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TN Musician Vol. 70 No. 1

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The Official Publication of the Tennessee Music Education Association

Creating a

Practice Culture

by Colin Hill

p. 28

This is How

We Do it Here:

Establishing

a Positive,

Successful

Culture in Your

Music Program

by DeLaine Chapman

p. 34

Starting a Tri-M Music

Honor Society:

An Interview with

Jonathan Schoepflin

by Anna Laura Williams

p.38

VOLUME 70, NO. 1


MUSIC

MUSIC WITH PURPOSE

A Christ-centered university in southeast

Tennessee with faculty, curriculum, facilities,

and opportunities to prepare you for your

goals as tomorrow’s musician.

Audition Dates:

NOV. | JAN. | FEB. | MAR. | APR.

LEEUNIVERSITY.edu/music


TENNESSEE MUSICIAN EDITORIAL STAFF

Michael W. Chester

Managing Editor and Advertising Manager

Justin T. Scott

Associate Editor

Laura Boucher

Associate Style Editor

Jazmin Jordan

Social Media Director

Allison Segel-Smith

Pre-Production Editor

Contributing Editors

Matthew Clark

Doug Phillips

Carol King-Chipman

Jerome Souther

PUBLISHED BY SLATE GROUP

6024 45th Street

Lubbock, Texas 79407

(800) 794-5594 office

(806) 794-1305 fax

Rico Vega

Director of Creative Services

Taylor Sutherland

Graphic Design

Ian Spector

Account Executive

All editorial materials should be sent to: Michael Chester, Managing

Editor (615-873-0605) E-mail: editor@tnmea.org.

Submit materials by e-mail in Microsoft Word format.

Advertising: Information requests and ad orders should be

directed to: Michael Chester, Managing Editor (615-

873-0605) e-mail: editor@tnmea.org. All advertising

information is on the TMEA web site, www.tnmea.org.

Deadlines for advertisement orders and editorial materials:

Issue No. 1 – Deadline: September 15 (in home delivery

date October 15); Issue No. 2 – Deadline: November 15

(in home delivery date December 15); Issue No. 3 – Deadline:

February 15 (in home delivery date March 15); Issue

No. 4 – Deadline: April 15 (in home delivery date May 15)

Tennessee Musician is copyrighted. Reproduction in

any form is illegal without the express permission of

the editor.

Postmaster: Send address changes to: Tennessee Musician,

c/o National Association for Music Education

(NAfME), 1806 Robert Fulton Drive, Reston, VA

20191-4348.

Non-Profit 501(c)(3) Organization U.S. Postage Paid

at Lubbock, Texas. ISSN Number 0400-3332; EIN

number 20-3325550

TABLE OF CONTENTS | 2017 | VOLUME 70, NO. 1

Prelude - A Message from the Editor 4

Michael Chester

TMEA Executive Director’s Message 6

Ron Meers

TMEA President’s Message 8

Johnathan Vest, Ed. D.

TMEA – By the Numbers/Verbatim 10

Matthew Clark

COLUMNS

TMEA State General Music Chair’s Message 13

Linzie Mullins

TMEA State Choral Chair’s Message 14

W. Fitzgerald Patton

TMEA State Orchestra Chair’s Message 16

Michelle Clupper

TMEA State Band Chair’s Message 19

David Chipman

TMEA State Higher Education Chair’s Message 20

Ryan Fisher, Ph. D.

TMEA State Collegiate NAfME Chair’s Message 23

Jennifer Vannatta-Hall, Ed. D.

TMEA Society for Music Teacher Education/

Research Chair’s Message 24

Jamilla McWhirter, Ph. D.

TMEA Advocacy and Government Relations

Chair’s Message 27

Christopher Dye, Ed. D.

FEATURED ARTICLES

Creating a Practice Culture 28

Colin Hill, DMA

This is How We Do It Here: Establishing a Positive

Successful Culture in Your Music Program 34

DaLaine Chapman, Ph. D.

Starting a Tri-M Music Honor Society: An Interview with

Jonathan Schoepflin 38

Anna Laura Williams

Tennessee Musician Advertiser Index 43

TMEA Back Then 44


TMEA BOARD AND COUNCIL

TMEA OFFICERS 2017-2018

TMEA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR:

Ron Meers

execdirector@tnmea.org

TMEA PRESIDENT:

Johnathan Vest, Ed. D.

president@tnmea.org

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

TMEA STATE GENERAL MUSIC CHAIR:

Linzie Mullins

genmusicchair@tnmea.org

TMEA STATE CHORAL CHAIR:

Gerald Patton

pattong@rcschools.net

TMEA STATE ORCHESTRA CHAIR:

Michelle Clupper

michelle.clupper@knoxschools.org

TMEA STATE BAND CHAIR:

David Chipman

banddir@bellsouth.net

TMEA STATE HIGHER EDUCATION CHAIR:

Ryan Fisher, Ph. D.

rfisher3@memphis.edu

TMEA COUNCIL

WTGMEA PRESIDENT:

Linzie Mullins

genmusicchair@tnmea.org

WTGMEA PRESIDENT-ELECT:

Frances Miller

fmiller@millingtonschools.org

WTVMEA PRESIDENT:

Lalania Vaughn

lvaughn@rebelmail.net

WTVMEA PRESIDENT-ELECT:

Christopher Davis

davischristophert@gmail.com

WTSBOA PRESIDENT:

Stephen Price

prices@gcssd.org

WTSBOA PRESIDENT-ELECT:

Ollie Liddell

ollie_liddell@hotmail.com

MTGMEA PRESIDENT:

Alexis Yatuzis-Derryberry

derryberrya@rcschools.net

MTVA PRESIDENT:

Michael Choate

choatem@pcsstn.com

MTVA PRESIDENT ELECT:

Lia Holland

liaholland@mtcscougars.net

TMEA PRESIDENT-ELECT:

Lafe Cook

pres-elect@tnmea.org

2 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1

TMEA PAST-PRESIDENT:

Jeff Phillips, Ed. D.

jeffrey.phillips@sumnerschools.org

TMEA STATE COLLEGIATE NAFME CHAIR:

Jennifer Vannatta-Hall, Ed. D.

jennifer.vannatta-hall@mtsu.edu

TMEA STATE EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CHAIR:

John Womack

webmaster@tnmea.com

TMEA PUBLICATIONS EDITOR AND

ADVERTISING MANAGER:

Michael Chester

editor@tnmea.org

TMEA PUBLICATIONS ASSOCIATE EDITOR:

Justin Scott

justin.scott@tcsedu.net

TMEA ADVOCACY AND GOVERNMENT

RELATIONS CHAIR:

Christopher Dye, Ed. D.

christopher.dye@mtsu.edu

MTSBOA PRESIDENT:

Debbie Burton

dlburton98@gmail.com

MTSBOA PRESIDENT-ELECT:

Justin Scott

justin.scott@tcsedu.net

ETGMEA PRESIDENT:

Margaret Moore

mamcmoore57@aol.com

ETGMEA PRESIDENT-ELECT

Marcus Smith

marcus.smith@knoxschools.org

ETVA PRESIDENT:

Kenton Deitch

kenton.deitch@knoxschools.org

ETVA PRESIDENT-ELECT:

Stephanie Coker

scoker@acs.ac

ETSBOA PRESIDENT:

Gary Wilkes

gwilkes428@gmail.com

ETSBOA PRESIDENT-ELECT:

Alan Hunt

ahunt@bradleyschools.org

CONFERENCE MANAGEMENT TEAM

TMEA CONFERENCE CO-CHAIR:

Brad Turner

brad.turner@acsk-12.org

TMEA CO-CONFERENCE CHAIR:

Paul Waters

paulwaters.tmea@gmail.com

TMEA CONFERENCE EXHIBITS CHAIR:

Jo Ann Hood

jhood10105@aol.com

ALL-STATE MANAGEMENT TEAM

TN ALL-STATE CHORAL GENERAL CHAIR:

Amanda Ragan

aragan@ortn.edu

ENSEMBLE CHAIRS

TREBLE HONOR CHOIR CHAIR:

Tiffany Barton

tntreblechoir@gmail.com

TN ALL-STATE SATB ENSEMBLE CHAIR:

Lauren Ramey

lauren.ramey@wcs.edu

TN ALL-STATE SSAA CHORALE ENSEMBLE CHAIR:

Amanda Short

amandalovellshort@gmail.com

TN ALL-STATE TTBB CHORUS ENSEMBLE CHAIR:

Johnny Kimbrough

johnny.kimbrough@jcseagles.org

TN ALL-STATE 9TH - 10TH GRADE STRING

ORCHESTRA CHAIR:

Andy Smith

andy.smith@sumnerschools.org

PROJECT CHAIRS

TMEA MEMBERSHIP CHAIR:

Position unfulfilled at this time

TMEA GUITAR EDUCATION CHAIR:

Chip Henderson

paul.henderson@mtsu.edu

TMEA JAZZ EDUCATION POLICY CHAIR:

Richard Ripani, Ph. D.

richard.ripani@mnps.org

TMEA SOCIETY FOR MUSIC TEACHER

EDUCATION CHAIR:

Jamila L. McWhirter, Ph. D.

jamila.mcwhirter@mtsu.edu

TMEA MUSIC MERCHANTS

INDUSTRY CHAIR:

Rick DeJonge

rick.dejonge@khsmusic.com

TMEA CONFERENCE REGISTRATION CHAIR:

Mark Garey

mgarey86@comcast.net

TMEA CONFERENCE PERFORMANCE

GROUP CHAIR:

John Mears

mearsj@rcschools.net

TN ALL-STATE INSTRUMENTAL

GENERAL CHAIR:

Todd Shipley

allstateinstrumental@tnmea.org

TN ALL-STATE 11TH - 12TH GRADE SYMPHONIC

ORCHESTRA CHAIR:

Jessica Peck

peck_j@hcde.org

TN ALL-STATE 9TH - 10TH GRADE CONCERT

BAND CHAIR:

J.R. Baker

john.baker@rcstn.net

TN ALL-STATE 11TH - 12TH GRADE CONCERT

BAND CHAIR:

Carter Noblin

noblinc@wcschools.com

TN ALL-STATE JAZZ BAND CHAIR:

Cord Martin

corderyl.martin@gmail.com

TMEA WEBMASTER:

John Womack

webmaster@tnmea.org

TMEA TRI-M CHAIR:

Anna Laura Williams

anna.laura.williams@outlook.com

TMEA MUSIC IN OUR SCHOOLS

MONTH CHAIR:

Tiffany Barton

tntreblechoir@gmail.com

TMEA HISTORY AND ARCHIVES CHAIR:

Position unfulfilled at this time

TMEA RETIRED TEACHERS CHAIR:

Bobby Jean Frost

bjfrost@aol.com


Compose Your Future

www.etsu.edu/music

www.Facebook.com/ETSUMusic

@GoETSUMusic

ETSU Music Days:

Open House and Auditions for Fall 2018 Enrollment

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

• Bachelor of Music Degrees in

Performance, Education, and Jazz

• Nationally recognized classical

and contemporary ensembles

• Competitive scholarships based

on audition

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Saturday, March 31, 2018

(Vocal Only)


PRELUDE - A MESSAGE FROM THE EDITOR

Michael Chester

I

WAS DRIVING TO ANOTHER LAVISH

social soirée one early evening this past

summer. In thinking about who would

attend and whether or not I should catch

a podcast of The Dinner Party Download, I

was also preparing my mind for my upcoming

trip to Washington D.C. to attend the

NAfME Hill Day and National Leadership

Assembly. As is the case with the mindless

drive that is westbound I-24, my mind

started to zone out, which is a common

occurrence when being stuck in Nashville

traffic. As I approached the off-ramp to my

exit, I was once again stuck in traffic and remained

on the off-ramp for at least 15 minutes.

I’m not sure if there was an issue with

the traffic light timing signal or people just

on their phones not paying attention to the

light. Since I was essentially parked on the

off-ramp for some time, I noticed that there

happened to be a small two-person roadside

attraction. The two gentlemen in question

were approaching cars and were receiving

various denominations of currency. They

were not performing, nor were they selling

anything. A modest cardboard sign that read

“Need Money . . . Every Little Bit Helps.”

They did not appear to be disheveled nor

did they fit any pre-conceived stereotype

of a beggar or someone who appeared to

be homeless. There seemed to be no shortage

of perfect strangers handing out loose

floorboard change. I watched, with rather

mixed emotions, this exchange take place

for the several minutes that I was stuck

on the ramp. I couldn’t help but think that

these two seemed to have something going

on here. As a side note, I want to make sure

that we are all on the same page here. There

is nothing funny about people in need, unemployment,

or homelessness for that matter.

Whatever my assumption about the two

gentlemen, their motives, and their true intentions

are irrelevant. The two gentlemen

found a solution to their problem, found a

prime location, and found a way to connect

with an audience who in turn, appeared to

be sympathetic to their cause.

In processing all of this, and in thinking

about my trip to Washington, D.C., I began

to think about where we are with the implementation

of ESSA and the funding for Title

I-A, Title II-A, and Title IV-A, respectively.

At this point it seems safe to say that there

may be a few nickels and dimes spent on

these appropriations, but nowhere near the

basic level that was intended to fund these

programs. So now it begs the question–where

do we stand? Perhaps more to the point is a

question of what do we do now?

Music educators

are the only

people who

can adequately

present the need,

justification, and

benefits of a wellfunded

and wellsupported

music

program.

For many years, or perhaps since the genesis

of music education in America (aka the

Lowell Mason years), it stands to reason that

music educators have managed to find every

conceivable workaround when it comes to

funding their music programs. As music educators,

we are truly the only spokespeople

who can truly advocate the needs of the students

we teach, on a local level. Music educators

are the only people who can adequately

present the need, justification, and benefits

of a well-funded and well-supported music

program. What actions, if extreme, should we

take to get the attention of those who exude

power and influence and who make decisions

on behalf of the electorate?

I’m not sure of the answer to this. However,

it occurred to me that perhaps music educators

could have more success and more of

an audience in today’s climate of viral social

media if we all took to the streets and started

begging people for money. Would our signs

read “music teacher desperately needs money

to buy sheet music–every little bit helps!”

I know that this seems like an absurd option,

perhaps even offensive. However, as it would

seem, about a week later I came across a report

on the wires of a teacher engaging in this

very behavior.

“Oklahoma teacher panhandles to raise

money for school supplies.” That was the

headline that started to get some traction. I

would imagine that many of you heard about

this through social media. To summarize,

Teresa Danks, a school teacher from Oklahoma

was tired of having to pay for supplies

out her pocket. Her husband jokingly suggested

that she panhandle for money to fund

her supplies budget. She did just that. Danks

did not realize that it would catch the attention

of the media, who took the story and ran

with it. Later appearances on Good Morning

America and $13,000.00 later in revenue

raised through GoFundMe gave Danks her

15 minutes of fame. While there are parts of

this that make a bad situation into a feel-good

4 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


Music teachers

desperately need

money to buy sheet

music–every little

bit helps!

news story, the fact remains that the lack of

funding for basic supplies, materials, and

professional development resources has become

the reality that many educators face.

Does it take all of us begging for money on

the street corner to get the attention of our

political leaders? Sadly, in my opinion, I don’t

know that it would matter. In fact, I’m willing

to bet that many teachers would just get fed

up enough and choose to leave the profession

rather than panhandle in the streets. Can we

blame them for that choice? Can you put a

price on dignity?

The passage of ESSA now makes it possible

for the states and LEA’s to have more of

a say in what controls and monies are spent

and on what. None of it matters if there isn’t

enough money allocated by Congress to fully

fund educational priorities. Any monies that

are made available are going to come in the

form of competitive block grants. Now this

means that some districts that have the resources

to write these grants will win, while

more rural LEA’s will lose out on desperately

needed funds. More importantly, it means

that the students will ultimately lose.

So at this point, what do we do? Certainly,

being aware is the first step. If, as the saying

attributed to Tip O’Neill, “All politics is local”

then perhaps it’s time to start paying attention.

TMEA has certainly made the right

steps by engaging with most of the regionally

affiliated organizations by contracting with a

lobbyist. A unique aspect of this relationship

is getting the summaries of proposed, pending,

and current legislative agendas and being

able to identify problems before they make it

to the floor. If you should get an email from

TMEA asking you to make contact with your

local elected officials, please take a moment

to do so. We must remain hyper-vigilant if

we are to have a seat at the table. As the new

special interest kid on the block, time will

certainly tell if we are successful in creating

a presence and a working relationship with

our state legislative officials.

Michael Chester, Managing Editor

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 5


TMEA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S MESSAGE

Ron Meers

We have been concerned that as a professional

organization, TMEA has been without a home

(office) for the past 70 years. I hope we share a

goal to change this situation.

I

HOPE ALL OF YOU HAD A RESTFUL

SUMMER and your new year is off to

a great beginning! TMEA appreciates

your continued support of music education

in Tennessee! It is truly a TEAM effort to

provide the BEST experience for our music

teachers and students.

The TMEA budget reports are always

available on the tnmea.org website. Please

contact me or any TMEA Board member

with any questions or concerns.

Once again, special thanks goes to Brad

Turner and Paul Waters for your dedication

and the work you do to make our conference

successful! In addition, I hope all

of our members remember that without

dedicated Conference equipment chairs,

our Conference and All-State would not

take place! THANK YOU to Ben Zolkower,

Frank Zimmerer, Kevin Jankowski, Jordan

Frederick, Keegan Paluso, Jeff Moore, and

Doug Young. AMAZING JOB! If you haven’t

expressed your appreciation to these

individuals, please do, it’s never too late!

Thanks to EVERYONE who works to

provide a fantastic music experience for our

teachers and students in Tennessee! Our

Conference Management Team is listed under

“About”/”Board-Council” on the website!

Special thanks to John Womack our

New TMEA Webmaster who is doing an

outstanding job!

As you know, we are in our second year of

the unified membership dues renewal process.

There have been some bumps along

the way but we expect a much smoother

process this year. Please notify me if you

have not received your NAfME membership

card within six weeks of your dues

payment. After paying your dues, please

login to your NAfME account and update

your information!

TMEA and four regional associations

have moved forward and have hired a

full time lobbyist for music education in

Tennessee. TMEA’s share of that expense

came to $8,529.00. Four regional associations

(WTVMEA, WTSBOA, ETSBOA,

and MTSBOA) contributed to the Advocacy

fund, as did our music business

partner, NAMM. TMEA appreciates the

support for this very important endeavor!

We have been concerned that as a professional

organization, TMEA has been

without a home (office) for the past 70

years. I hope we share a goal to change

this situation. We now have a dedicated

phone line for TMEA business (615-784-

8632). This fall we will begin the process

of searching for and renting property for

a TMEA office starting Jan. 1st, 2018. After

office space is secured, we will proceed

with hiring another TMEA staff member,

on a part time basis for approximately six

months each year, finances permitting.

PLEASE REMEMBER:

1. Please participate in the hotel housing

advanced payment program! We had

several members in hotel registration

line for 2 to 3 hours in 2017. The

advanced housing payment option we

had in Memphis and Opryland made

check-in much faster. Very few of our

members participated this last year

and you know what happened.

2. FYI- It appears there have been some

changes in state policies regarding

Professional Development credit

during the school day. The interpretation

of the policy is left up to the

local school district. Teachers in

each county should reach out to their

school board about the possibility of

getting PD credit for attending sessions

during the school day at TMEA

in April! At least two East Tennessee

counties are now allowing PD credit

for in-service activities during the

school day. More information will

be made available on this important

topic as soon as possible.

3. More information coming soon about

a new Arts Advocacy Coalition in

Tennessee.

4. Be sure your parent support group is

registered on the tnmea.org website so

our advocacy efforts can be coordinated

for maximum impact!

5. Plan to attend NAfME In-service

Conference, November 12th – 15th, at

the Gaylord Texan Hotel, Dallas, TX

6. The TMEA Discount Meal Cards will

be available on the TMEA website this

year beginning Feb. 1st. Total sales for

2017 was $31,600. Please support this

effort. The sale of meal cards counts

toward our $50,000 food and beverage

contract agreement with Opryland

(and keeps us from incurring substantial

penalties).

7. Gaylord Opryland Reservations will

open on February 1st on the TMEA

Website. Gaylord Opryland Reservation

Cut-off date, March 21st, 2018.

(Please make your reservations before

March 21st and cancel any rooms not

needed BEFORE March 21st.

8. Plan to attend the TMEA Professional

Development Conference, April 11th

– 14th, 2018, Opryland Hotel and Convention

Center.

THANK YOU FOR ALL YOU DO FOR

MUSIC EDUCATION IN TENNESSEE!

6 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


What can you do with

a UTC music degree?

Proud to

introduce

CRAIG DAVIS

as our new

Director of

Bands

Call (423) 425-4111 or visit UTC.edu/music

UTC is a comprehensive, community-engaged campus of the UT System.

UTC is an EEO/AA/Titles VI & IX/Section 504/ADA/ADEA institution.


TMEA PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Johnathan Vest, Ed. D.

As I enter my second and final year as

TMEA President, I know that we still have

problems and challenges that lie ahead.

SCHOOL DAYS ARE HERE AGAIN!

As hard as it is to get back in the

“teaching groove,” it is always made

easier with students who are eager

and willing to learn and make music

together. Their enthusiasm for learning always

makes the challenging times just a bit

easier.

Some great things happened in our association

this summer. I, along with several board

members, had the privilege of attending the

NAfME Leadership Conference in late June.

The focus at this year’s conference was equity

and access. Please let us know how TMEA

can help you in ensuring that ALL students

have equal access to music education.

The TMEA Council also met in August

at the Country Music Association (CMA)

offices in Nashville. Special thanks to CMA

Outreach Director Tiffany Kearns for being

such a gracious host. We are excited about

our growing partnership with CMA—more

on that soon.

I know there are some days that I wish

my job (and life) would just stop throwing

problems my way for me to solve. But then

I’m reminded that solving problems is what

leaders (and teachers) do. It’s actually WHY

we do what we do. Problems (and the ability

to solve them) are characteristics of an effective

teacher and leader. The most enjoyable

problems are the musical ones related to our

curriculum that we help our students solve!

As I enter my second and final year as

TMEA President, I know that we still have

problems and challenges that lie ahead. We

have new state music standards rolling out

next year that may have some impact on how

and what we teach. We have a growing membership

with varied interests and needs, as

well as a growing TMEA Professional Development

Conference. I know that together

we can meet these challenges head-on. I’m

thankful for all of our regional association

officers that work so hard every day to make

sure these organizations remain effective and

provide wonderful musical experiences for

our students across the state.

HAVE A GREAT SCHOOL YEAR, AND I’LL BE

SEEING YOU ALL SOON!

Belmont’s School of Music is a place where you can fully develop your talent and see how far it can take you.

To join our creative community and explore your artistry, visit BELMONT.EDU/CREATIVECOMMUNITY.

AUDITION DATES FOR ADMISSION FALL 2018

UNDERGRADUATE: 10.28.17 • 11.11.17 • 1.13.18 • 1.27.18 • 2.10.18

GRADUATE: 11.11.17 • 1.19.18 • 2.9.18 • 2.23.18

8 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


Photo Credit: Rob Davidson

Get the National Recognition

Your Music Program Deserves!

Apply to be designated by

The NAMM Foundation as a

Best Community for Music

Education (BCME) program

The 2018 BCME Survey

is open from

October 17–January 31

“Being named a BCME was the catalyst for us to gain an

expanded music education budget, all while increasing

community visibility and support. It was a wonderful

recognition of the efforts of our music staff to provide

the highest quality of music education possible and

further provided validation of the quality of

programs we provide for our students.”

-LONNIE STOVER, SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC AT

SYCAMORE COMMUNITY SCHOOLS IN CINCINNATI, OHIO

Stay Connected

Sign up to receive

The NAMM Foundation monthly

newsletter to receive updates on

Talking Up Music Education podcast

episodes, community events,

music making opportunities, and

educational downloads.

Music Education Days at

The 2018 NAMM Show

Music educators are eligible to attend

The 2018 NAMM Show to participate in

informative sessions; to experience inspiring

performances; and to preview the latest

instruments, products and tools relevant

to today’s music classrooms.

Be part of The NAMM Foundation

The NAMM Foundation provides grants,

supports research and engages in advocacy

to support music making across the

lifespan. Learn how you can be part of

our mission to ensure access to

music education for all at

nammfoundation.org/get-involved.

VISIT NAMMFOUNDATION.ORG/BCME TO LEARN MORE AND TO COMPLETE THE SURVEY

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 9


BY THE NUMBERS: THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF MUSIC EDUCATION

Matthew Clark

Jobs in the arts

generate an estimated

$37 billion

with a return of

$3.4 billion

in federal income tax

TENNESSEE’S

nonprofit & culture

industry generates

$1.17 billion

in annual economic activity

38,482

837.8

MILLION DOLLARS

in household income

supporting

and generating

&

FULL-TIME

EQUIVALENT

JOBS

135.9

MILLION DOLLARS

in local and state

government revenues

10 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


Students who study music are found to have the

following traits which result in increased economic

success throughout life:

• Higher rates of graduation

• Increased general academic success

• Double the rate of college admission

• Better career viability

• Heightened abilities to work with

others successfully

• Good citizenship/lower

incarceration rates

According to

, the top five skills employers

value in a new hire are universal skills taught by

involvement in many musical organizations:

1. Ability to work in a team

2. Ability to make decisions and

solve problems

3. Ability to plan, organize and

prioritize work

4. Ability to communicate verbally with

people inside and outside an organization

5. Ability to obtain and process information

VERBATIM

“The arts are an economic plus—second

only to aerospace as our most lucrative

national export.”

–Michael Greene of The National Academy

of Recording Arts and Sciences

“A grounding in the arts will help our

children to see; to bring a uniquely human

perspective to science and technology. In

short, it will help them as they grow smarter

to also grow wiser.

–Robert E. Allen, Chairman and Chief

Executive Officer, AT&T Corporation

“The arts enrich communities and

employees, and also stimulate the kind of

intellectual curiosity our company needs to

stay competitive.”

Norma R. Augustine, Chairman and

Chief Executive Officer, Martin Marietta

Corporation

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 11


TMEA STATE GENERAL MUSIC CHAIR’S MESSAGE

Linzie Mullins

HELLO TO THE BEST GENERAL MU-

SIC EDUCATORS IN THE STATE!

I hope that you all had a restful

summer and had a chance to recharge

your batteries for this year.

For those who I have not yet met,

my name is Linzie Mullins, and I am here to

help you find good professional development,

support you in your classroom, and provide

a wonderful set of presenters at the conference!

I am happy to say that this year, the

conference will be one of the best yet!

I will talk more about the conference in issue

no. 3 of the Tennessee Musician later this

year, but please mark your calendars for April

11-14! You will not want to miss learning from

Miss Carole from Macaroni Soup, Dancing

Drum, and John Feierabend. Need help getting

there? Be sure to check out the General

Music page on the TMEA website located under

the “Conference” tab. I have and will continue

to post helpful resources for you.

Also, I have started a General Music teacher

spotlight on our General Music web-page.

If you know of an amazing teacher that is a

member of TMEA, please send me their information.

I want to use this platform as a

way to learn and collaborate with teachers

across the state. Then, when we all come to

the conference together, we will know more

about the teachers we are learning with.

One more thing about the conference – a

new way to get involved! One session this

year will be our General Music Poster Session.

If you have ever been too nervous or

overwhelmed to present a full hour session,

or need a good reason to get to the conference,

this is it! We will have a room of tables

set up, almost like a science fair, and you

will share one lesson that you adore in your

classroom. You will set up a foam presentation

board and have whatever manipulatives

you need to present your lesson to teachers

that come to your table. Also, please print

100 lesson plans to pass out. My goal is for

every teacher that walks into this session to

leave with at least ten lesson plans, if not,

more! Please register to present at the poster

session on the general music page on the

TMEA website.

I have been teaching at Shelby County

Schools’ Superintendent’s Summer Learning

Academy this summer, and it has been

so fun getting to know students from different

schools, but to also try out new ideas on

a smaller scale. I also love any opportunity

to add technology to my classroom. Something

that the students have really enjoyed

is Kahoot! I have mentioned this web-based

application to other teachers and was surprised

when I found out they did not know

what it was! It is a fun, fast, and easy way to

assess the students and also gives a competitive

spin on it as well. My favorite type of Kahoot!

is to make is the quizzes. The question

pops up on the screen, and the timer starts.

The students have to hit the answer on their

cell phone, laptop, tablet, etc. and the person

who gets it right the fastest earns the most

points for that question. You can create your

own quizzes or use one that has already been

made. This summer we played Kahoot! to

review the different types of notes and rests,

line and space notes, different types of instruments,

and so much more. The possibilities

are endless!

I hope you all have a great year, and I am

really looking forward to meeting you all at

the conference!

YOU WILL NOT

WANT TO MISS

LEARNING

FROM MISS

CAROLE FROM

MACARONI

SOUP, DANCING

DRUM,

AND JOHN

FEIERABEND.

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 13


TMEA STATE CHORAL CHAIR’S MESSAGE

W. Fitzgerald Patton

At our vocal

caucus in

April, one of

the first things

we discussed

was uniformity

in the audition

process.

CHORAL MUSIC EDUCATORS,

it is my hope that your year is off to a

successful start! I firmly believe that

we have a great calling to change and

inspire the lives of our students each and

every day we are in the classroom. As state

choral chair, my job is to keep you informed

on issues relevant to choral music education

so that teachers across this great state can

continue fulfilling their purpose. I am privileged

to help strengthen music education in

our state through serving choral directors

across the regions.

To reflect, my first year as state choral

chair was definitely a learning experience.

After serving one year, I feel that I am better

prepared to serve you this year; but sadly, this

will be my last year since my term expires in

June. It was a privilege to meet you all at the

vocal caucus last April. I am confident there

were about 70 choral directors in attendance

from all over the state of Tennessee. We introduced

ourselves, I gave a vocal report, and

we discussed many issues. I have updates for

several issues as well as some new business

to discuss.

Before I dive into the various topics, I

want to take a moment and thank everyone

who attended the 2017 TMEA Conference.

A lot of hard work by many people contributed

to the success of our conference. We

had wonderful sessions, a better performance

venue, and we were able to meet our

contractual agreements with Opryland Hotel.

With the next conference in 2018, let me

again encourage you to support TMEA and

book your rooms at Gaylord Opryland Hotel

so that we can continue to reap the benefits

of having the Presidential Ballroom for our

all-state performances.

At our vocal caucus in April, one of the

first things we discussed was uniformity in

the audition process. Currently, Middle Tennessee

is the only region that does blind allstate/mid-state

auditions. West and East are

in the process of discussing and perhaps implementing

blind auditions. Blind auditions

allow the focus to be solely on the voice. Having

all three regions unified in this process

will ensure that we have the best singers for

the all-state/mid-state choirs.

The new Tennessee music education

standards will be implemented during the

2018-2019 school year. During the 2017-

2018 school year, music educators are being

introduced to the standards. Not a great deal

has changed with the new standards. You will

essentially teach the same thing, but the way

in which you teach should line up with the

new standards. The four domains with the

new standards are perform, create, respond,

and connect. Within each domain are foun-

14 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


dations, and within each foundation are the

teaching standards. I personally have been

to several workshops in order to better familiarize

myself with these new standards.

I know there will be several sessions on the

new standards at our annual conference in

April. I encourage you to start planning now

to acquaint yourself with these standards.

So, take time to familiarize yourself with the

standards, ask questions, and perhaps begin

thinking about possible lesson plans. Again,

TMEA has some great sessions planned to

help you. Speaking of sessions, do not forget

to submit a proposal to TMEA if you would

like to present at the April 2018 TMEA conference.

The deadline is coming up soon. For

more information, go to www.tnmea.org.

Another topic discussed at our caucus was

the all-state/mid-state second tier audition.

We were all in agreement that each region

executes this process differently—we are not

unified. There is currently a committee of

about four to six individuals working on assessing

ways we can both unify and improve

this process. Bottom line is we want students

to be prepared, but at the same time, we want

the process to be both fair and consistent

throughout the regions. We want the process

to accurately measure if students are prepared

for all-state. I want to thank Dr. Brian

Russell, choral director from Stewarts Creek

High School for heading this committee and

thank those choral directors who are serving

on the committee. I am confident he will have

more information for us at the next caucus.

Now on to a few items of new business that

I feel will evoke lots of interest at this year’s

caucus. In the Middle Tennessee region we

will allow freshmen boys to audition as sopranos

for the first time ever. This was brought

to my attention recently by a Middle Tennessee

director. Many pre-adolescent boys’

voices have not fully developed into the tenor

or baritone range. Many of these young men

can still sing very comfortably in the soprano

range. TMEA fully supports freshmen boys

who want to audition for the SATB choir as sopranos

at your regional level event. We do not

want to discourage these young men or make

them feel like something is wrong with their

voice. Again, I know this will be a topic of great

interest. But it’s important for you to know

that TMEA supports these young singers.

Finally, there has been lots of discussion

about whether freshmen should be allowed

to audition for the all-state choirs. Currently,

I believe that freshmen are allowed to audition

for the NAfME National Honor Choir,

yet they cannot audition for the Tennessee

All-State Chorus. As state choral chair, I have

mixed feelings on freshmen eligibility. However,

I am open to discussion. I am in the process

of creating a survey to get more feedback

on how the membership stands on this issue.

In closing, thank you for reading my column.

I want you to know that I am available

to you if you have questions, concerns,

suggestions, and comments. Let me know

things you’d like to see at our conference.

Do not forget to submit a proposal to TMEA

if you would like to present at the April 2018

TMEA conference. I want to leave you with

a few reminders and dates. The 2018 TMEA

Conference is April 11 – 14 at Gaylord Opryland

Hotel in Nashville, TN. Other important

dates include the NAfME National

In-service Conference in Dallas TX. This

year’s conference is November 12 – 15, 2017.

Mark these dates on your calendar. Thank

you for your time.

AGAIN, I WISH YOU A VERY SUCCESS-

FUL SCHOOL YEAR!

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Music

Clarksville, Tenn.

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Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 15


TMEA STATE ORCHESTRA CHAIR’S MESSAGE

Michelle Clupper

I

HOPE THAT EVERYONE IS OFF TO AN

EXCITING START in this new school

year. I know that I always start the

new school year feeling inspired to try

something new, schedule a new event and

perform new music with my groups. I have

concert dates set, performances outside of

the school building in the works and ideas

for fun activities with my new students.

This year, however, we are all aware that

there are programs outside of the state

that will not be able to continue with their

scheduled plans. Their concert dates, activities

and even basic equipment for class

have been thrown into chaos due to the

recent hurricanes in Texas and Florida. I

know that I am not alone in watching the

videos of some of the Houston area schools

that have lost a great deal of their music

and instruments due to flood damage. I

honestly cannot imagine coming into Farragut

High School and seeing the damage

to the facilities that I have seen in these

videos. I encourage all of us in the state

of Tennessee to reach out to one of those

programs and offer any assistance possible.

I know that many of you already have

plans for benefit concerts and fundraisers

to help in the recovery efforts and I know

that your donations will be so appreciated

by the schools impacted by the hurricanes.

Luck’s Music Library has started a You

Caring campaign to help Texas orchestra

directors rebuild their libraries. For every

dollar donated, Luck’s Music Library will

match that donation. You can go to https://

www.lucksmusic.com/c/harveyorchestrafund

to get more information or donate.

At the Summer Board Meeting, I was

so excited to hear about all of the orchestra

programs that were participating in

Concert Performance Assessments and

it occurred to me that it would be great to

be able to publish all of the exciting events

that take place across our state. If your Orchestra

will be attending a festival, hosting

a guest artist, performing with another

group or participating in a community

service event, please email me the details.

I would love to be able to include those

events in the next issue of the Tennessee

Musician. This summer, I also met Anna

Laura Williams, Tri-M Chair for TMEA.

She is encouraging everyone in the state

to consider starting a Tri-M Music Honor

Society Chapter at their school. We have

started one at Farragut and the students

are really excited to see the chapter grow

and make an impact in their school and

community. Details on starting and growing

a chapter can be found at https://www.

musichonors.com/.

As we look forward to this year as a

whole, I wanted to take a moment and

place a couple of details in your mind in

looking toward the spring and the 2018

TMEA Professional Development Conference.

Dr. Rebecca MacLeod, Associate

At the Summer Board Meeting, I was so

excited to hear about all of the orchestra

programs that were participating in

Concert Performance Assessments

Professor of Music Education from the

University of North Carolina at Greensboro,

will conduct the 2018 9th-10th Grade

All-State String Orchestra. Dr. MacLeod

directs the string education program and

conducts the UNCG Sinfonia. Prior to

joining the UNCG faculty, she was the assistant

artistic director and conductor of

the Tallahassee Symphony Youth Chamber

Orchestra and Philharmonia Orchestra in

Tallahassee, Florida. The 2018 11th-12th

Grade All-State Symphony Orchestra will

be conducted by Jeffrey Grogan. Mr. Grogan

serves as Education and Community

Engagement Conductor of the New Jersey

Symphony Orchestra, conductor and Artistic

Director of the NJSO Youth Orchestras,

the InterSchool Orchestras of New

York and the New Jersey Youth Symphony.

I am so excited for this year’s conference,

and I know that the participating students

will have a very special experience with

the conductors. I know as an educator, I

am looking forward to learning from their

rehearsal techniques and also from the

sessions that will be presented from fellow

educators from across the state. So

many of you have said that you are applying

to present a session and I know that

your presentations, ideas and techniques

will make this a wonderful learning experience.

I would like to encourage all of you

to make plans to attend this year’s conference

and also to stay at the Opryland Hotel

during your stay. The more rooms we book

as a conference, the more facilities we have

access to and the more impactful our conference

will be.

I LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU

THERE IN APRIL!

16 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, 69, No. 12


TENNESSEE

U N I V E R S I T Y O F T E N N E S S E E

2018 MARCHING BAND AUDITION DATES

Music Majors and Music Minors

(Woodwind, Brass & Percussion) - February 10 and February 17

Non Music Majors

(Woodwind, Brass, Percussion, & Color Guard) - February 24 and March 3

For more information on how to join The Pride of the Southland Band visit

our website www.utbands.com or call us at 865-974-5031.

Connect with UT Bands

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 17


AUDITION DATES

Saturday, February 3, 2018

Friday, February 16, 2018

Saturday, February 24, 2018

CAREERS IN MUSIC DAY

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

18 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1

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0917-4544 / Middle Tennessee State University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or disability. See our full policy at mtsu.edu/titleix.


TMEA STATE BAND CHAIR’S MESSAGE

David Chipman

GREETINGS COLLEAGUES! To our

returning and new directors, we

welcome you to a great year of

music education in Tennessee!

As we open the new score of this

school year, take a moment to pause to reflect

on the value of music education to all

students and the responsibility it brings to

the music educator. Classroom instruction,

selecting music, objectives, high standards,

rehearsals, repairing instruments, hauling

equipment, performances, after-school rehearsals,

concerts, parent meetings…this

is just a small snapshot of what we music

teachers do daily for our students because

no one else can!

The 2017 State Concert Festival was a

great success! A sincere THANK YOU to

the 27 ensembles who performed. My gratitude

also goes to Greg Wolynec and John

Schnettler, their Graduate Assistants and

the Austin Peay State University Band Students

for being such wonderful hosts. A special

thank you also goes out to Ms. Jo Ann

Hood for her invaluable help and support.

The 2018 State Concert Festival will be

hosted again by Austin Peay State University.

The dates are April 26 and 27. Online

registration will go live in mid-February.

We are currently working to secure a

world-class judging panel. Please consider

bringing your ensemble.

Changes to the Jazz Auxiliary Percussion

Audition

The following motions were all passed

by the jazz caucus in April and subsequently

by the TMEA board and council

in August:

1. The 8 vibe pieces in the rotation

will be changed to the 4 best pieces.

Educational videos and teaching

materials will be created and provided

to teachers.

2. The following non-melodic percussion

instruments will be included in

the prepared audition pieces: Conga,

Timbales, and other minor accessory

instruments.

3. Auxiliary percussion students

will sight-read on both vibes and

non-melodic instruments. Auxiliary

percussion students will also improvise

on both vibes and non-melodic

instruments.

4. Auxiliary percussion students will

improvise on the vibes, as in previous

auditions, (F Blues and Bb

Rhythm Changes) and they will play

the same grooves that the drum set

players play (on Congas).

Our 2018 All-State Band Conductors will be:

• Mr. Richard Floyd, Texas UIL Music

Director (retired), will conduct the 11-12

All-State Band.

• Mr. Greg Bimm, Director of Bands from

Marian Catholic High School in Illinois,

will conduct the 9-10 All-State Band.

In closing, to our young and newer directors:

please do not hesitate anytime to contact

an experienced director for help. We

are blessed with some of the finest music

educators in the country who are always

willing to assist. You are important and we

want to help!

“The most valuable resource that all teachers

have is each other. Without collaboration,

our growth is limited to our own perspectives”

Robert John Meehan

The 2018

State Concert

Festival will be

hosted again

by Austin

Peay State

University. The

dates are April

26 and 27.

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 19


TMEA STATE HIGHER EDUCATION CHAIR’S MESSAGE

Ryan Fisher, Ph. D.

This new academic year also

ushers in teacher licensure

changes in Tennessee.

AS WE USHER IN A NEW ACA-

DEMIC YEAR, I feel it important

to reflect on the successes of the

past. The 2017 TMEA Professional

Development Conference offered

numerous quality interest sessions and the

myriad music performances warmed my

spirit and confirmed my conviction that Tennessee

contains some of the finest young musicians

in the nation. I was especially pleased

with the success of the All-Collegiate Orchestra

under the stellar direction of Jeffrey

Grogan. The numerous chamber ensembles

featured in the “Spotlight Performances”

added a special touch to a successful conference.

Plans are already underway for the

2018 TMEA conference, which will feature

the All-Collegiate Choir under the direction

of Dr. Jo-Michael Scheibe of the University

of Southern California. Registration for the

All-Collegiate Choir will begin in January

2018. I also welcome small ensemble directors

and musicians at the elementary, middle,

high, and collegiate levels to participate in

the 2018 TMEA Spotlight Chamber Performances.

Applications for those performance

ensembles will be reviewed in early January.

This new academic year also ushers in

teacher licensure changes in Tennessee. For

the past several years, those seeking Tennessee

teacher license have had to pass the

Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators

(reading, writing, and mathematics sections)

exam, a Praxis exam in their content

area (Music Content and Instruction for

those seeking music K-12 licensure), and the

Praxis Principles of Learning and Teaching

(PLT) exam. This year, the accepted passing

score for several Praxis content exams

have been increased (i.e., Visual Arts K-12,

etc.). Luckily, the Praxis Music Content and

Instruction passing score was not adjusted.

Perhaps, the biggest change to licensure

requirements is the implementation of the

edTPA (Teacher Performance Assessment)

portfolio measure. Though many university

teacher preparation programs (namely

Ready2Teach programs) have been using

the edTPA as a requirement for graduation,

all Tennessee teacher preparation programs

will be required to take the edTPA in 2018.

Preservice music teacher candidates will be

required to achieve a score of at least 37 on

the edTPA OR pass the Praxis PLT in addition

to passing the Praxis Music Content and

Instruction exam. Beginning January 2019,

all initial-license applicants will be required

to score at least a 42 on the edTPA and the

Praxis PLT will no longer be accepted.

The shift from the Praxis PLT to the edTPA

(administered by Pearson) drastically changes

the expectations of initial-teacher applicants.

What was once a “pencil and paper”

standardized exam and now computer-based

exam will be replaced by an intensive portfolio

exam that requires submission of narrative

responses, evidence of assessment, and

video segments of teaching. For a detailed

explanation of the edTPA, I encourage you

to visit edTPA.com. The edTPA was developed

by the Standard Center for Assessment,

Learning and Equity (SCALE) and inspired

by the Performance Assessment of California

Teachers (PACT) and the National Board for

Professional Teaching Standards. The edTPA

(a $300 exam) focuses on three tasks: Planning,

Instruction, and Assessment. Teaching

candidates submit a portfolio that contains

videos, instructional artifacts and numerous

commentaries that are scored by “highly

trained educators” who are selected and

trained by Pearson.

The Society for Music Teacher Education

has issued a statement cautioning against

the use of high-stakes, value-added assessments

like the edTPA. One of their main arguments

is no evidence exists that the edT-

PA equates to success as a practicing music

teacher. They also argue the edTPA is more

of a measure of writing than a measure of

teacher effectiveness.

Despite the opposition to the edTPA, music

teacher trainers in Tennessee will need

to find a way to prepare preservice music

teachers to be successful on the exam in order

to secure teacher licensure. Adjustments

will more than likely need to be made to the

curriculum and degree plan for undergraduate

music education majors, which many will

view as another example of “teaching to the

test”. We have already seen student teaching/

residency seminars shifting from continued

professional development to edTPA coaching.

At the 2017 TMEA Higher Education

Caucus, some music teacher trainers voiced

concern of securing and retaining quality

secondary music student teaching/residency

supervisors, especially high school band,

orchestra and choir directors who have competitive

performance ensembles. Those supervisors

might be less likely to take student

teachers/residents because of the increased

focus on the edTPA, which would require

student teachers/residents to implement

“unit plan” instruction across 3-5 consecutive

lessons.

As Tennessee music education programs

adapt to these licensure changes, trust that

the Tennessee Music Education Association

will remain informed of the impact of these

changes and do our best to provide support as

needed.

20 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


Experience

the Music within

2017-2018 Audition Dates

Junior/Senior Day Monday, Feb. 19, All Day

Woodwind Day Saturday, Feb. 24, All Day

REGISTER TO AUDITION HERE:

utm.edu/audition

Additional dates upon request.

Accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music

(731)881-7402 • music@utm.edu • utm.edu/music

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 21


22 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


TMEA STATE COLLEGIATE NAfME CHAIR’S MESSAGE

Jennifer Vannatta-Hall, Ed. D.

GREETINGS COLLEGE STUDENTS

AND COLLEGIATE FACULTY!

I hope you are having a wonderful

semester. In the column that follows,

you will find information regarding

the C-NAfME Fall Kickoff, our newly

elected state collegiate officers, and the

College Advocacy Summit and Hill Day in

Washington, D. C. next summer.

2017 COLLEGIATE NAFME FALL KICKOFF

Our annual C-NAfME Fall Kickoff

was held on Saturday, September 16

at Middle Tennessee State University.

We offered twelve different sessions

throughout the day, which featured presentations

from collegiate faculty and

music specialists. If you were unable to

attend, or if you want to review the information

presented throughout the day,

you can find links to our Fall Kickoff presentations

on the TMEA website: http://

www.tnmea.org/cnafme.

MEET YOUR STATE C-NAfME OFFICERS

During our 2017 C-NAfME Fall Kickoff,

we held elections for state officers. The following

college students began serving their

terms as state officers on October 1, 2017.

• East Regional President: Andrew Layne

(UT, Knoxville) alayne@vols.utk.edu

• Middle Regional President: Lexi Buglio

(Belmont) alexis.buglio@pop.belmont.edu

• West Regional President: Ebonee Woodland

(UT, Martin) ebolwood@ut.utm.edu

• Vice President/Public Relations: Emily

Campbell (UT, Martin) emimcamp@

ut.utm.edu

• Secretary: Sarah McCutchan (Belmont)

sarah.mccutchan@pop.belmont.edu

These five collegiate officers are ready

and eager to serve! Feel free to reach out to

them with questions and/or ideas!

COLLEGIATE ADVOCACY SUMMIT AND HILL DAY

The NAfME National Assembly is an

opportunity to advocate music education

for all. TMEA will financially support

three to five Collegiate NAfME members

to serve as state delegates for the Collegiate

Advocacy Summit and Hill Day in

Washington, D. C. June 28 – July 1, 2018.

Mentoring and professional development

will empower you to be the advocate you

need to be, for yourself, and for your future

students. Other opportunities include

the following:

• Go “behind the scenes” as we meet faceto-face

with U. S. legislators and their

staffs in Senate and Representative offices

on the Hill.

• Meet and network with NAfME state

and national leaders.

• Participate in leadership and advocacy

training that you can take back to share

with your chapter and use in your career.

It’s the chance of a lifetime to carry

your passion for music education to Capitol

Hill!

Applicants who receive some financial

support from their college/university will

receive priority. If you are interested, apply

online www.tnmea.org. For questions

regarding this event, please contact me by

email: jennifer.vannatta-hall@mtsu.edu.

The NAfME National

Assembly is an

opportunity to

advocate music

education for all.

TMEA will financially

support three to five

Collegiate NAfME

members to serve

as state delegates

for the Collegiate

Advocacy Summit

and Hill Day in

Washington, D. C.

June 28 – July 1, 2018.

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 23


TMEA SOCIETY FOR MUSIC TEACHER EDUCATION/

RESEARCH CHAIR’S MESSAGE

Jamila L. McWhirter, Ph. D.

At the August TMEA Council Meeting, I

proposed a research protocol to assist in

the numerous requests for participation in

research of TMEA members.

SMTE NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM

The Society for Music Teacher Education

(SMTE) was held September 7 – 9,

2017 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The

keynote speaker was Aaron P. Dworkin,

who has served as dean of the University

of Michigan’s School of Music, Theater,

and Dance. He is founder of The Sphinx

Organization, the leading national arts organization

for transforming live through

the power of diversity and the arts. TNS-

MTE was represented by presentations by

Dr. Angela Ammerman (UT – Martin), Dr.

Christopher Dye (MTSU), and Dr. Jamila

L. McWhirter (MTSU):

• The Cycle of String Teacher Attrition:

Predicting Recruiting Practices with

the Theory of Planned Behavior – Dr.

Ammerman

• Developing Music Education Policy

Works: Pre-service Music Education

and Policy - Dr. Dye (with Dr. Carla E.

Aguilar – Metropolitan State University,

Denver)

• A Creative Duet: Mentoring Success

for Emerging Music Educators – Dr.

McWhirter

TMEA NEWLY ADOPTED RESEARCH PROTOCOL

At the August TMEA Council Meeting,

I proposed a research protocol to assist in

the numerous requests for participation in

research of TMEA members. The following

procedure was approved by the council

and is currently in place. Please read

carefully if you wish to approach TMEA

regarding research.

1

A request for approval from TMEA

must be submitted to the TMEA Research

Chair for evaluation. If this is an

initial request for a letter to submit for

IRB approval, then the researcher/student

researcher must provide the title,

type of research, purpose statement, description

of the study and why they wish

to include the TMEA membership (i.e.,

survey). This with the understanding that

this is not approval for the study, but an

acknowledgement that the request will be

considered again if IRB approval is granted.

The researcher/student researcher

must understand that IRB approval is

necessary to ensure that materials will be

treated in an ethical manner concerning

confidentiality and consent to participate.

2

Once IRB approval has been obtained,

the researcher/student researcher

may contact the TMEA Research Chair

with the IRB approval number, cover letter,

and survey questions. At this time,

the TMEA Research Chair will examine

the cover letter and survey questions.

If approved, they will be forwarded

to the TMEA Executive Director for

examination and any discussion that

may be needed with the TMEA officers.

3

If final approval is granted, then the

Executive Director will send the cover

letter and survey to the TMEA membership.

At no time will a researcher/student

researcher receive the email addresses of

the TMEA membership. The researcher/

student researcher may also place a link to

the survey on the TMEA Facebook Page if

they are a member of the organization.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The Call for Proposals for Research

and Best Practices is now available on the

TMEA website. In order to submit a proposal,

click on the Conference Tab and then the

SMTE/Research Tab. The online proposal

submission form is due by February 1, 2018.

In-service teachers, graduate students,

and university faculty are encouraged to

submit for consideration for the poster

session or possible presentation.

Research – Research may be quantitative,

qualitative, or mixed methods. Research

should be completed and related

to music teaching and learning. In-service

teachers conducting action research in

their classrooms are encouraged to submit

these projects for consideration.

Best Practice – Best Practice submissions

should describe programs or practices

that are effectively meeting important

goals in music education. Proposals should

include a specific justification and/or rationale

for the program or practice, and a

description of the context in which it has

been implemented.

All submissions must meet the Code

of Ethics published in the Journal of Research

in Music Education. The proposal

form allows the submitter to select consideration

of the proposal in poster form, as a

presentation, or consideration as either.

3RD ANNUAL TNSMTE LUNCHEON/TNSMTE

SYMPOSIUM

Due to the increased participation, the

TNSMTE Luncheon will be held again

during the TMEA State Professional Development

Conference. Be sure to watch

for forthcoming details.

Also, the 2nd TNSMTE Symposium will

be held in September 2018 on the campus

of MTSU. More information will be available

this spring.

24 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


Join NAfME to

help you keep step

FOR YEARS TO COME.

When you become a member of National Association for Music Education (NAfME),

you’re joining the largest and most active group of music educators in the country –

addressing all aspects of music education and supporting quality instruction from elementary

to college levels. With us, you’ll have access to a wide variety of programs, discounts and

services to help orchestrate success in the classroom, raise your professional standards,

and advocate for keeping music education in our schools.

Join today, visit www.NAfME.org/join.

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800-336-3768

info@memberservices2.org

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 25


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Friday, March 16, 2018

Cody Hoenie, a junior from Knoxville, Tennessee, studies with Dr. Colin J. Hill. PHOTO BY WARREN LAFEVER.

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TMEA ADVOCACY AND GOVERNMENT RELATIONS

CHAIR’S MESSAGE

Christopher Dye, Ed. D.

TMEA’s primary state-level policy ask continues to be

the reestablishment of a specific fine arts coordinator

position at the department. Additionally, we will be

seeking to work with the Department of Education

in providing specific professional development to

accompany the rollout of the new state music standards.

IT IS AN EXCITING TIME to be an ad-

last year to become a more active voice

vocate for music education in Tennessee.

TMEA has made significant steps in the

on the issues that impact our profession. We

completed our first legislative session working

with Millsaps Gowan Government Relations to

monitor and respond to pending state legislation.

We held our first state Hill Day for music

education advocacy, establishing relationships

with key legislators and raising awareness of

TMEA as a voice for the music teaching profession

and the students of Tennessee. We have

also scaled up our communications, reaching

TMEA members through the Advocacy News

and Current Legislative News blogs and mobilizing

parents of music students through the

booster leadership listserv.

Tennessee was well represented this summer

at the NAfME Hill Day in Washington,

D.C. Our delegation of eleven included four

terrific collegiate members who also participated

in the Collegiate Advocacy Summit.

Our primary ask in our meetings with staffers

in senate and house offices was for full funding

of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)

in the fiscal year 2018 budget. We continue to

celebrate music’s inclusion as an enumerated

subject in ESSA. To reach the benefits of this

enumeration the associated programs need

funding, particularly through Title II, Part A,

and Title IV, Part A. As I write this, the budget

process continues, with varying levels of

allocation authorized by the house and senate

appropriations committees. Follow the

latest developments on the TMEA blogs and

through NAfME’s advocacy resources and

make your perspective known to your elected

representatives.

As we approach the next year of state-level

legislative activity, I have proposed several

goals for the organization. We will be working

on several fronts to establish improved relationships

with the state Department of Education.

TMEA’s primary state-level policy

ask continues to be the reestablishment of a

specific fine arts coordinator position at the

department. Additionally, we will be seeking

to work with the Department of Education in

providing specific professional development

to accompany the rollout of the new state music

standards.

At the legislative level, we will begin crafting

model language that would expand the

place of music and the arts in the curriculum

of all Tennessee schools, K-12. Along with

this, we will work to identify legislators to

partner with to introduce this legislation on

our behalf. The second state Hill Day will expand

beyond a single day’s events to include

opportunities for branded local and digital advocacy

activities across the state throughout

March. Finally, we will begin looking ahead

to the upcoming election cycle, creating and

disseminating arts education questionnaires

that can be used to encourage candidates to

consider arts education in their campaign

platforms.

We also want TMEA to be a resource for

advocacy at the local level. Please reach out

to myself or any member of the TMEA board

if you encounter policy challenges at your

local level. Working together, we can ensure

that every student in Tennessee receives a

high-quality music education.

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 27


CREATING A

PRACTICE CULTURE

Colin Hill, DMA

is nothing more satisfying than

teaching a student who practices

diligently each week. Their

progress is continuous and new

AS A MUSIC EDUCATOR, there

concepts and material can be frequently

introduced. Both the student and the

teacher leave each lesson/rehearsal feeling

successful and their steady progress keeps

both parties fully engaged, providing mutual

motivation for future sessions.

Unfortunately, for most educators, these

students are few and far between. Many

students exhibit sub-par practice habits.

As a result, lessons/rehearsals are often

focused on material covered in previous

weeks and teachers end up repeating concepts

ad nauseam. Further, students often

feel anxiety entering lessons/rehearsals,

dreading the inevitable conversation,

“Why didn’t you practice more?” Teachers

often find these situations equally frustrating,

and count down the minutes until

these sessions come to an end.

Is this challenge an inherent trait of music

education or perhaps a product of the way

we teach? Certainly some students walk in

the door with more discipline and a stronger

work ethic than others, but I’m convinced it

is possible to drastically improve the practice

habits of all of our students.

Typically, bad practice habits stem from

a lack of interest, motivation, or perceived

progress. However, when students are

taught how to practice efficiently, using fun

and creative methods, a successful practice

routine can be developed. When programs

are able to develop this successful practice

culture among its members, the learning

process becomes much more enjoyable for

both the students and teacher.

This article is designed for educators

who are looking for new and innovative

ways to motivate their students to practice.

I will share methods I have discovered or

been exposed to as a student and as an educator

at the middle school, high school, and

collegiate level, as well as my dissertation

research on practice habits.

When motivating students to practice,

the first step should include an effective

28 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


While it is

unrealistic to

expect that all

students will

develop great

practice habits,

it is possible to

greatly improve the

culture and attitude

towards practicing.

explanation of the importance of practice.

While all students and educators intuitively

realize that practice is necessary for our development,

research on the practice habits

of the most gifted consistently shows that

innate talent plays a much smaller role than

preparation. Further, substantial evidence

suggests that mastery can only be achieved

after 10,000 hours of practice early in life.

The second step is to require each student

to create an individualized practice

schedule. Our society operates on a web

of schedules, and if students can develop

a consistent practice schedule (time and

day), practice becomes a routine, rather

than something that must be “fit” into each

day. When executed correctly, students

will “show up” to their designated practice

time, much like they attend rehearsals and

classes. This approach doesn’t allow for

other obligations to prioritize themselves

over practicing and eliminates most issues

of motivation.

The third step is to create sustaining

motivation. While some teachers resort to

stern communication as their default routine,

there are numerous positive methods

that can be much more effective. When

implemented correctly, these methods can

help a student, and an entire program, develop

a long-lasting devotion to practice.

PUBLIC PRACTICE LOGS

Practice logs are an age-old way of encouraging/enforcing

practice hours. However,

these often fail for a number of reasons: dishonest

entries, lack of enforcement, poor

participation, added busy work for educator,

etc. A simple solution is to make these logs

public and highly promoted. Instantly, practicing

becomes a competitive activity, as students

try to “out do” one another and avoid

finishing near the bottom of the list. Practicing

then becomes a desirable activity, tied to

the program’s weekly culture. This system

naturally accomplishes many goals. One, the

students who already exhibited great practice

habits receive deserved recognition and

feel pressure to maintain their reputation as

a “top student.” Students also begin to see a

correlation between practice hours and ability

level. The top players are almost always

near the top of the list, while the weak players

routinely finish at the bottom. For the weaker

students, this is often a tangible explanation

as to why there are inferior players. Some

students blame their deficiencies on their

“lack of talent” rather than accepting it as a

product of their work ethic.

While dishonesty will still occur, it is a

favorable type of dishonesty. Those who

lie about their practice hours do it because

they feel pressure from their peers to practice

more. Further, these lies are typically

debunked rather quickly when they claim

to be practicing a high number hours but

consistently show up for lessons/rehearsals

unprepared.

30 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


Enforcing participation is as simple as

giving grade deductions for those who do

not complete the public practice log on a

weekly or bi-weekly basis. Further motivation

can be created by giving out weekly or

monthly awards to students who achieve

exemplary practice hours.

RECORDED ASSIGNMENTS

With today’s smartphones and computers,

every student should have access to a

recording device. Supplementing weekly

lesson assignments or rehearsal goals with

individual recording assignments, often resolves

many practice issues.

A recording assignment could be an exercise,

phrase, or excerpt that the student

is required to record and submit by a designated

deadline. The student may record it

as many times as needed (if done correctly,

it should take multiple takes), and the version

submitted should be as close to “perfect”

as possible.

The success of this method lies in the

simple fact that it takes a substantial

amount of practice to produce a recording

of a perfect run-through. Many students

have the false notion that if they

play it right once in the practice room,

they are prepared. However, when the red

light turns on, the student will feel added

pressure as they attempt to capture a perfect

run-through. Successfully capturing a

correct repetition requires a much higher

level of proficiency.

The pressure felt when trying to record

a perfect run-through is very similar to

the pressure one feels in a performance.

This pressure is rarely felt in the practice

room, which is another benefit of recorded

assignments.

Before students submit their recordings,

require that they listen closely

to their final product. This process of

self-evaluation can be an eye-opening experience

for less experienced players and

teaches them what they actually sound

like. For most, this instills a newfound

awareness of their abilities, eliminating

distorted self-perceptions.

REGULAR OCCURRING SOLO PERFORMANCES

It is amazing how hard students will

practice when they know they have to get

up and play for their peers. It only takes

one or two unprepared public performances

to improve a student’s practice habits.

While this may sound harsh, the fear of

embarrassment is a huge motivator.

These performances could be formal

(performance attire, on stage) or in a more

relaxed environment (masterclass setting).

Regardless, the frequency is key. It is recommend

that each student be required to

perform solo at least twice per semester

and could be as frequent as once per week,

maybe in the form of a playing test.

INCENTIVES AND PRIZES

Positive reinforcement is often the most

successful type of motivation. Reward

your students individually or as a group

for accomplishing their practice goals. For

example, individuals may receive small

prizes or something as simple as candy for

learning all their assigned lesson material.

In a group context, students could be rewarded

with a pizza party after reaching

a certain number of combined practice

hours. Creating incentive, especially with

younger students, can be highly successful.

These methods are just a few ways that

educators can motivate their students to

practice. There are many other methods

and strategies that can be implemented,

and regardless of the approach, it is important

that educators remain pro-active

regarding their students’ practice habits.

While it is unrealistic to expect that all students

will develop great practice habits, it

is possible to greatly improve the culture

and attitude towards practicing.

Dr. Colin J. Hill currently serves as the

Professor of Percussion Studies at Tennessee

Tech University. As an active performer,

Hill has been invited to perform concerts

throughout the United States, Europe, and

Asia and performs regularly with the BluHill

Percussion Duo, Bryan Symphony Orchestra,

and the TTU Faculty Jazz Combo. As an

educator, he has appeared as a guest artist

and clinician at numerous high schools and

universities throughout the United States as

well as several PAS Days of Percussion and

PAS International Conventions. Hill holds

degrees from The University of North Texas

(B.M.), Jacobs School of Music at Indiana

University (M.M.), and The University of

Kentucky (D.M.A)

Positive

reinforcement is

often the most

successful type

of motivation.

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 31


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Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 33


THIS IS HOW WE

DO IT HERE:

ESTABLISHING A POSITIVE,

SUCCESSFUL CULTURE IN

YOUR MUSIC PROGRAM

DaLaine Chapman, Ph. D.

34 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


THE DREADED QUESTION

“Are we playing today?” asked a trombone

player as he entered the band room.

“What do you mean?” answered the band

director, “Yes--we are doing what we do

everyday, we’re playing.” “Oh, boo,” the

student responded, “I thought maybe we

could take a break and watch a movie. It’s

Friday and we always used to watch movies

on Friday’s when Mr. (fill in the blank) was

here…” “Ugh,” thought the teacher, “here

we go again.” This exchange is likely familiar

to many music teachers. It is not that

watching the occasional movie is bad; it is

that we often do not have enough time as it

is to teach all of the standards and curriculum

that are required during the time we

have with the students. Also, we want them

to want to play or sing everyday, right?

A director who recently changed schools

told me he had a goal to get his students to

the point where they were disappointed

when they had to watch a movie. He was

new to the school and wanted to know how

he would be able to change the thinking of

the students—thinking and behavior that

had been passed on from class to class for

years. I told him that he likely would have

to begin the long and arduous process

of changing the culture of his program. I

explained that to do so would require patience

from both him and his students, and

be done in small, yet powerful steps.

CULTURE

One of the definitions of culture is “the

beliefs, customs, arts, etc., of a particular society,

group, place, or time; a particular society

that has its own beliefs, ways of life, art,

etc.; a way of thinking, behaving, or working

that exists in a place or organization” (Merriam

Webster Online, 2015). Establishing a

strong culture in any program, band, chorus,

orchestra, or general music, makes it easier

for everyone involved to know and understand

expectations. Teachers may have

to ask themselves, are the ways that we do

things in this program helping or hurting

our success? We sometimes unknowingly

and blindly teach without a vision of success

for our students (or us). Bob Duke, Professor

of Music at the University of Texas at

Austin, states that we are to have a vision of

our students as successful, accomplished

learners. I would add that we should also

have a vision of ourselves as successful, accomplished

teachers. This vision can also

include the culture of our program.

Having a routine helps to form a culture.

Routine often involves having consistent

classroom activities, consistent classroom

management principles, and teaching

students respect for not just the physical

environment but for the program as a whole.

Before one can establish a culture, it is

best to identify what the vision actually is

for the program. It is at this point when decisions

can be made about the habits likely

enabling the maladaptive behavior(s).

When all of the behaviors are corrected

and your positive culture is in place, what

does it look like? Does your new culture

include a lot of parent support? Does it include

a lot of performances? Having a firm

idea of the end result is your vision of your

new and improved culture.

As far as behaviors are concerned, you

will have to determine what it is you want

to change. Do you want your students to

enter the room in a certain way? Do you

have guidelines for who is and is not allowed

in the music room? Do you want

your students to think of the music room as

a sacred place that is a safe haven for them

throughout the school day and beyond?

Teachers often tell me that they want

their students to have fun and enjoy the

experience in their classroom. I think it

would be difficult to find anyone who disagrees.

However, what exactly does that

mean? Does it mean that your students

enjoy your class because they are not being

corrected for their academic or social

behavior? Or are they enjoying the experience

because they are thrilled that the

one musical passage you have all been

working on finally came together beautifully?

Which enjoyment do you want them

to have? This is why identifying current

behaviors is so important. Defining what

fun and enjoyment is in your classroom is

part of how you change the culture. This is

different for everybody which is why it is

important to think through what you really

want for your program.

Having a routine helps to form a culture.

Routine often involves having consistent

classroom activities, consistent classroom

management principles, and teaching students

respect for not just the physical environment

but for the program as a whole.

It is a constellation of consistent behaviors

that interact together to create the culture.

A culture of any program is about just

that: the entire program. Not just the

marching band, or the top show choir, but

about all of the ensembles. It is likely that

in programs that have a strong sense of culture,

a high percentage of the students and

parents, not just the teacher, have strong

allegiances and loyalty toward having success.

Perhaps we have heard all too often:

“We had a great choral program for many

years…then she left…” It has to be about

everyone involved in the program for the

culture shift to happen and be successful.

CHANGE IS DIFFICULT, BUT A FEW

SELECTED STUDENTS CAN HELP

A mentor once told me that changing

the culture of any organization is like

turning a ship in a harbor. It takes time,

tenacity, and a lot of patience. It also takes

teamwork. Changing the thinking and behavior

of just one person is often difficult,

but having to do so with groups of students

is very challenging for one person

alone. A teacher trying to do so may be

better served by having a smaller subset

of that group to help in the process.

Older students mentoring younger students

help the culture cause tremendously.

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 35


If a teacher has trained student helpers in

how to act and how to mentor other students,

mentoring can be a powerful tool

in achieving a positive culture. Mentors

can be there to show that, yes, everyone

practices; yes, everyone obeys the rules;

yes, everyone not only gets to rehearsal,

but also arrives on time; and yes, we

have fun, but we have fun doing the right

things. The students respect each other

for their similarities and differences. Older

students show younger ones how to act

by modeling the expected behavior. Often,

when younger students see an audience

react positively to a well-done musical

performance by the older students, the

culture of the program starts to change.

Former students have told me that they

were glad they had older students to look

up to and help navigate their first year in

the program—they acknowledged that

there was a certain comfort in knowing

someone was looking out for them.

You have the good

fortune to establish

the culture of your

choice. So, look

around. Are you happy

with the culture of

your program? Is it

self-sustaining where

you do not have to tell

students every Friday

that “yes, we are

playing today”?

RESPECT

The endgame of course is gaining respect

for the program, and not just from

administration, parents, and the general

public, but also from the students themselves.

Students who are proud of their

music programs typically are a part of programs

of excellence. They practice, they

work hard, and they reap the benefits of

the hard work by becoming excellent musicians.

They are proud to wear the jacket

associated with the ensemble, and they are

happy to have a room on campus where

they can go to just ‘hang out.’

I am sure many who are reading this

would agree that when we walk into music

rooms we have developed a sense of

knowing quite quickly the culture of the

program. There are often students in the

room before and after school. Are the students

respectful and helpful? Are they nice

to each other? Do they adhere to the guidelines

of the school?

Students have to have a healthy respect

for the room in which they are making music.

It does not matter if it is the band room,

choir room, or general music classroom.

Students can be taught how to respect

their environment. How do they treat the

physical room? Is there trash on the floor?

Are there instrument parts lying around?

Are choral risers unhooked from one another

and spread around the room? Are

there stacks of books and papers on the piano?

Are there broken music stands everywhere?

You might say, well, perhaps that is

the job of the parent to instill such values

in their own children. Yes, but…we have

all had students who act much better in

our music room than they do in their own

home, or in other teachers’ classrooms.

It is no secret that we are often mother,

father, sister, or brother to our students,

teaching them not only music, but also how

to behave in a public place.

Finally, there has to be a strong respect

for the music itself: for rehearsing it, for

understanding it, and for performing it.

After all, producing an exquisite sounding

group with your students is likely a large

part of why you were hired. It would be

equally terrific if the students were well

mannered and respectful as well as good

musicians. Ultimately, the probability is

high that the culture will change in the

right direction if it is about the music. Incidentally,

the music portion of this article

was not placed near the end to signify its

place in a successful culture. Remember,

all of these points interact with one another

on a daily basis toward a successful culture

in any program.

You have the good fortune to establish

the culture of your choice. So, look

around. Are you happy with the culture of

your program? Is it self-sustaining where

you do not have to tell students every Friday

that “yes, we are playing today”? If so,

then congratulations! I am sure you enjoy

going to school and reaping the rewards of

your patience and hard work. If not, you

are in the perfect position to make lasting

changes that will benefit both you and

your students.

Culture. [Def. 5]. (n.d.) In Merriam-Webster.

com.

Retrieved January 3, 2015, from http://www.

merriam-webster.com/dictionary/culture

DaLaine Chapman is currently an Assistant

Professor of Music Education at Florida

Atlantic University in Boca Raton. Her

research interests include music teacher

evaluation and assessment as well as the supervision

of student teachers. Dr. Chapman

is an active conductor/clinician who has presented

at numerous clinics and conferences

nationwide. Her professional affiliations include

Florida Music Educators Association,

Florida Bandmasters Association, Texas Music

Educators Association, and the National

Association for Music Education. She is also

a member, by invitation, of the Omega chapter

of Phi Beta Mu, the prestigious International

Band Fraternity. She holds Bachelors

and Masters Degrees from The Florida State

University and a Ph.D. from The University

of Texas at Austin.

36 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


MUSIC AT

Milligan produces life-long learners and lovers of music, as well as accomplished performers. The program’s

faculty consists of knowledgeable and experienced musicians who also are dedicated and caring educators

focused on helping students achieve their musical goals.

MAJORS

Music Performance

Music Business

music education

(Instrumental, Vocal)

Musical Theatre

fine arts (MUSIC EMPHASIS)

worship leadership

MINORS

music Performance

Music ministry

Worship leadership

ENSEMBLES

Concert Choir

Women’s Chorale

Orchestra

String Quartet

Civic Band

Johnson City Symphony

Orchestra

Heritage

Heard Mentality

SCHOLARSHIPS

Scholarships are available, regardless of a student’s intended

major. To schedule an audition, call 423.461.8723, or email

music@milligan.edu.

INTRODUCING

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2018

LEARN MORE

MILLIGAN.EDU/MUSIC

A TOP COLLEGE & BEST VALUE.

–U.S. NEWS

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 37


STARTING A TRI-M MUSIC HONOR SOCIETY®:

AN INTERVIEW WITH JONATHAN SCHOEPFLIN

Anna Laura Williams

STUDENT LEADERSHIP:

these two words can positively

impact the enjoyment and influence

your student musicians have

within your music program and

community. If you are seeking to

“recognize the outstanding music students

in your school, and the importance of music

education in shaping the leaders of tomorrow”,

“highlight your music program and

make an impact in your community,” and

“motivate students to take on leadership

roles...and develop key skills for future success,”

then “Tri-M® is for you, your students,

and your community.”

WHAT IS TRI-M?

Formerly known as “Modern Music Masters”

before becoming a program of NAfME

in 1983, Tri-M is a music student service organization

with chapters in public and nonpublic

schools throughout America. As described

on its website, “Tri-M Music Honor

Society® is a program of NAfME...[and] is the

only national honor society for student musicians

in grades 6-12. There are more than

1,900 chapters across all 50 states, involving

more than 75,000 students. Each year, these

students contribute more than 750,000 service

hours to their schools and local communities,

and raise nearly $1 million for causes

they care about.” Tri-M offers two divisions:

Senior (Grades 9-12) and Junior (Grades 6-8;

can include 9th grade, depending on your

school’s grade-level distribution).

INTERVIEW: 2017 TRI-M JUNIOR DIVISION

CHAPTER OF THE YEAR

NAfME annually recognizes two Tri-M

Chapters (one Junior Division and one Senior

Division) with the “Tri-M Chapter of

the Year” award. This year, Elizabeth Davis

Middle School (Chester, Virginia) received

the distinction of 2017 Tri-M Junior Chapter

of the Year.

Mr. Jonathan Schoepflin is the current

Tri-M Chapter Advisor at Elizabeth Davis

Middle School and started the band program

in 2008 when the school opened. Since its

inception, the band has substantially grown,

now has two full-time band directors (his

Tri-M Music Honor Society®

is a program of NAfME...

[and] is the only national

honor society for student

musicians in grades 6-12

Tri-M co-sponsor, Mrs. Madeline Barker), and

has started an orchestra program. Mr. Schoepflin

spoke with us about his Tri-M chapter to

provide advice to any music educators seeking

to start or build a Tri-M chapter.

In your opinion, what is the best aspect of

having Tri-M in your school/community?

“In a word, Leadership. We are a school

of 1,200 students between the grades of

6-8. The students who are members of the

Tri-M are sought-after by teachers and administrators…as

the ‘pulse’ of the school.

These young leaders know what goes on

and want what is best for our school. [Our

Tri-M chapter] is still young, only four years

old. Our school has seen the impact we have.

One of our goals of [this] year is to focus on

public relations so the community can see

what we are doing. One of the first things

I tell the new members of our Tri-M every

year is: ‘Whether you succeed or fail to meet

your goals for this year…will be completely

up to you. I am just your guide and will help

you along the way, but I will not be doing the

work. You will.’ The kids take it upon themselves

to set goals and then figure out a way

to meet them.”

What inspired you to begin the Tri-M

chapter at your school?

“Leadership, kids don’t have a place to

practice it in schools. Sports really don’t provide

this (coaches are the leaders most often

and the kids are just cattle). Everyone likes

music, so it seems a natural fit for our school.

We want our kids to think for themselves

and lead our organization in a way that represents

what is important to us. Our goal is to

have every music offering at our school with

a dedicated teacher for that. We added classical

guitar in 2015. Our orchestra is growing

larger and managing a guitar program is getting

too much for just two teachers. Having a

lot of students is a good problem. One of the

things I’ve learned is that ‘good problems’

have to be fixed too. In order to continue to

serve our students, I HAD to start a Tri-M.

We cannot survive without it!”

How many students are in your current

Tri-M Chapter?

“Next year is our 5th year of Tri-M at our

school, and because our orchestra program

is still growing, the largest group of members

[comes from] band. Our chorus teacher

isn’t interested at this time of having her

students be part of Tri-M…[because] her

38 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


program is still growing. In our by-laws at our school, Tri-M is [exclusively

for] 8th grade. Students have three opportunities to be ‘invited’

to join the group. The first two [invitations] happen while they

are in 7th grade. We had 38 eighth graders qualify so far for next year

(29 band, 9 orchestra). We also have twelve more students that have

met all criteria except for GPA (3.4 on 4.0 scale). These students

have until the end of the 1st nine weeks to be invited if their grades

meet our criteria at that time.

Also, as we are located next to Ft. Lee Army Base, we have a large

population of military families. Students that move-in are also invited

if they meet the invitation criteria. In all, we anticipate the 2017-18

Tri-M to be about 55, and the 2018-19 [Tri-M] to be close to 70 as that

is the year that our orchestra growth will start to level off. Students

are not considered to be members until they have met the goals they

set and that is when we do our induction, near the END of their 8th

grade year. We eventually want members in chorus, guitar, as well

as music technology (when we offer that class!), but for now, that is

where we are on our journey.”

How many hours outside of your normal teaching duties do you

devote towards Tri-M planning, meetings, etc.?

“Typically about an hour a week, depending on what the kids have

planned. I don’t go to all their events. The members have to present

their ideas to the group, and this includes what adult supervision will

be present and who from the membership will help.”

What is some advice you can give to music educators looking to

begin Tri-M chapters at their schools?

“[After accepting the position at this school when it was first

built], I decided then that I did not want to take on [a Tri-M chapter]

until the growth in the band leveled off. We started off with only

100 kids in the band and quickly shot up to 280 in just a couple years.

After doing some ‘weeding,’ we were consistently at 225 kids in the

band by our 5th year and are still at this point now. The first group

of kids that I talked with regarding starting a Tri-M, I called…the

‘Charter Members’. I made a big deal about starting something that

can live past your time here at this school. The goal of this group was

to do the mundane administrative tasks such as writing our bylaws,

developing procedures, and setting long-term goals. Because the

tasks are a bit boring, I had 14 girls and ZERO boys that wanted to do

it! Anyhow, they wrote our bylaws, and we start every year tweaking

them as it was designed to be a fluid document that changes as our

program does.

My advice for people who want to start a chapter is they first need

to realize this is not a one-year thing. Even though our chapter is only

four years old, we have goals and commitments we have set for the

next decade. Make sure your classroom music program has ‘leveled

off ’ in terms of growth. Our goal for the band was a minimum of 15%

of the student population consistently every year. Tri-M is an ‘icing on

the cake’ and really difficult to manage if you are still baking the cake!

I am learning this now because as of last year, [Mrs. Barker and I] are

now not only the band directors but also the orchestra directors as

well. We have taken our orchestra from less than 4% of students a year

ago, to 13% next year. Our goal is by our third year for our band and orchestra

to be the same size, meaning just the two of us will teach over

37% of the school. We inducted our first orchestra Tri-M members

last year, and each year, more members will be string players. This

will force music educators to get out of the mindset of ‘more is better.’

They have to ask the question: how many students should be in my

band program? Orchestra program? Choral program? etc. Think like

a farmer. If you are constantly growing, you are never harvesting. Having

a Tri-M allows our school to harvest the best things about being

in a music program.”

Our next article will continue the second half of Mr. Jonathan

Schoepflin’s interview, featuring some of his chapter’s most successful

Tri-M service projects.

Mr. Jonathan Schoepflin is the current Director of Bands and Orchestra

at Elizabeth Davis Middle School (2008-Present), is entering

his twenty-first year of teaching, and has attained his Bachelor’s and

Master’s degrees in Music Education from Virginia Commonwealth

University (1995, 2015).

WHAT ARE ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR TRI-M CHAPTER?

To become a Chapter Advisor and begin the process of creating a

Tri-M® chapter, please visit Tri-M’s official website for additional details

regarding eligibility. To join Tri-M, students “must be enrolled

in at least one music class for at least one semester, have a 2.0 GPA in

their core classes, and a 3.0 in their music class(es), and be of strong

character.” More information regarding student membership criteria,

including music ensemble participation, academic achievement,

leadership, service hours/points, and character, are available in the

Tri-M Quick-Start Guide and Tri-M Membership Criteria website

(available online).

Elementary, Middle, and High School

Band, Choir, and Orchestra

2018:

April 20-21

April 27-28

May 4-5

2019:

April 12-13

April 26-27

May 3-4

www.SMMFestival.com

or call:1-855-766-3008

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 39


HOW TO START A CHAPTER

It only takes three simple steps to create a

Tri-M chapter at your school:

1. “Visit nafme.org/tri-m to download

your chapter activation form, call 800-

336-3768, or email Tri-M@nafme.org.

2. Send in your activation form and

$100 fee

3. Receive a Tri-M Quick-Start Guide

and get your chapter going.”

Schoepflin, J. (2017, July 8). 2017 Tri-M

Junior Division Chapter of the Year

[E-mail & Phone interview].

Tri-M Learning Guide. (2017). Retrieved

August 20, 2017, from https://nafme.

org/wp-content/files/2014/05/Tri-M-

Learning-Guide-2016-2017-1.pdf

Tri-M Membership Criteria. (2017).

Retrieved August 20, 2017, https://nafme.

org/programs/tri-m-music-honorsociety/why-tri-m/membershipcriteria/

Tri-M Music Honor Society: History of

Tri-M. (2017). Retrieved August 20, 2017,

from https://nafme.org/programs/tri-m-

music-honor-society/tri-m-music-honor-

society-history-of-tri-m/

Tri-M Quick-Start Guide. (2014, April).

Retrieved August 20, 2017, from https://

nafme.org/wp-content/files/2014/05/

Tri-M-Quick-Start-Guide-15-16.pdf

Tri-M FAQ. (2017). Retrieved August 20,

2017, from https://nafme.org/programs/

tri-m-music-honor-society/tri-m-faq/

Tri-M Music Honor Society. (2017).

Retrieved August 20, 2017, from https://

nafme.org/programs/tri-m-music-honorsociety/

Why Tri-M? (2017). Retrieved August 20,

2017, from https://nafme.org/programs/

tri-m-music-honor-society/why-tri-m/

Anna Laura Williams serves as the Tri-M

Music Honor Society Tennessee State Chair.

She is the co-director of bands at Siegel Middle

School in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and

is a member of MTSBOA. She received her

BM in music education from Middle Tennessee

State University (summa cum laude).

it's time

TO START A

Tri-M MUSIC

honor

SOCIETY CHAPTER

Start a chapter at your school in

3 EASY STEPS!

Join the only national honor

society for student musicians in grades

6-12.

1,775

CHAPTERS

75,000

STUDENT MEMBERS

MusicHonors.com | Tri-M@nafme.org | 1-800-336-3768

®

40 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


LEARN, PERFORM, PERFECT

“Maryville College is the perfect

place for me to grow into

the music educator

I hope to be.”

MEGAN KOLB

Birmingham, Alabama

Recipient of the

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Located in the new $47-million Clayton Center for the Arts, the

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MARYVILLECOLLEGE.EDU

MARYVILLE, TENNESSEE

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 41


TENNESSEE MUSICIAN ADVERTISER INDEX | VOLUME 70, No. 1

A very special

thank you to all

of our advertisers

who support the

work of music

educators at all

levels in the State

of Tennessee.

ADVERTISER

Austin Peay State University 15

Belmont University 8

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East Tennessee State University 3

Spectrum of Richmond/Fiesta-val 42

Lee University

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Maryville College 41

Middle Tennessee State University 18

Milligan College 37

NAMM Foundation 9

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Smoky Mountain Music Festival 38

Tennessee State University 12

Tennessee Technological University 26

University of Memphis 32

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 7

University of Tennessee at Knoxville Bands 17

University of Tennessee at Knoxville School of Music 22

University of Tennessee at Martin 21

Yamaha Corporation of America 33

Tennessee Music Education Assocation | www.tnmea.org | 43


TMEA BACK THEN

• An interesting news bulletin appeared

in this edition of the Tennessee Musician

with the headline “TMEA Convention

Postponed.” According to the article, the

TMEA Board of Directors, at a meeting

held on October 2nd, voted to unanimously

postpone the first state convention,

which was planned for November 7-9,

1954. The program had been planned

with several national exhibitors lined up.

The TMEA Board of Directors deemed

the postponement as necessary because

“attendance in November, by all indications,

would not justify the large-scale meeting

planned at this time. Adequate information

had not reached the teachers over the state,

and several other conventions and district

meetings were competing for teachers’

attendance.” It should be noted that the

convention was to be held in conjunction

with the Tennessee Division of Music

Teachers National Association, which

planned to hold their own convention in

November during the same dates at Peabody

College in Nashville, Tennessee.

• C.B. Hunt, Jr. a past president of MTSBOA

wrote an interesting article that detailed the

results of a composition contest that was

co-sponsored by both TMEA and MTSBOA

during the academic year 1953-1954. Using

the Peabody College Symphonic Band as the

laboratory band, fifty-eight works were read

and two winners were selected from a pool

that represented twenty-nine states. The

budget was included $400.00 for prize money

and $100.00 for expenses. The winners were

Nicholas Tawa who wrote Concerto Grosso

for Band and Donald O. Johnston who wrote

Prelude for Band. The contest committee

members were Howard Brown, Music

Supervisor of Nashville City Schools, Taylor

Hagan, Band Director at East High School,

Philip Slates, Assistant Professor of Music at

Peabody College, Philip Howard, Assistant

Professor of Music at Middle Tennessee State

College, Eli Pacetti, Band Director at Howard

School, and C.B. Hunt, Associate Professor

of Music at Peabody College.

national requirements and judges who were

nationally known authorities on marching

bands, the contest announcement cited that

there was much interest by the band directors

in the area.

• A reprint of an article that first appeared

in the Tennessean that reviewed a marching

band contest held at East High School in

Nashville, Tennessee. The contest featured

eighteen high school bands and their baton

twirling auxiliary units. The highlight of the

contest was the mass band performances

of the Star Spangled Banner. Band’s with

notable performances included Tullahoma

High School Band, Isaac Litton High School,

East High School, and Howard School.

Taylor Hagan, Band Director at East High

School, served as festival chair. The mass

band performance was directed by Howard

Brown, Music Supervisor of Nashville

City Schools. Assisting Brown was Floyd

Rodgers, Instrumental Music Supervisor

of Nashville City Schools. Ratings of A

through E were announced by then MTSBOA

President J.B. Hewgley and results were

published in this edition of the Tennessee

Musician.

• An announcement of a West Tennessee

Marching Contest, sponsored by the Jackson

Exchange club was scheduled to be held in

Rothrock Stadium on November 18, 1954.

It was noted in this announcement that

this particular contest was the first such

contest organized before World War II. Using

THE TENNESSEE MUSICIAN

(OCOTBER 1954)

Volume 7, No. 1 – 12 pgs.

Carolyn (McCalla) Travers, TMEA President

Floyd D. Funk, Editor

44 | TENNESSEE MUSICIAN | 2017 | Volume 70, No. 1


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