Popular Photography on Campus April 2016

hughes.s

APRIL 2016

THE SECRETS

TO ASSISTING

A PRO GOES BACK

TO SCHOOL

WHERE TO LAUNCH

YOUR CAREER

WHAT

MAKES

YOU LOOK?

Catherine Opie on portraits, places, culture, and politics—

and why you should never stop asking questions


The moment your whole career comes into focus.

This is the moment we work for.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: JOE RIIS; HOLLY ANDRES; RUSH JAGOE; MARVIN ORELLANA; CATHERINE OPIE/REGEN PROJECTS, LA AND LEHMANN MAUPIN, NY & HONG KONG

FEATURES

15 Your Next Move

After graduation, scores of young photographers will descend upon

New York and L.A. to seek their fortunes. Want to stand out from

the crowd? Don’t join it. We talked to four shooters who owe their

success to their surprising locations.

By Sara Cravatts

20 Ready, Set, Assist

To become a working pro, start by working for the pros. Here’s

our guide to getting your first assisting job—including everything you

need to do to get hired back again.

By Russell Hart

24 Ask More

Famed photographer and UCLA professor Catherine Opie talks to us

about what it means to make—and look at—portraits. By Meg Ryan

DEPARTMENTS

4 Editor’s Letter When casting about for

career ideas, don’t forget weddings.

34 Shoot This Get on the roof for an

amazing new perspective.

FILTER

6 Two Years Out Lindsey Best had

already gone pro when she started school;

here’s how her education pushed her farther.

8 Books & Shows What to see: From a

girl in the wild to boxers in Britain.

12 Photo Realism Use social media to

promote your work—the right way.

TOOLS

30 First Look Sony debuts its own series

of super-high-quality lenses.

31 Roundup The best of the latest

cameras, compared.

32 What It Takes Freeze the action

using a simple hot-shoe flash.

24

15

20

APRIL 2016

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 3


EDITOR’S LETTER

On the

Cover

MASTER OF

THE PORTRAIT

“Nick,” 2003, from

Catherine Opie’s

Surfers series. Read

more about this

artist and

professor’s

approach on

page 24.

An Overlooked

Tradition?

Whether you’re graduating this

spring or simply looking ahead,

you may be wondering how—or

whether—you can build a career in photography.

In this issue we directly address some of the practical questions with feature

stories on assisting and which places, besides the photo meccas of New York

and Los Angeles, to get your start.

But there’s one path that few aspiring artists, photojournalists, fashion

shooters, or commercial photographers take seriously: wedding photography.

You’d be surprised at how many successful pros in other genres of

photography honed their skills by shooting weddings. Not just their

photographic skills, but also their business practices, time management, and

approach to clients. Done right, wedding photography can help you pay off

those student loans and earn a living.

But even if you never plan to make wedding photography your career, or

even a weekend job, chances are that sooner or later someone will ask you to

shoot their nuptials. It’s tougher than all those smartphone-wielding guests

and DSLR-slinging uncles of the bride might lead you to believe.

We recently launched a channel on our website, PopPhoto.com/wedding,

aimed at informing and inspiring photographers who are just getting into

the bridal biz. Some of our own editors, including Web Editor Stan Horaczek,

shoot several weddings each year as a side gig. “Have a contract,” he advises.

“Also, don’t try to learn new techniques right before a wedding; your focus

has to be on learning the flow of the wedding. That’s why assisting is a good

idea. The pacing is the hard part—taking the pictures is the easy part.”

The rewards, he adds, can be more than financial. You get to capture

people enjoying what is often the happiest day of their lives. And that is a

pretty cool, and rare, opportunity.

FROM TOP: CATHERINE OPIE/REGEN PROJECTS, LA AND LEHMANN MAUPIN, NY & HONG KONG; PETER HURLEY

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF MIRIAM LEUCHTER

ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Sarah Hughes

FEATURES EDITOR Debbie Grossman

SENIOR EDITOR Peter Kolonia

SENIOR TECHNOLOGY EDITOR Philip Ryan

TECHNOLOGY MANAGER Julia Silber

ASSISTANT TECHNOLOGY EDITOR Adam Ryder

ASSISTANT EDITOR Sara Cravatts

ART DIRECTOR Jason Beckstead

PHOTO EDITOR Fiona Gardner

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Jack Crager, Russell Hart,

Meg Ryan, Allegra Wilde

ONLINE EDITOR Stan Horaczek

ASSISTANT ONLINE EDITOR Jeanette D. Moses

BONNIER’S TECHNOLOGY GROUP

VICE PRESIDENT, PUBLISHING DIRECTOR

GREGORY D. GATTO

FINANCIAL DIRECTOR Tara Bisciello

GROUP NATIONAL ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Jeff Timm

EASTERN SALES DIRECTOR Christine Sendelsky

ACCOUNT MANAGER Chip Parham

MIDWEST MANAGER Doug Leipprandt

AD ASSISTANT Lindsay Kuhlmann

DETROIT SALES DIRECTOR Jeff Roberge

DIRECTOR OF CUSTOM SOLUTIONS Noreen Myers

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, INTEGRATED MARKETING Brenda Oliveri

SALES DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Elspeth Lodge

DIGITAL SALES MANAGER Lee Verdecchia

DIGITAL CAMPAIGN DIRECTOR Amanda Mays

DIGITAL CAMPAIGN COORDINATOR Justin Ziccardi

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, BRAND INTEGRATION Beth Hetrick

CREATIVE SERVICES DIRECTOR Ingrid M. Reslmaier

MARKETING DESIGN DIRECTORS Jonathan Berger, Gabe Ramirez

DIGITAL DESIGN MANAGER Steve Gianaca

BRAND INTEGRATION DIRECTOR Michelle Cast

ASSISTANT BRAND INTEGRATION MANAGER Vanessa Vazquez

CONSUMER MARKETING DIRECTOR Andrew Schulman

RETAIL SINGLE COPY SALES:

PROCIRC RETAIL SOLUTIONS GROUP Tony DiBisceglie

HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTOR Kim Putman

GROUP PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Michelle Doster

PRODUCTION MANAGER Rick Andrews

CHAIRMAN Tomas Franzén

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Eric Zinczenko

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER David Ritchie

CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER Elizabeth Burnham Murphy

CHIEF DIGITAL REVENUE OFFICER Sean Holzman

VICE PRESIDENT, INTEGRATED SALES John Graney

VICE PRESIDENT, CONSUMER MARKETING John Reese

VICE PRESIDENT, DIGITAL OPERATIONS David Butler

VICE PRESIDENT, PUBLIC RELATIONS Perri Dorset

GENERAL COUNSEL Jeremy Thompson

COPYRIGHT © 2016 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY

Editorial contributions should be sent to ong>Popularong> ong>Photographyong> on Campus, 2 Park Avenue,

9th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Submissions must be accompanied by return post age and

will be handled with reasonable care; however, publisher assumes no respon sibility for the

safety of unsolicited original artwork, photographs, slides, or manuscripts. For reprints,

email reprints@bonniercorp.com. ong>Popularong> ong>Photographyong> on Campus, April 2016, Vol. 1,

No. 4. Entire contents © 2016 Bonnier Corporation.

4 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


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FILTER

Books

& Shows P.8

Photo Realism P.12

TWO YEARS OUT

SOUND

AND

VISION

Art Center grad

Lindsey Best explores

the emotions behind

the scenes

LINDSEY BEST fell in love with photography

when she got a Polaroid

as a young teenager, and she soon

combined it with another passion:

music. “I would go to shows and

bring my film point-and-shoot

camera with me,” Best recalls. “As I

got older and got better equipment,

I had to start figuring out how I

could get my photo gear into these

venues. That’s when I started trying

to reach out to bands and navigate

how that world worked.”

By the time she graduated from

California’s Agoura Hills High

School, she had started shooting

concerts with official credentials,

often on assignment for local

publications. Though she knew she

wanted to be a photographer, she

enrolled at San Diego City College

to study physical and biological

anthropology. “I wasn’t yet ready to

put my academic studies behind

me, so I took two years of classes

studying non-photography fields

while taking photo classes on the

side,” she says. “I wanted to have a

well rounded bank of knowledge to

draw on for my art.”

Meanwhile, Best continued her

photo practice. After leaving City

College, she says, “I spent three

years trying to establish myself as

a music photographer, developing

my portfolio and networking as

much as I could.”

Gradually she put together a

client list including Rolling Stone,

Crawdaddy!, Pitchfork Media, Urban

Outfitters, Blue Man Group, Premier

Guitar, Pedal Punk, LA Weekly,

and Live Nation. “I’ve primarily

marketed my music work in the

editorial world, and also directly to

artists, labels, management, and

show venues,” she says. “One of the

most important things has been

understanding the range of potential

places that my work could live.

This is something I’m constantly

expanding upon.”

Meanwhile Best had a long-term

dream of studying at Art Center

College of Design—“It seemed that

all the best photo students went on

to go there,” she recalls—and she

enrolled at the Pasadena campus

as a photo major in 2011. “It was

SUBWAY

STRUMMER

Best captured this

image of a

musician playing

on a subway

platform using her

Apple iPhone 5s in

Chicago, in 2014.

6 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


LINDSEY BEST (2)

important for me to go into Art

Center knowing what I wanted to

get out of it, in order to maximize

my time there.”

Having graduated in 2014, she

credits her BFA program with burnishing

the skill of follow-through.

“Art Center gave me the mentality

of constantly working on something

and seeing it through from

the conception stage to execution,”

she notes. “So many people

have ideas that they think about

for years and then never end up

executing. The ability to go from

one stage to the next is something

I’m grateful to my instructors for

helping instill. I am always making

work; and when I’m not shooting, I

am thinking about ideas I’d like to

make into photographs.”

During college, Best expanded

her stylistic range, adding formal

portraiture, landscapes, and stilllife

work to her portfolio. “All my

work stems from the same place

conceptually,” she says. “I have

always been more interested in

showing what an experience felt

like rather than just showing what

something looked like. I think every

image is made up of the base layer

of data and literal information

but I always want my images to go

beyond that layer, and show the

emotional experience of what a

moment feels like.”

In concert venues—especially

shooting major artists such as the

Rolling Stones, Radiohead, or U2—

Best is often relegated to the “three

songs in the pit” rules for photographers.

Yet her work for editorial

clients and music labels has led to

NO DOUBT

At a 2009 No

Doubt concert in

Irvine, CA, Best

captured Gwen

Stefani and Tony

Kanal with a Nikon

D200. The shot ran

in L.A. Record.

close long-term collaborations with

artists such as Conor Oberst and

Jason Isbell. “Every time I photograph

someone I feel like I discover

facets of who the person is that

I want to illuminate. Conor and

Jason are two of my favorite musicians

with whom I have had that

kind of experience. I’ve been able to

explore and tell a deeper story.”

Such impulses led her to take up

the camera in the first place. “ong>Photographyong>

lets you take an experience

and express it in such a way

that it is felt as a human story, and

not just specific to one individual

person or situation,” she says. “As

human beings we all tap into the

same emotions, and as an artist I

love the challenge of translating

those emotions into visuals.”

—Jack Crager

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 7


FILTER BOOKS & SHOWS

TECH-AGE WASTELAND

Nick Brandt finds environmental peril in the land of his grand animal portraits

INHERIT THE DUST By Nick Brandt

Edwynn Houk Editions, $65

Nick Brandt’s latest project is both gorgeous and

disturbing: He applies his stately animal portraiture

to a potent caveat about the Earth’s fate. Brandt

returns to East Africa, where he photographed

his artful trilogy of wildlife imagery: On This Earth

(2005), A Shadow Falls (2009), and Across the Ravaged

Land (2013). This time around, he places life-sized

panels of great and endangered species—elephants,

rhinos, zebras, lions, apes—in locales where the

animals once roamed, now littered with industrial

detritus from factories, dumpsites, quarries, highway

underpasses, and other manmade intrusions. The

message is immediate and visceral: Our natural

world is disappearing at an alarming rate.

Always a formal portraitist, Brandt has carefully

composed each panorama so that the natural

backdrop in his life-size print looks like it could be

the same landscape as its now-littered environs.

Meanwhile workers labor, scavengers forage,

squatters camp, and townspeople stroll through the

wasteland, oblivious to the animals’ ghostlike images.

“The result is an eloquent and complex ‘J’accuse,’”

writes Vicki Goldberg in her blurb, “for the people are

as victimized by ‘development’ as the animals are.”

Brandt has deftly turned his art into a call for action.

JESSE BURKE: WILD AND PRECIOUS Rhode Island School

of Design, Providence, RI, through Sept. 25 risdmuseum.org

As something of an encore to Burke’s 2015 monograph of the same

title, RISD is staging an exhibition of the project. Over a five-year period

Burke traveled across America with his daughter, Clover, exploring the

wonders of nature and the experience of the open road. The resulting

images reflect upon childhood misadventures (cuts, bruises, bloody

noses) as well as poignant moments (portraits on the beach and in the

woods). It’s a tender mix of images exploring childhood, parenthood,

companionship, and a sweet life on the move.

FROM TOP: NICK BRANDT, COURTESY OF EDWYNN HOUK GALLERY. NEW YORK; JESSE BURKE

8 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 9


FILTER BOOKS & SHOWS

MODERN KIDS By Jona

Frank Kerher Verlag, $40

In her third monograph,

photographer and filmmaker

Jona Frank continues to explore

adolescence and coming-ofage

with a look at the boxing

community in Ellesmere Port, a

suburb of Liverpool, England. Her

portraits of boxers in the gym

evoke the smell of sweat-stained

leather, while her atmospheric

images of British suburbia and

youthful couples lend universality

to a specific place. “Jona gets to

this crazy level of emotion and

intimacy that most photographers

hope for with the people in front of

their camera,” writes Bruce Weber

in his intro. “Her photographs and

film are a poem about memory—

lost and regained.”

GOWANUS WATERS

By Steven Hirsch

powerHouse, $45

Through Hirsch’s lens, the polluted

waters of Brooklyn’s Gowanus

Canal are iridescent abstractions,

a painter’s palette of colorscapes

in which oil, water, chemicals,

and foliage blend in psychedelic

patterns. It would be lovely if not

for the underlying decay. While

the surrounding dumps, oil depots,

and bus yards remain, the canal’s

Superfund designation may

someday render these chemical

combos obsolete—a good thing.

PREVIOUS PAGE

Nick Brandt’s

“Factory with

Rhino, 2014”;

Jesse Burke’s

“Flesh and Blood.”

THIS PAGE:

(clockwise from

top) Jona Frank’s

“Mason, Training,

2012”; Carrie Mae

Weems’ “Untitled

(Man in Mirror)”;

Steven Hirsch’s

“Psamathe, 2014.”

CARRIE MAE WEEMS:

CONSIDERED Savannah

College of Art and Design,

Savannah, GA, through

June 12 scad.edu

A three-decade retrospective

of Weems’ photography, this

exhibition covers a wide range

of topics and styles, all united

by the artist’s blend of historical

references, social activism, and

wit. In projects ranging from her

starkly composed Kitchen Table

series to the montages of From

Here I Saw What Happened and I

Cried, Weems explores complex

emotional and socioeconomic

themes, delving far below the

surface through photography.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: JONA FRANK; CARRIE MAE WEEMS, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY, NEW YORK; STEVEN HIRSCH

10 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


FILTER PHOTO REALISM

#ENGAGE

Simplify your social media presentation

LET’S IMAGINE for a minute that

the online audience you present

your photos to, and aim to impress,

would actually spend time with

your pictures—lingering over them,

taking in their story and yours—

before pushing the Like button or

commenting. Sounds like a dream,

right?

Unfortunately, most of the time,

it’s a complete fantasy that your

viewers will do anything like that.

Typically they spend a few seconds

(if you’re lucky) on your individual

photographs, including

recent Facebook and Instagram

posts, as well as the front page of

your website or Tumblr. (See the

February issue for specific tips

about those.) And if people have

to read an explanation of your

images, beyond a title, caption, or

hashtag…well, they just won’t.

But, there are two things you

can do to increase engagement

with your social networks that will

help grab the attention of your

audience, and even keep their

eyes on your work long enough to

“invest” by commenting on and

even sharing your images.

First, consider the words you

use. Most of the photographers I

know and follow, both emergent

and established, are often uncomfortable

writing about themselves

and their photos. I’ve met with

many of you at portfolio reviews

and school events, and I see a lot of

struggling with an “elevator pitch”

or artist’s statement that sums up

the entirety of your work. (That

goes for current projects and individual

images, too.)

So how about we lose the copy?

It’s better to choose an image that

has intrinsic visual power that

needs no explanation or context.

One that is just awesome. Especially

on your Facebook posts:

Include only a quick caption or

title, a link to your site, or nothing

at all. Let your audience get

curious and ask questions, then

you can respond to them in the

comments. The comments section

is a better place on Facebook

to add info, links, and description

than at the top of the post. Long

explanations are a waste of time,

will probably go unread, and will

visually step on the image that

accompanies them.

I’ve seen overly wordy artist’s

statements on Instagram, too.

This time they’re in the comments

section, but the same

advice applies. A simple hashtag

or caption and a link to see more

work suffices and will help your

audience engage without feeling

the pressure to read—and not

see—your story.

My second tip: Mind the grid. In

most social sites, it is possible to

see a mosaic of all of your recent

photos in one place. This is by

default on your Instagram profile,

and it happens when you click

through to photos on Facebook.

It is important to be conscious

of the order and design of the

way your images appear in those

grids. They are an immediate representation

of you as a photographer.

The pictures don’t need

to be uniformly thematic or narrowly

focused on a particular subject

or series. But you want the

viewer’s eye to travel over the grid

and absorb an overall tightness of

your aesthetic, color, and composition.

If you arrange and upload

your photos with some forethought

to the sequence within

that grid, it will, in addition, give

any slideshow view some muchneeded

rhythm.

This may mean not putting

photos that are too similar next

to each other, and alternating

your color scheme and composition.

Or, you can get more specific

with your grid— perhaps by

always using the same frame/

border, color palette, or compositional

rules. The point is to make

the first quick read of your profile

page very, very succinct.

It may not be obvious, but paying

attention to this overview, as

well as to what you write about

each photo, helps your audience

perceive you as a serious photographer

and aids in your ability

to stand out. If you can stand

out, it’s the first step in engaging

with your viewers and instilling

in them an interest in spreading

your message. —Allegra Wilde

PLAN THE GRID

Your Instagram feed

is a miniature

introduction to your

work, so curate it

as such.

MEET THE

AUTHOR

The cofounder and

chief operations

officer of Eyeist, the

online portfolio review

service, Allegra Wilde

is a visual strategist,

creative director, and

consultant to artists,

photographers, and artbased

businesses. She

has served as an MFA

mentor at the School

of Visual Arts and as

a visiting instructor at

Art Center College of

Design, FIT, and many

other university photography

programs.

CONTINUE THE

CONVERSATION

facebook.com/

PopPhotoRealism

twitter.com/

PopPhotoRealism

ALLEGRA WILDE (2)

12 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


CALLING ALL

STUDENT

PHOTOGRAPHERS

ong>Popularong> ong>Photographyong> on Campus is giving

student photographers the opportunity

to win prizes and have their work

recognized in the fall issue of PPOC

or on PopPhoto.com/campus

DEADLINE

AUGUST 31, 2016

FREE TO ENTER: For the contest rules and prizes, please visit

PopPhoto.com/campus-contest


11x14

...and more

ORDER 24/7 AT

SHORTRUNPOSTERS.COM

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 15


YOUR

NEXT

MOVE

After graduation, scores

of young photographers

will descend upon New

York and L.A. to seek

their fortunes. Want

to stand out from the

crowd? Don’t join it. We

talked to four shooters

who owe their success

to their surprising

locations.

By Sara Cravatts

LIFE OUTSIDE

THE METROPOLIS

Photographers Joe

Riis, Rush Jagoe,

Holly Andres, and

Pao Houa Her,

(clockwise from

top left), are

building successful

careers away from

big cities.

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 15


Joe Riis

31, Pierre, South Dakota; University of Wyoming ’08

FOR PHOTOGRAPHER Joe Riis,

the decision to move to western

Wyoming after his college graduation

was one born from a passion

for wildlife rather than an explicit

career strategy. “The day I graduated

college in May of 2008 is when

I started photographing full-time,”

Riis says. “I moved into my pickup

and photographed the pronghorn

migration for two years, which is

how I got the attention of the editors

I wanted to work for.”

Those editors were from National

Geographic Magazine, where Riis is

now a contracted, regularly contributing

freelance photographer.

Choosing to forge a career away

from photo-centric cities like New

York and Los Angeles was easy

for Riis, now based in rural South

Dakota, because he needed to

reside in a location conducive to

his nature photography. He moved

with a subject in mind above all

else. Riis points out that photographers

can live wherever they

please, as “nowadays it’s easy to

communicate with editors, and it

all comes down to their trust in

your ability to handle the fieldwork

and come back with the images.”

It is important to live in a location

that is consistent with the

subjects you want to photograph:

If you want to shoot landscapes,

live somewhere you can easily do

so; if street scenes are your calling,

choose an urban home. Identifying

a subject matter that is not

widely covered, and reporting on

it in depth with beautiful images

CAMPFIRE

Yellowstone

backcountry, June

2014.

BULL ELK

Also Yellowstone

backcountry,

October 2014.

can be a great way to attract

the attention of publications. In

Riis’s opinion, prioritizing your

passion is always the way to go.

“Pick a story that you deeply and

personally care about, and photograph

it for a long time. Make

pictures of that subject that

have never been made, dive in

and become a part of the story.”

Career success, if you market

yourself accordingly, will follow.

JOE RIIS (2)

16 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


PAO HOUA HER (2)

HMONG VETERAN

A portrait of a

Hmong man taken

in Saint Paul,

Minnesota in 2012

from Her’s Desire

series.

YA AT THE

SWIMMING POOL

Shot in Eagan,

Minnesota, 2011

also from Desire.

Pao Houa Her

33, Lino Lakes, Minnesota;

Minneapolis College of

Art and Design ’09 and

Yale University ’12

“IF YOU HAD asked me a few years

ago if I would ever go to Yale and

live on the East Coast, I would have

said no,” recalls Pao Houa Her of

her time spent earning an MFA in

New Haven, CT. After exploring

the area and graduating, she went

home to Minnesota to pursue her

goal of working as a professional

photographer.

For Her, the decision to return to

her home state was both practical

and passionate. She is part of

Minnesota’s tight-knit community

of Hmong, who arrived there over

40 years ago after the Vietnam

War. That culture, and Minnesota

itself, is a frequent subject of her

work. There were also logistics to

consider: “In New York or L.A. there

is such a high density of photographers

that it can be harder to

get resources. I’m not sure I would

have the same funding that I do

here if I were to live somewhere

else,” she says.

Setting yourself apart from the

competition is a definite plus,

but moving too far out can pose

another challenge: staying relevant.

Her says that in order to make sure

her work is seen she makes a point

to connect with the right people.

“You have to take all opportunities

available whether it’s knowing

which critics are coming to your

city or having a conversation with

a curator,” she says. Your physical

location can serve many purposes

for your career, but first and foremost

it should inspire your work.

“I get all of my ideas from where I

am,” the photographer says.

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 17


Holly Andres

38, Portland, Oregon;

University of Montana ’02 and

Portland State University ’04

“I FELL IN love with Portland during

graduate school,” says photographer

Holly Andres, “and I’ve found a very

supportive and creative community

of people here.” In addition to the

people, the environment itself has

been an inspiration. “If I was a studio

photographer my location wouldn’t

matter as much,” she says, “but since

I work on location, it’s important to

me to live in a place that offers me

inspiration and access.”

When choosing a place to live, you

must first consider what you need

to make your pictures. Your environment

should support your photography—not

get in the way. And don’t

forget cost. “New York and L.A. are

both very expensive places to work

in terms of locations and permits,”

explains Andres. When you can keep

DAWN: BELMONT

HOUSE

Andres made the

above image for

her series The

Fallen Fawn. Shot

in Portland,

Oregon in 2014.

MARIEL

HEMINGWAY

Shot for the New

York Times

Magazine in 2013;

Malibu, California.

both your shooting and living costs

down, you can focus more directly

on your craft. “Living in Portland

has allowed me to support a more

creative-focused life,” she says.

Andres has also found that keeping

industry eyes on her work is not

as challenging as it may have once

been. “The world is simultaneously

getting smaller as it gets bigger,”

she says. “Social media platforms

like Instagram have connected

people in the photography industry

in ways that were unimaginable

only a few years ago.” Why

pay to live in N.Y.C. or L.A. when

staying relevant can be as easy as

an Instagram post?

HOLLY ANDRES (2)

18 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


RUSH JAGOE (2)

Rush Jagoe

27, New Orleans, Louisiana; Western Kentucky University ’07

WHEN WE asked Rush Jagoe how

he decided where to begin his

professional career, he responded:

“It was pretty whimsical.” His

spontaneous move to New Orleans

in 2009 proved to be fateful, and he

has been living and shooting there

professionally ever since.

Among the many perks of his

colorful Louisiana environment are

the characters he can meet and

capture everyday. “I have a lot of

friends who moved to New York,

and they were doing interesting

things but they also only hung

out with other photographers. I

wanted to live in a more diverse

community of people.”

Like the other shooters we spoke

with, Jagoe described his photography

as being heavily influenced by

his society and surroundings. “The

culture and traditions [in New

Orleans] are very rich,” he explains,

and “the kinds of people who make

Louisiana their home are very

interesting to me. It can be harder

to focus on one person’s story and

legacy in a bigger city.”

One drawback of living outside

WADING

Portrait of hog

hunter John-Henry

Trant taken in

2016 for Jagoe’s

personal portfolio.

BIRD ON A

SHOULDER

Quintron at City

Park in New

Orleans. Taken for

Airlift in 2015.

of a major photography market:

You are required to travel for

some jobs. “You have to get used

to dropping whatever you are

doing to go shoot an assignment

in New York,” Jagoe cautions, but

it is an inconvenience he is willing

to live with.

When Jagoe reflects on his

decision to pick up and move his

life to New Orleans, he focuses

most on his deep investment in

his adopted home. “Go somewhere

that you think is interesting,

not just somewhere you are

told to go. Take a lot of pictures.

Make work constantly whether

you are getting paid for it or not.”

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 19


READY, SET,

ASSIST

Want to be a working pro? Start by

working for the pros. Here’s how to get

your first assisting job—and what you

need to know to do it right.

By Russell Hart

20 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


GET ON THE JOB

Photographer

Marvin Orellana

captured this

image of a photo

shoot in progress

for the New York

Times.

MARVIN ORELLANA; ISTOCK.COM/MICHAEL_H_REEDHOTMAILCOM

“THERE ARE millions of people

out there who can make gorgeous

pictures,” says New York-based

Will Styer, a Rochester Institute of

Technology grad who, after several

years of assisting, shoots still lifes

for clients such as Esquire, Armani,

and Ralph Lauren. “But a lot of

what goes into being a professional

photographer is dealing

with clients, solving problems as a

team, and making sure things go

smoothly on the day of the shoot—

skills that have nothing to do with

actual photography.” Want to learn

these skills so you can succeed as a

pro? Start by assisting.

1Sell yourself.

Put together a portfolio

that shows off your creative

and technical prowess. Then

customize it to the photographer

you want to work for; if he or she

relies mainly on studio lighting,

for example, include images that

show your ability with lights.

Build a solid website and keep it

updated, so that anyone hiring has

a reference. Then go for it. “As long

as you’re upfront with a photographer

you want to assist about your

knowledge and experience, it’s

never too soon,” says Styer. “You

don’t have to know how equipment

works to carry it. Be honest

about your abilities and realistic in

your expectations.”

2Decide how you

want to work.

Should you work full-time

for one photographer or freelance

with different photographers who

use assistants as needed? “There

are pros and cons to each,” says

New York advertising and

editorial photographer Jack

Reznicki, who assisted for

five years after getting his

BFA from RIT and now shoots

for big-ticket clients such as Hyatt,

AT&T, and The Wall Street Journal.

“With full-time work, you get to

see the entire production from

first phone call to finished product.

As a freelancer you usually see

only a piece of the process, but you

experience a lot more different

kinds of shooting,” he adds. James

Porto, an influential high-concept

photographer, thinks you should

do both. “The ideal path would be

to work for a single photographer

who you admire for at least a year,

then to freelance for multiple photographers,”

Porto says. “Freelancing

pays better, too.”

3Pick your

bosses wisely.

Either way, hire yourself

out to photographers you can

learn from. Look at their work,

especially in magazines and other

print media, and when you make

contact tell them where you’ve

seen it and why you like it. If you

know what kind of work you want

to do, assist photographers who

do it; if you’re still trying to decide,

mix it up. In the process, you may

even find a mentor.

4Choose the best

way to make

contact.

Email may seem the easiest and

least obnoxious, but it’s also easy

to ignore. “I think phone calls are

better and more personal than

email,” says Reznicki. “With the

first call I usually say I can’t talk

then, but I tell them to call me

back at a certain time. What’s

amazing is that only about 25

percent of people follow through

with that request.” The remaining

75 percent, says Reznicki, “don’t

get through the door,” even if they

call back some other time.

5Be persistent

but polite.

“I’m not going to remember

you from one interaction,” says

Tony Gale, an assistant-turnedphotographer

who has taught

assisting workshops co-sponsored

by American Photographic Artists

(APA, of which he’s now president)

and Sony, to whose Artisans of

Imagery group he belongs. “Being

consistent is important. I would

suggest trying a few different ways

to reach out—postcards, email,

social media. Just don’t do them

all at once or too frequently.”

6Do whatever

needs to be done.

Once you start assisting,

know your place. “As an assistant,

your job is to make the shoot as

smooth as possible,” says Gale.

“That might mean setting up

lights, but it could also mean

mopping the bathroom. Don’t be

reluctant to get your hands dirty.”

7Be seen and

not heard.

“Unless you’re the first

assistant and know exactly what’s

going on, you won’t endear yourself

to the boss by always putting

in your two cents on set,” says

Reznicki, who recalls an assistant

who gave unsolicited

advice in front

of a client. “He

didn’t realize

that there was

also a political

aspect to the problem,”

the photographer

says. “I never

hired him again.”

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 21


ISTOCK.COM/MR_MORTON; ISTOCK.COM/BARRAND

8Bring

your own

“kit.”

Pack simple tools and materials

that will reduce your need to ask

for things—a multipurpose pocket

tool, clamps, gaffer’s tape, a roll

of black foil to control light, a pad

and pen for keeping notes, Power

Bars so you won’t have to work

on an empty stomach. “I used to

bring memory cards, which more

than once solved what could have

been a huge problem,” says Gale.

9Anticipate the

photographer’s

needs.

Don’t make the photographer ask

for everything he or she wants

you to do—go ahead and start to

do it. Be judicious, though. “Some

of my assistants know exactly

what needs to be done before I

even tell them because they’ve

worked with me so long,” says

Styer. “But if it’s your first time

assisting a particular photographer,

I’d pay close attention and

just be ready when you’re asked

to do something.”

10 Ask

questions.

Don’t be afraid to

admit what you don’t know. Your

boss knows you’re there not just

to earn some money, but also to

BE A JOINER

Join professional

photographers’

groups such as

PPA, APA, and

ASMP, and volunteer

to work at

their conventions.

These groups often

offer discounted

student memberships

and maintain

searchable assistant

databases

that can help you

find work.

learn. Just don’t overdo it—after all,

you took Photo I in school. “Be confident,

but be teachable,” advises

veteran Minneapolis-based assistant

Tim Olsen, who maintains

APhotoAssistant.com, a website

dedicated to assisting.

11

Be ready.

Sometimes photographers

need assistants

at very short notice—

especially if a member of

their go-to crew can’t take

on the assignment. Lastminute

substitutions can

lead to regular work.

12“If you pay attention,

Have a positive

attitude.

listen, and can focus on a task,

that’s what I care most about,”

says Gale. “Knowing more is always

good, but if I’m going to spend

from six hours to several days with

someone, personality is important.”

13

Don’t use your

smartphone

on set.

“It’s very disrespectful, especially

when time is money and so much

is on the line,” says Jack Reznicki.

“If you have to, do it on your lunch

break or go to the bathroom.”

Reznicki tells of a case in which a

photographer was sued by his client

because his assistant uploaded

a behind-the-scenes image of the

shoot to social media.

14assisted a

Follow up.

If you’ve

photographer and all went

well, send a thank-you note

saying you’d like to work

for him or her again and

expressing the hope that

he or she will refer you

to other photographers.

15 Keep

networking.

Even if you end up

working full-time for one photographer,

it’s important to establish

new connections. Do this on

shoots, of course, but attend photo

community events too. And be sure

to make friends with your local

photo equipment rental house.

16

Exploit social

media.

“It’s actually one of

the ways I’ve met a lot of wellknown

photographers,” says

Detroit-based Matthew LaVere,

who is now making the transition

to full-time professional. “Down the

line, they’ve called me up to see if

I was available to assist. Instagram

and Twitter have really helped me

network.” Facebook offers similar

opportunities, among them The

Crew Group, an informal gathering

of assistants. (Search for groups/

TheCrewGroup.)

17 “It is absolutely

Start mixing in

your own jobs.

possible to assist and shoot at the

same time,” says Gale. “I know

some people believe you should

make a clean break as soon as you

think you’re ready, but I’m not sure

that’s realistic. Gradually shooting

more and assisting less is a

perfectly fine way to do it. And if

you start turning down shooting

jobs because you’re already booked

to assist, you know it’s time to quit

assisting!”

22 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


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Ask

More

Catherine Opie talks about what it means

to make—and look at—portraits

Photos by Catherine Opie; text by Meg Ryan

24 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


AN ORDINARY kitchen in a ranchstyle

home, light diffusing through

a window and reflecting off the

mirrors over scuff-marked, aging

wallpaper. A note to self in red

lipstick on a mirror. The contents

of a closet, half a dozen or so items

at a time: dresses, shoes, gowns,

furs. The golden statuettes. Photos

of friends and family on practically

every surface. A pile of red AIDS

ribbons. A diamond and emerald

necklace dissolving into the sun.

Zooming in on the objects of a

life, from reflections of an inimitably

public image to the mundane,

TWO PORTRAITS

“Kate and Laura,”

2012, from Recent

Portraits, at left,

and “Living Room

West View,”

2010–2011, from

700 Nimes Road

Portfolio (Elizabeth

Taylor), above.

Catherine Opie constructed a

portrait of Elizabeth Taylor without

ever meeting the legendary actor

in person. For the project that ultimately

became 700 Nimes Road, the

photographer was granted access to

Taylor’s Bel-Air home in 2011 after

their mutual accountant made the

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 25


connection—and although Opie

never intended to photograph the

star, the project shifted gears on

March 23, 2011, when Taylor died of

congestive heart failure. The resulting

series (recently on exhibit at

Lehmann Maupin’s Lower East Side

gallery in New York and at the Los

Angeles MOCA Pacific Design Center

through May 8) gave Opie time

to explore one of many questions

that have motivated her to make

photographs over a celebrated

career: What is a portrait, really?

“It’s trying to extend the definition

of how we begin to define

what a portrait is,” says Opie, the

fine-art photographer whose rigorous

explorations of portraiture and

landscape have produced some of

the most lauded images of the past

25 years. “Somebody as iconic as

Elizabeth Taylor—we know exactly

what she looks like. So through the

still lifes, my question was...does

it give us even more information

about [her] than just having her

sit for me for a portrait?”

If Opie is about anything, she

is about asking questions. From

American Cities to Freeways to her

most recent portraits, the photographer

has been especially

interested in asking questions

about American culture and its

politics. Her aim, she says, is to

“really use my lifetime, my ideas,

and questions that I put forth

to the world…to try to make

bodies of work in relationship

to that.” Opie has set her prolific

and technically exacting work

on tableaux such as Tea Party

rallies, President Barack Obama’s

first inauguration, high school

football, San Francisco’s bondage

community, and natural and

human-made landscapes such

CATHERINE OPIE/REGEN PROJECTS, LA AND LEHMANN MAUPIN, NY & HONG KONG (ALL)

26 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


JEWELS

“Emeralds,”

2010–2011 (top

left), from 700

Nimes Road

(Elizabeth Taylor).

DRESS UP

“Oliver in a Tutu,”

2004, from In and

Around Home.

BALLER

“Kaine,” 2007,

from High School

Football.

as the Los Angeles freeways and

Yosemite National Park. Each image

peers into its subject and points to

the context in which it sits.

As William Eggleston did with

his still lifes of Elvis Presley’s

Graceland in 1984, at Taylor’s home

Opie constructed a similar mosaic

and she takes care to point out

that by fitting disparate images

together, we get to know the person,

not her stuff. “It’s the simple idea

of what bearing witness does,”

Opie says. “You bear witness to a

home. You construct something in

relationship.”

For Opie, those relationships

extend not only into Taylor’s own

life and our cultural history in

relation to her, but into the whole

history of portraiture. Start with

her photo of Andy Warhol’s portrait

of Taylor. “It’s about me the artist

looking at Elizabeth, but also there’s

a relationship to artists or history

having a look at Elizabeth,” Opie

says. “There’s a kind of layering...

that begins to create or designate

the notion of portraiture for me.”

Peel back more layers of relationship—between

artist and

subject, art and audience, artist

and history—and the audience is

pulled into a conversation with

artists who came centuries ago. In a

recent series of portraits (in another

show at UCLA’s Hammer Museum

through May 22), Opie’s friends

and associates sit in poses remi-

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 27


niscent of Renaissance portraits:

emerging from an inky background,

their faces more illuminated than

lit. Idexa kneels inside the frame

gazing into the distance, allowing

us to gaze back at her elaborately

tattooed body. Author Jonathan

Franzen sits with his back to the

camera, inviting us to read over his

shoulder. The chiaroscuro-style portraits

have a strong relationship to

painting, especially to the portraits

of Old Masters such as Hans Holbein,

Rembrandt, and Caravaggio.

Opie looks at that relationship both

conceptually and technically.

“The question that I’m asking...

now [involves] lighting and the way

one would think about Renaissance

lighting,” Opie explains. “Are we

able to hold the person longer, to

think about portraiture vis-à-vis

the fact that social media has taken

over in relationship to the selfie?

By using an older trope, do I have

people actually standing before the

work longer?”

OVERPASSES

Untitled #2, #1,

#11, and #30,

1994, from Opie’s

series Freeways.

INTIMATE

POSESSIONS

“Jewelry Box #6,”

2010–2011, from

700 Nimes Road

(Elizabeth Taylor).

IMAGE OF

AN ARTIST

“Ron,” 2013, from

Recent Portraits.

28 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


To achieve that seductive effect,

Opie uses ProPhoto lights with

a fresnel over the strobe. (She

shoots with a Hasselblad H2 and

Phase One Q180 back.) “Then I’m

able to control the light on the

subject,” she says. “None of the

light manipulation has happened

post-production; it’s all done at

the time of photographing. So I’m

treating digital, for the most part,

still as a platform, like I would treat

a negative.”

In the Portraits and Landscapes

show at the Hammer and at

Lehmann Maupin’s Chelsea gallery,

Opie’s landscapes sit like space bars

amid the portraits’ rich allegorical

text. They prelude a six-story

mural of Yosemite Falls that will

be installed in May at the new L.A.

federal courthouse. These images,

too, invite pause. They stop the

viewer as the brain tries to decipher

the details. Then the gaze softens,

as if staring long enough might

make the image drift into focus.

More questions. “How do we keep

people looking at images?” Opie

asks. “Why are images still important

in this completely saturated

image space, a culture that has been

created through social media?”

As UCLA faculty, Opie advises artists

to follow their passion, understand

their work in context, and to

ask questions. “That’s the cool thing

about being an artist, right? You get

to ask a lot of questions and try to

figure them out by making work,”

she says. “Be passionate, and where

passion alone doesn’t answer everything,

allow complexities to come

in within your work [that] allow you

to understand, really, the language

that you’re working with.

“And don’t stop,” she continues.

“That’s the beauty of being able to

express, of knowing one’s medium

and history of art in depth—to

really explore the complexities of

ideas of representation. I never run

out of questions, and that’s really

a nice thing.”

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 29


TOOLSWhat It

Roundup P.31

Takes P.32

FIRST LOOK

GREATER GLASS

Sony shoots for sharpness with its new lens line

FULL-FRAME FINERY

Sony’s new line of glass debuts with

three full-frame lenses. The traditional

24–70mm f/2.8 workhorse and an

85mm f/1.4 and 70–200mm f/2.8.

FOR YEARS NOW, the best lenses

you could get for Sony Alpha

cameras bore the Zeiss moniker

and were made to the high standards

of that esteemed brand.

Now, with the introduction of its

new series of G Master lenses for

FE- and E-mount mirrorless cameras,

Sony has come up with its

own set of high standards. The

first two lenses in the series, the

FE 24–70mm f/2.8 GM and the

FE 85mm f/1.4 GM, are currently

available for $2,198 and $1,798,

respectively. The third lens in the

series, the FE 70–200mm f/2.8

GM OSS, doesn’t have an official

price yet, but is expected to hit

stores in May.

These lenses throw image

circles that cover full-frame

sensors, but can also be used on

Sony’s APS-C bodies, capturing

the equivalent field of view of

36–105mm, 127.5, and 105–

300mm lenses, respectively.

We had a chance to use the

first two lenses recently on a

Sony-sponsored trip to Miami

Beach, and can say that the

image quality from both lenses

appears superb. Sony says that

it is trying to balance sharpness

and smooth bokeh in its new

glass. Extremely tight manufacturing

tolerances—down to

0.01 micron—aim to make their

new XA (Extreme Aspherical)

elements serve up extremely

smooth out-of-focus discs without

the ring-like effect that can

arise with some lens designs.

Furthermore, new direct drive

supersonic motors and duallinear

supersonic motors help

drive fast, precise focusing. That

said, given the 85mm’s heavy

glass, you can’t expect it to focus

G MASTER

LENSES

KEY SPECS

FOCAL LENGTHS:

24–70mm; 85mm;

70–200mm

MAXIMUM

APERTURES:

f/2.8; f/1.4; f/2.8

MOUNTS:

Compatible with Sony

FE and E mounts

FILTER SIZES:

82mm; 77mm;

77mm

DIMENSIONS:

3.4x5.4 in.; 3.5x4.2

in.; 3.5x7.9 in.

WEIGHTS:

1.95 lbs; 1.81 lbs;

3.26 lbs

PRICES: $2,198,

street; $1,798, street;

price not yet

determined

INFO: sony.com

as quickly as the 24–70mm, or

smaller lenses with lighter elements.

Both lenses are well built

and weather sealed to fend off

moisture and dust; they should

easily stand up to daily use.

According to Sony, G Master

lenses deliver a baseline resolution

of 50 line-pairs per millimeter—more

than double the 20 lp/

mm you might expect from film

era lenses. Why so much res?

Sony has endeavored to make

glass that can deliver more when

paired with cameras that boast

extremely high pixel counts.

From the images we made with

the lenses mounted on Sony’s

A7R II, we think that the company

is on to something. Both the

24–70mm and the 85mm served

up some of the sharpest images

we’ve ever seen with creamy outof-focus

areas. —Philip Ryan

30 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


TOOLS ROUNDUP

CAMERA

UPGRADES

AS YOU GET more serious, you’ll want a camera that keeps

up. These new models each offer advanced capabilities and

outstanding image quality (see our full lab and field tests at

PopPhoto.com/gear for all but the Canon and Nikon, coming

later this spring). All street prices are for the body only.

Olympus Pen-F $1,119 Olympus put a 20.3MP Live

MOS Four Thirds sensor in this interchangeable-lens compact. With

a burst rate of 10 frames per second and ISOs up to 25,600, it’s

aimed at street shooters. High-res mode shoots 50MP images, and

a dial allows for color or monochrome shooting. getolympus.com

Sony Alpha 6300 $1,148 This update has a newly

configured 24.2MP APS-C-sized Exmor CMOS sensor to assist in

video capture, now boosted to an oversampled 4K resolution at 30,

25, and 24 fps. Still shooters will like its robust 425-point autofocus

system and improved subject tracking, high-speed burst mode of 11

fps, and expanded ISO up to 51,200. sony.com

Fujifilm X-Pro2 $1,699 A score for mirrorless camera

fans: its re-engineered hybrid viewfinder blends optical and digital

readouts to enhance manual focus and provide real-time camera

data with options for a bright-line rangefinder view and digital splitscreen

focusing. The new 24.3MP APS-C-sized X-Trans sensor is

sensitive up to 51,200 for low-light shooting. fujifilm.com

Pentax K-1 $1,800 This DSLR brings the solid Pentax

design to the realm of full-frame digital cameras. Its 36.4MP CMOS

sensor is incorporated into a five-axis stabilizer for shake reduction

and use in creative modes like its Astro Tracer for stellar imaging. A

pentaprism viewfinder and novel articulated LCD screen are added

perks. us.ricoh-imaging.com

Nikon D500 $1,997 Nikon’s new top APS-C-format (DX)

DSLR body has a rugged magnesium-alloy frame and integrates a

20.9MP sensor with impressive ISO sensitivity—expandable to cover

ISO 50 to 1,640,000—and the ability to churn out 4K video at up to

30 fps or Full HD at up to 60 fps. Nikon added 153 AF points, 99 of

which are cross-type, and 10 fps shooting. nikonusa.com

Canon EOS-1D X Mark II $5,999 This DSLR

sports a 20.2MP full-frame sensor and two DIGIC 6+ image

processors. Its UDMA7-compatible CompactFlash slot and CFast 2.0

slot lets you capture large, Fine JPEGs (up to 73 RAW images on a

UDMA7 CF card, or 170 RAW shots on a CFast2.0 card). It records

4K video at up to 60 fps as Motion JPEG files and offers ALL-I or IPB

compression when recording Full HD at up to 120 fps. The expanded

sensitivity range spans ISO 50 to 409,600. usa.canon.com

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 31


TOOLS WHAT IT TAKES SHOE-MOUNT FLASH

HOT

SHOT

To freeze action,

try using an

accessory flash

OUR WEB EDITOR Stan Horaczek

took on a cool assignment a few

years back: An aspiring Hollywood

professional asked him to help

build a portfolio of action photos

that she hoped would get her stunt

work. To create the action—here

taken among state office buildings

in Albany, New York—she planted

her foot on the edge of a large public

sculpture and acrobatically pushed

herself off it into a flip. For the shot

to work, Horaczek had to catch her

at exactly the right moment and

keep her as sharp as possible. His

perfect timing assured the former

and his flash the latter.

Why Use It

Even though the scene had plenty

of natural light, Horaczek needed

the pop of his shoe-mount flash. Its

additional output illuminated detail

in his subject’s black dress: You can

see the folds, and even a little of

the texture, in its dark fabric. They

wouldn’t have recorded if Horaczek

relied on available light.

But that’s not the main reason he

added the flash. “Hotshoe flashes

typically have pretty fast flash

durations, and this one did a good

job freezing her,” says Horaczek. His

Canon 580EX Speedlite's duration

of approximately 1/2000 sec (at full

power), was much shorter than his

sluggish—by action standards—

1/160 sec shutter speed. The flash

assured the sharpness he needed,

and because it was held off-camera

and up high, it cast that cool

shadow behind his subject.

How to Use It

To get the shortest flash durations,

switch your unit to manual mode,

and set the lowest power output (i.e.

1/32 or 1/64 power). For this subject,

however, full-power delivered

sharpness enough. —Peter Kolonia

Horaczek used a

Canon EOS 5D Mark

III and Canon EF

24–105mm f/4L IS

USM lens. Exposure

1/160 sec at f/8,

ISO 400. The 580 EX

Speed lite flash was

set to full power.

STAN HORACZEK (PORTRAIT)

32 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


Alpha Universe Magazine

A World of ong>Photographyong> Inspiration.

— In-depth features across all areas of photography

— Learn from Acclaimed Sony Artisans such as Brian Smith, Me Ra Koh, Ira Block and more

— Learn more about Award-winning Sony Cameras

Available for download in the iTunes ® and Google Play stores and with select issues of ong>Popularong> ong>Photographyong>.

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are trademarks of Sony. All other trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners. iTunes is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the

U.S. and other countries. Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc.

POPPHOTO.COM/CAMPUS POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS 33


SHOOT THIS ROOFLINES

AN ARCHITECTURAL photographer

based in Chicago, Slobodan Blagojevic

visited New York in 2013 and

toured the Museum of Modern Art.

Looking out from a top floor, Blagojevic

was struck by the elements of

French, Palladian, neoclassical, and

modernist styles in sight.

Rooftops offer refreshingly atypical

views of buildings compared to

what we experience from the street.

They’re also home to distinctive

objects. Blagojevic, for example,

enjoys shooting Manhattan’s water

TOP OF THE WORLD

Get up high to change your perspective

towers. London has its chimneys

and Paris its distinctively shaped

mansard rooflines—most places can

look distinctive from up high.

If you want to try for yourself,

Blagojevic advises to first make sure

your camera is level. This keeps a

scene’s vertical lines distortion-free

and parallel to the frame edges. Try

not to shoot your subject through a

window: it can add unwanted reflections,

blurriness, and color shifts,

especially if the glass is thick, coated,

or tinted.

—Peter Kolonia

A DIFFERENT

VIEW

Blagojevic used a

Canon EOS 60D

and EF 17–55mm

f/2.8 IS USM lens,

exposing for 1/80

sec at f/4, ISO

400.

YOUR

ASSIGNMENT

Photograph rooftops or a roofline

and try to capture the character

or personality of the architecture,

the city, or the atmosphere. Look

for eye-catching angles, lighting,

and design. Share to Instagram

or Facebook with the hashtag

#AssignmentPopPhoto for the

chance to be featured on www.

PopPhoto.com/campus.

SLOBODAN BLAGOJEVIC

34 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016


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36 POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY ON CAMPUS APRIL 2016

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