International Congress<br />

on Law and Mental Health.<br />

The formation of the IAFP was based upon the true roots of psychoanalytic<br />

psychotherapy with offenders, which started at the Portman Clinic in London<br />

with its foundation over 70 years ago.<br />

The first President of the IAFP, Estela Welldon, and her colleagues were a<br />

small group of European psychiatrists trained in analytic psychotherapy and<br />

working within forensic settings. They decided to meet regularly to discuss<br />

the difficulties encountered daily in their work in terms of the treatment of<br />

patients, policy making and working with colleagues from other disciplines.<br />

The organisation grew from this small body into an international society<br />

with members from all disciplines.<br />

The IAFP has held 21 international conferences to date.<br />

MEMBERSHIP<br />

Membership of the Association will be open to any person over the age of<br />

18 interested in furthering the work of the Association and is available by<br />

annual subscription to the IAFP at the subscription rate fixed at the business<br />

meeting and thereafter fixed by resolution carried at each Annual General<br />

Meeting or Special General Meeting. Membership will lapse if the annual<br />

subscription is not maintained.<br />

The Association reserves the right to remove from membership any individual<br />

who may be deemed by the Executive Board of the Association to have<br />

brought the work of the Association into disrepute.<br />

www.forensicpsychotherapy.com<br />

6


IAFP PRESIDENT'S WELCOME<br />

Over 26 years of hosting conferences, the IAFP<br />

has earned a reputation for holding unique, intimate<br />

events in spectacular locations around the<br />

world. This year's conference in beautiful Catania<br />

certainly lives up to that reputation. Approximately<br />

40 presenters, from psychotherapists to<br />

literary scholars and legal experts, will spend two<br />

days exploring the theme of "Rage and Mourning"<br />

in the forensic context, placing particular<br />

emphasis on a psychodynamic understanding of<br />

these complex processes. As IAFP President, I am proud of our organization's<br />

long-standing commitment to preserving the role of psychodynamic expertise<br />

in forensic settings.<br />

The 2017 conference offers an important opportunity for clinicians, scholars,<br />

and service users to examine the often-overlooked interplay between grief<br />

and violence, with the ultimate goal of improving both our understanding<br />

and our therapeutic technique.<br />

On a personal note, I should also say that many Americans, myself included,<br />

have learned more about rage and mourning since our 2016 presidential<br />

election than we cared to know.<br />

We are mourning the loss of our first African-American president, and on<br />

many days it feels as though we are also mourning the loss of important ideals:<br />

multiculturalism, tolerance, and equality. We are filled with rage, but we<br />

are also told that our ignorance of other (poor, white) Americans' rage is<br />

responsible for the election of our new president. Our emotions are difficult<br />

to contain and even more difficult to sort through. I know that many others<br />

around the world - in Britain, France, and elsewhere - are struggling with<br />

similar dilemmas in this uncertain political context.<br />

Although a long road lies ahead, I am so grateful for the opportunity to gather<br />

with an international community of peers - even if just for a few days - to<br />

commiserate and face the challenges of our complicated world together.<br />

Thank you for participating in the 2017 conference, and welcome to the IAFP!<br />

Reena Kapoor, MD<br />

7


IAFP BOARD MEMBERS<br />

ESTELA WELLDON<br />

HONORARY LIFE PRESIDENT<br />

REENA KAPOOR<br />

PRESIDENT<br />

CARINE MINNE<br />

VICE PRESIDENT<br />

RICHARD CUREN<br />

TREASURER<br />

COLIN CAMPBELL<br />

SECRETARY<br />

FRANCESCO SPADARO<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

LOCAL ORGANIZER<br />

GWEN ADSHEAD<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

RONALD DOCTOR<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

ANGELA FOSTER<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

8


IAFP BOARD MEMBERS<br />

GABRIEL KIRCHUK<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

TILMAN KLUTTIG<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

LESLIE LOTHSTEIN<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

CATERINA MARCHETTI<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

DAVID MILLAR<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

ELENA MUNDICI<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

KATYA ORRELL<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

EMMA WENT<br />

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL<br />

BARBARA JACOBS<br />

ADMINISTRATOR AND<br />

COMMUNICATIONS<br />

ASSISTANT TO THE IAFP BOARD<br />

9


GILL MCGAULEY AWARD OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION<br />

FOR FORENSIC PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR YOUNG PROFESSIONALS<br />

IN FORENSIC PSYCHOTHERAPY<br />

This award granted by the International Association<br />

for Forensic Psychotherapy should<br />

encourage newcomers and trainees from all<br />

forensic professional disciplines to present at<br />

IAFP conferences and recognize outstanding<br />

scholarly contributions to the field of forensic<br />

psychotherapy.<br />

The award is granted by the IAFP in memory<br />

of our friend and colleague, Professor Gill<br />

McGauley, former secretary and past president of the International<br />

Association for Forensic Psychotherapy, who died unexpectedly on<br />

the 14th July 2016. Gill’s contribution to forensic psychotherapy and<br />

to our association is unique. She was the first Professor of Forensic<br />

Psychotherapy and Medical Education and Head of the Center for Clinical<br />

Education at St George’s University of London and a Consultant<br />

in Forensic Psychotherapy in Central and North West London Foundation<br />

NHS Trust (CNWL).<br />

She developed psychotherapy services for women in prison (HMP<br />

Holloway and YOI Bronzefield) and worked in the High Secure Hospital<br />

Broadmoor where she established the first forensic psychotherapy<br />

service in a high secure hospital. Gill has developed forensic<br />

psychotherapy through teaching, scholarship and research. In 2009<br />

she was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship by The Higher Education<br />

Academy for excellence in teaching.<br />

She gave an outstanding contribution to the research on the application<br />

of Attachment Theory and the development of Mentalization Based<br />

Treatment (MBT) for personality disordered offender patients.<br />

10


STATUTES OF THE GILL MCGAULEY AWARD<br />

PROCEEDINGS AND CONDITIONS:<br />

1. The award shall be granted once per year.<br />

2. Eligibility criteria for the award include:<br />

a. First-time presenters at an IAFP conference; or<br />

b. Presenters who are still in training; or<br />

c. Self-described newcomers in the field of forensic psychotherapy<br />

3. Candidates will be asked about their eligibility and interest in being considered<br />

for the award when submitting a conference abstract.<br />

In addition, candidates can be nominated by the scientificcommittee on the<br />

basis of their abstracts.<br />

4. The award will be open to candidates from every profession.<br />

5. If a presentation is given by more than one individual, the first author of the<br />

abstract will be presented with the award. The content of the presentations may<br />

be research work, theoretical contributions, reports on innovative practice,<br />

or case reports with a relevant link to therapeuticmethods and/or theory.<br />

JURY:<br />

1. A committee will attend the presentations and assess their quality, their scientific<br />

and/or clinical relevance and the quality and originality of the presentation.<br />

2. The award committee will be three persons – a member from the local scientific<br />

committee, a member from the board of IAFP, and (given that this will develop)<br />

the editor of the Journal for Forensic Psychotherapy or the board member<br />

responsible for the one-day seminars.<br />

3. The committee decides unanimously or by a majority on the award winner.<br />

The decision of the committee is final and not subject to legal recourse.<br />

THE AWARD MAY INCLUDE EITHER FOR SINGLE AUTHORS:<br />

1. A one year free membership to IAFP<br />

2. Participation at the next IAFP conference<br />

(IAFP will cover the conference feeonly).<br />

3. Support for the publication of a paper based on the presentation by a prominent<br />

tutorship through IAFP members. The family of Professor Gill Mc Gauley, Tim,<br />

Sarah and Jessica Hucker will be informed each year by the president of IAFP<br />

who has been given the award.<br />

11


IAFP PAST CONFERENCE<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2016 (GENT)<br />

Families: how to survive them - or not…<br />

An analysis of the dangerous family<br />

and societal response<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2015 (YALE)<br />

Recovering from Violence.<br />

Victims, Perpetrators and Communities<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2014 (UTRECHT)<br />

Understanding Justifications and<br />

Excuses for Criminal Behavior<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2013 (KONSTANZ)<br />

Forensic Psychotherapy in the<br />

Community - Between Inclusion<br />

and Exclusion<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2012 (VENICE)<br />

Corruption, Deception and<br />

Collusion – Attacks on the Mind<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2011 (EDINBURGH)<br />

Murder In Mind<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2010 (OXFORD)<br />

Tales of Transgression<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2009 (KONSTANZ)<br />

Ruptures and Relations – Group<br />

Dynamics and Forensic<br />

Psychotherapy<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2008 (VENICE)<br />

Security and Terror: A State of Mind<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2007 (OXFORD)<br />

Hope and Hate – Working With<br />

the Forensic Patient<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2006 (OXFORD)<br />

Revenge, Justice or Treatment.<br />

Forensic Psychotherapy and the<br />

Criminal Law<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2005 (DUBLIN)<br />

After Trauma - Within Families<br />

and Between Strangers<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2004 (EDINBURGH)<br />

Understanding Persecution<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2003 (ARNHEM)<br />

Process or Protocol?<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2002 (STUTTGART)<br />

Trauma and Delinquency<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 2000 (BOSTON)<br />

Learning from Violence<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 1999 (SHEFFIELD)<br />

Forensic psychotherapy and<br />

thepublic sphere<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 1998 (COPENHAGEN)<br />

Forensic Psychotherapy - Boundaries<br />

and Relations<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 1997 (LONDON)<br />

Intoxification, Crime and the<br />

Forensic Patient<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 1996 (ULM)<br />

Freedom and Coercion.<br />

Forensic Psychotherapy under Scrutiny<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 1995 (GLASGOW)<br />

Violence and Death<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 1994 (THE HAGUE)<br />

Personality Disorders.<br />

The Challenge for Forensic Psychotherapy<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 1993 (LONDON)<br />

Psychodynamics and the<br />

Adolescent and Female Offender<br />

IAFP CONFERENCE 1992 (LONDON)<br />

Forensic Psychotherapy - Identity,<br />

Network and Future<br />

13


IAFP ONE-DAY SEMINARS 2005 - 2016<br />

05/05/2006<br />

IAFP AND HENDERSON<br />

BODILY HARM<br />

LONDON, UK<br />

07/07/2006<br />

IAFP AND ESRC<br />

FIRE STARTING AS A SYMPTOM<br />

OF PERSONALITY DISORDER<br />

LONDON, UK<br />

25/01/2008<br />

IAFP AND CO<br />

THE THERAPEUTIC MILIEU<br />

UNDER FIRE: ATTACHMENT,<br />

ATTRITION AND REGENERATION<br />

LONDON, UK<br />

17/09/2010<br />

IAFP AND MILLFIELDS<br />

ON BEING HATED BY THE PATIENT:<br />

THE MEANING OF AND RESPONSES<br />

TO RUPTURES IN THE<br />

THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE<br />

LONDON, UK<br />

21/05/2010<br />

IAFP AND BROADMOOR<br />

"BRUTAL CULTURES":<br />

BULLYING AND SCAPEGOATING<br />

IN FORENSIC SETTINGS<br />

CROWTHORNE, UK<br />

11/02/2011<br />

IAFP AND RESPOND<br />

STRANGE FASCINATION: DISABILITY<br />

PSYCHOTHERAPY IN FORENSIC<br />

SETTINGS<br />

LONDON, UK<br />

21/10/2011<br />

IAFP AND CO<br />

DESTRUCTIVE THINKING AND<br />

THINKING ABOUT DESTRUCTIVENESS:<br />

THEORY-PRACTICE GAPS IN<br />

PSYCHO-SOCIAL STUDIES,<br />

CRIMINOLOGY AND FORENSIC<br />

MENTAL HEALTH<br />

PRESTON, UK<br />

25/05/2012<br />

IAFP AND SCOTTISH PD<br />

NETWORK AND NHS SCOTLAND<br />

TREATMENT OF PERSONALITY<br />

DISORDER IN FORENSIC SETTINGS<br />

STIRLING, UK<br />

01/05/2013<br />

IAFP AND NOTTINGHAM<br />

SHIRE HEALTHCARE<br />

EVIDENCE FOR THE ARTS<br />

PSYCHOTHERAPIES IN FORENSIC<br />

PRACTICEIN PRACTICE: SETTING<br />

TARGETS OR BEING TARGETED?<br />

RAMPTON, UK<br />

24/05/2013<br />

IAFP<br />

CRIME IN MIND CRIME IN ACTION<br />

CATANIA, ITALY<br />

07/06/2013<br />

IAFP TREATING EVILPHILOSOPHICAL,<br />

PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC AND<br />

LEGAL PERSPECTIVES<br />

TREATING EVILPHILOSOPHICAL,<br />

PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC AND LEGAL<br />

PERSPECTIVES<br />

OXFORD, UK<br />

14


06/12/2013<br />

IAFP AND TFP INSTITUTES MÜNCHEN<br />

IN KOOPERATION MIT DER<br />

DAS STATIONÄRE SETTING IN DER<br />

FORENSISCHEN PSYCHOTHERAPIE<br />

MUNICH, GERMANY<br />

05/12/2014<br />

AFP AND TFPINSTITUTES MÜNCHEN<br />

IN KOOPERATION MIT DER<br />

PERVERSION UND PÄDOPHILIE<br />

IN DER FORENSISCHEN<br />

PSYCHOTHERAPIE<br />

STIRLING, UK<br />

17/10/2015<br />

IAFP AND CONFER<br />

WHY ARE WE MURDEROUS?<br />

THE PSYCHODYNAMIC TREATMENT<br />

OF THE FORENSIC PATIENT<br />

LONDON, UK<br />

28/11/2015<br />

AFP AND MEDIA AND THE INNER<br />

WORLD NETWORK, UNIVERSITY<br />

OF ROEHAMPTON AND<br />

UNIVERSITY OF BOURNEMOUTH<br />

BOX SET, MIND SET’ THE FORENSICS<br />

OF POPULAR CULTURE<br />

LONDON, UK<br />

11/12/2015<br />

IAFP<br />

MOTHER IN MIND; IMPROVING<br />

SERVICES FOR MOTHERS<br />

WITH COMPLEX MENTAL<br />

HEALTH NEEDS<br />

OXFORD, UK<br />

04/12/2015<br />

IAFP AND TFPINSTITUTES<br />

MÜNCHEN IN KOOPERATION<br />

MIT DER<br />

MALIGNER NARZISSMUS<br />

ANTISOZIALE<br />

PERSÖNLICHKEITSSTÖRUNG<br />

PSYCHOPATHIE PSYCHODYNAMIK<br />

UND BEHANDLUNGSTECHNIK<br />

MUNICH, GERMANY<br />

12/03/2016<br />

IAFP AND CONFER<br />

UNRAVELLING PSYCHOPATHY:<br />

PSYCHODYNAMIC<br />

PERSPECTIVES ON<br />

WORKING WITH<br />

PERSONALITY DISORDERS<br />

LONDON, UK<br />

01/10/2016<br />

IAFP AND CONFER<br />

PSYCHODYNAMIC<br />

PERSPECTIVES ON SEXUAL<br />

PERVERSIONS<br />

LONDON, UK<br />

07/10/2017<br />

IAFP AND SIPFO<br />

IAFP AND SIPFO<br />

CATANIA, ITALY<br />

09/12/2016<br />

IAFP<br />

CREATING CONTAINMENT:<br />

WORKING THERAPEUTICALLY<br />

WITH PARENTS IN CRISIS<br />

OXFORD, UK<br />

15


MAIN TOPICS<br />

RAGE AND MOURNING IN FAMILY AND GENDER DYNAMICS<br />

ACTS OF RAGE AGAINST SOCIETY BY INDIVIDUAL<br />

AND BY GROUPS<br />

THE DARK WEB: CYBERBULLYING AND OTHER FORMS OF<br />

ONLINE VIOLENCE<br />

VIOLENCE BY CAREGIVERS AGAINST VULNERABLE PEOPLE:<br />

CHILDREN, THE ELDERLY, AND INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES<br />

SEARCHING FOR RELIEF THROUGH DRUG USE<br />

THE MATTE BLANCO AND BI - LOGIC BASED PERSPECTIVE ON<br />

RAGE AND MOURNING<br />

PERVERSION, RAGE, AND MOURNING<br />

THERAPEUTIC PERSPECTIVES: INDIVIDUAL, GROUP, AND<br />

SOCIAL THERAPIES FOR GRIEF AND RAGE<br />

DEALING WITH RAGE AND MOURNING IN THE COURT<br />

RAGE AND MOURNING IN CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE<br />

THE HUMAN BEING IN THE GREEK TRAGEDIES: FATE,<br />

FAMILY INHERITANCE, PASSIONS AND WILL<br />

RAGE AND MOURNING: THE DANGEROUS LIASON<br />

16


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS<br />

VINCENZO CARETTI (ROME)<br />

SALVATORE CASTORINA (CATANIA)<br />

JAMES GILLIGAN (USA)<br />

REENA KAPOOR (YALE)<br />

GIUSEPPINA MENDORLA (CATANIA)<br />

CARINE MINNE (LONDON)<br />

KONSTANTIN NEMIROVSKY (MOSCOW)<br />

ADRIANO SCHIMMENTI (ENNA)<br />

FRANCESCO SPADARO (CATANIA)<br />

GIUSEPPE SPECIALE (CATANIA)<br />

17


SPEAKERS AND CO-AUTHORS<br />

AGNESE ALBERIO<br />

EMMA ALLEN<br />

STELLA DICKINSON COMPTON<br />

ANGELO COSTANZO<br />

TAMSIN COTTIS<br />

RICHARD CUREN<br />

GIULIA CUSUMANO<br />

ROBERTA DESIDERIO<br />

RONALD DOCTOR<br />

FRANK FARNHAM<br />

MARKUS G. FEIL<br />

LISA FIRESTONE<br />

ANGELA FOSTER<br />

VINCENZINA FRAGASSO<br />

JONATHAN GARABETTE<br />

LISA GARDINER<br />

SANDRA GRANT<br />

MARY HAMER<br />

ROSA INGIULLA<br />

MANZA KAMAL<br />

PAM KLEINOT<br />

FRANS KOENRAADT<br />

KAREL'T LAM<br />

RAVI LINGAM<br />

LESLIE LOTHSTEIN<br />

ALEX MAGUIRE<br />

CATERINA MARCHETTI<br />

DAVID MILLAR<br />

CARINE MINNE<br />

CHRISTINE MONTROSS<br />

ELENA MUNDICI<br />

KATYA ORRELL<br />

FOTEINI PAPOULI<br />

ANDREW PERRY<br />

ARIANNA PULSONI<br />

SIMONA RAMELLA PAIA<br />

MOUSTAFA SAOUD<br />

SANDRA SCOTT<br />

IOANNIS SFYRAKIS<br />

CHRISTOS SIDERAS<br />

PENNY STOPFORTH<br />

CELIA TAYLOR<br />

JAN VAN DER LEEUW<br />

RACHEL WOODWARD<br />

GERALD WOOSTER<br />

NADYA WYNCHANK<br />

MANFREDI ZAMMATARO<br />

18


CHAIRS<br />

GWEN ADSHEAD<br />

COLIN CAMPBELL<br />

FELICE CARABELLESE<br />

RICHARD CUREN<br />

RONALD DOCTOR<br />

ANGELA FOSTER<br />

REENA KAPOOR<br />

PAM KLEINOT<br />

TILMAN KLUTTING<br />

FRANS KOENRAADT<br />

LESLIE LOTHSTEIN<br />

DAVID MILLAR<br />

CARINE MINNE<br />

ELENA MUNDICI<br />

KATYA ORREL<br />

JOHN SCHLAPOBERSKY<br />

FRANCESCO SPADARO<br />

ESTELA WELLDON<br />

EMMA WENT<br />

19


GENERAL INFORMATION<br />

ONSITE REGISTRATION DESK<br />

Thursday May 25 th , 19.00-20:00 (terrazza Museo Diocesano)<br />

Friday May 26 th , 07.50-08:20 (Aula Magna - Palazzo Università)<br />

NAME BADGES<br />

All participants must wear their name badges during the meeting.<br />

Badges allow admission to all sessions, breaks, lunches, receptions and the banquet.<br />

ACCOMPANYING PERSONS<br />

Accompanying persons are not allowed to attend the Scientific Sessions and the<br />

Exhibition area. There is no registration fees for accompanying persons. However they are<br />

required to purchase tickets to tour events: https://form.jotform.com/63352357979975,<br />

and social dinner: https://form.jotform.com/63351685462965<br />

WELCOME RECEPTION<br />

The welcome reception will be held on Thursday May 25 th at 20.00<br />

(terrazza Museo Diocesano)<br />

IAFP GENERAL MEETING<br />

The IAFP general meeting will be held on Saturday May 27 th from 13.15 to 14.15.<br />

All IAFP members are encouraged to attend.<br />

IAFP GALA DINNER<br />

The IAFP gala dinner will be held on Saturday May 27 th from 21.00 at "Palazzo Biscari".<br />

Partecipants are required to purchase tickets: https://form.jotform.com/63351685462965<br />

CLOTHING<br />

Clothing in business casual for all occasion.<br />

LIABILITY AND PERSONAL INSURANCE<br />

The IAFP 2017 organizers can not accept liability for personal accidents or loss of or<br />

damage to private property of participants and accompanying persons.<br />

SAFETY AND SECURITY<br />

We kindly request you not to leave bags, suitcases or backpacks unattended at any time<br />

during the meeting.<br />

20


INFORMATION FOR PRESENTERS<br />

LANGUAGE<br />

The official language of the IAFP 2017 Meeting is english.<br />

ORAL PRESENTATION<br />

Presenters using a powerpoint presentation should bring it on memory stick (usb) and<br />

load between 08,00-08,30 for morning sessions during the luch for afternoon sessions.<br />

Presenters with powerpoint and video are requested to check their presentation to be<br />

sure they work properly.<br />

Macintosh users must convert their files to powerpoint in order to be used on the pc,<br />

otherwise must bring their own computer and VGA adaptor.<br />

RECORDING POLICY<br />

Recording any presentation or poster is prohibited, except by IAFP agent,<br />

or by authors.<br />

21


HISTORY<br />

THE VENUE:<br />

BENEDICTINE MONASTERY<br />

The Benedictine Monastery of Catania is a jewel of the late Sicilian Baroque.<br />

A Cassinese congregation founded the complex in 1558.<br />

The original structure was modified by two natural calamities the lava eruption<br />

of 1669 and the earthquake of 1693. It was destroyed and re-built and it<br />

is now an example of the integration of different historical periods. Visiting it,<br />

you can see the changes due to the lava eruption and the earthquake, but also<br />

to the civil uses to which it was destined after the Italian Unification.<br />

The first Monastery had a square floor plan with a cloister in the middle,<br />

called the “marble cloister” (renamed Western cloister) because of the presence<br />

of a refined colonnade from the XVIII century and a four-leaved clover<br />

shaped fountain in the middle with elegant decorations typical of the Renaissance<br />

period both made with precious marble from Carrara.<br />

The lava eruption of 1669 and the catastrophic earthquake of 1693 marked<br />

the destiny of Catania during the XVII century. On March 8, 1669 the Volcano<br />

Etna exploded, at the end of April, the lava flow reached the city walls, the


monastery was saved, but not the Church attached to it, which was completely<br />

destroyed by the lava, leaving behind a lunar landscape.<br />

Eighteen years after the eruption, in 1687, the reconstruction of the Church<br />

started, probably based on a project of the roman architect Contini.<br />

In the night between the 10th and 11th of January of 1693 the city of Catania<br />

was shacked. The earthquake of 1693 was one of the most devastating catastrophes<br />

in Eastern Sicily. According to researchers, the earthquake reached<br />

a magnitude of 7,7 degrees on the Richter scale. The day after the earthquake,<br />

the city was destroyed and most of the citizens were buried under the ruins.<br />

The basement and part of the first floor of the Monastery , were still safe.<br />

Only 14 columns of the cloister were still standing, the others were destroyed.<br />

In 1702, nine years after the earthquake, the reconstruction of the monastery<br />

started. On top of the lava ‘wall’, were built two gardens: the botanical garden<br />

– the wonders garden – and the novices’ garden.<br />

The church of San Nicolò l’Arena was conceived as a small Sicilian Saint Peter,<br />

but its facade remained unfinished. Extended and enriched with decorations,<br />

the monastery became one of the biggest in Europe, following the other<br />

Benedictine Monastery of Mafra in Portugal.<br />

Various famous Sicilian architects took part in the reconstruction: Ittar, Battaglia,<br />

Battaglia Santangelo, and Palazzotto. Craftsmen came from various Sicilian<br />

towns: Palermo, Messina, Siracusa. Giovan Battista Vaccarini.<br />

In 1866, the state confiscated the Benedictine Monastery, which passed under<br />

the state’s property. From 1868, the monastery was re-used for civil scopes.


There were mostly schools, but also a barrack and the Astrophysics laboratory<br />

with the laboratory of meteorology and geodynamics. These new uses caused<br />

a deep and, sometimes, irreversible change of the monastery structure.<br />

Most of the frescos were cancelled, the corridors were divided, and other divisions<br />

added to create offices, training rooms, and toilets.<br />

In 1977, within a project of regeneration of the historical centre of the town,<br />

the Municipality donated the Monastery to the University of Catania that<br />

used it for the Faculty of Humanities. The architect Giancarlo De Carlo supervised<br />

the restoration works that brought to the recognition of the value of<br />

the monastery as an example of Contemporary Architecture from the Sicilian<br />

Regional Government.<br />

In 2002, UNESCO included the monastery, together with other sites representative<br />

of the late Baroque of South-Eastern Sicily, in the World Heritage<br />

List.The restoration of the Monastery lasted thirty years and has led to the discovery<br />

of the history of the town from the Roman period to the present day.<br />

An entire Roman neighbourhood with the two main axes the Cardum and<br />

the Decumanus Maximus, houses of the late Hellenistic and imperial time<br />

has been found under the monastery.<br />

It is possible to see the remains in the main court and under what used to be<br />

the stables of the monastery (where now are the classrooms of the faculty).<br />

In particular, a domus (Roman house) with its peristilio (court) is still visible<br />

within the university library, perfectly integrated in the structure of the<br />

16th century monastery and in the contemporary ‘hanging’ structures that<br />

allow students to access and use this space.<br />

Using architect De Carlo words, today the monastery, “with its real structure,<br />

of a three-dimensional space, has character of a place where young people<br />

move from one point to the other: a place full of air, light, communication,<br />

expectations and promises.<br />

Through different readings of the place and tentative projects the old meanings<br />

have been substituted by a new one that allows the old architecture to get<br />

a new structure, and an important role for the contemporary world”.


SCIENTIFIC<br />

PROGRAM<br />

27


MAY 25 th<br />

TERRAZZA MUSEO DIOCESANO<br />

19:15-19:30 Welcome of the Major of Catania Enzo Bianco<br />

19:30-21:00 Welcome Party and Opening Ceremony<br />

by Reena Kapoor (President IAFP) and<br />

James Gilligan (Past President IAFP)<br />

MAY 26 th<br />

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM<br />

AULA MAGNA - PALAZZO CENTRALE UNIVERSITÀ<br />

07:50-08:20 Registration<br />

08:20-08:30 Greetings<br />

Marina Paino (Head of the Department of Human Sciences)<br />

08:30-08:45 Opening and Welcome Remarks<br />

Francesco Spadaro (Catania)<br />

The Achilles Paradigm<br />

Chair: Reena Kapoor (Yale)<br />

08:45-09:30 Keynote speakers: Konstantin Nemirovsky (Moscow)<br />

Silence is violence: social and personal consequences<br />

of psychic trauma and it’s working-through<br />

09:30-10:15 Keynote speakers: Carine Minne (London)<br />

Rage, not Mourning: A child's loss becomes a young<br />

man's violence<br />

10:15-10:40 Discussion<br />

10:40-11:00 Coffee Break<br />

11:00-13:00 Parallel Session: The Clinical Field (1)<br />

13:00-14:00 Lunch<br />

13:30-14:00 A possibility: paid tour of the Benedictine Monastery<br />

“Archaeological Tour”<br />

14:00-16:00 Parallel Session: Family, Groups and Society<br />

16:00-17:00 Large Group<br />

Group Conductor: John Schlapobersky (London)<br />

17:15 Transfer for the paid tour to the Greek Theatre of Syracuse<br />

to assist to the Greek tragedy “The Seven againt Thebes”


MAY 27 th<br />

BENEDICTINE MONASTERY AUDITORIUM DE CARLO<br />

Chair: Estela Welldon (London)<br />

08:30-09:15 Keynote speakers: Salvatore Castorina and<br />

Giuseppina Mendorla (Catania)<br />

Tiresia, an interpeter of violence: about the violation of<br />

borders and the desolation of the word<br />

09:15-10:00 Keynote speakers: Giuseppe Speciale (Catania)<br />

But one can't live with hate. I know that.<br />

We have to forget if we are to go on living.<br />

The rage and mourning of the winners and the losers<br />

10:00-10:15 Discussion<br />

10:15-10:30 Coffee Break<br />

10:30-12:30 Parallel Session: The Clinical Field (2)<br />

12:30-13:15 Lunch<br />

12:45-13:15 A possibility: paid tour of the Benedictine Monastery<br />

“Eighteenth-Century Tour”<br />

13:15-14:15 Annual General Meeting IAFP<br />

Chair: Reena Kapoor (New Haven)<br />

Chair: Felice Carabellese (Bari)<br />

14:15-15:00 Keynote speakers:Vincenzo Caretti (Roma)<br />

and Adriano Schimmenti (Enna)<br />

Trauma and Psychopathy<br />

15:00-15:15 Discussion<br />

15:15-17:15 Parallel Session: Organizations and Institutions<br />

17:15-17:30 Coffee Break<br />

17:30-19:00 Large Group<br />

Group Conductor: John Schlapobersky (London)<br />

19:00-19:30 Closing Ceremony and Gill McGauley Award<br />

21:00 Gala Dinner at "Palazzo Biscari"<br />

SOCIAL EVENTS<br />

MAY 28 th<br />

09:00 Transfer for the paid tour “Visiting Etna”<br />

26 May<br />

Seven Against Thebes<br />

Greek theatre of Syracuse


PARALLEL SESSION<br />

MAY 26 th<br />

AULA MAGNA - PALAZZO CENTRALE UNIVERSITÀ<br />

11:00-13:00 Parallel Session: The Clinical Field (1)<br />

Personality disorders (Room 1) Chair: Felice Carabellese<br />

Celia Taylor:<br />

Creative processes in forensic psychotherapy and psychiatry: high-risk offenders<br />

with personality disorder<br />

Ravi Lingam, Rachel Woodward, Foteini Papouli:<br />

Pragmatic and Systemic Management and Containment of Interpersonal<br />

Aggression in Complex Personality Disorders<br />

Clinical experiences (Room 2) Chair: Ronald Doctor<br />

Jonathan Garabette, Carine Minne:<br />

Resurrecting the dead –Psychosis, Rage and Mourning in Pseudopsychopathic<br />

Schizophrenia<br />

Elena Mundici, Katya Orrell:<br />

Terror and wonder: Whose choice is it anyway?<br />

Children and violence (Room 3) Chair: Reena Kapoor<br />

Nadya E. J. N. Wynchank, Penny Stopforth:<br />

Under-age, under-rage: an exploration of South African children who commit<br />

sexual violence<br />

Arianna Pulsoni:<br />

The cathartic process in therapy:From the Cave to Earth<br />

The human soul: light and darkness (Room 4) Chair: Elena Mundici<br />

J. David Millar:<br />

Grief to rage: from darkness into darkness<br />

Alex Maguire:<br />

Carlo Gesualdo: music, murder and mourning in Renaissance Italy


14:00-16:00 Parallel Sessions: Family, Groups and Society<br />

The cultural approach (Room 1) Chair: Colin Campbell<br />

Christine Montross:<br />

The Rage of Isolation: Aggression and Self-Injury in Solitary Confinement<br />

Mary Hamer:<br />

Rage and mourning in Euripides’ Medea<br />

Rage and mourning: group therapy (Room 2) Chair: Angela Foster<br />

Leslie M. Lothstein:<br />

Mourning and Rage in a Long Term Psychodynamic Outpatient Group of<br />

Male Sex Offenders<br />

Vincenzina Fragasso, Simona Ramella Paia:<br />

The Psychoeducational group for abusive men as a way to interrupt the cycle of<br />

violence and his social return of impact (SROI)<br />

Destructiveness, individuals and institutions (Room 3) Chair: Frans Koenraadt<br />

Caterina Marchetti:<br />

A psychoanalytic psychotherapy group with women criminals in a Northern<br />

Italian Prison<br />

Moustafa Saoud:<br />

Rage, Narcissism and the Search for Mourning at the Extremes of Age<br />

Sandra Scott, Manza Kamal:<br />

IDC on a patient<br />

Rage and mourning: the creative arts therapies (Room 4) Chair: Pam Kleinot<br />

Stella Compton Dickinson:<br />

Journey's End: Rage or Reconciliation<br />

Andrew Perry:<br />

Permission to come alongside?<br />

Personality and family (Room 5) Chair: Richard Curen<br />

Markus G. Feil:<br />

Personality organization as major responsivity factor<br />

Ronald Doctor,<br />

Rage and Mourning in family and gender dynamics: fate, passion and will


MAY 27 th<br />

BENEDICTIN MONASTRY AUDITORIUM DE CARLO<br />

10:30-12:30 Parallel Session: The Clinical Field (2)<br />

The dark web (Room 1) Chair: Emma Went<br />

Foteini Papouli, Ioannis Sfyrakis, Ravi Lingam:<br />

The Dark Web: The hideout of the identity<br />

Giulia Cusumano, Rosa Ingiulla, Roberta Desiderio, Agnese Alberio:<br />

Bullying and cyberbullying in Sicilian adolescents<br />

Jealousy (Room2) Chair: Tilman Kluttig<br />

Karel‘t Lam:<br />

A case of attempted rapes and sexual stalking: Forensic psychotherapeutic<br />

reflections on jealousy in perversions<br />

Frans Koenraadt:<br />

Jealousy penetrating into the family domain: Considerations from forensic<br />

mental health assessment and research<br />

Jan van der Leeuw:<br />

The presence and absence of jealousy in two cases in relationship to rage<br />

Learning disabilities (Room 3) Chair: Katya Orrell<br />

A Special Session Dedicated To The Memory Of Dr. Alan Corbett<br />

Tamsin Cottis:<br />

You Don’t Give A Shit About Me!: Rejection, Rage and the Growth of Love<br />

Richard Curen:<br />

“I spit on your grave”: a psychodynamic perspective on intellectual<br />

disability, rage, mourning and sado-masochistic states of mind<br />

The bi-logic thinking: the Matte-Blanco perspective (Room 4)<br />

Chair: Francesco Spadaro<br />

Christos Sideras, Gerald Wooster:<br />

Emotions and infinity: The contributions of Ignacio Matte Blanco to<br />

understanding emotions<br />

Angelo Costanzo:<br />

Bi-logic and Argumentation<br />

15:15-17:15 Parallel Session: Organizations And Institutions<br />

Terrorism and mafia (Room 1) Chair: Carine Minne<br />

Pam Kleinot and Sandra Grant:<br />

Terrorism: rage and longing<br />

Manfredi Zammataro, Giulia Cusumano:<br />

Mafia: psychological functioning between traditional business and<br />

new opportunities<br />

32


Rage and mourning dynamics in the institutions and<br />

organizations (1) (Room 2) Chair: Leslie Lothstein<br />

Angela Foster:<br />

Staff accused and abused; Managing pain and distress in the system of care<br />

Lisa Gardiner:<br />

Forensic Hospitals and Pathological Organizations:<br />

destructive narcissism in the internal world and in the social defence system<br />

Long term segregation (Room 3) Chair: Gwen Adshead<br />

Katya Orrell, Elena Mundici:<br />

Swansong: Can hope survive an indeterminate prison sentence?<br />

Emma Allen:<br />

The Boy Who Cried Wolf: A Collaborative Approach to Long Term Segregation


ABSTRACTS<br />

35


Francesco Spadaro<br />

Psichiatrist, Psychoanalytic Psychotherapist.<br />

President of the Italian Society of Forensic Psychoterapy (SIPFO) and Board Member IAFP and EFPP.<br />

Department of Mental Healt, Catania<br />

THE ACHILLES PARADIGM<br />

“Muse, sing the rage of Peleus’s son Akhilleus, deadly rage that brought the<br />

Akhaians endless pain, that hurled down to Hades many strong souls of heroes<br />

and made their bodies meat for dogs and vultures […]” (Homer, Iliad). Thus<br />

begins Homer’s Iliad, in the recent translation of Richard Whitaker in South African<br />

English. But The Iliad, an epic poem that is the first masterpiece of Western<br />

Literature, is not only about the rage of Achilles, but also about his mourning. His<br />

rage due to the Briseide abduction and his mourning for the death of his beloved<br />

friend Patroclus. Neither the mass killings of his enemies that he perpetrates, nor<br />

their humiliations, nor the killing of Hector, the one who had killed Patroclus<br />

relieved his fury or his grief. To help him overcome his rage and mourning is a<br />

dream. A dream in which his dead, and already avenged, friend Patroclus talks to<br />

him and asks to be finally buried. Otherwise, he wouldn't be able to reach Hades.<br />

At the same time, predicting the future death of Achilles, Patroclus asks him to<br />

put both of them in the same cinerary urn, in order to be hugged for eternity.<br />

The Iliad, is, of course, a poem full of tragedy and in this sense it is a precursor of<br />

the Greek Tragedies. But also, in more contemporary forms of art, like Cinema,<br />

for example, I am thinking of a movie that has been suggested to be used in this<br />

conference, as has been done in past ones, Truly, Madly Deeply, or the recent<br />

Manchester by the Sea, rage and mourning have been able to be overcome after<br />

and by virtue of dreams. In other forms of cultural imaginary, like painting, the<br />

creative description has the same function as dreams, such as in the art of Marc<br />

Chagall, in which pogroms and his lost Jewish childhood home world are evoked<br />

and transformed into oneiric visual tales.<br />

But Achilles dreaming of Patroclus talking to him is a precious synthesis of the<br />

elements necessary for the human being to overcome rage and mourning. I emphasize<br />

here two of them. The role and the changes of superego and the destiny of<br />

bonds. A human being is in the position of facing and overcoming his or her rage<br />

and their mourning only when they have found their solution for reestablishing a<br />

true and evident continuity between the superego and the principles that regulate<br />

the world. A continuity that had been broken by the experience of a crime or of<br />

a loss, but now means a reestablished order of his or her inner world compatible<br />

with the established order of the external world, and when they have found a<br />

personal solution to restore a lost bond.<br />

36


Konstantin Nemirovsky<br />

Moscow Psychoanalytic Society,<br />

Society for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy, Russia<br />

SILENCE IS VIOLENCE: SOCIAL AND PERSONAL CONSEQUENCES OF<br />

PSYCHIC TRAUMA AND IT’S WORKING-THROUGH<br />

One-hundred years ago Freud set mourning against melancholia in the belief<br />

that endured losses lead to depression. The dramatic events that took place<br />

during the following century (wars, revolutions, rise and fall of political systems)<br />

as well as personal histories of that generation, confirmed this belief.<br />

Not only unmourned grief, but unworked-through violence leads to destruction,<br />

that enables the victim the possibility of ridding themselves of unbearable<br />

psychic pain.<br />

The solutions of this predicament are different - from identification with the<br />

aggressor, when the former victim projects his own suffering onto others and<br />

attacks them, to turning this pain against himself resulting in depression,<br />

self-injuries and suicide.<br />

These actions arise at social and personal level. For instance, conducted denazification<br />

enabled Germany to recover after the WWII and become the<br />

locomotive of EC economic development. On the contrary, uncompleted decommunization<br />

in Russia gave rise to reappearance of society authoritarian<br />

governance limiting further development of the country. The same phenomenon<br />

can be observed in the life of people facing the violence - those who<br />

come for psychotherapy would have the chance for recovery and development;<br />

those who refused/cut off of this help would be forced into a reenactment<br />

of this violence and ultimately found themselves either in jail or at six<br />

feet under.<br />

Psychic trauma is like the Lernean hydra capable of poisoning clear water<br />

just with its toxic breath. Hercules could not overcome it on his own - each<br />

time he cut its head off, new ones grew immediately up. It was only with the<br />

help of Elaeus that he could defeat the monster. Similarly, it is only consolidated<br />

efforts of different parties - psychotherapist and patient, government<br />

and citizens - that could set the victim of violence free (either individual or<br />

whole generation) from unconscious enactment of old dramas and offers the<br />

opportunity to live, thive and develop.<br />

37


Carine Minne<br />

Consultant Psychiatrist in Forensic Psychotherapy at Broadmoor Hospital, West London Mental Health<br />

Trust and the Portman Clinic, Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust, UK<br />

RAGE, NOT MOURNING: A CHILD'S LOSS BECOMES<br />

A YOUNG MAN'S VIOLENCE<br />

In this paper, I will present two patients diagnosed as suffering from severe<br />

Personality Disorders with psychotic episodes. I will illustrate the changes<br />

that can arise during the course of several years’ psychoanalytic treatment in<br />

high security hospital. Progress was monitored using the Operationalised<br />

Psychodynamic Diagnostics (OPD) system. The clinical presentations will<br />

indicate how earlier childhood losses contributed to these adolescent boys’<br />

homicidal violence. I also hope to show that it is more helpful to consider<br />

such patients as suffering from a single entity diagnosis where, at times, their<br />

mental states are more manifestly personality disordered and, at other times,<br />

more manifestly psychotic. At each end of that diagnostic spectrum, a different<br />

set of anxieties is being defended against. The psychoanalytic treatment,<br />

as one part of the overall treatment, is described to show how the secluded<br />

parts of the patients’ minds can be approached, including references to the<br />

regular regressions that arise, provoked by ‘getting better’.<br />

38


Salvatore Castorina 1 / Giuseppina Mendorla 2<br />

1<br />

Full professor of Dynamic Psychology, Department of Humanities, Catania University<br />

2<br />

Associate professor of Dynamic Psychology, at the Department of the Human Sciences, University of Catania<br />

TIRESIA, AN INTERPETER OF VIOLENCE: ABOUT THE VIOLATION OF<br />

BORDERS AND THE DESOLATION OF THE WORD<br />

In Euripedes’ The Phoenicean Women, and in the myth of the children of<br />

Oedipus, already brought to the stage by Aeschylus, there appears a new and<br />

surprising character: the seer Tiresias.<br />

He brings to light a story regarding the origins marked by the violence that<br />

breaks out within the same grouping, the same family: Cadmus, the founder<br />

of Thebes, kills the dragon, son of Ares, who therefore seeks revenge; the<br />

teeth of the dragon (the oral violence that devours), on being planted grow<br />

into giant warriors who kill each other in a fratricidal fight, almost an anticipation<br />

of the mortal duel of Oedipus’s children.<br />

Oedipus himself kills his father and curses the children, born of incest.<br />

The conclusion is predictable for Tiresias, the parricide turns into its opposite:<br />

the filicide must be repeated in the present generation (Creon must<br />

sacrifice his son Menoeceus), just as the fratricidal coaction will re-present.<br />

Where does all this violence come from? Tiresias is the protagonist of a drama<br />

described in the Yakto (Antioch, Turkey) mosaic: he himself is among<br />

the heroes (Narcissus, Adonis, Actaeon, Meleagrus), who, in the throes of<br />

Megalopsychia, a relentless feeling of omnipotence, have violated the limits<br />

set for humans and by so doing have rendered themselves similar to the gods.<br />

This shift has been made possible by the denial of limits: the denial of the loss<br />

of omnipotence.<br />

Violence, therefore, homicidal or suicidal, is the direct consequence of the incapacity<br />

or the impossibility of surpassing the persecutory vision of the world<br />

and of setting out on the painful path of the work of mourning.<br />

Tiresias is the interpreter of this drama, which, although resolved in mortal<br />

outcomes, is nevertheless narrable.<br />

The figure of the interpreter, albeit contested by Creon, is able to process the<br />

message of the gods.<br />

Tiresias remains in any case a determining, reliable mediator between human<br />

and divine discourse. Only the unfolding of the dramatic narration allows,<br />

in The Phoenicean Women, a conclusion in which Oedipus and Antigone<br />

attempt a difficult depressive task.<br />

We have sought to trace the figure of Tiresias in contemporary poetry and<br />

art, in Guillaume Apollinaire and in Thomas Stearns Eliot.<br />

39


Salvatore Castorina / Giuseppina Mendorla<br />

TIRESIA, AN INTERPETER OF VIOLENCE: ABOUT THE VIOLATION OF BORDERS AND THE DESOLATION OF THE WORD<br />

In this world Tiresias appears uncertain, old, “withered”; forced to observe not<br />

a universe enclosed in the myth populated by heroes, but a sad bourgeois reality<br />

of the urban periphery.<br />

The great wisdom that comes to him from being in possession of both genders<br />

is transformed into fragility, omnipotent delirium.<br />

The gift of seeing with one’s eyes degraded into a card reader’s trick.<br />

Is Tiresias, at least in part, a metaphor for the difficulties of narrating and interpreting<br />

in many psychopathologies of the contemporary clinical panorama?<br />

40


Giuseppe Speciale<br />

Department of jurisprudence, Catania<br />

BUT ONE CAN'T LIVE WITH HATE. I KNOW THAT.<br />

WE HAVE TO FORGET IF WE ARE TO GO ON LIVING<br />

1. The protagonists of the trial - judges, defendants, victims, and people - are<br />

like moving pieces in a kaleidoscope that reflect their feelings of anger and<br />

mourning on the mirrors. In the kaleidoscope we can see the complex and<br />

tormented image of the human condition. In the kaleidoscope it may also<br />

happen that the pieces change their nature: so the winners become the losers<br />

and the losers winners.<br />

2. It is interesting to note how the victim, as an individual, after some time,<br />

tends to forget why he needs to start a new life without the burden of sorrow<br />

and mourning. On the contrary, societies ordered in states or in other<br />

forms of association, tend to institutionalize memory, and promote initiatives<br />

to eternalize memory, because they think that memory serves to keep the<br />

collective consciousness alive and to avoid repeating the same facts. But the<br />

institutionalization of memory leads to the risk of banality, and the repetition<br />

of the lowest rhetoric, with devastating effects on younger generations.<br />

41


Vincenzo Caretti / Adriano Schimmenti 1<br />

1<br />

PhD, DClinPsy, Faculty of Human and Social Sciences,<br />

UKE - Kore University of Enna<br />

TRAUMA AND PSYCOPATHY<br />

From a biopsychosocial perspective, it is likely that the inborn vulnerabilities<br />

of psychopaths interact with negative environmental experiences to determine<br />

the severity of the psychopathic traits.<br />

Especially in childhood, when the child's brain is particularly sensitive to experiences<br />

for its development, traumatic experiences in the attachment relationships<br />

are able to deviate the typical development of basic capacities such<br />

as empathy, mentalization, affect regulation in the child. This may lead to the<br />

development of severe psychopathic traits in vulnerable individuals.<br />

The empirical evidences linking psychopathic traits with childhood experiences<br />

of abuse and neglect will be reviewed. Research findings from different<br />

countries show that psychopaths are often exposed to a number of traumatic<br />

experiences during their childhood, and among these neglect, rejection and<br />

different types of abuse in the family. Such findings on the relationship between<br />

traumatic experiences and psychopathy have significant implications<br />

for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of psychopathic personalities.<br />

42


43


PARALLEL<br />

SESSION<br />

45


Personality disorders (Room 1)<br />

Celia Taylor<br />

Millfields Unit, John Howard Centre, East London NHS Foundation Trust,<br />

Hackney, London, UK<br />

CREATIVE PROCESSES IN FORENSIC PSYCHOTHERAPY AND PSYCHIATRY:<br />

HIGH-RISK OFFENDERS WITH PERSONALITY DISORDER<br />

The successful psychodynamic treatment of high-risk offenders with severe<br />

personality disorder is a highly complex endeavour. It requires the therapist<br />

to help these individuals explore, confront and integrate many facets – both<br />

destructive and healthy – of their emotional and social ways of being. In this<br />

presentation I will discuss my experience of working psycho-dynamically<br />

with such patients in a medium secure, modified therapeutic community, in<br />

such a way as to foster the core creative processes of change – including curiosity,<br />

storytelling, and recognition of the potential new self. In many ways,<br />

these processes resemble the fundamental paradigmatic shifts described by<br />

Kuhn in 1962, which underpin major scientific discoveries. I will illustrate<br />

the nature and meaning of these transformative stages with case material<br />

from perpetrators of patricide.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (1)<br />

46


Personality disorders (Room 1)<br />

Ravi Lingam / Rachel Woodward, Foteini Papouli<br />

Forensic Services, Bamburgh Clinic, Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust,<br />

Newcastle-on-Tyne, UK<br />

PRAGMATIC AND SYSTEMIC MANAGEMENT AND CONTAINMENT OF<br />

INTERPERSONAL AGGRESSION IN COMPLEX PERSONALITY DISORDERS<br />

Operational and relational management of risk are cornerstones in the safe<br />

and effective running of secure hospital units. This challenge is compounded<br />

by internal, external factors and pressures.<br />

The Oswin Medium Secure Unit in Newcastle-on-Tyneis a specialist service<br />

for offender-patients screened to the Offender Personality Disorder (OPD)<br />

pathway. The service model was re-designed and embedded within OPD<br />

pathway in 2015, meetingcommissioning specifications, offering primarily<br />

high risk personality disordered offenders a pathway of care from prison<br />

to hospital. These individuals are recognized to be‘stuck’ within the prison<br />

system. They are difficult to engage, in part because of co-occurring mental<br />

health problems, and pose considerable disturbances, aggression, violence in<br />

prison and are a risk to themselves.<br />

Individuals are engaged in focused and relatively brief assessment and treatment.<br />

This is, in most cases,followed by a return to sign-posted prison pathways<br />

for ongoing care and treatment and relies on sound partnership work<br />

with probation, psychology and commissioning colleagues in the OPD Pathway<br />

and the Prison system.<br />

This paper is an overview of a model of care paying particular attention to<br />

the quality of interpersonal engagement and resilience in multi-professional<br />

staff. A key aspect in engaging difficult-to-engage individuals is to develop<br />

systemic awareness of the case formulation and how this relates to criminogenic<br />

risks. Expectations are re-framed in the delivery of ‘care’ to maintaining<br />

‘ambition’ for patient-offenders, and viewing the work of engagement<br />

as one,relatively narrow part in a pathway of change and progression that<br />

includes prison and community services.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (1)<br />

47


Clinical experiences (Room 2)<br />

Jonathan Garabette 1 / Carine Minne 1,2<br />

1<br />

Broadmoor Hospital, West London Mental Health Trust, Berkshire, UK<br />

2<br />

Portman Clinic, Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK<br />

RESURRECTING THE DEAD –PSYCHOSIS, RAGE AND MOURNING IN<br />

PSEUDOPSYCHOPATHIC SCHIZOPHRENIA<br />

Purpose:<br />

Here we suggest the benefit of resurrecting a forgotten nosological entity –<br />

“pseudopsychopathic schizophrenia” as a way of better understanding a subgroup<br />

of severely disturbed forensic patients. We suggest that, through the<br />

oscillations between psychopathic and psychotic states of mind, these individuals<br />

avoid mourning and the unbearable reality of a painful and fragmented<br />

internal world. A brief overview of the history of the diagnosis is given,<br />

with suggested modifications for resurrecting its use, together with clinical<br />

examples from high secure and community forensic settings. Implications for<br />

assessment, risk and treatment are discussed.<br />

Methods:<br />

Literature review and case series.<br />

Results:<br />

Despite its original description in 1955, there has been very little uptake of<br />

the category for Pseudopsychopathic schizophrenia, and little research into<br />

the epidemiology and treatment of patients meeting this diagnosis. Our case<br />

series demonstrates that the potential utility of resurrecting this category to<br />

better describe and understand a small subgroup of forensic patients.<br />

Conclusion:<br />

Pseudopsychopathic schizophrenia is a mostly forgotten nosological entity<br />

but can be a useful diagnosis for a number of forensic patients. Resurrecting<br />

its use could have significant clinical and legal implications.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (1)<br />

48


Clinical experiences (Room 2)<br />

Elena Mundici / Katya Orrell<br />

Panoptikon,<br />

London, UK<br />

TERROR AND WONDER: WHOSE CHOICE IS IT ANYWAY?<br />

‘Many things cause terror and wonder, yet nothing is more terrifying and wonderful<br />

than man’ (Sophocles). Greek tragedy defines man as deinós, terrible<br />

and great -an ambiguous word for an ambiguous being.<br />

Concerned with the investigation of the role of man in his destiny, one element<br />

of the Tragic is the conflict between éthos, character, and daímon, a<br />

spiritual force often interpreted as fate. If éthos belongs to the realm of the<br />

conscious, daímon from the psychoanalytic perspective could be understood<br />

as the unconscious.<br />

Tragedy in its more classic form explores the tension between man’s deeds<br />

and his progressive acquisition of self-knowledge. This is where he learns<br />

who he really is and what his actions mean in relation to his identity.<br />

As forensic psychotherapists, we are spectators of the tragic events that get<br />

told and re-enacted in the therapeutic process. However, we are also actors,<br />

in that we help our patients to unravel the meaning of their actions. Why did<br />

they come to prison? Who were they trying to destroy? Or were they actually<br />

trying to mourn?<br />

In their being at the crossroad between ethical, political and spectacular, forensic<br />

institutions present many analogies with the Greek tragic phenomenon.<br />

Like tragedy, prisons contain those who enacted society’s most obscure<br />

phantasies and those who look after them. Both are the source of terror and<br />

wonder. In this paper we explore the conflicts that emerge in our clinical<br />

work with staff and prisoners, through the juxtaposition of tragedy and forensic<br />

psychotherapy.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (1)<br />

49


Children and violence (Room 3)<br />

Nadya E. J. N. Wynchank / Penny Stopforth<br />

Juvenile Forensic Service of the Western Cape, Valkenberg Tertiary Hospital,<br />

Cape Town, South Africa<br />

UNDER-AGE, UNDER-RAGE: AN EXPLORATION OF SOUTH AFRICAN<br />

CHILDREN WHO COMMIT SEXUAL VIOLENCE<br />

Recent research has demonstrated a steady increase in sexual violence committed<br />

by children in South Africa. In terms of the Child Justice Act of South<br />

Africa, children between the ages of 10-14 who have committed acts of sexual<br />

violence are referred for a psychological assessment to determine their criminal<br />

capacity. Against the background of South Africa’s political history and<br />

its pervasive socio-economic inequalities, this paper briefly explores some of<br />

the factors contributing to the prevalence of sexual violence and the power<br />

relations implicated in constructing violent masculinities.<br />

In addition, distinct beliefs and gendered social constructs informing normalisations<br />

of sexual violence will be outlined. Examples of such phenomena<br />

include “Ukuthwala” (child abductions leading to forced marriage), “corrective<br />

rape” and “virgin cleansing” myths.<br />

The paper also focusses on children we have assessed, who have expressed<br />

an apparent absence of subjective aggression during the commission of these<br />

decidedly aggressive acts, and shall attempt to explore their behaviour using<br />

a psychoanalytic lens. The role of attachment and mentalisation in the genesis<br />

of sexually violent behaviour will be examined alongside developmental factors<br />

that distinguish child perpetrators from adult perpetrators.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (1)<br />

50


Children and violence (Room 3)<br />

Arianna Pulsoni<br />

The Tavistock and Portman NHS Foundation Trust,<br />

Research Fund Clinical Workshopon Intergenerational family difficulties,<br />

London UK<br />

THE CATHARTIC PROCESS IN THERAPY:FROM THE CAVE TO EARTH<br />

This clinical paper describes some parent-child work and psychotherapy with<br />

a three-year-old boy who had a traumatic historyand who at the beginning of<br />

the treatment presented with severe autistic traits.<br />

The paper draws on and elaborates upon links between the boy’s traumatic<br />

experiences of abuse and neglect, his autistic defences and his developmental<br />

delay.The narrative tracks the development of the relationship with the<br />

therapist and the consequent “birth” of this boy, that is, the emergence of his<br />

persona once the autistic defences began to fade away.<br />

The paper also explores the parallel parent work with the boy’s adoptive parents.<br />

In the last section, the paper discusses the boy’s development of spacetime<br />

categories in the context of more depressive functioning.Once he acquired<br />

a sense of time as duration and then as memory, the patient began to<br />

remember, in therapy, the traumas he had experienced.<br />

When the resulting anger and pain emerged, so did life: the seemingly autistic<br />

child came out of his cave and began to read, learn and to understand the<br />

world around him.<br />

Recollection of past facts and the acquisition of memory occurred at first<br />

as a Greek tragedy of sorts, where pain and baleful anger alternated as if in<br />

a dance. In the cathartic process of experiencing anger and pain,they were<br />

also understood deeply and then a sense of mourning was born, through<br />

which defences gave way to development, curiosity and the emergence of the<br />

experience of beauty within the relationship with the ‘object.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (1)<br />

51


The human soul: light and darkness (Room 4)<br />

J. David Millar<br />

Centre for Psychoanalytic Studies, University of Essex,<br />

Colchester Essex, UK<br />

GRIEF TO RAGE: FROM DARKNESS INTO DARKNESS<br />

My paper will be largely theoretical. I have chosen grief and rageas my starting<br />

points rather than mourning and rage as I believe the former arethe<br />

emotionally unprocessed starting points in our most extreme reactions to<br />

life. I intend to show how griefcan either progress through mourning and<br />

end in sadness and meaning (darkness into light); or alternatively how it can<br />

lead through emptiness to depression and despair (darkness into darkness).<br />

Similarly, I proffer howrage can either progress through anger to acceptance<br />

(darkness into light) or through retribution and revenge ending in bitterness<br />

and spite (darkness into darkness). In both cases, grief and rage can either be<br />

‘worked though’ to become a stabilising influence in life or ‘stumbled through’<br />

to become a disruptive and malign influence.<br />

My presentation will consist mainly of a spoken paper butblended with a<br />

striking musical video that I believe ‘shadows’ my arguments with its own<br />

moving interpretation.<br />

Purpose: To show how fundamental human responses can lead either to<br />

emotional wellbeing or psychological ill-health.<br />

Method: A mixture of oral presentation with a music video backdrop.<br />

Results: I will be attempting to refine the theoretical position on the bifurcated<br />

emotional development of grief and rage.<br />

Conclusion: Sometimes even in darkness there is light.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (1)<br />

52


The human soul: light and darkness (Room 4)<br />

Alex Maguire<br />

Arts Therapies Department,Broadmoor Hospital,<br />

Crowthorne, UK<br />

CARLO GESUALDO: MUSIC, MURDER AND MOURNING IN<br />

RENAISSANCE ITALY<br />

On 16 th October 1590 Carlo Gesualdo put his wife and her lover to the sword<br />

in his Naples residence. Whilst the revenge of the cuckold was a matter of<br />

honour at this time, Gesualdo (1560-1613) was no ordinary Neapolitan; born<br />

into the aristocracy, one of his uncles was Cardinal Carlo Borromeo, a leading<br />

figure in the counter-Reformation and supporter of Caravaggio. Having<br />

inherited his father’s titles and land upon his death, from that point on Gesualdo<br />

gave himself over totally to his overriding passion: the composition of<br />

vocal music.<br />

This music, particularly his settings of religious texts, is many years ahead of<br />

its time; indeed it is not until Richard Wagner that we hear again such complex<br />

chromaticism and unsettling shifts of harmonic context.<br />

The only extant music from Gesualdo’s pen was written after the double murder,<br />

and is thus the expression of a man with this experience in his mind.<br />

Can we say that Gesualdo is mourning the double murder of his wife and lover<br />

in his music? Can the forensic patient ever leave the offence behind him?<br />

Or does such a patient inevitably bring his offence into the room with him?<br />

In a Music Therapy setting, will this then be played out in some way in the<br />

patient’s own music? This paper considers such ideas using examples from<br />

Gesualdo’s final compositions, the Tenebrae Responsories (composed in 1611<br />

for Holy Week) where his extravagant treatment of elements of the New Testament<br />

murder story reaches a level of extraordinary intensity.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (1)<br />

53


The cultural approach (Room 1)<br />

Christine Montross<br />

MD, MFA Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior Brown University,<br />

Rhode Island, U.S.A.<br />

THE RAGE OF ISOLATION: AGGRESSION AND SELF-INJURY IN<br />

SOLITARY CONFINEMENT<br />

Acts of aggression and self-injury committed by incarcerated men and women<br />

in solitary confinement are often interpreted as evidence of the detainees’<br />

dangerous natures, and as justification for their continued isolation and<br />

detention. “Of course they’re animals and they’re monsters,” a correctional<br />

officer at Northern Correctional Institute in Connecticut, U.S.A. says of men<br />

detained for months to years in twenty-three hour-per-day isolation cells. “If<br />

they weren’t, they wouldn’t be there.” Yet studies in various scientific disciplines<br />

on topics ranging from aviation to polar exploration to blindness have<br />

shown that sensory deprivation and isolation can, in fact, give rise to violent<br />

fantasies andaggressive actions, even in people who were previously psychologically<br />

well. In this session, psychiatrist and author Dr. Christine Montross<br />

willexamine the relationship between violence and isolation in essay form.<br />

Montross, a 2015 Guggenheim fellow in nonfiction, will read from and discuss<br />

her essay On Isolation, which is a chapter from her current book project,<br />

Acquainted With the Night: Mental Illness in America’s Prisons. The discussion<br />

of the essay—which draws on the scientific studies mentioned above as<br />

well as on descriptions of paranoia in Korean prisoners of war; accounts of<br />

disorientation in free divers who descend ever deeper into the ocean’s depths;<br />

studies of self-injury in non-human primates; and analyses of Pip floating<br />

lost at sea in Moby Dick—will launch questions not only on the rage of isolation,<br />

but also as to what role interdisciplinary research in the arts and sciences<br />

might have in deepening our understanding of forensic psychiatric work.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

54


The cultural approach (Room 1)<br />

Mary Hamer<br />

Harvard University, USA<br />

RAGE AND MOURNING IN EURIPIDES’ MEDEA<br />

It’s easy to write off Medea as a witch, deranged, a rejected wife who takes out<br />

her jealousy by killing her children. That’s the lazy version.<br />

But the story of Medea, as conceived and staged by Euripides more than two<br />

thousand years ago offers a different take. It presents the rage of a wife who<br />

has been replaced, an experience that is still familiar today.<br />

Rather than accepting the husband’s betrayal as a commonplace, the act of<br />

a single individual, Euripides identifies it as a practice, one that is bound up<br />

in maintaining a particular social order. The action of his play demonstrates<br />

how this order imposes psychological damage and death on men too.<br />

My paper will examine the process by which the playright situates Medea in a<br />

culture where ‘the hero’ is the only model for aspiration. Underpinning that,<br />

however, the play suggests, is a refusal to recognize or give a place to human<br />

vulnerability and failure.<br />

Getting it so wrong, argues the play, requires a change of direction. Critics<br />

have always puzzled over the way Euripides chose to end, with a total disregard<br />

of dramatic convention or psychological consistency.<br />

In this provocative finale Medea announces her project of community<br />

mourning and expiation: the knowledge of weakness and loss, suppressed<br />

under the culture of Athens, is retrieved and brought forcibly to the attention<br />

of the audience.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

55


Rage and mourning: group therapy (Room 2)<br />

Leslie M. Lothstein<br />

Ph.D. ABPP, West Hartford CT, USA<br />

MOURNING AND RAGE IN A LONG TERM PSYCHODYNAMIC OUTPATIENT<br />

GROUP OF MALE SEX OFFENDERS<br />

The therapist’s capacity for treating violent sex offenders (VSO) in outpatient<br />

group therapy varies according to how comfortable the group therapist is<br />

with having very strong feelings enacted in an outpatient VSO group.<br />

For most VSOs intense rage is often followed by intense shame as complex<br />

transference and countertransference states emerge that need to be attended<br />

to if change is to occur. Two prototypical cases serve as examples of how<br />

therapeutic change occurs in the context of boundary crossings in the group.<br />

Carl, a violent sex offender, viciously raped a 15 year old boy, abducting him,<br />

tying him up and sodomizing him. At times he speaks violently in the group<br />

and once sat in the therapist’s chair and took over the group. The group asks,<br />

“Is it safe to be here?”<br />

Bob wrote a highly intellectualized suicide note that arrived a day after he violently<br />

suicided by jumping off a 100 foot overpass. Over the ensuring months<br />

the group’s mourning and rage take on many forms. During one group Stan’s<br />

boundaries become con-fused with those of the deceased Bob. Stan misses<br />

Bob and wants to die and join him. The group is confused by Stan’s words that<br />

Bob is inside him. They ask, “What’s wrong with his/our boundaries? Are we<br />

safe from his/our feelings? Can the group survive this experience?”<br />

The parallel process between the VSO enactments in the group and change is<br />

discussed as at the core of therapeutic work in relationally focused psychoanalytically<br />

informed group therapy with VSOs.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

56


Rage and mourning: group therapy (Room 2)<br />

Vincenzina Fragasso / Simona Ramella Paia<br />

Forensis Psychologist, Psychoterapist,<br />

Biella, Italy<br />

THE PSYCHOEDUCATIONAL GROUP FOR ABUSIVE MEN AS A WAY TO<br />

INTERRUPT THE CYCLE OF VIOLENCE AND HIS SOCIAL RETURN OF IMPACT<br />

(SROI)<br />

PAVIOL is an Association that promotes social health operating in Biella,<br />

Piedmont from 2013.<br />

In 2015 PAVIOL started with a new project: to offer free psychoterapy to<br />

abusing adults; this is a group therapy based on the model of CAM in Florence,<br />

the first private center in Italy .<br />

The group therapy is organized on two levels:<br />

a 18 sessions focused group in wich people talk about violence, family, parenting,<br />

sexuality, women;<br />

a psychoterapeutic group with the model of transactional analysis .<br />

This presentation will offer a reflection about the prevention of future violence<br />

by the intervention on adults : the positive modelling is a good way to<br />

prevent future; it’s true actually that a lot of abusing adults were abused children<br />

in the past (Liotti, Farina, 2011; Cornell, Olio 1992).<br />

One of the missions of the Association is changing culture and preventing<br />

violent behaviors working with all the actors of the abused families.<br />

The social costs of violence are very high if we think, as example, about health<br />

costs, legal costs, loss of work…<br />

The mission of PAVIOL is to stop the cycle of violence in order to introduce<br />

a new way to think about social costs (SROI)<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

57


Destructiveness, individuals and institutions (Room 3)<br />

Caterina Marchetti<br />

Forensic Psychologist Psychotherapist,<br />

Turin, Italy<br />

A PSYCHOANALYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY GROUP WITH WOMEN CRIMINALS<br />

IN A NORTHERN ITALIAN PRISON<br />

This presentation tells the story of a therapy group in a prison where a total<br />

of 350 men and women are incarcerated, 40 of whom are women who have<br />

committed crimes of a range of severities.<br />

The group began in 2013 and was composed originally of 12 women. As with<br />

any forensic psychotherapeutic group, the initial objective was to try to understand<br />

what was behind the crimes and to activate the women’s thinking<br />

in order to reduce acting out. The group meet weekly for an hour and a half.<br />

During the three years the group ran, I was supervised by Estela Welldon, and<br />

despite the fact there were many interpretations made about my reluctance to<br />

interpret any negative transference made by the group to the therapist, I didn't<br />

feel easy making them. At times I forgot my therapeutic role and behaved in<br />

a friendly and kind way to the extent that I was unable to interpret the hidden<br />

fear and anger that some of the women experienced. This especially applied<br />

to one woman who'd killed both her parents in cold blood, and behaved in<br />

the most seductive of ways in the group. Actually she psychologically hijacked<br />

the group and was extremely successful in getting rid of, one by one,<br />

the other group members, so that eventually, she had a one-to-one session<br />

with me. We were able to discuss some unresolved mourning processes in my<br />

own family, which had completely obliterated my capacity to think. Also, I<br />

clung firmly to the belief that this woman was suffering from schizophrenia<br />

although EW was of the opinion that she displayed psychopathic personality<br />

structures. The suggestion was that this enabled me to dismiss my own sense<br />

of fear of this dangerous woman. At this point, having consulted with the<br />

supervisor EW, after three years, it was decided to terminate the group as it<br />

was no longer a group. Paradoxical to its purpose, this group failed because<br />

it did not achieve the capacity to think. Following the last supervision, it<br />

became clear that the involvement of the therapist had played a role in the<br />

disintegration of the group. The blindness of the therapist is comparable to<br />

an unwillingness to see the obvious signs of a group that doesn’t function.<br />

The presentation wishes to examine the parallels between the therapist in the<br />

group and Jocasta in the myth of Oedipus. Both did not recognize in time a<br />

truth which was right before their eyes.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

58


Destructiveness, individuals and institutions (Room 3)<br />

Moustafa Saoud<br />

Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust,<br />

Sussex, UK<br />

RAGE, NARCISSISM AND THE SEARCH FOR MOURNING AT THE<br />

EXTREMES OF AGE<br />

These case presentations vividly illustrate the impact of unprocessed feelings<br />

of rage on the existence of the human soul. The first case is of a man in his<br />

seventies who has no history of involvement with forensic or mental health<br />

services. He commits murder and his crime was described as ‘surprisingly<br />

ruthless and puzzling’. It is not however until he is admitted to hospital that<br />

staff are faced with his severe psychopathology and inability to mourn. The<br />

team also struggles to cope with a range of difficult emotions aroused by their<br />

daily interaction with him, and with the wider rehabilitation system.<br />

The second case is of a very young man who has managed by openly communicating<br />

his violent fantasies, and without actually committing any physical<br />

violent acts, to put the local criminal justice and mental health systems on<br />

high alert. It demonstrates that fragility of our systems when faced with unprocessed<br />

feelings of rage, especially when disowned and projected into the<br />

wider system.<br />

Specific areas of relevance to the conference theme that will be highlighted<br />

include the role of psychodynamic thinking with regard to: risk assessment<br />

and management and the prevention of future offending; and the interface<br />

between forensic services and outside agencies.<br />

The relationship between violence acts and narcissism as a defence against<br />

threats to self-existence will also also be explored.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

59


Destructiveness, individuals and institutions (Room 3)<br />

Sandra Scott / Manza Kamal<br />

West London Mental health NHS Trust,<br />

London UK<br />

IDC ON A PATIENT<br />

Mr K is a 42-year-old man originally from Jamaica. He experienced a number<br />

of significant losses in his early life. He was admitted to Broadmoor Hospital<br />

from prison on 20 th March 2014. His index offence was Manslaughter of a<br />

sex worker in London in January 2014, and Sexual Assault and False Imprisonment<br />

of another sex worker ten days earlier . Mr K’s account of the index<br />

offence indicated that the offence was not directly sexually motivated. Prior<br />

to the index offence Mr K had a 5 year history of contact with mental health<br />

services associated with multiple admissions to psychiatric hospital under<br />

the Mental Health Act, and periods of non-compliance with medication necessitating<br />

depot antipsychotic medication.<br />

Mr K was transferred to an MSU from Broadmoor Hospital in January 2016.<br />

Superficially Mr K appeared to be generally settled on the MSU ward and was<br />

not involved in any untoward incidents. However it was noted that he socialised<br />

with few patients and was very guarded with staff; that during his interactions<br />

with staff although outwardly compliant there was no depth or detail<br />

to his communications. In addition, a number of female staff members noted<br />

that Mr K had a habit of sitting in a chair with a bird’s eye view of the nurses’<br />

station, staring intently inside. It made several members uncomfortable.<br />

Other members of staff observed that there appeared to be a sense of suppressed<br />

rage and hostility in Mr K which was at odds with his superficial<br />

cooperation and politeness. The MDT concluded that after several months<br />

that they felt that they were making no real progress in understanding Mr<br />

K psychologically. It was felt that he had put up a barrier and that this and<br />

the discomfort some staff felt in his presence was hindering their ability to<br />

manage him generally and assess his risk to others. The MDT decided to<br />

undertake an Interpersonal Dynamic Consultation. This is a whole team<br />

approach. There are facilitated discussions used to look at how individual<br />

patients interact with staff and engage with treatment. How the patient’s behaviour<br />

is impacting on the relationship with staff and the ability to deliver<br />

effective care. The aim is to create an understanding of the patient’s relationship<br />

patterns, allowing for an effective strategy for care. The team’s treatment<br />

plan and approach to the patient is revised in light of this information. Dr<br />

Kamal and I shall carry out an IDC workshop based on this case.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

60


Rage and mourning: the creative arts therapies (Room 4)<br />

Stella Compton Dickinson<br />

Instiute of Mental Health,<br />

Nottingham, UK<br />

JOURNEY'S END: RAGE OR RECONCILIATION<br />

Adshead (2012) states that forensic patients have frequently suffered psychological<br />

harm in their childhood. Compton Dickinson (2006; 2013, pp.154–<br />

166) demonstrates howperverse adult responses develop from damaging<br />

childhood experiences which lead to dissociation from painful emotions, the<br />

blunting of emotional recognition, the formation of dysfunctional patterns<br />

of relating and callous responses, ultimately leading to harm through enactments<br />

of rage and the inability to mourn.<br />

Mourning is a process that involves emotional relatedness to self and others.<br />

The catalyst for coming to terms with feelings of loss can be elicited through<br />

music. Music therapy is an expressive psychotherapy to help patients improve<br />

their mental health; within a therapeutic relationship, patient and therapist<br />

collaborate in jointly-creating music to enable the expression of troubled<br />

thoughts, memories and feelings (Davis, Gfeller&Thaut, 2008). For patients<br />

receiving treatment in forensic psychiatric settings there are risks of offence<br />

re-enactment that are symbolically enacted and visibly witnessed during<br />

jointly –created musical improvisation. Perseveration is a common phenomenon<br />

because of unconscious avoidance of endings and the associations with<br />

killing and death. Thus, there are risks of harm to Music Therapists and the<br />

need for an evidence –based, context specific model which can be integrated<br />

into Multi-disciplinary treatment pathways.<br />

This paper willprovides guidance on the general use of music in forensic<br />

settings towards resolving grief, withdescription of risks and what works in<br />

terms of structures and freedom in an evidence-based, time-limitedmanualised<br />

model called Group Cognitive Analytic Music Therapy(Compton Dickinson<br />

(2006; 2013; 2015; 2017)<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

61


Rage and mourning: the creative arts therapies (Room 4)<br />

Andrew Perry<br />

Chartered Clinical Psychologist, UK<br />

PERMISSION TO COME ALONGSIDE?<br />

Purpose: Cultural change provides new opportunities and threats for mental<br />

health practitioners in forensic services. There are opportunities to play<br />

a seminal role in practice development. There is also the threat of indistinguishable<br />

roles. This submission outlines a contemporary useful relational<br />

model and a technology to deliver it.<br />

Methods: Co-producing reciprocal outcomes, making your dependence on<br />

other people an asset. Accepting invitations to come alongside other people,<br />

to spend time with them, be influenced by their world, to talk and to play<br />

music. That shared power gives us an insight into another person’s world,<br />

equalising the experience, the meaning of the relationship, the level of commitment,<br />

openness to new experiences, risk, and respect. It feels like we are<br />

doing something new together. In this way both parties allow themselves to<br />

be transformed ethically by someone else. A ‘co-productive relationship.<br />

Results: a) A ward talking group is a place for conversation. A simple analogy<br />

from popular culture would be a group of colleagues meeting over lunch<br />

where spontaneous interactions occur within a commonly understood<br />

framework.<br />

b) Social music groups. Patients to get to know staff better through music. In<br />

turn they allow us to get to know them better through music. Taking turns in<br />

being vulnerable by trying new things. Enjoy making musical mistakes with<br />

pace, pitch, timing, and or volume.<br />

Conclusions: A good enough practitioner promotes effective clinical and<br />

non clinical relationships. I have a successful model to do just that in contemporary<br />

forensic services.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

62


Personality and family (Room 5)<br />

Markus G. Feil<br />

Psychotherapeutic Clinic for Violent and Sexual Offenders<br />

Munich/Germany<br />

PERSONALITY ORGANIZATION AS MAJOR RESPONSIVITY FACTOR<br />

Men who sexually offend against children frequently meet the criteria of pedophiliaaccording<br />

to DSM-IV-TRresp. DSM-5. However, it remains unclear<br />

how many men with pedophilia actually commit an offence and reoffend.<br />

Also more research is needed to clarify the typological differences between<br />

hands on und hand off child offenders.<br />

This paper examines clinically relevant commonalities and differences of<br />

men with pedophilia with the help of the Structured Interview for Personality<br />

Organization(STIPO)according to the psychodynamicconceptualization<br />

of Kernberg. Variables of this study consisted of hands-on- vs. hands-off-offence,<br />

the sex of the victimsas well as violence in any offence.<br />

Results show that child sexual offenders function on different levels of personality<br />

organization.Although there was no statistical significance the personality<br />

of child sexual abusers wasmore often organized on a borderline level,<br />

while there was a greater variance in the levels of personality organization<br />

in consumers of child pornography.Violent offenders significantly more likely<br />

to function on a lower level of personality organization.<br />

Although there is little immediate prognostic relevance, the diagnostic and<br />

therapeutic value of personality organization should be considered as an important<br />

responsivity factor.Treatment of pedophilic offenders with a borderline<br />

structure can only be effective if the treatment is adjusted to the level of<br />

personality organization.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

63


Personality and family (Room 5)<br />

Ronald Doctor<br />

British Psychoanalytical Society,<br />

London UK<br />

RAGE AND MOURNING IN FAMILY AND GENDER DYNAMICS:<br />

FATE, PASSION AND WILL<br />

Rage and Mourning are powerful affects that deeply disturb the human<br />

soul and interrupt the course of their existence.<br />

In the Psychopath the object relationship which results is not with a person<br />

truly seen as separate but with the self projected into another person and<br />

related to as if it were someone else. This is the position of the mythical Narcissus<br />

who fell in love with a strange youth he did not consciously connect<br />

to himself. The way I think of all personality disorder is to think of the patient’s<br />

narcissism, which is usually most obstinately resistant to treatment. In<br />

narcissistic object relations, defences against any recognition of separateness<br />

between self and object play a predominant part. Awareness of separation<br />

would lead to feelings of dependence on an object and therefore to anxiety.<br />

Dependence implies love for and recognition of the value of the object, which<br />

leads to aggression, anxiety and pain because of the inevitable frustration in<br />

relationships and their consequences.<br />

The process of regaining parts of the self lost through projective identification<br />

involves facing the reality of what belongs to the object and what belongs to<br />

the self. This is established most clearly through the experience of loss and the<br />

process of mourning where those parts of the self are regained.<br />

This achievement may require much working through in therapy.<br />

With the help of clinical material, this presentation will explore the transference<br />

and counter transference in relation to the personality disorder and in<br />

particular the psychopath. It is possible to classify the responses aroused by<br />

such patients under three headings: collusion, disbelief and condemnation.<br />

In treatment of the personality disorder, and in particular the psychopath,<br />

projective identification stirs our own sadism and this leads to two-fold response:<br />

either disbelief or condemnation. The psychopath despises the person<br />

who holds onto an illusion that he is good. Unconsciously he knows that<br />

it is a rejection of an important part of him, and will always give a strong clue<br />

about the hidden side of his character.<br />

If we accept what we see in the psychopath then we have to accept our own<br />

sadism. It may be more comfortable to believe that he and I are good.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Family, Groups and Society<br />

64


The dark web (Room 1)<br />

Foteini Papouli 1 / Ioannis Sfyrakis 2 / Ravi Lingam 1<br />

1<br />

Specility Doctor in Forensic Services. Currently working for a medium secure personality disorder unit in UK.<br />

Trained in Psychiatry in Greece and UK<br />

2<br />

School of Computing Science, Newcastle University, UK<br />

THE DARK WEB: THE HIDEOUT OF THE IDENTITY<br />

Purpose: The preservation of the identity in the fast-changing world of social<br />

media is a topic that appears to be of increasing interest for scientists and<br />

public. Research is available for thepsychological profile of the users usingthe<br />

unencrypted internet where, despite usernames and passwords, the user can<br />

be identified.<br />

We aim to find published research on the psychological profile of the “Dark<br />

Web” user. The “Dark Web” is a collection of anonymous and hidden websites<br />

using an encrypted network. It attracts a wide variety of people who want to<br />

keep their activities secret.<br />

Methods: Search of the online databases of “Pubmed” and “Google Scholar”.<br />

We used “dark web”, “dark net”, “psychology”, “identity” as key words.<br />

RESULTS: Pubmed did not produce results for our topic. Google Scholar offers<br />

more research on the Dark web, however the focus is mainly on its nature<br />

and the links to specific criminal acts, rather on the psychological characteristics<br />

of its users.<br />

Conclusions: The Dark Web is seen as a tool for those who want to be anonymous,<br />

for the better or worse. As the experience with mainstream web has<br />

shown, the internet can be powerful; itcan split an identity, form personae,<br />

shake the links with the outer world.<br />

Those who need to be anonymous may already struggle with being regardedas<br />

disturbing by others and/or by themselves. Further research is required<br />

to shed light to a topic that is by definition Dark.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (2)<br />

65


The dark web (Room 1)<br />

Giulia Cusumano 1,2,3 / Rosa Ingiulla 1 , Roberta Desiderio 1 , Agnese Alberio 1,3<br />

1<br />

Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Università degli Studi di Catania, Catania, Italia;<br />

2<br />

Associazione Antiusura Antiracket Obiettivo Legalità, Catania, Italia;<br />

3<br />

AssociazioneCODICI – Centro per i diritti del cittadino – Sicilia, Palermo, Italia<br />

BULLYING AND CYBERBULLYING IN SICILIAN ADOLESCENTS<br />

Cyberbullying is today an extensive phenomenon especially prevalent among<br />

adolescents and preadolescents, encouraged by the widespread use of new<br />

technologies and the communication revolution due to chat, social networks<br />

and file sharing. The consequences for victims must not be undervalued because<br />

the impact of this kind of persecutory violence, perpetrated in a context<br />

of a space physically and temporarily non limited, is considerable: from the<br />

analysis of research conducted in literature, nationally and internationally, we<br />

find, for example, high percentages of suicide ideation by cyberbullied youth.<br />

After a review and a study of the main national and international tests and<br />

questionnaires on bullying and cyberbullying, examined evaluating their<br />

construction and validity, in the present study we propose an instrument that<br />

– on the basis of past scientific experience about this phenomenon – has the<br />

purpose of finding some quantitative data on the diffusion and influence of<br />

cyberbullying; a further aim of the study is the analysis of the different behavior<br />

acted out in the victimization context.<br />

We observed bully and cyberbully behavior: attitudes that can easily change<br />

into acts of sexting or sextortion favored by the ease of sharing files, and that<br />

are often acted out in a less overt way (because of the opportunity offered by<br />

Internet and technology) than traditional bullying. Our data shows furthermore<br />

how the fact of belonging to certain social classes does not change the<br />

quality of bullying and cyberbullying behaviors.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (2)<br />

66


Jealousy (Room 2)<br />

Karel‘t Lam<br />

Forensic Psychiatric Hospital Assen,<br />

The Netherlands<br />

A CASE OF ATTEMPTED RAPES AND SEXUAL STALKING: FORENSIC<br />

PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC REFLECTIONS ON JEALOUSY IN PERVERSIONS<br />

In the case we present we reflect on the specific role of jealousy – besides other<br />

emotions - in a case of multiple rapes and sexual stalking.<br />

The patient we will reflect upon is born with a physical abnormality, limiting<br />

his speech and in his physical appearance. These abnormalities resulted in a<br />

special position in his family of origin. Later in life the patient felt seriously<br />

limited in efforts to make contact, especially with the members of the other<br />

gender. Jealousy is a central theme in his relation with his siblings. At a more<br />

fundamental level: his mother treated him as special, delivering care that was<br />

humiliating for him, at the same time giving him a special position.<br />

The patient is convicted for attempted rape on different occasions the last<br />

fifteen years, hunting for victims that looked similar to his first victim. In<br />

treatment he revealed he’s still aching for his first victim. Central is his feeling<br />

of jealousy and rage about definitely having no place in her life.<br />

Aim is to deepen our understanding of jealousy, its role in understanding<br />

sexual perverse behaviour and how we came across this theme in diverse<br />

aspects of treatment.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (2)<br />

67


Jealousy (Room 2)<br />

Frans Koenraadt<br />

Utrecht University, NIFP & Forensic Psychiatric Hospital,<br />

Assen The Netherlands<br />

JEALOUSY PENETRATING INTO THE FAMILY DOMAIN: CONSIDERATIONS<br />

FROM FORENSIC MENTAL HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND RESEARCH<br />

As a sensitive emotion jealousy might destabilise the family area. Among siblings<br />

and spouses, but even among parents and their children jealousy might<br />

interfere, sometimes resulting in domestic violence and in some cases with a<br />

lethal outcome: uxoricide, infanticide and siblicide.<br />

Based on cases from forensic mental health assessment and research in this<br />

presentation we will discuss and differentiate between the pathological jealousy<br />

and the non-pathological jealousy and the consequences for forensic<br />

mental health experts' recommendations for the court and the decisions by<br />

the judges.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (2)<br />

68


Jealousy (Room 2)<br />

Jan van der Leeuw<br />

Private practice Maastricht,<br />

The Netherlands<br />

THE PRESENCE AND ABSENCE OF JEALOUSY IN TWO CASES IN<br />

RELATIONSHIP TO RAGE<br />

In this presentation I like to present two short clinical vignettes. One showing<br />

the evident presence of jealousy in a case of a man accused of trying to kill<br />

his wife. The other case of a pervert man, condemned of rape in former times<br />

and nowadays accused of child-pornography.<br />

In this case I will explore the harmful consequences of the absence or denial<br />

of jealousy in (the relationship of) the patient and his partner. Jealousy as a<br />

defence against oral aggression is missing.<br />

By creating a shared fantasy about sexual abuse of a daughter who still is to<br />

beget, a triangular situation is introduced. The third one is a necessary condition<br />

for the development of jealousy feelings. Jealousy refers to love and<br />

possession and the fear of losing this. L’ amour captative.<br />

Where jealousy cannot find the normal pathways of discharge, hate and envy<br />

can raise as sadistic projections by despising the third one.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (2)<br />

69


Learning disabilities (Room 3)<br />

This parallel session is dedicated to the memory of our colleague Dr Alan Corbett the IAFP<br />

who sadly died in December last year when he still had so much to offer. Thankfully we have<br />

the legacy of his wonderful writings. As a tribute to his ground breaking work in the field of<br />

forensic psychotherapy the IAFP is proud to announce the first of an annual conference parallel<br />

session dedicated to the theme of intellectual disability, autism and social exclusion. At<br />

subsequent annual conferences the Board will ask for contributions under this theme. At this<br />

years event we are delighted to have 2 of Alan's closest colleagues, Tamsin Cottis and Richard<br />

Curen, who will present papers that build on Alan's thinking and practice.<br />

Tamsin Cottis<br />

UKCP registered Child Psychotherapist.<br />

Primary school and private practice at SW1 Child Psychotherapy, London, uk<br />

YOU DON’T GIVE A SHIT ABOUT ME!: REJECTION, RAGE AND THE<br />

GROWTH OF LOVE<br />

This case-based presentation will describe the long-term psychotherapeutic<br />

treatment of a woman with learning disabilities who was a victim of childhood<br />

sexual abuse and a sexual risk to others. Drawing on theories of Trauma<br />

and Attachment, Winnicottian object relations, and Alvarez’s Levels of Work,<br />

the paper will explore how the patient moved from a position of extreme<br />

anger, hostility and rejection to the therapy, to being able to make positive<br />

use of it. Over the course of the treatment, despite episodes of acute crisis, the<br />

patient became able to mourn profound early losses, often through the use of<br />

metaphor and transitional objects. With support, she became able to form a<br />

mutually loving relationship with a partner.<br />

The treatment took place atRespond, a specialist clinic for people with learning<br />

disabilities, and was case managed by Dr Alan Corbett. His role in the<br />

work was pivotal to the therapy and reflective of the case management model<br />

pioneered at Respond. This aspect of the therapy will also be highlighted and<br />

its clinical impact explored.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (2)<br />

70


Learning disabilities (Room 3)<br />

This parallel session is dedicated to the memory of our colleague Dr Alan Corbett the IAFP<br />

who sadly died in December last year when he still had so much to offer. Thankfully we have<br />

the legacy of his wonderful writings. As a tribute to his ground breaking work in the field of<br />

forensic psychotherapy the IAFP is proud to announce the first of an annual conference parallel<br />

session dedicated to the theme of intellectual disability, autism and social exclusion. At<br />

subsequent annual conferences the Board will ask for contributions under this theme. At this<br />

years event we are delighted to have 2 of Alan's closest colleagues, Tamsin Cottis and Richard<br />

Curen, who will present papers that build on Alan's thinking and practice.<br />

Richard Curen<br />

Respond Group,<br />

London UK<br />

“I SPIT ON YOUR GRAVE”: A PSYCHODYNAMIC PERSPECTIVE ON<br />

INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY, RAGE, MOURNING AND SADO-MASOCHISTIC<br />

STATES OF MIND<br />

The psychodynamic treatment of people with intellectual disabilities and sexual<br />

perversions is still in its infancy. Using a case-based material this presentation<br />

will explore some of the ways in which the pioneering work of Dr Alan<br />

Corbett provides a richer understanding of the intersection of psychodynamic<br />

theory and ‘forensic disability psychotherapy.’ Material from the treatment<br />

of a number of patients with intellectual disabilities will explore the impact<br />

of early losses on the development of sado-masochistic preoccupations. The<br />

turning inwards and outwards of psychic pain will be explored in the light of<br />

Dr Corbett’s ground-breaking theories.<br />

71


The bi-logic thinking: the matte-blanco perspective (Room 4)<br />

Christos Sideras 1 / Gerald Wooster 2<br />

1<br />

University of Athens, University College Hospitals London, Royal Society of Medicine, London UK<br />

2<br />

Retired Consultant Psychiatrist and Psychotherapist, London UK<br />

EMOTIONS AND INFINITY: THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF IGNACIO MATTE<br />

BLANCO TO UNDERSTANDING EMOTIONS<br />

Being firmly stuck in states of rage or mourning is an experience found in<br />

some extreme mental states, which is often accompanied by similarly extreme<br />

behavior that leads people to the attention of professionals, often against their<br />

own volition.<br />

This "stuckness" offers a good starting point to consider the ideas of chilean<br />

psychoanalyst Ignacio Matte Blanco on emotions and the eternal now they<br />

are experienced in. Matte Blanco describes, along the axis of a polarity of<br />

symmetry to assymetry, a number of levels where this infinity of emotional<br />

experience is varied and structured, and thus differently experienced and<br />

acted upon. He describes the importance of the faculty enabling this move<br />

through the different structurations of the symmetric to assymetric, what<br />

some could call different levels of symbolization.<br />

Re-experiencing the bodily state of an infinite emotional now, with the maturity<br />

of either an inner, or in the case of such a lack, an outer guide, may be a<br />

good way to practice the facility of shifting between the stages. Whether the<br />

guide is somewhat out of sync or, in some cases, frankly dissociated from the<br />

emotional self, there is still in this process the possibility of re-engagement, in<br />

some cases even offering the possibility of a transformation of the emotional<br />

experience, and the behavior outpouring from it. Time permitting we may<br />

also offer some clinical vignettes, to consider, and initiate the discussion.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (2)<br />

72


The bi-logic thinking: the matte-blanco perspective (Room 4)<br />

Angelo Costanzo<br />

Magistrato della Cassazione<br />

BI-LOGIC AND ARGUMENTATION<br />

La psicologia si occupa delle condizioni soggettive di vario genere che influenzano<br />

i pensieri. Invece, la logica riguarda le regole necessarie del pensiero:<br />

è un'etica del pensiero non riducibile a una descrizione psicologica e i suoi<br />

principi appaiono come se fossero indipendenti delle condizioni mentali. Gli<br />

psicologi descrivono il pensiero effettivo. Invece, il ragionamento logico corretto<br />

dipende da criteri che non possono essere analizzati empiricamente.<br />

Nello sviluppo di una argomentazione logica e psicologia sono come i due<br />

fuochi di un'ellisse.Mirando a una gestione razionale della conoscenza incerta,<br />

l’argomentazione segue strategie di pensiero, complementari a quelle della<br />

dimostrazione. A questa ampliata concezione della argomentazione, la logica<br />

del Novecento ha fornito due potenti strumenti di affinamento.<br />

Le logiche non-classiche hanno dato forma a quelle deviazioni dai principi<br />

logici che la tradizione ha inteso come fondamentali, ma che nelle argomentazioni<br />

sono frequentemente relativizzati.<br />

La bi-logica ha fornito strumenti per capire la parte inconscia dei ragionamento<br />

discorsivi [MATTE-BLANCO].<br />

Analizzare mediante la bi-logica un determinato argomento o addirittura<br />

una argomentazione completa è un lavoro non facile e, in ogni caso, destinato<br />

a rimanere incompiuto. Tuttavia anche alcuni passi in questa direzione possono<br />

chiarire alcune delle radici psicologiche del ragionamento, i loro gradi<br />

di forza di persuasione e le loro fallace.<br />

La forza persuasiva di una argomentazione è determinata dalla combinazione<br />

tra asimmetria e simmetria, tra logica (dell'identità) e analogia (somiglianza).<br />

Questa combinazione è efficace se si rispetta un canone fondamentale: la cogenza<br />

logica ha (se riconosciuta) una efficacia persuasiva in sé, alla quale può<br />

essere aggiunta la forza delle varie forme di emozioni. Tuttavia, poiché l'argomentazione<br />

rimane un discorso segmentato, con una successione di passaggi,<br />

la pura emozione (simmetria) non può valere oltre misura: lucem demonstrat<br />

umbra, umbram demonstrat lux.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / The clinical field (2)<br />

73


Terrorism and mafia (Room 1)<br />

Pam Kleinot 1 / Sandra Grant 2<br />

1<br />

Member of The Group Analytic Society International, Institute of Group Analysis, London, UK<br />

2<br />

Board Member of the Scottish Association of Psychoanalytic Psychotherapists, UK<br />

TERRORISM: RAGE AND LONGING<br />

There is increasing alarm about the increase in terrorist activities and threats,<br />

almost universally seen at present as being in an Islamist cause. One consequence<br />

has been a focus on trying to understand‘radicalisation’, where extremist<br />

ideas may lead to violent action. A source of puzzlement has been the<br />

motivation of “homegrown terrorists” who have grown up and been educated<br />

in a developed western country who have themselves identified with terrorist<br />

groups such as Daesh, commonly known as Isis. What are they raging and<br />

killing for? After all, haven’t they had it good, been raised well, in a liberal<br />

democracy?<br />

The authors take a psychoanalytic and group analytic perspective to contribute<br />

to this debate, calling on both theory and recent research. Remembering<br />

their own ‘radical’ youths in the 1960s and ‘70s, when “One man’s terrorist<br />

was another man’s freedom fighter”, they consider,apart from the negative<br />

anger and rage, what the positive ‘pull’factors for terrorism are, such as hope<br />

to make the world a better place.<br />

These themes will be illustrated with examples from Pam growing up in<br />

South Africa under state terrorism as well as her work with the families of<br />

suicide bombers in Palestine and Israel and Sandra’s work in a mosque with<br />

men traumatised by accusations of being potential terrorists.<br />

Pam Kleinot, a former journalist, is a psychoanalytic psychotherapist and<br />

group analyst who has worked in the National Health Service, Women’s Therapy<br />

Centre and Women’s prison. Sandra is a psychiatrist and psychoanalytic<br />

psychotherapist, who has worked as an NHS consultant and manager at local<br />

and national levels within Scotland.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Organizations and Institutions<br />

74


Terrorism and mafia (Room 1)<br />

Manfredi Zammataro 1,2 / Giulia Cusumano 1,2,3<br />

1<br />

Associazione Antiusura Antiracket Obiettivo Legalità, Catania, Sicilia, Italia<br />

2<br />

CODICI – Centro per i diritti del cittadino – Sicilia, Palermo, Sicilia, Italia<br />

3<br />

Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Scienze Umanistiche, Catania, Sicilia, Italia<br />

MAFIA: PSYCHOLOGICAL FUNCTIONING BETWEEN TRADITIONAL<br />

BUSINESS AND NEW OPPORTUNITIES<br />

The Sicilian mafia appears nowadays as a reality strongly rooted in our territory<br />

despite the fact that Police and other Forces of the Law today fight incessantly<br />

against criminal clans, often reporting good results.<br />

So it is natural to wonder why the mafia phenomenon is still so alive. After<br />

a review of newspapers articles, investigations and other studies on mafia<br />

psychology, in addition to the examination of penal proceedings in which<br />

the Anti-racket and Anti-usury association “Obiettivo Legalità” has been involved<br />

against people accused of affiliation to the clans of East Sicily, an important<br />

characteristic has emerged: the mafia has an enormous capacity to<br />

adapt, transforming itself when new historic-economic exigencies manifest<br />

themselves, asking of the clan a change (but maintaining traditional family<br />

laws) that allows them to survive despite adverse conditions.<br />

A concrete sign of this is the current tendency of mafia groups (in addition to<br />

traditional business like extortion, usury and narcotraffic that today involves<br />

new recruits such as people in conditions of extreme poverty who see in dealing<br />

drugs the opportunity to earn the money they need to live) to use European<br />

or State funds: clean money (obtained illicitly) available for the family.<br />

The mafia has today many entrepreneurs among its ranks, experts in economic<br />

mechanisms who are conscious of the possibilities of financing offered<br />

by the European reality; if necessary, it uses professionals to easily achieve the<br />

family aims and illicitly earn money for the clan.<br />

A new social class of white-collar mafia that, even if it kills less than in the<br />

past, still damages the economic reality of our country.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Organizations and Institutions<br />

75


Rage and mourning dynamics in the institutions and organizations (1) (Room 2)<br />

Angela Foster / Manza Kamal<br />

FRC consultants Organisational consultancy & professional development,<br />

London UK<br />

STAFF ACCUSED AND ABUSED; MANAGING PAIN AND DISTRESS IN THE<br />

SYSTEM OF CARE<br />

Much has been written about the impact of forensic patients on those who<br />

care for them while relatively little attention has been paid to the impact of<br />

the political climate - the culture of blame. When Bion omitted to address the<br />

anxiety his first Northfield experiment generated in his seniors their response<br />

was to close it down. When Baby P died (London 2007), Sharon Shoesmith<br />

the service director was publicly vilified. In both these cases it can be argued<br />

that the extreme response was punishment for failing to protect other from<br />

seeing things they preferred to remain ignorant of i.e. that soldiers become<br />

disturbed and mothers can kill their babies.<br />

The duty of care requires professionals to look after those deemed to be at<br />

risk and risky and to protect others from harm. This dual responsibility can<br />

place staff in a sandwich of persecutory anxiety in which they are also likely<br />

to experience depressive and existential anxieties. When a patient or client<br />

does something particularly alarming we worry about how to manage the<br />

immediate clinical situation, how to manage our managers and the external<br />

system and about our own abilities and our survival.<br />

While some degree of anxiety may be helpful as a motivator, too much is anxiety<br />

inhibits our ability to think hence the management of anxiety is crucial<br />

to good practice. Reference will be made to the theme of rage and mourning<br />

in clinical teams.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Organizations and Institutions<br />

76


Rage and mourning dynamics in the institutions and organizations (1) (Room 2)<br />

Lisa Gardiner<br />

Presenter Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist and Forensic Psychotherapist,<br />

Ravenswood House, Knowle, Hampshire, UK<br />

FORENSIC HOSPITALS AND PATHOLOGICAL ORGANIZATIONS:<br />

DESTRUCTIVE NARCISSISM IN THE INTERNAL WORLD AND IN THE<br />

SOCIAL DEFENCE SYSTEM<br />

PDestructive narcissism is an important feature of the internal worlds of patients<br />

in Forensic Hospital settings. The development of this idea has led to<br />

concepts such as the claustrum, the claustro-agoraphobic dilemma and the<br />

psychic retreat. These further help to understand the murderous internal<br />

worlds of our patients.<br />

However, patients are often held in a hospital setting. The development of<br />

theories around social defence systems as a means of managing anxiety in<br />

institutions has high relevance to the task of caring for Forensic in-patients.<br />

These also help to focus our attention on the internal worlds of the staff working<br />

in these settings.<br />

There is a great deal of resonance between the concept of the Pathological<br />

Organisation and the Social Defence Systems that evolve in Forensic Institutions.<br />

This presentation aims to consider the two theoretical models and<br />

their relevance – not only to working in a Forensic Hospital setting but in<br />

how these interplay to prevent the work of mourning as an essential task for<br />

patients and staff in an institution set up to contain the most frightening and<br />

dangerous individuals in society.<br />

Methods: PowerPoint presentation / workshop with participant discussion of<br />

theoretical and clinical material<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Organizations and Institutions<br />

77


Long term segregation (Room 3)<br />

Katya Orrell / Elena Mundici<br />

Panoptikon, London, UK<br />

SWANSONG: CAN HOPE SURVIVE AN INDETERMINATE PRISON SENTENCE?<br />

‘Piles of junk. …an overturned stool. Night. Darkness.’<br />

These stage directions from Chekhov’s ‘Swansong’ could be describing the<br />

prison wing, both physically and metaphorically. His play depicts a drunk,<br />

elderly comic actor who has fallen asleep after the performance is over and<br />

awakes to a deserted theatre. He speaks, and is answered by the prompter<br />

responding from the darkness, an image not unlike the therapeutic dyad.<br />

Over the past year, perhaps more than ever before, working psychodynamically<br />

in a man’s prison has felt dangerous. For the man serving an IPP sentence,<br />

a sentence with no finite ending, the threat of psychic death, the death<br />

of hope, is the sword of Damocles which hangs over his every day. In this<br />

paper, we examine what it means to adapt our work with a man who never<br />

knows when he will leave prison and how he manages those feelings.<br />

Using the concept of the swansong, a song considered to be more beautiful<br />

because of the fragility of a life that is about to end, we ask what is happening<br />

when a prisoner whose unprocessed grief and rage threatens to destroy all<br />

creativity.<br />

We explore how the danger of his internal destructiveness meets, and is also<br />

reflected by, the actual threat of our own extinction as forensic psychotherapists.<br />

What happens to the work, to the ability to contain, when the relationship<br />

with the prison itself feels like a dangerous liaison, when each session<br />

feels like a Swansong?<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Organizations and Institutions<br />

78


Long term segregation (Room 3)<br />

Emma Allen<br />

Art Psychotherapist at Rampton Hospital & Senior Lecturer in Art Psychotherapy<br />

at the University of South Wales, UK<br />

THE BOY WHO CRIED WOLF: A COLLABORATIVE APPROACH TO LONG<br />

TERM SEGREGATION<br />

This paper presents a unique account of a transdisciplinary approach, combining<br />

dialectical behavioural therapy (DBT) and art psychotherapy to longterm<br />

segregation and seclusion in a National High Secure Learning Disability<br />

Service. The rationale for joint psychology and art psychotherapy sessions<br />

with both a female and male therapist is discussed, along with how risk was<br />

managed.<br />

Purpose: The paper describes the clinical work with one patient, and discusses<br />

both advantages and challenges of ‘re-parenting’ through the seclusion<br />

hatch, whilst exploring transference and countertransference difficulties of<br />

defectiveness, shame, rage and mourning.<br />

Methods: A collaborative, cross-disciplinary, dialectical behavioural therapy<br />

(DBT) and art psychotherapy approach to long term segregation (LTS) in the<br />

National High Secure Learning Disability Service; Usingthe ‘I Can Feel Good<br />

(ICFG) Programme: Skills for training people with intellectual disabilities<br />

and problems managing emotions’ (Ingamells and Morrissey, 2014),mindfulness,<br />

image-making and schema therapy supervision.<br />

Results: Identifying the benefits and challenges of transdisciplinary work<br />

(DBT, Art Psychotherapy, Schema) whilst also contributing to the sparse literature<br />

on LTS and engaging with patients ‘through the seclusion hatch’.<br />

Conclusions: Athree-way therapeutic relationship offers an alternative sense<br />

of containment to that offered by seclusion. A transdisciplinary ‘re-parenting’<br />

process for patients’ ‘victim’ and ‘perpetrator’ identities allows therapists to<br />

work with both the ‘boy’ and the ‘wolf ‘’, surviving ongoing allegations and<br />

threats of violence.<br />

PARALLEL SESSION / Organizations and Institutions<br />

79


Notes


Notes


Local PCO<br />

www.medeacom.com

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