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Viva Lewes Issue #138 March 2018

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PUTTING

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138

VIVALEWES

EDITORIAL

A friend of a friend, visiting Lewes for the first time, summed

it up pretty neatly. They'd noticed just how many independent

shops there were here, and how different it made our (already

beautiful) town look from others of a similar size, more

dominated by the garish primary colours of chainstore façades.

Lewes is the town all the other towns want to be.”

Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with chains. I think that most all Lewes’ retailers

would agree that a good smattering of them brings people into town, and that those people

are also likely to spin off to the nearby indies. Anyway, how many people can put their hands

up and say they NEVER go to Tesco, or Fuego, or Mountain Warehouse, or Bill’s, for that

matter? It’s often a matter of cost, for one thing: the Farmers' Market is a fantastic asset, but

who can afford to do all their shopping there?

Nonetheless, if you do feel that Lewes’ independent spirit is heightened by its independent

shops, we would urge you to appreciate them, by using them as much as you can. Find a

minute to pop in and have a look inside, when you’re walking past. Have a chat with the

person behind the till. Get to know them, if you don’t already. They’re great people.

The theme of this issue is ‘independence’, as in ‘independents’. We want to celebrate the

initiative and bravery of those who’ve literally set up shop here, or taken on and run with

existent independent concerns. Long may they thrive; long may they continue to do things a

bit differently. Enjoy the issue...

THE TEAM

.....................

EDITOR: Alex Leith alex@vivamagazines.com

SUB-EDITOR: David Jarman

DEPUTY EDITOR: Rebecca Cunningham rebecca@vivamagazines.com

ART DIRECTOR: Katie Moorman katie@vivamagazines.com

ADVERTISING: Sarah Hunnisett, Amanda Meynell advertising@vivamagazines.com

EDITORIAL / ADMIN ASSISTANT: Kelly Hill admin@vivamagazines.com

DISTRIBUTION: David Pardue distribution@vivamagazines.com

CONTRIBUTORS: Jacky Adams, Michael Blencowe, Sarah Boughton, Mark Bridge, Emma Chaplin,

Daniel Etherington, Mark Greco, Anita Hall, John Henty, Mat Homewood, Chloë King, Dexter Lee,

Lizzie Lower, Carlotta Luke, Richard Madden and Marcus Taylor

PUBLISHER: Becky Ramsden becky@vivamagazines.com

Viva Lewes is based at Pipe Passage, 151b High Street, Lewes, BN7 1XU, 01273 480131. Advertising 01273 488882


April – December

PRESENT LAUGHTER

random / generations

THE CHALK GARDEN

THE COUNTRY WIFE

ME AND MY GIRL

THE MEETING

COPENHAGEN

FLOWERS FOR MRS HARRIS

COCK

THE MIDNIGHT GANG

THE WATSONS

SLEEPING BEAUTY

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THE 'INDEPENDENCE' ISSUE

CONTENTS

Bits and bobs.

Mark Ellender deciphers his enigmatic

cover (8-9); Chloe Edwards talks us

through her Lewes likes (11); how

TRINITY are helping the homeless

(13); Brighton Festival hits Firle (16); a

Cambodian demon reading Viva (17);

Carlotta Luke at Seedy Saturday (25),

and the usual rainbow smorgasbord of

clocks and hats and facts and plaques.

Columns.

Mark Bridge bids adieu (27), David

Jarman assesses the meagre canon of

William Collins (29) and Chloë King

returns to this section, much better

organised than she was before (31).

On this month.

Lewes FC home-and-away man

‘Cynical’ Dave McKay (33); The

Esterházy Choir, celebrating 25 years

with Haydn’s Creation (35); Pinter’s

Betrayal at Lewes Little Theatre (39),

and another fine selection of films at the

Depot, including the 1929 classic Man

with a Movie Camera (41).

11

Art.

William Blake at Petworth House (42-

3); Cliff Crawford’s mesmeric portraits

of groyne heads at the Martyrs’ (45),

and Lizzie Lower’s round-up of what’s

hanging on which gallery wall, in town

and well beyond (47-51).

Listings & Free Time.

Dates for the diary, including a charity

dash across hot coals at Plumpton

Racecourse, an open day at St John sub

Castro and a footie quiz at the Pan (53-

7). Plus our classical music round-up (59),

our monthly gig guide (61-3), swipe-right

stuff for the under 16s (65), and a literary

event at Skylark (69).

20 Years of Penguin Essentials Vitrine Display (detail). Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft, photo by Sam Moore


THE 'INDEPENDENCE' ISSUE

Food.

Pintxos at The Patch (71); a groundnut

stew recipe from The Feature Kitchen

(72-3); al frrrresco fare at the Riverside

(75) and our edible updates food news

section (77).

The Way We Work.

We snap four off-beat independents

fresh on the scene… and ask them why

they’re doin’ it for themselves (79-83).

89

Features.

Michael Blencowe examines the sex

life of slugs (85); Todd drags Richard

and Sarah over Berwick way (87); Anita

Hall discovers why there’s no need to

dread the menopause (89); exciting new

proposals for an NHS ‘Super-practice’

(91); Lewes’ at-risk buildings (92);

Alistair Fleming’s Plumpton workshop

(94-5) and John Henty out loud (97).

72

Inside Left.

Jenkins and Stripp, one of Lewes’ ten

independent newsagents in 1953 (114).

VIVA DEADLINES

We plan each magazine six weeks ahead, with a mid-month

advertising/copy deadline. Please send details of planned events

to admin@vivamagazines.com, and for any advertising queries:

advertising@vivamagazines.com, or call 01273 434567.

Remember to recycle your Viva.

Every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of our content.

Viva Lewes magazine cannot be held responsible for any omissions, errors

or alterations. The views expressed by columnists do not necessarily

represent the view of Viva Lewes.

Love me or recycle me. Illustration by Chloë King

6


Archie

Lower Sixth

Scholar

You are warmly invited to our

Senior School Open Morning

Saturday 10 March 2018

9.30am to noon (Entry at 13 and 16)

HMC – Day, weekly and full boarding Boys

and girls 13 to 18

To register please contact:

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T 01323 843252

or online at bedes.org

Bede’s Senior School

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East Sussex BN27 3QH


THIS MONTH’S COVER ARTIST

This month, local artist Mark Ellender is back

with his third Viva cover, illustrating our theme of

‘independence’. “It’s about going against the tide,

going out on your own, doing things under your

own steam,” he says. “Have you seen the speech

that Steve Jobs gave at Stanford? It’s fantastic – in

a nutshell, it’s all about following your heart and

striking out on your own. I wanted to somehow

put across that entrepreneurial spirit – ‘everything

else is going on over there, but I’m going this way’

– I think that really fits in Lewes.”

We agree, and we love the eclectic mix of images

that Mark’s covers always bring: the Harvey’s

chimney puffing away on top of the man’s hat; the

fish, quite literally, out of water. “A lot of my work

starts as a stream of consciousness,” he explains.

“I just sketch and sketch, and whatever comes out

of that will or won’t find its way into a painting.”

One theme which tends to rear its head fairly frequently

in Mark’s work is Easter Island. “I love

Pacific island art and it’s almost impossible for

that not to show up in everything I do. The masks,

the statues – I remember being struck by them as

a kid, seeing them in National Geographic and just

thinking they were amazing. I’m just absolutely

fascinated by the mystery of how the devil they

got there – some of them are four metres tall!”

Mark finally got to make his trip of a lifetime to

Easter Island back in October; he appeared in the

8


MARK ELLENDER

Spread the Word slot of VL#136, holding his Viva,

of course.

Mark produces bespoke paintings and murals to

commission, as well as smaller scale illustrated

works. He has also designed and illustrated a children’s

book series. Until now his work has predominantly

been in acrylic on canvas, because of

its fast-drying nature, which allows his hands to

keep up with his mind, but his plans for the coming

year are to build on his digital skills. “I’m not

going to step away from the easel completely,” he

says, “but I’d like to be able to go back and do a bit

of editing. I really like artists like Shag, and seeing

the work they do with it, that’s something I want

to try out.” Perhaps when he’s back with his fourth

cover, it won’t be a painting at all… RC

Check out some more examples of Mark’s work at

markellenderblog.wordpress.com

9


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MY LEWES: CHLOE EDWARDS, SEVEN SISTERS' SPICES

Are you local? I’m London born and bred. My

partner Charlie and I are life-long renters and

our rent in Hackney increased from £60 a week

in 1996 to £1,600 a month in 2010; we were

priced out and were delighted to find Lewes as an

affordable alternative.

So, quite a difference… At first we lived in

Paddock Road, and it was a revelation. The kids

were just five and seven, but we could let them

roam, as long as they kept to the Paddock. I had

time to myself!

Did you change jobs? I used to work in deaf

adult language support, and at first I commuted.

Then my daughter Agi fell ill – she’s fine now – so

I had to find something local to do. I taught myself

to cook with spices, and set up Seven Sisters’

Spices, partially so I could feed the family healthy

food. I was turned down by both markets, so I

decided to peddle my wares from a Silver Cross

pram, on a Friday. Now I also do workshops, and

have developed a product range that I sell on the

internet. And in March 2017 I was given the green

light for a stall at the Farmers’ Market.

Is Lewes a good place to run an independent

business? According to government statistics,

Lewes District has the second most microbusinesses

per capita in the country. So there’s a

culture of supporting local business here: perhaps

because we all support each other!

And in that spirit you set up Lewes Women

in Business… I’d met a number of women in

the town doing their own thing, but they didn’t

necessarily know one another, and I realised they

really should. With the great support of colleagues

– particularly Marisa Guthrie and Sophie Isachsen

– we’ve now become a 70-plus-member, not-forprofit

CIC. It’s about networking, but also about

learning new skills from other members: from

SEO, to making a business plan, to voice therapy,

to Alexandra Technique.

What’s your favourite pub/restaurant? The

Swan, I’m so glad they’re doing so well there.

Mine’s a glass of dry white wine! We don’t often

eat out, but on special occasions, the food at the

Limetree Kitchen is excellent.

Where do you shop for food? Pestle and

Mortar are great for spices and other Asian food;

the boys selling veg in Cliffe are great value; I

alternate between May’s and Peter Richards for

meat. Bickerstaffs in the Riverside have a wide

range of fish.

What do you do for exercise? We walk the

dog in the wetlands behind the Stanley Turner.

Working on the allotment in Hope in the Valley is

a good work-out. And I do Zumba on a Monday at

the All Saints. What a way to start the week, and

what a laugh we have, bumping around: it really

lifts the soul!

Where would you live if not in Lewes? On a

homestead on a Greek island, with livestock and

land to grow vegetables. Interview by Alex Leith

sevensistersspices.com / leweswomeninbusiness.co.uk

11


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PHOTO OF THE MONTH

HINT OF CASTLE

‘This photo was taken at 8am in early February, after we had snow,’ writes Emma Chaplin, our former

editor, whose photo we liked so much we decided to disobey our unwritten rule about not using images

from regular Viva contributors in this space. There was good reason she was out and about so

early: ‘I think I have the most beautiful walk to work in the world. From the Pells to the Hive on the

High Street, usually up Castle Banks and past the Tilting Ground.’ That certainly beats commuting.

‘Inspired by the wonderful Peter Messer,’ she continues. ‘I observe my surroundings closely. I'm

always looking for something different to photograph, either buds on the trees, new flowers growing

in the beds, or interesting ways to frame a similar, and familiar, view. So I took this shot with my

phone through the gap in the flint wall by Castle Precincts. I like the snow on the wall and the leaves

beyond, with just a hint of castle.’ Knowing that we like to check out the tech in this slot, she tells us,

too, what she took it on: ‘my Moto G5 Plus’.

Please send your pictures, taken in and around Lewes, to photos@vivamagazines.com, with comments on

why and where you took them, and your phone number. We’ll choose our favourite for this page, which

wins the photographer £20, to be picked up from our office after publication. Unless previously arranged,

we reserve the right to use all pictures in future issues of Viva magazines or online.

13


BITS AND BOBS

TRINITY AND HOMELESSNESS IN LEWES

REV JULES MIDDLETON

I’m a Sussex girl,

originally from

Hurstpierpoint. I was

ordained at Chichester

Cathedral June 2016,

and now I’m Assistant

Curate for TRIN-

ITY Church. Not

something I’d thought

I’d be. I had a misspent

youth, and dabbled in

everything.

TRINITY is now

one church which

offers five or six services, varying from traditional to

modern, every Sunday across three locations - Southover,

St John sub Castro and South Malling.

In terms of supporting the community, we run a

number of projects: Southover Community Care,

a care agency; Southover Counselling; lots of

children’s and youth groups; the Monday Club for

older people, helping address loneliness, and the

TRINITY Voices choir of older people. We’ve just

completed transforming the interior of TRINITY

St John sub Castro into a multiple-use community

venue, with a café space, office space, meeting

rooms and crèche.

And we are involved with Re-homing Lewes, a

temporary day centre for homeless people. I know

of three rough sleepers who sleep on the streets

of Lewes at the moment, but there are a lot more

who don’t have permanent housing. They might

be sofa surfing, sleeping in a car or tent. Some have

problems related to addiction or mental ill-health.

Mental health support and rehab options are

severely under-resourced and can be hard to access

if you don’t have a permanent address, which

creates a vicious circle. Welfare cuts and Universal

Credit mean the problem is only getting worse. It

doesn’t take much for people to drop off the radar.

Re-homing Lewes

was the brainchild

of Thomas Schorr-

Kon, with the help

of Subud and others.

It’s a drop-in, offering

food, warmth and

somewhere to wash

at 26a Station Street

(part of Subud, up the

steps on the road entrance),

currently open

every day, 1-3pm. It’s

funded by donations

and run by volunteers. We’re open until the end of

March, when Subud are having building work done.

We’re looking for premises to use after that. We’d

love more volunteers. And any contributions via the

Facebook page or church would be brilliant.

If people wonder what they can do to help someone

on the streets - perhaps ask? Drying out a wet

sleeping bag could be most useful. Or point them to

SWEP provision. This is short for Severe Weather

Emergency Protocol, normally triggered when the

temperature has been forecast to be zero degrees or

below for three days. Lewes District Council makes

accommodation available to those sleeping rough.

Support can be accessed via Southover House,

01273 471600 or housingneeds@lewes.gov.uk. Also

Re-homing Lewes drop-in or Landport Community

Café. The café offers a nutritious meal (donation

only, Fridays 5-7pm, Landport Community Room,

2A Horsfield Road).

We’re hoping to put together an information

leaflet. The local PCSOs (police community support

officers) are great at letting people in need

know where they can get help. Emma Chaplin

Find Re-homing Lewes on Facebook. Sat 3rd, TRIN-

ITY Centre Open Day at St John sub Castro. Tours,

café, kids’ activities, meet the vicar. trinitylewes.org

Photo by Emma Chaplin

14


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BITS AND BOBS

BRIGHTON FESTIVAL

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The Brighton Festival programme was announced

just before we went to press, and, as ever, there are

several Festival events taking place east of our neighbouring

city between May 5th and 27th.

One of the real talking points - The Voice Project’s

The Arms of Sleep – is taking place in Firle Place,

Fri 11th - Sun 13th. This is a ten-hour choral work

composed by Jonathan Baker, Helen Chadwick and

Orlando Gough: punters are given a bed, ‘spending

the night surrounded by sound and shadows, poised

between sleep and wakefulness.’ It’s described as

‘23rd-century vespers’. Pyjamas advised.

We’ve been excited for a while about Lewes composer

Ed Hughes’ score for Cesca Eaton’s film

Cuckmere: A Portrait, which will premiere at the Attenborough

Centre on the 5th of May: the music

will be played live by the Orchestra of Sound and

Light; we’ve seen a scene and it’s rather beautiful.

The University of Sussex venue will also host Emma

Rice’s The Flying Lovers of Vitebsk (May 9th - 12th,

performed by Kneehigh, who brought the exuberant

Tristan & Yseult to Brighton Dome last year), poet

Lemn Sissay MBE’s life story Gold from the Stone

(13th), and Gob Squad’s take on Dorian Gray, Creation

(Pictures for Dorian).

And, as ever, Glyndebourne are in on the act, with

two performances, a Baroque programme from

Belgian early music ensemble Vox Luminis (6th),

and Songs of the Sea (13th) an afternoon of ‘evocative

imagery and profound artistry’ featuring tenor Mark

Padmore, pianist Julius Drake, baritone Roderick

Williams and narrator Rory Kinnear. Get booking!


BITS AND BOBS

SPREAD THE WORD

On their way to Angkor Thom,

the ancient fortified city near

Siem Reap in Cambodia, Ruth

and Neil Thomson offered one

of the 54 demons, lining one side

of the causeway of the moat to

the city, the chance to catch up

with the January edition of Viva

Lewes. He remained inscrutable.

And here’s the ever colourful

Viva Lewes with the very colourful

Chris Vinten in even more

colourful Gokana, India. Chris is

one of those clever people who

overwinters in warmer climes

(and he likes to look the part).

Keep taking us with you and keep

spreading the word. Send your

pics to hello@vivamagazines.com

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BITS AND BOBS

CLOCKS OF LEWES #16: THE TOWN CLOCK

With its black and gold face,

gabled roof and weathervane,

the Town Clock looms out over

the High Street on an ornate

cast ironwork gantry from the

Church House of St Michael

in Lewes, as it has done for the

past 137-odd years. In this time,

the commercial focus of Lewes

might have shifted somewhat

but the clock remains emblematic

of the town.

In the mid-19th century, a clock

used to protrude from a building

on the other side of St Michael’s,

but this was demolished for the creation of a parish

school. In 1881, Church House was built, with the

new clock tower. Today, the narrow tower contains

various elements of the clock’s history.

The tower has five bells,

which chime the hours. The

bells were recast by Gillett

and Co of Croydon, dated

1887 – Queen Victoria's

Golden Jubilee. An electric

mechanism was added in

1958, replacing the pendulums,

which apparently hung

in a deep pit under the tower.

Brian Courage, Town

Ranger, says the clock

was restored again about

eight years ago, when local

residents requested the night

chimes be silenced. Despite this partial muting, the

clock still presides handsomely over the top of town.

Daniel Etherington

Thanks to Brian Courage and John Downie

19


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PUBS AND BOBS

TOWN PLAQUE #36: TOM PAINE

Uniquely featuring on three plaques in the town centre, Tom Paine has been

called ‘a rope-maker by trade, a journalist by profession, and a propagandist

by inclination’. He came to Lewes in 1768 as a Customs and Excise Officer

to keep an eye on local smugglers, but he only lived here, at Bull House at

Westgate, for less than seven years. In that time he threw himself into the

town’s life: he fought for better employment conditions for Customs Officers,

married and separated, launched a business that failed, went broke, then

sold all that he had and moved out to America early in 1784. He arrived

in Philadelphia too unwell to leave the ship: an unpromising start - but his radical republican pamphlets,

especially Common Sense (1776), which crystallized sentiment for independence, are now seen as crucial in

encouraging separation from Britain and the birth of a new nation. (One plaque is on Bull House, one on the

White Hart, where he debated, and this is in the Castle Precincts, near the Maltings.) Marcus Taylor

LEWES IN NUMBERS

Where do people work and how do they get there? The last Census asked workers resident in Lewes, and

found that 1 in 4 worked at or from home, or overseas or offshore. 39% work within 10 kilometres of home,

which includes Lewes and Falmer. A further 23% work between 10-30 km of Lewes, including Brighton,

Eastbourne, Worthing and Haywards Heath, while 13% travel over 30 km including Crawley, London and

beyond. More men than women work from home, although women are more likely to work closer to home

overall. 25% travel to work by foot or cycle, around double the local or regional percentage, while a further

20% travel by public transport. 44% travel by private car or van, much lower than the 66% across the county

and the region. Sarah Boughton

GHOST PUB #41: THE PRINCE OF WALES, MALLING STREET

The present Malling Hill road was constructed around 1830, and the

Prince of Wales was almost certainly built around the same time. This became

the first Lewes pub on the route into the town from the north-east,

and as such would have experienced a fair amount of trade. For almost the

entire period between the 1870s and 1970s, the Prince of Wales was run

by just three families: the Eastwoods, the Bournes, and the Lampers. Albert

Eastwood took over the pub in 1876, and appears to have been quite

a character, hosting events and dinners for many clubs and societies. He

had his own ‘spacious marquee’ at the annual Great Sheep Fair in town,

where he sold luncheons, wines, spirits and cigars. And in 1892 Lewesians

were invited to the Prince of Wales to see a display of Albert’s ‘unusually heavy’ potatoes. Robert Bourne and

his wife Frances (a Ringmer girl) took over the pub in 1897, and remained there for 34 years. It was then

handed over to Stephen and Edith Lamper, who passed it to their son John in 1960. Both Stephen and John

played for the Prince of Wales in the Lewes Darts League. Sadly, this lovely old pub closed in the 1990s. It

did open again briefly, but did not last long. The building is now home to a firm of solicitors. Mat Homewood

21


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BITS AND BOBS

WHERE DID YOU

GET THAT HAT?

Holly of Keere Street is an avid

fan of charity shops, and she was

browsing the rails in British Heart

Foundation on the High Street

when I stopped her to ask for a

snap of her fabulous leopard print

trilby. She remembered all the

details. She bought it in Topshop

three years ago for £25, and says

it is one of her favourites… she’s

more than got her money’s worth.

Great coat too, Holly! Kelly Hill

• Antique and new jewellery

• Silverware

• Watches

• Repairs

• Valuations

23


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Our clients seek our advice at key moments in their lives. Circumstances change

and we can never predict just what the future will hold. Adams & Remers have

been helping families in East Sussex for many years and can offer advice on:

• Buying or selling all types of property, including Listed Property

• Protecting your Listed Property for future generations to enjoy

• Making or revising a Will

• Inheritance tax planning

• Planning for children and grandchildren’s futures

• Creating an Education Trust

• Financial affairs of family members

• Dealing with disputes

Most of our clients are recommended to us and we are

rated as one of the top private client firms in the South

East. Call us on the number below or drop in to our

office - we look forward to working with you.

In terms of

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are absolutely

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Adams & Remers LLP

LEWES 01273 480616

LONDON 020 7024 3600

www.adamsandremers.com


PHOTOGRAPHY

CARLOTTA LUKE

SEEDY SATURDAY

Forget snowdrops: one of the first signs of spring

is Seedy Saturday, where local horticulturalists and

gardeners swap seeds and nuggets of grow-yourown

advice. Carlotta Luke was there, of course,

and she caught (clockwise from top left): Anne-

Marie Sullivan’s wicker workshop; some ‘stinking

hellebore’ seeds; Landport Community gardeners

making newspaper planters; Michael Hanson from

Bread4Life.org on a wooden bicycle-powered

wheat-grinding machine, and Chloe Edwards from

Seven Sisters’ Spices running her savoury café. A

green-fingered bunch indeed: let’s hope it’s a good

season for them. carlottaluke.com

25


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COLUMN

East of Earwig

My state of independence

Being a self-employed copywriter in Ringmer is

often a thankless task. This is good. In the past

I’ve crafted letters from various chief executives,

I’ve given voice to a cartoon mobile phone, I’ve

interviewed one of the greatest racing drivers of

all time and I’ve, briefly, become an expert on

international rail travel. All great fun - and without

any sign of Mark Bridge, whoever he is. My name

rarely appears in print. As a result, no-one stops

me in the street to offer their opinion. No-one

photographs me when I pop to the shops wearing

pyjamas and flip-flops. No-one asks me if I’m him

from that thing.

The freelance lifestyle is also unstable. This is also

good. While some of my contemporaries get their

thrills from driving fast cars, kite-surfing and wild

parties, I get my adrenaline rush from wondering

whether my invoices will be paid before our mortgage

is due. This is much safer, with absolutely no

chance of a twisted ankle.

A writer in a big city may talk about working in

a different coffee shop every day for a change of

scenery. Here in Ringmer, fewer choices mean

fewer visits. Ruling out the local pubs - which is

a good idea, because I'd be inclined to stay for a

bowl of chips and a pint when I'd finished my coffee

- I'm left with a choice between Café Ringmer,

an outside table at the bakery and the regular

‘Souper Saturday’ fund-raiser at the village hall.

Quite simply, living in a village saves me a fortune

on my cappuccino budget.

Then there’s the freedom. I don’t have any set

hours to work, as long as I get the job done. I can

stay up late if I want (although, to be honest, I

often start dozing on the sofa before 10pm. The

Newsnight theme might as well be a lullaby.) I can

work at weekends, without any of the annoying paperwork

associated with overtime payments. And

I can even start early, just like most other people

with regular jobs.

Of course, there are disadvantages. By not commuting,

I miss out on the camaraderie of fellow

travellers as we stand nose-to-armpit on public

transport, I don’t see the cheery gestures that

drivers exchange at the Cuilfail roundabout and

there’s no chance for me to boost my circulation as

I sprint through the rain to my desk.

Let’s face it, I am a man of mystery. And I’m about

to become even more mysterious, because this is

my last East of Earwig column. To everyone who’s

enquired about the new house (still delightful), the

grandson (still delightful) or the late Rupert (still

in his little packet on the bedroom windowsill);

thank you for joining me on my voyage of discovery

through Ringmer. Meanwhile, if you’d like to

know what happens next… I’m open to commissions.

Mark Bridge

@markbridge

27


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COLUMN

David Jarman

Not prose ≠ poetry

In as much as the poet William Hayley

is remembered at all these days,

it is not for his ‘bad verses’ but

for his extensive patronage

of the arts; always wellintentioned,

not always

happy in its execution. The

poet William Cowper,

painter George Romney

and sculptor John Flaxman

are the most illustrious

of Hayley’s protégés. And

then, of course, there’s

William Blake. Hayley was

directly responsible for Blake’s

three-year stay in Sussex. It’s the

subject of an exhibition at Petworth

House that we review on pages 42-3.

Hayley was born in Chichester, and in 1795

he commissioned Flaxman’s monument to his

fellow-poet, William Collins, who was born in

Chichester on Christmas Day, 1721. The son of

a respectable vendor of hats, and haberdasher,

who was twice Mayor of Chichester, William

Collins was educated at Winchester and Oxford.

But thereafter, diverse trials and tribulations

bedevilled his short life, not least of which was

a chronic irresolution. Relative to his thirtyseven

years, the undoubted literary reputation

that he achieved in his lifetime was founded on

surprisingly few poems. A tendency towards

dissipation didn’t help, and, as the years slipped

by, recurrent bouts of disabling depression, which

at one time saw him confined to a House for

Lunatics, took an increasing toll on his vitality.

Dr Johnson, in his Lives of the Poets, took a pretty

dim view of Collins’ creativity: ‘He affected

the obsolete when it was not worthy of revival;

and he put his words out of the common order,

seeming to think… that not to write

prose is certainly to write poetry’.

Collins ahead of his time,

perhaps!

But if he did not favour

the work, Dr Johnson was

sympathetic to the man.

One passage, recycled

in Lives of the Poets, is so

eloquent and generousspirited

that it deserves to

be quoted at length:

‘His morals were pure,

and his opinions pious:

in a long continuance of

poverty, and long habits of

dissipation, it cannot be expected

that any character should be exactly

uniform. There is a degree of want by which the

freedom of agency is almost destroyed; and long

association with fortuitous companions will at

last relax the strictness of truth, and abate the

fervour of sincerity. That this man, wise and

virtuous as he was, passed always unentangled

through the snares of life, it would be prejudice

and temerity to affirm; but it may be said

that at least he preserved the source of action

unpolluted, that his principles were never shaken,

that his distinctions of right and wrong were

never confounded, and that his faults had nothing

of malignity or design, but proceeded from some

unexpected pressure, or casual temptation’.

In his declining years, Collins was cared for by his

sister in Chichester. He died June 12th, 1759, and

is buried in St Andrew’s Church in East Street.

Flaxman’s monument to Collins, in Chichester

Cathedral, is to be found, appropriately enough,

close by to the recumbent figures that inspired

Philip Larkin’s poem, An Arundel Tomb.

Portrait of William Collins

29


COLUMN

Chloë King

...bites the bullet

It’s late, and small

person is getting ready

for bed, which, in this

instance, means standing

in a doorway licking

the snot from one’s

nostrils for 40 minutes.

This is no exaggeration.

I have been watching

the minutes pass by

excruciatingly as I lie

immobilised by the giant

infant on my chest.

They say time is flexible,

and it’s true that

moments like these are

pretty much the only

ones in my new-found crystalline adulthood for

which the clock slows. The rest of the time, I am

hurtling through hours and days like a slug from

a blunderbuss. This is why the discovery of a new

form of diary-keeping is changing my life.

A friend mentioned the words ‘Bullet Journal’ to

me quietly in the school playground this January.

My interest peaked immediately. What has always

been lacking with previous diaries is a reference

to violence – surely a Bullet Journal will keep me

in line?

A Bullet Journal, it turns out, is first of all

a notebook. A rather expensive, luxurious

notebook with a hard cover available in every

colour of the rainbow. It’s a German design, the

Leuchtterm1917, with bevelled, off-white pages,

corner numbering, a front index and dots. The

‘bullet’ refers to these dotted pages that make it

easy to draw grids and charts to suit your planning

needs, which is the other point of interest

– its brand new notetaking system.

Everyone I have raved to about this has looked

deeply perplexed as I have tried to explain how

the system works. In spite

of holding two communications/colouring-in

degrees, it seems I am

incapable of making a

mind-bogglingly difficult

method seem simple.

Sorry, I meant to say I am

capable of making a simple

method seem mind-bogglingly

difficult. Note to

self: normal people tend to

switch off on hearing the

words ‘hierarchical lists’.

I found the best way to

learn was to spend a weekend

watching YouTube

‘walk-throughs’ by self-styled heroes of timemanagement

and Instagram-friendly calligraphic

script handwriting.

If you can see past reams of washi tape and not

be deterred by the evidence that millennials have

such a luxurious abundance of time they spend

hours decorating charts detailing their daily water

consumption, you will find some handy tips. In any

case, you should certainly watch the summary by

Bullet Journal's inventor Ryder Caroll, at

bulletjournal.com.

I’ve found my Bullet Journal such a boon because

my brain simply doesn’t retain typed information

as well as that which I have written down. We all

know the best way to stretch time is to make better

use of it, and now I can manage more efficiently

my to-do lists; diary and everything I once filed in

my overtired brain, an A6 diary, various notebooks,

my iPhone and on scraps of paper.

In short, it has never been so easy to see how many

small tasks and major life goals I am falling behind

on every God-given minute of the day. I couldn’t

be more pleased!

Illustration by Chloë King

31


Welcome to the new-look Royal Oak.

A smart, contemporary pub in the heart of the town.

We have a fantastic range of real ales, premium beers and spirits

and a great selection of wines available by the glass.

Our kitchen provides small plates, sharing boards and

hearty bowls, with a focus on locally sourced produce.

The Function Room can host up to 60 guests and boasts its own

bar. It is available for private hire, parties and meetings.

We even have a secret little garden hidden out the back.

Pop in and say hello. We promise you a warm welcome!

www.RoyalOakLewes.co.uk | 01273 474 803 | 3 Station Street, Lewes BN7 2DA


FOOTBALL

'Cynical' Dave McKay

Home and away fan

Photo by James Boyes, McKay centre in denim jacket

If you’ve ever witnessed an away-from-home goal

by Lewes FC Men’s team in the last 12 years,

you’ll almost certainly have noticed the unfettered

celebration of one fan in particular, a seriouslooking

fellow with sandy-grey hair who generally

stands at pitch-level, near the back of the goal.

It’s at moments like this when Aberdonian Dave

McKay belies his nickname, ‘Cynical Dave’.

Chances are, the scorer of the goal will run into

his open arms, and a joyful huddle of fans and

players will form, divided only by the advertising

hoarding.

Dave started going to away games in the 2006/7

season. “It was the promotion season, to the

Conference National. I’d been following Middlesbrough

away until then, but I was sick of the

excessive stewarding, meaning that any sign of

emotion was immediately quelled. I decided to go

to a Lewes away game against Eastleigh. We lost

3-0, one of our players ended up in hospital and

[manager Steve] King was sent to the stands for

protesting. I was hooked.”

He hasn’t missed many away games since, even

though Lewes’ away form has, in the intervening

decade, been pretty dreadful. “The worst game, I

think, was at St Albans in the season we got relegated

from the Conference South: it was bitterly

cold, we barely created a chance, and lost 3-0. We

were so bad I could hardly watch: I’ve never spent

so long staring at concrete.”

This season has been a little different, with

Lewes, as we go to press, having won 10 of their

17 away games. This has led to something of a

spike in the number of away fans. “In the past

it’s been between 12 and 20, irrespective of how

we’ve been doing. This season there’s been at

least 30 every game, with a maximum of 150 who

went to Bromley to see the top-of-the-table clash

against Cray.”

He describes the average away fan as “male, and

over thirty”. Unlike some, Dave has never made

a list of the football grounds he has visited: he’s

more there for the football, and the camaraderie.

He always travels on the train, meaning he and his

companions can enjoy a “can or two of McEwans

Export” on the way back, to fuel the post-mortem,

or celebrate a win. A drink is had before the game,

too. “We don’t really do any sightseeing, but we

do research the best pub in the area, meaning the

one that sells the best real ale.”

There have been a lot of miserable defeats over

the years, but a smattering of real high points too.

He cites an FA Cup win at John Hollins’ Crawley,

in 2006, as being the best of all. Steve King and

the players ran over to the 250-or-so Lewes fans

after the final whistle, to celebrate together, as

Lewes reached the First Round proper for only

the second time in their history. “It’s that sort of

moment that reminds you why you fell in love

with football in the first place.” Alex Leith

33


ON THIS MONTH: CLASSICAL MUSIC

Photo by Ash Mills

Haydn’s Creation

A special anniversary concert

The Esterházy Chamber Choir, named after

Austrian composer Joseph Haydn’s patron Prince

Nikolaus Esterházy, was formed in Lewes a

quarter of a century ago. It’s highly fitting, then,

that the choir have chosen Haydn’s Creation to

perform, at Lewes Town Hall, to celebrate their

own beginnings.

Amateur choirs need to raise money to put on

concerts, in order to pay for the orchestra, any

solo singers that are needed, and the venue hire.

Putting on Haydn’s 1798 masterpiece isn’t a venture

that allows for the cutting of many corners.

The oratorio is a depiction of the creation of the

world as described in the Book of Genesis, including

a musical representation of a lion, a tiger, insects

and a serpent. The choir, 30-40-members strong,

will be joined by a similar-sized orchestra: it

promises to be quite a spectacle.

“We needed to hire three professional soloists, and

we wanted a high quality orchestra, so we hired

the world-renowned London Mozart Players,”

says Matthew Spencer, a first bass who has been

singing with the choir for twenty years. None

of this came cheap, of course. “So we devised a

novel way of raising money, which we dubbed the

Carol-athon.”

There exists a tome affectionately called ‘The

Green Book’ which contains many traditional carols

– over 50 of them – “half of which you rarely

hear sung any more”. The choir raised over £1,700

by singing every note of every carol – in one marathon

session of three hours – in December. “It was

hugely enjoyable,” he says, “but I don’t think we’ll

do it every year.”

The choir has had an injection of fresh blood:

there are three recently joined members who

weren’t yet born when it started up… and its recently

appointed musical director, Richard Dawson

(above, bottom row), is at the beginning of what

looks like a stellar career. Richard, just 26, is the

Deputy Director of Music at Brighton College and

Director of Music at St Paul’s Church, Brighton.

The choir has delighted audiences with many

memorable concerts over the years, under a number

of different directors. When pressed to mention

one concert in particular, Matthew recalls the

choir’s 15th anniversary celebration, at St John sub

Castro, a performance of Bach’s St John Passion,

conducted by guest director Nigel Perrin, a big

star in the choral music scene and formerly of The

King’s Singers. “A member of the choir generously

sponsored that concert instead of throwing a party

for a significant birthday of their own that year,”

he says.

The future sounds healthy, and we can expect

much more from the choir, which performs four

concerts every year: an a capella performance,

a couple of concerts generally accompanied by

piano or organ, and a “flagship” show with a hired

orchestra. This is a flagship performance deluxe,

an apt way of celebrating the choir’s birthday. “A

party’s just a party,” concludes Matthew. “But a

great concert will be remembered for ever.”

Alex Leith

Haydn The Creation, 7pm, 25th March, Town Hall.

esterhazychoir.org

35


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ON THIS MONTH: LITERATURE

Philippe Sands

All roads lead to Lviv

When the barrister

Philippe Sands, a specialist

in international

law, was invited, in 2011,

to give a lecture at the

University of Lviv,

in Western Ukraine,

he thought the place

sounded familiar.

And so it might have:

Lviv is the Ukrainian

name for a city known as Lwow by the Russians,

Lvov by the Poles, and Lemburg by the Germans,

all of whom controlled the city at some

point in the twentieth century. It turned out it

was the home of his grandfather Leon before he

escaped Nazism. Leon’s wife and child also managed

to flee to England: all the rest of his of his

relatives were murdered in the Holocaust.

It was also where two brilliant lawyers, who

spearheaded the prosecution cases in the

Nuremburg Trials, were brought up: Hersch

Lauterpacht, who put the indictment of ‘crimes

against humanity’ into the trials, and Raphael

Lemkin, who indicted, for the first time, against

what he termed ‘genocide’.

“I was having lunch with my editor after I came

back [from Lviv],” I’m told, by Sands, down

the phone, “and I was talking about these three

men’s intertwining stories, and he said ‘that’s

your next book!’ It wasn’t until later down the

line that a fourth character walked into the book:

Hans Frank.”

“Frank is a totally fascinating figure,” he continues.

“He was highly educated, intelligent and

cultured. He was an outstanding pianist, and the

friend of authors, and musicians, like Richard

Strauss. And yet he became responsible for the

murder of countless people.” Frank, Hitler’s

Photo by John Reynolds

personal lawyer, who

became the Nazi

regime’s chief jurist in

occupied Poland (including

Lviv) was tried

at Nuremberg: he was

found guilty of crimes

against humanity, and

executed.

“The big question is,

if a man as ordinary as

Hans Frank can, swept up in a bigger moment,

cross the line into mass murder, then why not

someone like me?” A question, he suggests,

which is ever more pertinent in our changing

political climate.

The book is called East West Street, and it’s a rare

beast: a book on international law, crossed with a

family memoir, which has the suspense and pace

of a detective novel, building up to a climactic

last quarter describing the Nuremburg Trials.

For Sands, the Trials were a massive milestone

in legal history: “This was the first time in which

rules were created so that the power of the state

was not absolute.” Again there’s a current pertinence:

“[The aftermath of] Trump and Brexit are

threatening to push that back.”

The book has led to a film, My Nazi Legacy:

What Our Fathers Did, “directed by my dear

friend David Evans, who also happens to be

the director of much of Downton Abbey,” says

Philippe, who wrote the documentary's script.

The film, being shown at Depot Cinema two

days before his talk in the All Saints, also features

the sons of two prominent Nazis, one of whom is

Niklas Frank, son of Hans Frank. Alex Leith

A Personal Story of International Crimes, Lewes

Literary Society, All Saints, 20th March, 8pm; My

Nazi Legacy, Depot Cinema, 18th March, 3pm

37


Saturday 17 March - Saturday

24 March 7.45pm excluding

Sunday. Matinee Saturday 24

March 2.45pm

Box Office: lewestheatre.org

or 01273 3474826

£12/ Members £8

WRITTEN BY

HAROLD PINTER

DIRECTED BY

PETER WELLBY

BE TRAYAL


ON THIS MONTH: THEATRE

Betrayal

But who’s betraying who?

Photo of Chris Parke (as Jerry) by Keith Gilbert

To begin with, the working title for the play was

‘Unsolicited Manuscript’. And then, because a

crucial scene is set in Venice, it became ‘Torcello’.

Later it was ‘White Wedding’. But before that,

it had been ‘Betrayal’, and, eventually, ‘Betrayal’

it became. Certainly there are many and varied

types of betrayal going on in Harold Pinter’s

play that the Lewes Little Theatre are presenting,

forty years on from its opening night at the

National Theatre on 15th November, 1978.

Jerry, a literary agent, is married to Judith, a

doctor. They have two children, Sam and Sarah.

Jerry’s ‘best and oldest’ friend is Robert, a publisher,

married to Emma. Again, two children,

Charlotte and Ned. But oh dear, Emma and Jerry

are having an affair. And by the time Robert finds

out about it, it’s already been going on for five

years. They’ve even set up a love nest in Kilburn.

So, Emma is betraying Robert. Jerry is betraying

Judith. The subject of a new novel that Emma is

reading in Venice, represented by Jerry’s agency,

turned down by Robert, may be betrayal. Robert

believes so. Emma disagrees. But then, as Robert

concedes, he may have been ‘thinking of the

wrong book’. And we’re soon told that Robert

has been betraying Emma, in serial infidelities,

for donkey’s years. So, myriad betrayals, and yet

it would seem that for Pinter the chief betrayal is

Robert knowing about Jerry’s affair with his wife,

and withholding that knowledge from Jerry.

The play is told in reverse, so none of this account

is really giving anything away. Apart from

a rather dumb Italian waiter in one scene (not in

Venice) the only three characters who appear are

Robert, Emma and Jerry.

When the play opened it was rather panned by

the critics. Pinter’s excursion into North West

London adultery was thought to be, how can

one put this, a betrayal of the highly individual,

edgy worlds that he had created in such plays

as The Homecoming and No Man’s Land. But

over the years the play’s standing in the Pinter

canon has improved considerably. Even Michael

Billington, one of its chief detractors when it

opened, has recanted.

And perhaps even Joan Bakewell has forgiven

Pinter. It’s been well known for some time now

that Betrayal was closely based on her years-long

affair with the playwright when he was married

to his first wife, the actress Vivien Merchant.

Not something we perhaps needed to know.

As someone observed at the time, it’s rather

like finding out that Hedda Gabler is based on

Valerie Singleton.

A diary entry in Antonia Fraser’s book Must You

Go?: My Life with Harold Pinter reads: ‘Harold

told Joan about Betrayal in the Ladbroke Arms.

She is “in a state of shock”. He always knew this

was going to be quite a meeting. Me, idiotically:

“Apart from that, did she like the play?” Harold:

“That would be like asking Mrs Lincoln the same

question.” I am a fool.’ David Jarman

39


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ON THIS MONTH: CINEMA

Man with a Movie Camera

Secret of Kells

Film '18

Cinema round-up

The highlight of the month at Depot Cinema, as

far as cineastes are concerned, has to be the screening

of the 1929 documentary Man with a Movie

Camera (Sun 11th, 3pm), part of the U3A’s Soviet

film season.

The ‘Man’ in question is Dziga Vertov, who presents

a vibrant warts-and-all picture of urban life

in four Soviet cities – Kiev, Khartov, Moscow and

Odessa – through a series of moving snapshots of

the citizens at work and play, starting at the break of

dawn and ending well after the lights go out.

Film critic Peter Bradshaw loves the film’s ‘spirit of

pure punk rock’: Vertov experiments with any number

of pioneering techniques – double exposure,

fast motion, jump cuts, tracking shots et al. The

editor, interestingly, was his wife Elizaveta Svilova,

who must have had her work cut out curtailing all

the footage to 68 rip-roaring minutes, like someone

clearing up after a great party. My favourite scene?

The homeless chap bursting out laughing as he

wakes in the morning to find a film crew in front

of him.

The other film in this three-part series (which

started in Feb with Battleship Potemkin) is Warren

Beatty’s 1981 classic Reds (4th, 2pm), in which

producer/director/scriptwriter Beatty stars as

Communist journalist John Reed (author of Ten

Days that Shook the World), alongside Diane Keaton,

who plays his lover-then-wife Louise Bryant. It’s

something of a monster, weighing in at 3 hours 15

minutes: American critic Roger Ebert called it ‘a

thinking man’s Dr Zhivago… from the other side.’

Another season to report is Depot’s ‘Documenting

Reality’ series of five classic documentaries,

screened in the Depot’s studio, and preceded by a

lecture by University of Sussex’s Wilma De Jong,

with a more informal discussion afterwards. These

started in February 22nd (with Michael Moore’s

Sicko) but there are four more to come in March,

starting with Sarah Polley’s raw and intimate

family tale Stories We Tell (1st and subsequent

Thursdays, 7pm).

As ever there’s the chance to do a bit of travelling.

Last month we mentioned Depot’s Japanese

season; this continues with the anime samurai tale

The Sword of the Stranger (3rd, 12pm); Kazura

Shiraishi’s mystery drama Birds Without Names

(6th, 8.30pm) and Shinji Azura’s Where I Belong

(13th, 8.30pm). Nearer to home, on St Patrick’s

Day (17th) there’s a rare big-screen chance to

see the brilliant 2009 Irish animation Secret of

Kells; further afield (and then some) the sci-screen

season continues with The Martian (27th).

It’s Oscars month, of course, but there’s much

more besides Hollywood fare (check out lewesdepot.org

for day-to-day listings of first-run and

other films) including live and as-live screenings

of stage performances including Bizet’s opera

Carmen (6th, 6.45pm); Shakespeare’s Julius

Caesar (directed by Nicholas Hytner, 22nd, 7pm);

The Royal Ballet’s Bernstein Centenary (27th,

7.15pm), and Handel’s Messiah, staged by Tom

Morris (28th, 8pm). Hallelujah to all that.

Dexter Lee

41


The Sea of Time and Space, 1821. Arlington Court, National Trust

William Blake in Sussex

Visions of Albion

The three years, from 1800 until 1803, during

which William Blake lived in the village of

Felpham on the West Sussex coast, was the only

time in his life that he spent outside London.

He came to Sussex with his wife, Catherine, at

the invitation of his fellow poet, William Hayley,

whom Blake had visited at Felpham in July, 1800.

Hayley was a great patron of the arts – John Flaxman,

George Romney and William Cowper all

benefitted from his largesse – and the arrangement

that he and Blake seem to have ironed out was that

Blake would take up residence in Felpham and

Hayley would engage him on various design and

engraving projects. And so the Blakes left London

on 18th September, 1800. At first, all went well.

In turning his back on ‘London’s Dungeon Dark’,

Blake was delighted to be ‘Away to sweet Felpham

for Heaven is there’. It was ‘the sweetest spot on

Earth’. In May 1801 he wrote in a letter: ‘Hayley

acts like a Prince’. But the relationship between

patron and ‘patronised’ is always a tricky one. By

January 1803 Hayley had become the ‘source’ of

42


ON THIS MONTH: ART

all Blake’s difficulties. Blake felt

increasingly that all the engraving

and other commissions had

encroached upon his creative

independence. By April 1803

Hayley was being stigmatised

by Blake as ‘the Enemy of my

Spiritual Life while he pretends

to be the Friend of my Corporeal’.

Soon Blake had resolved

‘not to remain another winter’

in Felpham, and by July 1803

he had determined to return to

London to ‘carry on my visionary

studies… unannoy’d’.

Alas, on 12th August, 1803

everything got a whole lot

worse. A private soldier in the

1st Regiment of Dragoons, one

John Scolfield, entered Blake’s

garden. Unaware that he was

there at the invitation of the

gardener, Blake ordered Scolfield

to leave. Scolfield refused,

angry words were exchanged,

and Blake manhandled the

soldier out of the garden ‘by

the elbows… and pushed him

forward down the road’. Three

days later, Scolfield went before

the Chichester Justice of the

Peace and accused Blake of

seditious expressions favouring

the French and damning the

King of England, not to mention

assault. Having gone back

to London, Blake returned to

Chichester to stand trial. Fortunately,

several witnesses testified

on Blake’s behalf and he was

acquitted on all charges. Hayley’s

moral and financial support

at this time did much to repair

their fractured relationship.

The story of Blake’s time in

Sussex is told in an absolutely

splendid exhibition at Petworth

House that runs until 25th

March. Petworth is proud of

being the only major country

house to hold original works

by William Blake which were

collected in the artist’s lifetime

or, in one case, acquired from

his widow.

Petworth’s own holdings are

supplemented by extensive

loans from, among others, the

Victoria and Albert Museum,

the Fitzwilliam in Cambridge,

the British Museum, Tate and

Manchester City Galleries. All

the court documents relating to

Blake’s trial are also on display.

David Jarman

William Blake in Sussex: Vision

of Albion is at Petworth House

until the 25th of March. Entry

by advance booking only: 0344

2491895 / nationaltrust.org.uk

William Blake, William, plate 29 from Milton a Poem, 1804-1811 © The Trustees of the British Museum

43


VALUATION DAY

Decorative Arts, Jewellery and Antiques

Tuesday 27 March, 10am to 4pm

The Courtlands Hotel

Bonhams specialists will be at The Courtlands

Hotel to offer free and confidential advice on

items you may be considering selling at auction.

APPOINTMENTS

AND ENQUIRIES

01273 220000

hove@bonhams.com

VENUE

The Courtlands Hotel

19-27 The Drive

Hove BN3 3JE

PORCELAIN BOWL

BY DAME LUCIE RIE

Sold for £113,500

CARTIER PANTHERE

BROOCH CIRCA 1995

Sold for £179,500

bonhams.com/hove

Prices shown include buyer’s premium. Details can be found at bonhams.com


ON THIS MONTH: ART

Focus on: Groyne 76

by Cliff Crawford

So these are the

tops of groyne

posts? Indeed they

are. There are 121

groynes in Bexhill,

and I’ve been photographing

them over

15 years, and particularly

frequently since

2010. I’ve always got

three or four projects

on the go at a time –

using all sorts of different

art-forms from

line drawing to 3D

computer graphics

- but this one’s been

going a long time,

and I’ve focussed a

lot on it in recent

years. I must have

taken over 18,000

photographs. It’s

become something of

an obsession.

Why? I think of

them as portraits. If you look at the change

that happens to them on a year to year basis it’s

fascinating. Just like traditional portraits. Taking

pictures at regular intervals highlights changes you

might not ordinarily notice, because they’ve happened

gradually over a long period of time. Above

you can see one of the posts of Groyne 76, just

west of the De La Warr: you can track the changes

in its condition and appearance over the years.

What are groynes for? For stopping the shingle

from being washed away, which would be a disaster.

There’s a process known as long-shore drift,

which means that the shingle is dragged – usually

from West to East

– laterally along the

shoreline. Pretty

soon we’d be down

to the sticky clay

beneath.

So you spend a

lot of time on the

shoreline… Actually

it’s not really

a line, if you think

of the difference

between high and

low tide, and neap

and spring tides,

and the fact that the

tide comes in much

further through the

shingle under the

surface than it does

above it. A line, conceptually,

has length

and no thickness,

so thinking about a

‘shoreline’ is very

reductive.

Do you wear wellies to work? Actually walking

boots are better, because once water gets into

wellies… I need good light, so I don’t go when it’s

raining, anyway. The light is best in the morning:

I have to stand on the west side of the groyne

to take a picture, so if I went in the afternoon I

would cast a shadow over the subject matter.

What artwork would you hang on your desert

island palm tree? A Rothko, to calm me down

when I started panicking. But I’d rather have pen

and paper: I’d need it to design my shelter. AL

Waveworn, Cliff’s photos and videos of Bexhill

groynes, Martyrs’ Gallery, March 3rd-23rd.

45


Photographic & Giclée Printing

Online Printing Service Available

C-Type Hand Printing

Archival Mounting

Scanning

01273 708222

info@spectrumphoto.co.uk

spectrumphoto.co.uk


ART

ART & ABOUT

In town this month

Liza Mackintosh

Liza Mackintosh is the featured artist

at Chalk Gallery until the 18th of

March. She describes her work as ‘an

open-ended journey into the organic

landscape’ - with the journey being more

important than the destination. The

resultant paintings are visual diaries of

her walks through local landscapes, most

recently Red House Common in North

Chailey. Liza, who works in the studio

with pencil, pastel, bark, charcoal and

carbon paper, says, ‘the paintings are like

a secret knowledge, a new perspective of

the landscape, the more I look at them

the more I see’.

Cliff Crawford

As well as the

exhibition by

Cliff Crawford

at Martyrs’ Gallery

from the 3rd

until the 23rd of

March (see pg

45) there’s also a new writers’ group at

the gallery on the 2nd and 4th Fridays

of the month (March 9th and 23rd).

Writers of fiction or non-fiction can

use the space free of charge for a calm,

quiet, untutored drop-in session inspired

by the current exhibition.

We learn as we go to press that from

March 1st Sarah O’Kane (formerly of

St Anne’s Galleries, and HQ Gallery)

will be showing her circle of artists’

work from Fisher Street Frames.

She’ll be arranging solo exhibitions in a

variety of spaces from spring onwards.

If you are quick, there is a last chance to

check out the Open Art Exhibition at Pelham

House which ends on the 6th of March.

The annual exhibition showcases the work

of more than 60 established and emerging

Sussex-based artists.

Goblet and Pears by Barbara Lovegrove

Birling Gap (detail) by Helen Brown

47


THE SPRING

SHOW

WAVEWORN

15 years in the intertidal zone

31 MARCH - 13 MAY

10AM - 5PM SATURDAYS

AND SUNDAYS OR BY

APPOINTMENT AT

OTHER TIMES

CLIFF CRAWFORD

Saturday 3 – Friday 23 March • 12–5pm • Thu–Sun

Private View • Friday 2 March • 6pm

www.martyrs.gallery

111 HIGH STREET, LEWES,

EAST SUSSEX BN7 1XY

www.stannesgalleries.com


ART

In town this month (cont)

It's 25 years since Artwave

began as a small

trail of local artists’

houses in Lewes.

It’s grown year on

year, with more than

500 artists and makers

showing their work last

year, across seven different

trails from Lewes to Seaford. For the

anniversary year, plans are afoot for

some colourful celebrations, including a

special Art on Film programme, a public

art installation and participatory events

across the area. Online registration is

open for venues and artists who wish

to participate. Visit artwavefestival.org

to sign up and to join the mailing list

or follow @artwavefestival on Twitter

and Instagram to keep up to date with

developments.

S U N D A Y S F R O M

1 A P R I L 2 0 1 8

P L U S

Gallery

Exhibitions,

Events &

Workshops

Photo by Jorge Colombo

The summer

will return and

the cross-channel

arts festival

diep~haven

will too. The

theme of the

2018 edition is

Terra Firma and 10 artists - Gabriela

Albergaria (pictured above), Matthew

Beach, Ève Chabanon, Sarah Duffy,

Valérie Egles, Azadeh Fatehrad, Freya

Gabie, Essi Kausalainen, John Newling

and Aurélie Sement - have been

invited to work in residence in gardens

and farms across East Sussex and Normandy.

Albergaria, whose work takes

gardens and their history as a starting

point, will be creating an installation at

Sheffield Park until the end of August.

Visit the website to find out more.

[diephaven.org]

A N D T H E

2nd Annual

Surrealist

Picnic

Farleyshouseandgallery.co.uk


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and to support you in every way we can.

Inc. Cooper & Son

42 High Street, Lewes

01273 475 557

Also at: Uckfield • Seaford • Cross in Hand

www.cpjfield.co.uk


ART

Out of town

Circa69

Celebrated VR artist Simon Wilkinson brings his immersive

virtual reality performance The Cube to The

Old Market in Hove for two nights on the 28th and

29th of March. It joins 17 other VR installations in a

show titled Whilst the Rest Were Sleeping, an ‘augmented

reality trail, live electronic music and AV performance’

about a mass disappearance which happened in 1959 in

America, particularly pertinent to the fake-news-filled

present day. “I first heard of the story as a child in 1982 in a magazine called Mysteries of The

World,” explains Wilkinson. “It wasn't until much later that I heard about Manfred Berry and the

way in which he, as an author, used the media to create these incredibly detailed story universes

interwoven with fact and fiction.”

Alongside the excellent Elizabeth Friedlander exhibition at

Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft, you’ll find a display of the

innovative and diverse covers that have adorned the Penguin

Essentials series, which began in 1998 under the guidance of Art

Director John Hamilton. In this display, Hamilton has selected

100 of his favourite, ground-breaking designs, with an additional

selection from the publisher’s archives that includes several

Friedlander book covers and noted designers of their day.

20 Years of Penguin Essentials Vitrine Display Detail

(Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft, photo Sam Moore)

Take a trip to

Towner Gallery

this month and

you’ll get an insight

into the mind

of the extraordinary

Haroon

Mirza; an artist

who considers his

main medium to be

electricity. Used to

working with video,

sculpture, light and sound to create large

scale installations, Mirza has selected works

from the Arts Council Collection, as well as

Towner’s Collection, and incorporated them

into a unique display, called We Stared at the

Moon from the Centre of the Sun. An accompanying

season of classic occult and sci-fi films

is screened in Towner’s plush new auditorium.

[townereastbourne.org.uk]

Lis Rhodes, Dresden Dynamo, 1971-2, Arts Council Collection,

Southbank Centre, London © the artist.

If you think Hastings’

reputation as

an artistic hub is a

recent thing, then

think again. Gus

Cummins - Royal

Academician and

long-standing

member of The

London Group -

has been living and working in the town for 40

years. Despite having recently celebrated his

75th birthday, he’s only now having his first

major UK solo show. In Off the Wall Jerwood

Gallery present a major retrospective of his

work, tracing Cummins’ diminutive early

works to the recent, monumental pieces created

in his signature ‘two and a half D’. Explaining

his penchant for creating works that stand

out from the canvas, he says: “I like the idea

of playing with perspective and manipulating

events - interventions with reality, if you like.”

Off The Wall © Gus Cummins

51


CALL ME BY YOUR NAME 15 132mins

Nominated for 4 Oscars 2018. In 1983, the son of a

professor is enamoured by the graduate student who

comes to live with his family. Together, they share an

unforgettable summer that will forever change them.

Friday 9th March 8pm & Saturday 10th March 5pm

THE DEATH OF STALIN 15 104mins

Nominated for 2 BAFTA’s 2018. Dark comedy following

the Soviet dictator's last days and depicts the chaos of

the regime after his death.

Saturday 10th March 7.45pm

Info & advance tickets from the All Saints Centre

Office, the Town Hall, High Street

www.filmatallsaints.com

All Saints Centre, Friars Walk, Lewes, BN7 2LE

01273 486391

Lewes Castle

& Anne of Cleves

House

Storytelling, Dressing Up,

Mask-Making, Hands-on

Crafts, Clay Modelling,

Spinning & much more!

Anne of Cleves House

Spring Greens - 3 rd April

Spinning Yarns - 10 th April

Drop in.

Admission included.

Lewes Castle*

Knights & Dragons - 5 th, April

Dinosaurs & Dragons -12 th April

Tickets £5 per child,

Adult must accompany.

Easter

Holiday

Fun in

Lewes

*Booking required for

Lewes Castle activities

www.sussexpast.co.uk


MARCH listings

THURSDAY 1

MONDAY 5

100 years on from Votes for

Women. A Lewes Labour

discussion with Hilary

Wainwright and Jess

Garland at the Electoral

Reform Society.

Phoenix Centre,

7.30pm, free.

Charleston re-opening. The Bloomsbury

lot's country house opens its doors for the 2018

season. See charleston.org.uk.

Comedy at the Con. Headliners Sean Meo,

Jason Patterson, Kathryn Mather and Tom Little.

Con Club, 7.30pm, £10/£8.

FRIDAY 2

Women’s World Day of Prayer. Service based

on the theme of recycling in Surinam, all welcome.

St Thomas’s Church, 11am, free (ploughman’s

lunch available, £3).

Lewes FC Quiz Night. Teams of 4 max, advance

booking required. Optional meal-deal £10 per

person. Dripping Pan, 7.45pm, £2, contact

nickgeall@tiscali.co.uk to book.

Film: The Unknown Girl (15). A doctor becomes

obsessed with the case of a dead woman.

All Saints, 8pm, £5/£2.50 (£25 for Lewes Film

Club season membership).

SATURDAY 3

Natural Alternatives at the Menopause. Oneday

workshop exploring a more natural approach

at menopause. St Mary’s Church Hall, 10am-

4pm, £50 (concessions on request) see chantryhealth.com;

also see pg 89.

TRINITY Centre open day/launch weekend.

Building tours, café, kids crafts, bouncy castle,

meet the Vicar and more. TRINITY St John sub

Castro, 10am-4pm, free.

TUESDAY 6

Film: Francofonia (U). Director Aleksandr

Sokurov presents a history of the Louvre during

the Nazi occupation and a meditation on

the meaning and timelessness of art. All Saints,

8pm, £5/£2.50 (£25 for Lewes Film Club season

membership).

THURSDAY 8

St Peter & St James Firewalk. Fundraiser with

interactive seminar, followed by a dash across

the coals. Plumpton Racecourse, registration

6-6.45pm, £25 per person, see stpeter-stjames.

org.uk for more details.

FRIDAY 9

Aspects of the South Downs National Park.

Talk by Dr Geoffrey Mead. Anne of Cleves,

7.30pm, £8 non-members (£5 members), contact

annacrabtree1@hotmail.com.

Taxes for Peace, not War. Headstrong talk and

discussion with Conscience campaign manager

Shaughan Dolan. Elly, 8pm, £3.

FRIDAY 9 & SATURDAY 10

Film: Call Me

By Your Name

(15). Romantic

coming-of-age

drama. All

Saints, 8pm

(9th) & 5pm

(10th), from £5.

53


MARCH listings (cont)

SATURDAY 10

Film: The Death of Stalin (15). Hilarious dark

comedy following the Soviet dictator's last days

and depicting the chaos in the Politburo after his

death. All Saints, 7.45pm, from £5.

MONDAY 12

Flat and Fabulous. A free talk by Gilly Cant on

how she started Flat Friends, a support network

for women like her who chose not to have reconstruction

following a mastectomy. Put on by the

Soroptimists. White Hart, 7pm, free.

The Forgotten War Memorial. David Arnold,

John Davey and their team will tell Lewes History

Group members (and anyone else who wants

to come) about the history of Priory School’s

Memorial Chapel (above) and the lives of former

pupils who made the supreme sacrifice in World

War II. King’s Church, 7pm for 7.30pm, £1/£3.

WEDNESDAY 14

Sussex Women’s Suffrage Marchers. Talk with

author and local historian Frances Stenlake. The

Keep, 5.30pm, £3.

THURSDAY 15

The Ministry of Biscuits. Satirical, musical family

show, about an alternate 1940s Britain where

biscuits are banned. Written by Philip Reeve and

Brian Mitchell. Con Club, 7.30pm, £10/£8.

CTH HTD2018 128x94 Ad AW.indd 1 12/02/2018 09:42

54


LOS MUSICAL THEATRE

CHESS

the Musical

Lyrics by

TIM RICE

Music by

BENNY ANDERSSON

and BJÖRN ULVAEUS

Based on an idea by

TIM RICE

All is fair in love

and cold war!

LEWES TOWN HALL

10th~14th April

TICKETS FROM £12.00

CONCESSIONS FROM £10.00

£3.00 supplement on tiered seating

This amateur production of “Chess (UK Version)” is presented

by special arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH, LTD.

LOS Musical Theatre is a Registered Charity No.1148609

Is it about the game of chess? Is it

a love story? Or a tale of scheming

spies and duplicitous politicians?

Actually, it’s all of these, woven into an

intriguing story by Tim Rice with music by

Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus –

the ‘Bs’ of Abba. One Night in Bangkok and

I Know Him So Well are probably the most

familiar of a wealth of big numbers, ranging

from pulsating rock to beautiful ballads

and soaring choral numbers. Another major

show for LOS Musical Theatre and another

great night out in prospect.

TICKETS AVAILABLE from www.losmusicaltheatre.org.uk

TELEPHONE 01273 480127 FOR MORE INFORMATION


01273 678 822

attenboroughcentre.com

EXHIBITOR SPACES AVAILABLE

Wedding Shows

Sunday 18 th March

All Saints Chapel, Eastbourne

Luxury & Unique Wedding Venue

30 Exhibitors • Goodie bags for all

Drinks on arrival • Samples & Demonstations

Sunday 25 th March

East Sussex National, Uckfield

Wedding Show & Catwalk

Beautiful venue with panoramic Sussex Views

50+ Amazing Exhibitors • Stunning catwalk

Don’t miss our evening showcase events:

Sunday 2 nd March 2018 • Copthorne Hotel, London Gatwick

Sunday 9 th March 2018 • The Ravenswood West Sussex Evening Showcase & 2018 Collections Catwalk

Register in advance via Facebook, on our website www.empiricalevents.co.uk or on the day as you arrive

For our full list of 2018 events visit www.empiricalevents.co.uk

empirical

Tel: 01424 310580 @empiricaleventsweddingshows @empiricalevents EVENTS


MARCH listings (cont)

Photo by Keith Gilbert

FRIDAY 16

Sussex in the Mercian Age: The Archaeology

of Power 750–850AD. Lewes Archaeological

Group illustrated talk by Professor John Blair

(Oxford University). Lecture Room, Lewes

Town Hall, 7.30pm, £2-4 (free for under 18s).

Film: Certain Women (12A). Based on three

short stories following the lives of three women

living in small-town America. All Saints, 8pm,

£5/£2.50 (£25 for season membership).

SATURDAY 17

Charity Book Fair. Raising funds for Paws &

Claws animal rescue. Lewes Town Hall, 10am-

4pm, 50p.

St Patrick's Day Barn Dance. In support of

Brighton Festival Chorus' 50th Anniversary Appeal.

No experience necessary, all dances called.

Affordable bar and snacks. All Saints, 7.30pm,

£10/12 on the door.

Cooksbridge Annual Jumble Sale. Raising

money for community events and projects. Teas

and cakes available. Beechwood Hall, Cooksbridge,

2pm, 50p (kids free).

SATURDAY 17 – SATURDAY 24

SUNDAY 18

Betrayal. A portrayal

of the autobiographical

Pinter classic. Lewes

Little Theatre, £8/12, see

lewestheatre.org for more

details; also see pg 39.

Empirical Events Spring Wedding Fair. All

Saints Chapel, Eastbourne, 11am-3pm, free.

TUESDAY 20

A Personal Story of International Crimes.

Talk with Philippe Sands, human rights lawyer

and professor of law at University College London.

All Saints, 8pm, £10. See pg 37.

WED 21ST TO SAT 24TH

Curtain Call. Ringmer Dramatic Society

presents the comedy by Bettine Manktelow.

An amusingly chaotic day in the life of Alec

Partridge, Manager of the Thurlow Playhouse.

Ringmer Village Hall, 7.45pm, £8, ticketsource.

co.uk/ringmerdramaticsociety.

FRIDAY 23

Red Bead Woman - An Earth that Thinks

in Myth. Story telling with Dr. Martin Shaw.

Subud Centre, Lewes, 7pm, £15, contact

mythandstories@gmail.com.

TUESDAY 27

Lewes Death Café. Discussion Group. The

Ram Inn, Firle, 7.30pm, all welcome.

TUESDAY 27 – FRIDAY 13 APRIL

Chris Watson: No

Man’s Land. Sitespecific

celebration of

the sounds, rhythms and

music of the world’s seas

and oceans. Attenborough

Centre, times and

prices vary, see attenboroughcentre.com.

MAUNDY THURSDAY 29 –

EASTER SUNDAY 1 APRIL

Easter church services. Across Lewes. See your

local church for details.

FRIDAY 30

Film: After the Storm (PG). Following the

death of his father, a private detective struggles

to reconnect with his son and ex-wife. All

Saints, 8pm, £5/£2.50 (£25 for Lewes Film Club

season membership).

57


March Concert

Walton

Johannesburg Festival Overture

Hummel

Concerto for Trumpet

Soloist Alice Boileau

Offenbach

Overture Orpheus in the Underworld

Prokoviev

Classical Symphony

Saturday 17th March 7:30pm

Trinity Church Southover, Southover High Street

For tickets & prices visit;

www.lewesconcertorchestra.org

The

Creation

Joseph Haydn

Esterházy Chamber Choir

London Mozart Players

Soprano Elin Manahan Thomas

Tenor Ruairi Bowen

Bass Henry Waddington

Director Richard Dawson

25th Anniversary Concert

Sunday 25 March 2018 7.00pm

Lewes Town Hall

Tickets £20 in advance from Lewes Tourist Information Centre

or from our website. £22 on the door (under 16s free)

See www.esterhazychoir.org for more details

St Michaelʼs First Sunday Recitals

SEASON OPENING RECITAL

Pergolesi Stabat Mater

Sunday 4 March, 3pm

St Michael’s Church, High Street, Lewes

2018

Shona Knight Soprano Rebecca Leggett Alto

String Quartet :Ellie Blackshaw Leader

Nick Houghton Chamber Organ

THE SONG SCHOOL

Singing Lessons Age 16 & upwards, beginners to advanced

Preparation for Diplomas, Examinations and Auditions etc.

Development of Sight-Singing skills, Kodály, Music Theory

VOICE THERAPY

Singing Rehabilitation therapy programmes

If you are at all anxious about your singing voice, please

contact us for advice.

FREE ADMISSION

Retiring collection for the Organ Appeal Fund

LECTURES, MASTERCLASSES & COURSES

Exploring the collaborative voice between Art & Science

through creative and practical events, delivered by invited,

leading authorities in their subjects.

Tel: 07976 936024

canto-voice.org


CLASSICAL MUSIC

SUN 4 TH , 3PM

First Sunday Recital: Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater.

The Sunday recitals season kicks off with this

18th-century piece, sung by soprano Shona

Knight and alto Rebecca Leggett. String quartet

led by Ellie Blackshaw; chamber organ by Nick

Houghton. St Michael’s Church, free with retiring

collection for the Organ Appeal Fund

SATURDAY 17 TH , 7.30PM

Lewes Concert Orchestra. The orchestra play:

Walton’s Johannesburg Overture; Hummel’s

Trumpet Concerto (with soloist Alice Bioleau);

Offenbach’s Overture to Orpheus in the Underworld,

and Prokofiev’s Classical Symphony.

TRINITY Church, Southover, £10 in advance (info@

lewesconcertorchestra.org) £12 door, £5 U18/ students

FRIDAY 23 RD , 7.45PM

Amatis Piano Trio. The Nicholas Yonge Society

host the Holland-based musicians (above), violinist

Lea Hausmann, cellist Samuel Shepherd and

pianist Mengjie Han, performing Brahms’ Trio

no 3 Opus 101, Kelly-Marie Murphy’s Give me

Phoenix Wings to Fly and Schubert’s Trio No 2

in E flat2. Sussex Downs College, £15, 8-25 years old

free, from nys.org.uk

SUNDAY 25 TH , 7PM

Pro Musica Spring Concert. Karl Jenkins

‘Armed Man’ (Choral Suite), and John Rutter’s

‘Feel the Spirit’, based on traditional spirituals.

St Andrew’s Church, Alfriston, £12 (U15 free)

geoffdellis@yahoo.co.uk

Photo of Amatis Trio © Allard Willemse

ST PANCRAS CATHOLIC CHURCH

Irelands Lane, Lewes BN7 1QX

www.stpancrascatholicchurchlewes.co.uk

MAUNDY THURSDAY

Mass at 8pm

GOOD FRIDAY

Children’s Stations of the Cross at 10am

Stations of the Cross (Via Crucis) at 12 noon

Celebration of the Passion of the Lord at 3pm

HOLY SATURDAY

Office of Readings and Morning Prayer at 8.30am

EASTER SUNDAY

The Easter Vigil (8.30pm on Holy Saturday)

Mass at 9am, 10.30am, 12.30pm (Latin)

Surrexit Dominus vere, Alleluia.

The Lord has truly risen, Alleluia.


J M Furniture Ltd

TRADING IN LEWES SINCE SEPT 1999

Bespoke custom made furniture and kitchens.

We welcome commissions of all sizes and budgets.

01273 472924 | sales@jmfurniture.co.uk

www.jmfurniture.co.uk

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GIG GUIDE // MARCH

GIG OF THE MONTH:

MAID OF ACE

Fans of The Distillers rejoice, there is a

female-fuelled brigade of punk-rockers

on the scene, and they are coming

to Lewes. Maid of Ace, hailing from

south-coast dirty Hastings (their words,

not ours) comprises sisters Alison, Anna,

Abby and Amy Elliot (all with middle

names starting C, literally making four

aces, nicely played Mum and Dad).

They have been playing together as a

sisterhood since a school show in 2005,

and the two albums now under their belt

are jam-packed with kick-ass tunes and

anti-establishment attitude (‘Minimum Wage’, ‘Fight’, ‘Greed’). Their sound is riotous, energetic punk rock

and they are certain to make for a memorable gig. Saturday 31st, Con Club, 8pm, £11.50

Preview and listings by Kelly Hill

FRIDAY 2

Bad Boy Boogie. AC/DC tribute. Con Club,

8pm, £5 (members free)

Lazy Susan. DJ set. Lamb, 8pm, free

SATURDAY 3

Martin Harley & Daniel Kimbro. Blues/folk/

Americana. Con Club, 7.30pm, £15

Open Night with Ken Hobbs. Folk (English

trad). Elly, 8pm, £3

Bassment. Dance grooves. Café du Jardin (near

Pastorale Antiques), 8pm, free

MONDAY 5

Kelvin Christiane. Jazz saxophone. Snowdrop,

8pm, free

FRIDAY 9

SYNTHONY 101. Electronic 80s tribute act.

Con Club, 8pm, free

Lazy Susan. DJ set. Lamb, 8pm, free

SATURDAY 10

Kit Trigg. Blues/rock. Lansdown, 7.30pm, free

Zoot Zazou. Vintage hot swing night. All

proceeds to Hamsey School. Con Club, 7.30pm,

£25/£20 adv

Judy Cook. Folk (US trad acapella). Elephant

and Castle 8pm, £7

The Fruitful Soundsystem. DJ set. Swan, 9pm-

12.30am, free

SUNDAY 11

Open Space Open Mic. Music, poetry and

performance. Elly, 7.30pm, free

Peter & the Test Tube Babies. Punk legend

Peacehaven wild kids. Con Club, 7.30pm, £12

MONDAY 12

Sam Carelse. Jazz vocals. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

FRIDAY 16

Lazy Susan. DJ set. Lamb, 8pm, free

61


䐀 漀 氀 瀀 栀 椀 渀 猀 伀 瀀 琀 漀 洀 攀 琀 爀 椀 猀 琀 猀 Ⰰ 䐀 漀 氀 瀀 栀 椀 渀 䠀 漀 甀 猀 攀 Ⰰ アパートアパート 䴀 甀 猀 琀 攀 爀 䜀 爀 攀 攀 渀 Ⰰ 䠀 愀 礀 眀 愀 爀 搀 猀 䠀 攀 愀 琀 栀 Ⰰ 刀 䠀 㘀 㐀 䄀 䰀

㐀 㐀 㐀 㐀 㔀 㐀 㠀 㠀 簀 眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 搀 漀 氀 瀀 栀 椀 渀 猀 漀 瀀 琀 漀 洀 攀 琀 爀 椀 猀 琀 猀 ⸀ 挀 漀 ⸀ 甀 欀

伀 瀀 攀 渀 椀 渀 最 琀 椀 洀 攀 猀 㨀 䴀 漀 渀 ⴀ 䘀 爀 椀 ⠀ 攀 砀 挀 ⸀ 圀 攀 搀 ⤀ 㤀 ⸀ ⴀ 㜀 ⸀アパート 圀 攀 搀 ☀ 匀 愀 琀 㤀 ⸀ ⴀアパート⸀

RICHARD GREEN FUNERAL SERVICE

The only truly independent, family owned and run

Funeral Directors & Memorial Masons in Lewes & Uckfield

Will my loved one really be in your care?

Yes they will. We have our own purpose built on-site mortuaries

which means that your loved one will be cared for by us, and you will

have the peace of mind knowing where they are.

(Most other Funeral Directors use off-site mortuary facilities,

often situated a long way from their premises).

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Lewes

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01273 488121 (24hrs)

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01825 760601 (24hrs)

uckfield@rgreenfs.co.uk


GIG GUIDE // MARCH (CONT)

SATURDAY 17

Matthew Gest's Boogie Troop. Blues and New

Orleans piano. Lansdown, 7.30pm, free

The Urban Voodoo Machine. Bourbon-soaked

gypsy blues. Con Club, 7.30pm, £18/£15

John Kirkpatrick. Folk (Eng trad). Elly, 8pm, £10

MONDAY 19

Terry Seabrook Trio. Jazz. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

FRIDAY 23

Arcadia Roots. Roots, dance, dub. Con Club,

8pm price tba

Lazy Susan. DJ set. Lamb, 8pm, free

SATURDAY 24

Underscore Orkestra. Balkan/klezmer/gypsy jazz

& swing. Landsown, 7.30pm, free

English Dulcimer Duo. Folk (British &

continental). Elly, 8pm, £7

SUNDAY 25

Kate and Co. Sundays

in the Bar. Con

Club, 3.30pm, free

MONDAY 26

Andy Urquart. Jazz

trumpeter. Snowdrop

Inn, 8pm, free

THURSDAY 29

Oh Mama. Psychedelic folk rock. Lansdown,

7.30pm, free

FRIDAY 30

Curst Sons. Hillbilly blues. Con Club, 8pm, free

Lazy Susan. DJ set. Lamb, 8pm, free

SATURDAY 31

Maid of Ace. See Gig of the Month

Photo (detail) of The Curst Sons by JJ Waller

MAR

@

Lewes

Con Club

1 COMEDY NIGHT

2 BAD BOY BOOGIE

3 MARTIN HARLEY & DANIEL KIMBRO

9 SYNTHONY 101

10 ZOOT ZAZOU

11 PETER & THE TEST TUBE BABIES

15 THE MINISTRY OF BISCUITS

17 URBAN VOODOO MACHINE

23 ARCADIA ROOTS

24 LOOSE CABOOSE NIGHT

25 KATE & CO

30 CURST SONS

31 MAID OF ACE

SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS AND ENTRY


FREETIME

SUNDAY 4

Art activities for children. Drop-in hosted

by volunteers; from paper lampshades to clay

models, inspired by the art and lives of the

Bloomsbury group. Charleston, 12.30pm, free.

Look Think Make. Look at the artworks, think

about the ideas behind them and be inspired to

make creations. De La Warr, 2pm, £1.

UNDER 16

êêêê

FRIDAY 30 – SUNDAY 1 APRIL

Easter Egg Trail. Carrot-themed trail,

with activities and

opportunities to learn

about carrots and their

wild relatives. Wakehurst,

see kew.org/wakehurst.

FRIDAY 30 – SUNDAY 15 APRIL

Peter Rabbit Goes Wild. Two weeks of Peter

Rabbit-themed fun for the Easter holidays,

with games, crafts and storytelling inspired by

Beatrix Potter’s tales. Wakehurst, see kew.org/

wakehurst.

TUESDAY 6

Tiny Towner. Weekly drop-in session at the

gallery, run by early-years artist educators

Octopus Inc, leading creative play for under 5s.

SATURDAY 10

High in the Old Oak

Tree. Writer, illustrator

and performer Ed

Boxall will perform his

book High In the Old

Oak Tree about a boy

who decides to spend

his life getting to know the strange unseen

creatures in the high branches, together with

other poems and songs. Giant books, projections

and more. Skylark (Needlemakers), 11am &

2pm, free. See pg 69.

SATURDAY 31

Springtime Studio. Celebrate the new season

with an assortment of family-friendly creative

activities. De La Warr, 11am-3pm, £1.

SUNDAY 1 – MONDAY 2 APRIL

Parham Easter family weekend. Garden trail,

face painting, craft activities, storytelling and the

opportunity to meet the Easter Bunny. Parham

House and Gardens, see parhaminsussex.co.uk.

BEATRIX POTTER TM © Frederick

Warne & Co., 2018

MONDAY 12

Tales for Toddlers. Stories, songs and

imagination-inspiring activities. De La Warr,

10.15am & 11.15am, £1.

65


April Lambing

at MIDDLE FARM

Witness lambs being born, and

even help bottle feed some of them


UNDER 16

êêêê

YOUNG PHOTO

OF THE MONTH

This month’s top photo was sent

in by Sophie Bannister, aged just

eight. “When I was walking home

from school with my mum and

brother I saw the starlings flocking

near my house,” she tells us. “The

flock was making lots of different

shapes and it looked beautiful.”

Indeed it did, Sophie, as did the

wintry trees silhouetted by the

clear blue sky. Looks cold, though!

The picture wins Sophie a £10 book token kindly offered, as ever, by Bags of Books in Cliffe. Just go along

with an adult, Sophie, and they’ll give it to you.

Under 16? For your chance to win a token and see your picture in this slot send your pics, along with a note of

where, when and why you took it, to photos@vivamagazines.com. Happy snapping!

With its excellent and

imaginative approach, the

Steiner Waldorf curriculum

has gained ever-widening

recognition as a creative and

compassionate alternative to

traditional avenues of education.

But just how does it feel to be

a child in this environment,

soaking up this stimulating and

rewarding teaching?

Find out more...

Open Morning

8th March

08:30 - 13:00

Please register online

A Day in the

Classroom

Saturday 24th March

08:15 - 13:00

Please book:

contact@michaelhall.co.uk

www.michaelhall.co.uk/school-open-days

Kidbrooke Park, Priory Road, Forest Row. East Sussex, RH18 5JA

Tel: 01342 822275 - Registered Charity Number 307006

Alternatively, book in

for a Private Tour

contact@michaelhall.co.uk

or call 01342 822275

67


GET BACK

TO SWIMMING

Visit your local pool at

Lewes Leisure Centre

For more details contact: 01273 486000

or email: info@waveleisure.co.uk

www.waveleisure.co.uk

@waveleisure

@TheWaveLeisure


UNDER 16

êêêê

SHOES ON NOW: ‘I’LL GIVE YOU A POUND FOR IT’

When you are a kid you don’t have

much economic power, do you?

Maybe your parents give you some

pocket money, but £2 or £3 will

barely buy you a magazine nowadays.

However, there’s one place

in Lewes where you can feel rich,

even without very much money -

the car boot sale.

It’s recently been upgraded to a

rather fancier Vintage Market, but

the old stalwarts are still there in

attendance. So, one cold February

Sunday morning, I take two of my boys down to the

back of Waitrose to see what bargains are to be had.

My middle child is a natural haggler. His technique

is to offer a pound less than the asking price then to

gradually increase his offer in ten pences until the

stall holder either gets exhausted

or until his younger brother gets

impatient and starts begging,

‘Please, please, please.’

The sale gives the boys the

opportunity to negotiate in a

safe environment and to have a

bit of fun doing it. We’ve often

got into lengthy conversations

with the stall holders and most

of them have a tale or two to tell.

And somehow, we feel as if we

are supporting a more independent

way of buying and selling. There’s an array of

goods: from large plastic dinosaurs, to old Beano

albums and even a giant exercise ball. Sure, there’s

some tat but part of the fun is sorting through to

find affordable treasure. Jacky Adams

HIGH IN THE OLD OAK TREE BY ED BOXALL

High in the Old Oak Tree tells the

story of a little boy who climbs up

an oak tree and never comes down.

He climbs so high that he can’t see

the ground, and the higher he gets,

the stranger things get. He meets

bears and wolves hiding amongst its

leaves, and when he reaches the top

he can touch the moon with a stick.

The book was written as a poem by

local author and illustrator Ed Boxall,

who will be performing High in

the Old Oak Tree, along with some

other poems and music, at Skylark

in the Needlemakers on the 10th of March. “It’s a

very magical, kind of surreal poem,” says Ed, “quite

in the tradition of Edward Lear – sort of nonsense,

but quite melancholy and serious

at the same time.”

“It was inspired by something

quite specific: over near Hastings

there’s a Woodcraft Folk camp

that I took my kids to every year,

and there are these two enormous

oak trees there. I made up a

version of the story while I was

camping there one summer, and

over a couple of years, it slowly

turned into the poem that appears

in the book.”

There will be two performances

on the day: one at 11am and one at 2pm. These are

aimed at children aged five and up.

edboxall.com

69


Fresh and

Seasonal Sussex

Produce

Cliffe

Precinct

Lewes

LEWES

FARMERS

MARKET

Creating stronger

communities and

a more sustainable

local economy

Find out more about

the food you buy, direct

from the farmers and

producers

www.commoncause.org.uk

1st & 3rd Saturday

Every Month

9am-1pm, Cliffe Precinct

Monday to Saturday - 1200 to 2200

Wood fired pizzas using the best

Neapolitan and local ingredients.

Eat in or take-away.

Book:

Visit:

01273 470755

Eastgate Lewes BN7 2LP

(above the old bus station)

busclubpizza.co.uk


FOOD REVIEW

The Patch

Pintxos? In Lewes?

My best friend lived

for many years in San

Sebastian, in the Basque

Country in Northern

Spain. I became a

regular visitor to that

wonderful city, which

is celebrated, among

other things, for its fantastic

food. One of the

highlights of the trip

was dining out in the

old part of town, going

from bar to bar trying

out different pintxos.

These are a kind of

Basque tapas, where

wildly different food combinations are stuck onto

a slice of baguette with a cocktail stick.

And now – on weekend evenings at least – Lewes

has a dedicated 'pintxos' bar. The Patch, which

has opened up where Fillers used to be, on the

corner of Market Street and School Hill, is a

regular sandwich shop in the daytime, and sells

a variety of craft ales at night. But, from 5.30 on

Friday and Saturday, they will be serving these

little Basque delicacies. "You'd better be quick

though," says Patch, the guy who runs the place,

(you might remember him from the Snowdrop).

"We only make so many, and when they're gone,

they're gone."

We arrive at 5.30.

Patch hasn't been able to perform miracles of the

TARDIS variety to make the place bigger inside,

so I'd suggest that it's not the sort of place for a

football team to drop into after a game, but we

find ourselves a little table by the window, just in

time to witness the unveiling of tonight's pintxos,

laid out on the bar surface – which they fill – on

a black slate. We immediately

fill a plate

with one of each, and

ask for a knife, so we

can share them.

For the record this is

what we got. One had

little pieces of steak

in a gravy with a tiny

dollop of mustard on

top. Another had some

Thai-spiced fish with

diced pepper, onion

and coriander. A third

had a generous slice

of goats cheese on

top of some gherkins,

with a roasted red pepper on top. And finally a

bit of courgette on a bed of mayonnaise with

some chopped up tomato and pomegranate

seeds. They cost £1.50 a shot, which seems very

reasonable.

To wash these down I choose a large glass of Billingshurst

English red wine, at £6, and Rowena

goes for a pint of Vermont Pale APA from Gun

Brewery... Patch specialises in keg ales, and you

can expect him to try out a whole variety of these

– another reason to pay a visit.

Back to the pintxos: it's a mistake to try to cut

them up, we realise: they are best enjoyed one

to a person, so after a bit of a messy disaster

first time round we chomp away happy in the

decision that we're going to buy another plateful

afterwards. Which we do, eliminating the courgette

mixture, and going for two Thai fish ones.

Verdict? A big thumbs up for another Lewes

first, and we'll certainly be back; I can't think of

a better way to start off a weekend evening (aka

line the stomach). Topa! Alex Leith

Photo by Chloë King

71


72

Photo by Rebecca Cunningham


RECIPE

Groundnut stew

By The Feature Kitchen’s Jacob Fodio Todd

I grew up in Mozambique, then Swaziland, then

Tanzania; my family moved around quite a bit

until I was 13, when we came to Lewes. I went to

school here, to Priory. When I left Lewes the first

time, I went to Paris for two years and worked in

the Rose Bakery there. Then I moved to London,

where I started a food enterprise with some friends

called The Groundnut, a project looking at African

food. We did a lot of pop-up restaurants and we

published a cookbook.

When I moved back to Lewes, I really noticed

that there wasn’t much diversity of takeaway

food available. There are a lot of takeaways, but

they tend to be the traditional Indian, Chinese,

Thai places. It’s really hard for new independent

businesses to open in Lewes because property

prices are very high, which is a shame because

we can’t have more speculative businesses, or

opportunities for people to try out their idea and

see how it works.

The idea of The Feature Kitchen is to create a

platform for chefs and food enthusiasts to come

in and cook. They don’t have to worry about

anything except the food; the packaging is taken

care of, the marketing, the logistics. We work on

a menu together, talk about it, cook it, taste it,

and once that works well they just pitch up in the

kitchen and start cooking. I often kitchen assist,

but otherwise it’s up to them. We work from the

Community Kitchen, so I hire that for a day,

pay the chefs a fee and get some drivers to come

and distribute the food. We don’t have our own

permanent space, so the business is kind of fluid.

The menu changes each month. The first was

Ethiopian, the second was Caribbean, then

Trinidad and Tobago, Thai… all over the world.

And the experience of the chefs really varies.

Genet, who did the first month, used to cook back

in Ethiopia so she's very experienced, just not so

much in the UK market. Omolola is a doctor and

she was taking a sabbatical, so she wanted to take

some time to explore her passion for African and

Caribbean food.

This recipe is actually from a friend, who’s from

Sierra Leone. It’s a peanut-based dish which is

common across West Africa, with similar variations

throughout Africa. Serves four.

Ingredients: 2 tins of black-eyed beans, 2

onions (finely chopped), 2 cloves of garlic (finely

chopped), fresh chilli (finely chopped), 2 heaped

tablespoons of tomato purée, 2 tomatoes (finely

chopped), vegetable stock, 2 heaped tablespoons of

peanut butter, ½ teaspoon of white pepper, salt and

pepper to taste

Method: Heat a little oil in a pot. Add the onions,

one of the cloves of garlic and the chilli (I used a

quarter of a Scotch Bonnet, but adjust according

to taste). Cook that all down until the onions turn

golden brown. Add the white pepper and tomato

purée and cook until it starts to burn slightly.

Put the fresh tomatoes and the rest of the garlic

into the pot with the black eyed beans and add

stock to just cover. Stir in the peanut butter and

leave to simmer for 30 minutes. Season with salt

and pepper. This goes really well with rice, bread –

any staple really – and then a nice salad.

As told to Rebecca Cunningham

This month Chloe Edwards from Seven Sisters

Spices will be taking over the kitchen. Her menu

will be available (Fridays and Saturdays only) on the

weekends of the 9th, 16th and 23rd of March. See

thefeaturekitchen.co.uk

73


FOOD

Riverside Café

Fresh-water croque

Apart from Tesco, I can’t really think of a company

that makes the most of its Ouse-side location. Unless

you count the aptly-named Riverside, of course.

There are a few tables inside the building in both

the Brasserie upstairs, and the Riverside Café

downstairs, which offer a river view out the window.

Outside the latter, if you sit with your back to Cliffe

High Street on the wooden bench at the furthest

table, you get an al fresco perspective of the water.

It’s barely mid-February so despite the sunniness

of the day I’m grateful for the blankets they’ve left

out there, and the outdoor heater. I order some hot

food – an arancini [sic] and a croque monsieur, and

wait with a flat white, wondering if using a knife

and fork with gloves on will be a first.

The food arrives on two separate wooden boards,

each with a little pile of dressed salad, so I eat it like

two courses, thinking what a wasted opportunity

the Argos car-park is (can we have a John Harvey

Tavern beer garden, please!).

The arancino serves to fill me up enough so I don’t

dispose of the main act in two bites. Croque monsieurs

are the most devilish French invention since

the guillotine: this one is nicely browned on the top,

and is in turns crunchy, chewy and soft.

Am I transported momentarily to a bistro on the

Rive Gauche? Well, not really, but it’s the nearest

we have to it: when spring hits you may have to

fight for the spot. Alex Leith

Photo by Alex Leith

75


The bakery in your home

From a business started by a Brighton

University graduate and launched via the

crowdfunding platform Kickstarter; The Spring

Oven is a unique ovenware vessel for bread

baking. It has a channel to fill with water, which

generates steam in your oven to help you bake

exceptional bread at home.

Read the full story at www.thespringoven.com

SPRING IS UPON US

Pop down to Riverside for seasonal farm shop

goodies from May’s Farm Cart, chocolate delights

from Poppy’s and a wealth of art and craft kit from

the-stitchery. If you have more time, linger in

The Brasserie for lunch with a view.


FOOD

Illustration by Chloë King

Edible Updates

A couple of promising

changes to the food

landscape: a new Turkish

coffee shop is opening

on Station Street, and

Trading Post Coffee

are opening in what

was the Real Eating Co

premises. Word is the Brighton

branch serves good vegan options and their onsite

roaster will add to their appeal.

Back Yard Coffee at the Needlemakers

convert their operation into a cocktail bar on

Friday and Saturday evenings, serving drinks

with ‘foraged ingredients’ to live jazz and DJs.

Excitingly, Pestle & Mortar are growing their

Asian whole-foods grocery offering with a

noodle bar and cafe in what was Laporte’s on

Friars Walk.

The Lewes Arms has had a thorough kitchen

refresh and now offers ‘small plates’ and mains

including a signature pulled pork burger. Mitch

from the John Harvey Tavern has taken over

the Royal Oak and revamped the interior and

drinks list to include Ground coffee.

As the weather warms, look out for a new

horsebox café at Lewes Vintage Market on

Sundays. It could be a good year for mobile

grocers with Charlotte’s Cupboard (see pg

83) pitching at Harvey’s Yard on Fridays and

The Sussex Peasant up for a BBC Food &

Farming Award.

In other news, Cashew Catering host a

‘Spring Feast’ workshop on 10th; Kabak,

a Middle Eastern Supper Club on the 24th

(kabakfood.wixsite.com) and The Feature

Kitchen are collaborating with Chloe Edwards

(thefeaturekitchen.co.uk, see pg 72).

Bonus: Proud Country House in Falmer now

have a supervised ‘Kids Table’ on Saturdays, offering

parents the possibility of an uninterrupted

lunch; and Limetree Kitchen are offering

bottomless prosecco on Sunday lunchtimes and

Wednesday evenings. Hic! Chloë King

The Pelham arms

LEWES’S FIRST

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䨀 甀 氀 椀 攀 琀 栀 愀 猀 琀 攀 愀 洀 攀 搀 甀 瀀 眀 椀 琀 栀 匀 愀 洀 䴀 愀 琀 琀 栀 攀 眀 猀 ⠀ 昀 漀 爀 洀 攀 爀 挀 栀 攀 昀 琀 漀 倀 愀 瘀 愀 爀 漀 琀 琀 椀

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㈀ 㤀 琀 栀 䴀 愀 爀 挀 栀 㨀 アパート 愀 洀 ⴀ ㈀ 㨀 瀀 洀

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㈀ 㜀 琀 栀 匀 攀 瀀 琀 攀 洀 戀 攀 爀 㨀 アパート 愀 洀 ⴀ ㈀ 㨀 瀀 洀

䰀 攀 愀 爀 渀 洀 漀 爀 攀 ☀ 戀 漀 漀 欀 漀 渀 氀 椀 渀 攀 愀 琀 眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 猀 甀 猀 猀 攀 砀 最 愀 爀 搀 攀 渀 猀 挀 栀 漀 漀 氀 ⸀ 挀 漀 洀


THE WAY WE WORK

With over 6,000 independent businesses in the Lewes District, how to choose

four without offending all the others? We decided to highlight recently started

concerns, which ply an innovative trade. Rebecca King did the honours

with the camera, asking our four entrepreneurial spirits

‘what do you most like about working for yourself?’

millsandkingphotography.com

Anna Lane & Nicola Wright, Treatment Tents (treatment-tents.com)

“It creates an equilibrium between family life and career, giving us wonderful

freedom to make our own decisions and choices.’’


THE WAY WE WORK

Nancy Meiland, Nancy Meiland Parfums (nancymeiland.com)

“Listening and acting on my instincts, shaping my own path

and learning all aspects of my business from scratch.”


THE WAY WE WORK

Tracey Horan, Dolly Fixtures (dollyfixtures.co.uk)

“The flexibility means I can usually be there for my family,

even if that means working into the wee hours, catching up!’’


THE WAY WE WORK

Thalassa de Burgh-Milne and Charlotte Cross, Charlotte's Cupboard

(charlottescupboard.com)

“We don't have to compromise on our values, we now use

our voice to support issues we believe in: #plasticfree.’’


Dog lovers wanted:

“Pleeease can I come to stay?”

While owners are away you will give their dogs

love,exercise and companionship within

your family home.

If you are at home all day, have no

children under the age of six, have

no more than one dog of your

own and would like to enjoy

the companionship of guest

dogs please get in touch.

Where happy dogs holiday

Emily Deacon

01273 286 165 / 07736 665 888

bn@waggingtailsuk.co.uk

www.waggingtailsuk.co.uk/bn/carers

facebook.com/WaggingTailsBN

A franchise owned and operated under licence by Emily Deacon

LEWES MAIN

SURGERY

21 Cliffe High Street

01273 473232

Cliffe Vets - your local

Veterinary Practice since 1865

RINGMER

SURGERY

01273 814590

WOODINGDEAN

SURGERY

01273 302609

LAUGHTON

EQUINE CLINIC

01323 815210

Domestic Pet, Farm Animal and Equine Services

www.cliffevets.co.uk – www.cliffeequine.co.uk


WILDLIFE

Illustration by Mark Greco

Slugs

The slimes they are a-changin’

I’ve had a strange fascination with slugs since I was

a little boy. Back then I believed that they were

homeless snails that had lost their shells. It turns

out I was right. Sort of. The whole eviction process

had started as far back as the murky Mesozoic when

some land snails cast off the shackles of a shell

and evolved into slugs for some truly independent

living. Sure, shells are great for protection and will

help you to avoid drying out but they’re clunky and

require calcium to construct. Without them you

can roam anywhere and (to namecheck another

mollusc) the world’s your oyster. The slug’s shell

has never completely been lost – a fragment still

remains hidden under their skin, a tiny, shrunken

souvenir of their snail ancestry. You can take the

slug out of the shell but you can’t take the shell out

of the slug.

Another link to their slimy dynasty is that slugs, like

snails, are both hes and shes and, as hermaphrodites,

possess both sets of sexual organs. This means

that, if the situation dictates, they can go it alone

and simply self-fertilise to produce their offspring.

A true state of independence. Imagine if our

reproduction process was so simple: no awkward

first dates, no wedding cake decisions – just DIY

duplication. And for narcissists there’s another bonus

– self-fertilisation creates a clone – or in a slug’s

case hundreds of clones. Imagine the possibilities

– an army of Blencowes churning out wildlife

articles for magazines up and down the country.

But the problem with inbreeding (and you can’t get

more inbred than having sex with yourself) is a lack

of genetic variability. Clones all possess the same

weaknesses. An entire slug population can be wiped

out by the same parasites and pathogens. An entire

Blencowe army could be distracted and defeated by

a few crates of Ferrero Rochers.

To produce varied and resilient offspring most

slugs go in for the more old-fashioned approach of

finding a partner for a quick rustle in the undergrowth.

But one garden slug species has turned this

chore into art – a flamboyant celebration of a lack

of independence. The spotted and striped leopard

slugs start their performance with a fair bit of slap

and tickle. The pair chase each other around a tree

giving each other some sensuous strokes and cheeky

nibbles. Then they climb, shimmy along a branch

and descend on a rope made of their own mucous.

Here, hanging in mid-air, the slugs evert their

sexual organs, entwining them to create a moonlit

globe. This graceful, balletic trapeze performance

has to be one of the most mesmerising sights on

our planet. If you search hard enough you can find

beauty in the strangest places. Still, if I was strolling

through the woods at night, I’d hate to walk into it

face-first. Michael Blencowe, Sussex Wildlife Trust

85


Problems at work?

Trouble at t’mill?

We can help

Call Chris Kingham on 01273 480234

to book your free half hour interview.

www.lawsonlewisblakers.co.uk

Suite 4, Sackville House, Brooks Close, Lewes BN7 2FZ

Offices also at: Eastbourne | Peacehaven

Check us out on Twitter and Facebook


COLUMN

Walkies

#13 Berwick Circular

Sarah is ‘faffing’. I think faffing is one of those

Mars and Venus things. I’m not saying there aren’t

men who faff but I do reckon that women tend to

faff more than men.

My confidence in this controversial assertion is

boosted by the fact that Todd obviously agrees

with me. He’s pulling on his lead and has let out

a whine and a bark. Quite why there’s this delay

in starting our walk, he can’t quite fathom. And

neither can I.

Not for the first time (or the second for that matter),

Sarah has decided to replace one article of

clothing with another and is now staring up at the

sky which, it has to be said, is giving few indications

of its ultimate intention.

Finally, an alternative anorak, an umbrella, a

woolly hat and a scarf are dragged out of the boot,

stuffed in a backpack, and handed to me. Despite

some dark mutterings from yours truly, it’s clearly

the price that must be paid if we are ever to leave

the car park.

This particular walk from the Cricketers Arms

near Berwick, up onto the Downs, west towards

Firle and then back through Alciston to the pub

is a summer favourite ending in the Cricketers’

delightful garden. In winter, the allure of a roaring

log fire is even more appealing.

When we reach the top of the Downs, the weather

gods are in a particularly fickle mood putting on a

son et lumière worthy of a scene from King Lear.

Within the space of a few minutes we are battered

by high winds, drenched by a cloud-burst, and

then blinded by bright sunshine.

Todd may be in seventh heaven – and would probably

remain so even if the sky fell in and we were

abducted by aliens – but I feel like a man more

sinned against than sinning. If I have to open this

wretched backpack one more time I shall pull my

own eyes out.

On the way back down to Alciston we shelter in

some trees to find some respite from the wind and

rain before making our way along the footpath

towards Berwick. Here we decide to take a look at

the famous WW2 murals in the church painted by

Duncan Grant and Vanessa and Quentin Bell.

I am immersed in an admiring reverie when I hear

a bark from the porch and Sarah’s voice echoes

down the nave. “Come on,” she says. “What on

earth are you doing? Todd’s getting impatient. We

can’t stay here all day.” Faffing, you see. Depends

how you define it. Richard Madden

Map: OS Explorer OL25. Distance: 4 miles. Terrain:

Steep climb onto Downs, views over the Cuckmere

Haven to the sea. Directions: From Berwick follow the

footpath up onto the Downs and then west along the

South Downs Way. At Bostal Hill, follow the sunken

path to Alciston and then the footpath east back to the

pub. Start/finish: Cricketer’s Arms, Berwick

87


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Steven Kell and Fay Jones have attended Professor

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his techniques to Lewes and Sussex. Fay also provides

Dermal Fillers.

It is very important to discuss your goals and

expectations before making a decision, and we want

you to be fully and properly prepared.

Our consultations are held at Lewes High Street

Dental Practice. Consultations are totally confidential,

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60 High Street Lewes East Sussex

01273 478240 | info@lewesdental.co.uk


HEALTH

Period drama

Time for a change…

What affects half the

population, yet is one

of the most misunderstood

– and least

discussed – of all conditions?

The answer

is the menopause.

It’s a term we’re all

familiar with, but

what exactly do we

mean by it? Technically,

menopause

occurs when a woman

has her last period.

More usually, though, we use the word to cover the

time during which declining levels of the hormone

oestrogen cause periods to dwindle, and trigger

other changes and symptoms.

According to campaign group Menopause UK, 13

million women in the UK fall into this category,

with an average age of 45 to 55. And of those

women, a quarter claim their symptoms adversely

affect them.

Symptoms range from hot flushes and night

sweats, to vaginal dryness, insomnia, reduced libido,

aching joints, and problems with memory and

concentration. No wonder the British Menopause

Society reported last year that over half of women

surveyed said the menopause had negatively

impacted their lives.

But while some women clearly experience difficulties

as they go through ‘the change’, problems

aren’t inevitable, and there is plenty we can do to

ease the transition.

So says Lynne Russell, a natural health practitioner

with a special interest in the menopause, who is

keen to challenge assumptions. “So much media

coverage of the menopause is negative, and often

Hormone Replacement Therapy or antidepressants

are the only options discussed, but there is

a lot a woman can

do to help herself

naturally.”

She uses a combination

of different remedies

and approaches

to help her clients

at The Cliffe Clinic,

tailoring treatment to

each individual. “Everyone

is different.

The key is to become

better informed. People

can be desperate

to feel better, but it’s important to gather all the

information, so you can work out what is going to

support your system best.”

To that end, Lynne believes that menopause can be

the perfect opportunity for a ‘life audit’. “Menopause

acts like a magnifier, so anything else going

on at the time will be intensified, whether it’s a

health issue or something emotional,” she explains.

“We tend to wait until we hit difficulties before we

act, but the more you can do to prepare yourself

for menopause, the better, whether that’s in terms

of tackling existing problems or generally improving

your diet and fitness. It’s a good opportunity to

take stock, then act pre-emptively. If you’re in the

best possible mental and physical place, you’re less

likely to experience problems.”

Above all, though, she says, try to stay positive.

“It’s about asking yourself what you can do to have

a better time of it. Menopause can be okay, and

moving onto the next stage of life can be positive

and empowering. You don’t have to be a ‘menopause

goddess’, but it doesn’t have to be a horror

story either.” Anita Hall

Natural Alternatives at the Menopause Workshop

takes place on the 3rd of March. For details or to

book, see chantryhealth.com.

89


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www.browns-lewes.co.uk


HEALTH

Lewes 'Super-surgery'

A riverside health campus by 2020

By the early 2020s,

all going to plan,

Lewes will have a

new ‘Super-surgery’,

which promises to

offer more wideranging

services and

improved efficiencies,

and will replace the

three existing surgeries,

whilst Ringmer

surgery remains.

I'm invited to St

Andrew's Surgery to talk to Dr Jason Heath, a

partner and GP there, who is one of the movers

behind the new plans. St Andrew's is one of the

three practices involved in what is much more

than just a merger, along with School Hill Medical

Practice and River Lodge Surgery.

The site proposed is directly opposite the river

from Tesco, where a number of warehouses from

the old Phoenix industrial site currently stand,

awaiting demolition before the Santon and Lewes

District Council development – of which this will

be part – is constructed. The plan includes underground

parking. The practice itself along with

other new buildings will be built from first-floor

height up, making it safe from flooding. The surrounding

transport infrastructure will be improved

to ease access to and from the site for both car and

public transport users.

More than just a merger? "We hope this will be a

state-of-the-art centre," says Dr Heath, "providing

a much wider access to health and social care

than the existing surgeries can. It’ll offer a broad

spectrum of services to cater for both physical and

mental health problems, and enable other key services

such as district nursing, midwifery, counselling,

audiology, physiotherapy etc to be located on

the same campus. Being in one place will improve

delivery of care and

serve what is a growing

population into

the next generation."

The 'hub' is also keen

to maintain links with

the Victoria Hospital,

with plans to open

a GP-staffed urgent

treatment unit.

One reason for the

modernisation is to

alleviate what Dr

Heath calls the 'GP bottleneck' whereby patients

see the GP first, even if there is someone else

better placed to help them: to this end Lewes

receptionists are already being trained to become

‘patient navigators’, to signpost patients to the

most appropriate care options, such as open access

support to children or young people with mental

health worries, benefits advice, or direct access

physiotherapy.

I ask the obvious question: "is this a cost-cutting

measure in disguise?" Dr Heath, who speaks of the

project with great commitment, is quick to dismiss

such a thought. "Not at all. In fact the overall cost

to the NHS for the surgery will be slightly higher

than the current facilities – which are no longer fit

for purpose – are costing."

"The three current practices are stretched beyond

capacity, and the population of the town is growing,”

he concludes. “We are planning something

which is quite pioneering: I believe we will be the

envy, for example, of anyone living in Brighton. A

similar project at Bromley-By-Bow has been very

successful, creating a space where people come for

much more than just to see their doctor, and we

are hoping to create something of real value to the

Lewes community."

Alex Leith

Courtesy of Axis Architects

S

H

91


BRICKS AND MORTAR

Pretty vacant

Lewes’ ‘buildings at risk’

Lewes has many

buildings of historic or

architectural importance,

hundreds of them

having the protective

status of being ‘listed’.

The town is inevitably

subject to change

- changes of use and

new developments. For

a number of reasons

buildings may become

‘at risk’, often for a

short time, occasionally

for very long periods.

Being at risk may

come about because

of vacancy, changes

of ownership or while

redevelopment opportunities are explored and

planning permission sought.

A good example of the latter category is Canon

O’Donnell Hall on Western Road. Many of

us will have a memory of this place, be it associated

with scouts, Western Road School, the Catholic

Church or drama classes… and that is by no means

an exhaustive list! After being empty for years, at

last this building with its Arts & Crafts touches

and in a prominent position, is being converted,

albeit very slowly, into four town houses. Earlier

plans by the owner to knock it down and build

a block of flats were opposed by the Friends of

Lewes and others on more than one occasion in

an attempt to save it from demolition and preserve

its exterior.

More recently, Lloyds Bank on the upper High

Street – a Grade II Georgian listed building - was

empty for some years, with obvious neglect and

deterioration, whilst development ideas were

pursued. The eventual conversion to a Côte

restaurant, with accommodation

above,

has preserved its fine

interior and put it back

into use.

Fisherman’s Cottages

off Foundry Lane were

in a ruinous state for

years before a radical

conversion brought

them back to a habitable

state, albeit with

the loss of some historic

internal features.

Castle Cottage, tucked

away in Castle Ditch

Lane, appears to be in

a perilous condition:

I believe uncertain

ownership and squatters have been the causes of

protracted delay in its redevelopment.

Sometimes the vacancy is measured only in

months, as with the old Turkish Baths in Friars

Walk, soon to be returned to yet another period of

use in its long history, but St Anne’s Special School

has been empty and deteriorating for a decade

now, with competing ideas for its future being

aired, but the County Council as owners have been

unable to resolve the complex issues involved: a

dreadful waste of a large site with much potential.

Buildings do not have to be historic to be at risk:

Springman House at the top of North Street is a

relatively modern office building which has been

derelict for years, having become surplus to the

needs of its previous Health Service owners. It is

due to be demolished and redeveloped this year

as part of the plan to relocate the fire station from

the North Street Quarter. Marcus Taylor

Marcus is Chairman of the Friends of Lewes /

friends-of-lewes.org.uk

92


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Alistair Fleming

Fine English bespoke kitchen cabinet maker

I began making kitchens over

35 years ago. Starting out as a

one-man band, with no formal

training beyond an interest in

design and making, I had a lot to

learn. I set up my first workshop

in my late twenties in a barn

in Hadlow Down. I had very

supportive landlords who didn’t

charge me much rent while I

got the business established. Jon,

who has worked with me since

those days, still manages the

workshop now. It’s a far cry from

where we started. There are ten

of us now, designers, cabinetmakers

and fitters. Mark and

Jack started with us as apprentices

and we’re about to take on

another one. We’ve gained a lot

of expertise along the way and

we’re growing!

We had the opportunity to

move to our current workshop,

in Plumpton Green,

back in 2000. It had been an

open cow byre and we got planning

permission to enclose one

side of it and convert it into a

purpose-built workshop. We’ve

recently updated our heating

system, with the help of Bhesco

(Brighton & Hove Energy

Services Co-op) who help to

fund green energy initiatives

for business. Next week we’re

installing solar panels which will

cover our whole roof and help

offset some of our electricity

usage. We try to be as green as

we can and continue to explore

ways to minimise our waste.

Although everything is made

in the workshop, the design

team are based in our Lewes

showroom and I spend most of

my time either here or visiting

on site. At any one time we

might have 20 clients on the

board, ranging from initial

inquiries, projects in the design

stage, kitchens being made in

the workshop, to final installation

and project completion.

94


MY SPACE

I still love the feeling that we see the whole

creative process through. If we were buying in

cabinets from China I wouldn’t be interested!

The showroom is our initial point of contact,

where people come in to see what we do and

discuss their projects. As designers, we start with

the dimensions of the space and see what’s going

to work. A design is always the result of a dialogue

between us and the clients. How do they want

to use their space? Is it just a kitchen, a kitchen

dining area, or a general living space? Once we

know a project is going forward we will dedicate

time and consideration to get all the detail right.

Designs are drawn in 3D and give a really clear

picture of what the finished kitchen will look like.

Although we’re best known for our shaker

kitchens, we also do a range of more contemporary

and modern designs, often using innovative

new materials that extend the possibilities

of what is practical to make. Using high quality

board materials (as opposed to MDF or chipboard),

it’s feasible to stretch the practical boundaries

which are a restriction with more traditional

cabinet-making techniques. We enjoy this creative

tension - we’re experimenting all the time!

As told to Rebecca Cunningham

alistairflemingdesign.co.uk

Photos by Rebecca Cunningham

95


COLUMN

Lewes Out Loud

Plenty more Henty

These days I seem

to do a lot of it.

Shopping. Mostly

in Lewes, of course,

with the occasional

sortie into Brighton

or by train to Eastbourne.

Walk out of

Eastbourne Station

currently and you

are confronted by

the vast Arndale

Centre which has

grown alarmingly

in the past year.

Where retail business is concerned, I happily

confess to being small-minded. I like small shops

– even ran one myself once – and here in eccentric

Lewes, we do have our fair share of such enterprising

endeavours.

However, from recent evidence on these very

pages, it is clear that some shops are struggling,

with murmurs of unreasonable parking charges,

rocketing rates and more and more competition

from nationwide chains.

Yet they survive. Thank goodness then for Si of

the records on Station Street, Rick and his Ground

coffee team in Lansdown Place and my favourite,

Bonne Bouche, in St Martin’s Lane. Owner Gilda

Frost (above) could argue that she’s literally ‘in

the pink’ having taken over the tiny shop from

Elizabeth Syrett who first opened it in 1987.

“Friends advised me not to buy the shop” Gilda

told me, “It’s down a side street and so small – how

can you possibly make any money?” She ignored

the friendly advice. “It’s true the shop didn’t make

a huge profit but it has outstayed many other

chocolate shops in the town so Elizabeth must have

done something right.” The doubting friends are

now some of Gilda’s best customers.

I note the

former Brats

premises on

School Hill has

been re-opened

as ‘Charlotte’s

Dragon’ by a car

boot friend of

mine, Carol and

her husband,

Gordon. They

are raising funds

for the Teenage

Cancer Trust, in

memory of their

daughter who, sadly, died from the disease.

Moving from small shops to small talk. One or two

brief encounters now, and where better to start

than the Tuesday market in the Town Hall. Here I

spotted Jean who once sold a gnome to me in the

St Peter and St James Hospice shop. She reminds

me of this whenever we meet. Jolly Jean was trying

on what appeared to be a leopard skin skirt to

match her snazzy cap and boots. I approved. She

bought it.

On the terraces at the Dripping Pan stood June,

on her own. She travels to watch the Rooks from

her home in Polegate. Sometimes with her son,

John. They normally stand on the open banking,

facing the main stand, but not on this occasion. I

can rarely remember a worse afternoon for weather

and I congratulated her on making the journey.

Jean also travels to some away games she told me.

Heading towards Station Street from a cinema

visit in the early evening, I was approached by two

young South London guys who were clearly lost.

“Where is Lewes football club?” one of them asked

hesitantly, “We’re down here for training.” “Follow

me” I instructed. “You’re joining a great club. I’m

one of the owners!” Joint disbelief! John Henty

97


Accounts need

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with tax returns, accountancy and VAT

07941 207 931

richard@beancountersoflewes.com

www.beancountersoflewes.com

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BUSINESS NEWS

On Mountfield

Road, opposite

Priory School,

Flint Barn Fitness

have opened up a

new gym in the

pretty building

pictured right.

We’ll be taking

up their offer of

trying the facilities

out - including obstacle

training - so

expect more soon

on this one.

There are two more empty spaces to rent in the

basement of the Needlemakers. Perrymans are

‘closing their shopfront to focus on design shows

and online sales’ (plus they’re having a baby);

you’ll still be able to get hold of their furniture at

From Victoria, in the same building, and online

(perrymandesign.com). Next door’s Modal are

going too – a sign in the window says they’re

changing their business plan so as to sell party

accessories.

Round the corner in Castle Ditch Lane, in that

pretty little square/car-park outside Martyrs’

Gallery, Louis Browne has set up a Lewes office

as a notary public, specialising in helping customers

sell property, do business or get married

abroad. We’ve also learnt that Sarah O’Kane

will be exhibiting her circle of artists in Fisher

Street Frames from March 1st.

Fiona Abbott tells us that she’s starting up a

dedicated yoga and personal training studio

on Western Road as a permanent base for her

Soulfit concern. And a big welcome to Clarriots

Care, a branch of the nationwide homecare

service, who’ve set up a new office in town.

It’s all go on Station Street, with rumours of

a Turkish café in what was Tash Tori, and the

Royal Oak looking splendid after an expensive

refurb. Anyone remember those saloon-style

yee-hah swinging

doors?

It’s a long cry

from those

days. While

we’re on pubs

we understand

that the Dorset

is changing

hands, and the

latest managers

of the Rainbow

in Cooksbridge

have called it a

day, after just

three months. We don’t want to double up too

much on what Chloë King has written in Edible

Updates (see pg 77) but it’s worth repeating that

Pestle and Mortar are moving their Asian food

operation into what was Laporte’s, and cooking

hot noodles, too, making us a four-Thai town;

and what was the Real Eating Company (and The

Long Room, and Elphicks) is becoming Trading

Post Coffee Roasters (there’s another branch in

Ship Street, Brighton) run by the people behind

Ooh Ah Café on the seafront.

A few months back we took a visit on this page to

the building works of The Spithurst Hub, outside

Barcombe. This is a state-of-the-art business

centre which will be the HQ of So Sussex, the

company behind the Elderflower Fields Festival,

and much more besides. They offer private

offices, workshop spaces and hot desks to other

businesses, and a conference and meeting space,

too. And there’s a cookery school! It’s all very

swish, for its rural setting.

Finally a mention for the Lewes District

Business Awards, set to launch on March 13th,

with the winners announced in July. Last year

Wave Leisure won the blue-riband ‘Business

of the Year’: start thinking of who you’d like to

nominate in 2018.

Alex Leith

99


DIRECTORY

Please note that though we aim to only take advertising from reputable businesses, we cannot guarantee

the quality of any work undertaken, and accept no responsibility or liability for any issues arising.

To advertise in Viva Lewes please call 01273 434567 or email advertising@vivamagazines.com

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HOME

G L E N N H E N R Y

B U I L D I N G & C A R P E N T R Y

Aluminium wondows, doors,

lantern roofs and bi-folding doors.

Loft conversion and

garage conversion specialists

Extensions and renovations

Project management with

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Professional service

Glennhenrybuilding@gmail.com

Mobile 07787912297

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Trading in your area for over 30 years

We guarantee all our products, installation and service

for the best doors, windows & conservatories

CLARKS GLASS LTD

Unit 10, Ringmer Business Centre,

Chamberlanes Lane, Ringmer, BN8 5NF

For your FREE no obligation consultation call us now on:

01273 814077

www.clarksglass.org.uk


HOME

Jason Eyre Decorating

Professional Painters & Decorators

jasoneyre2@gmail.com

07976 418299/07766 118289

Herriotts Clearances

FULL HOUSE CLEARANCE SERVICE

www.herriottsclearances.co.uk

Handyman Services for your House and Garden

Lewes based. Free quotes.

Honest, reliable, friendly service.

Reasonable rates

Tel: 07460 828240

Email: ahbservices@outlook.com

roject1/NEWSIZE_Layout 1 18/01/2012 14:59 Page 1

PAUL FURNELL

Carpenter / General Building

and Renovation works,

Based in Lewes

t. 07717 868940 e. paulfurnell@btinternet.com

AHB ad.indd 1 27/07/2015 17:46

Jack Plane Carpenter

Nice work, fair price,

totally reliable.

www.jackplanecarpentry.co.uk

01273 483339 / 07887 993396

Painter Michael Webber

Colour Consultant

Domestic & Trade. Interior & Exterior

michael.webber6@yahoo.co.uk

01273 890779 | 07880 558 556


HOME

coastal carpet cleaning A5 land flyer.qxp 03/01/2018 09:07 Page 1

Domestic/Commercial/Office/End of Tenancy/Stain Speciality

Carpet, Rug & Upholstery Cleaning

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• Family Run Business

• Fully Insured and estimates freely given

• All Flooring: Block/Panel/Vinyl/Varnish

For advice, queries or quotations please call


HOME

OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE

FREE estimates on all types of

plastering work and finishes.

TELEPHONE: 01273 472 836

MOBILE: 07974 752 491

EMAIL: cdpoulter@btinternet.com

Plumbing & Heating

Design & Installation

Bathrooms/Kitchens

Plumbing/Heating

Boilers/Central heating

Gas Safe Registered

Tiling / Woodwork

Free estimates & Advice

T: 01273 487 565 M. 07801 784 192

E. tonywplumbing@icloud.com


HOME

Chartered Building Surveyors

• Building Surveys • Defect Analysis

• Project Management • Dilapidaaons

• Historic Building Specialists • Party Wall

Contact us for friendly professional advice

01273 840608 | www.gradientconsultants.com

LTD

Curtains | Roman Blinds | Soft Furnishings

Now stockist of Ian Mankin fabrics -

100% Natural fibres, woven in Lancashire.

Also Professional Repairs and Alterations Service.

01273 470817 | 07717 855314

TheLewesSeamstress.co.uk

We are a building company specialising in residential

extensions, refurbishments, loft conversions

and conservation work on listed buildings.

We pride ourselves on paying attention to detail,

using bespoke materials and bringing projects

in on time and on budget.

Contact us for a free quote and please

visit the website for more info:

www.stjamesbuilding.co.uk

01273 499 641 / 07780 964 608


HOME

GARDENS

Global

Gardens

Design,

Restoration &

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07784053679

tom@tbacc.co.uk

thebuildingandcarpentryco.co.uk

Mobile 07941 057337

Phone 01273 488261

12 Priory Street, Lewes, BN7 1HH

info@ globalgardens.co.uk

www.globalgardens.co.uk

RHS

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Winners

Real gardeners for all your gardening needs.

From a one off blitz to regular maintenance.

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01273 434567


OTHER SERVICES

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ADVICE

O N E S T O P S H O P F O R P R E M I U M , M I D R A N G E A N D B U D G E T T Y R E S

We also stock vehicle batteries, wiper blades, bulbs and top up engine oils.

LOCAL INDEPENDENT RETAILER.

TYRES. BATTERIES. BULBS. WIPERS

FROM STOCK WHILE YOU WAIT.

FREE TREAD & WEAR CHECKS.

PUNCTURE REPAIRS.

WHEEL BALANCING.

WHEEL ALIGNMENT.

Flo Tyres And Accessories

Unit 1 Malling Industrial Estate, Brooks Road, Lewes, BN7 2BY

Tel: 01273 481000 | Web: flotyres.com | info@flomargarage.com


OTHER SERVICES

LESSONS & COURSES

The Cycling Seamstress

Vanessa Newman

Alterations, repairs, tailoring & hair cutting

07766 103039 / nessnewmantt@gmail.com

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Ages 16 and up from an experienced, qualified teacher

Contact: Lucinda Houghton BA(Hons), AGSM (GSMD), FRSM

Kingston, Lewes (Ample parking)

07976 936024 | canto-voice.org

www.andrewwells.co.uk

We can work it out

GUITAR LESSONS

with Guy Pearce

For all ages and abilities. Fully CRB checked

• Lessons and Grades in Electric and Acoustic guitar.

• Mobile Tuition

• Guitar restringing service.

07504173888

guypearceguitarlessons@gmail.com

• BUSINESS ACCOUNTS AND TAX

• MEDIA AND THE ARTS

• CONTRACTORS AND CONSULTANTS

• FRIENDLY AND FLEXIBLE

T: 01273 961334

E: aw@andrewwells.co.uk

FREE

initial

consultation

Andrew M Wells Accountancy

99 Western Road Lewes BN7 1RS


LESSONS & COURSES

Singing Lessons

Experienced voice teacher - DBS checked - Wallands area

www.HilarySelby.com

07960 893 898

HEALTH

Ruth Wharton Viva Advert 3.17 AW.qxp_6 12/05/2017

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BIODYNAMIC

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NUTRITIONAL

THERAPIST

sallygallowaynutrition.co.uk

Other therapies

alsO available

fOr MOre details see:

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CLINIC SPACE

available

INTRINSIC HEALTH

01273 958403

32 Cliffe high st, lewes bN7 2aN

HEALTH

Doctor P. Bermingham

Retired Consultant Psychiatrist. Retired Jungian Psychoanalyst.

Assoc. Med. Psychotherapy. Open ended psychodynamic

psychotherapy for depressive illness. Supervision for therapists

drpbermingham@gmail.com

GOOD HEALTH FROM THE INSIDE OUT

Why have a colonic?

Do you suffer from weight issues, bloating,

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Arts Counsellor - Tara Canick MCGI, BACP

The Family Room @ The Montessori Place

Lewes Road, Easons Green, TN22 5RE

For adults & children from £10 per session

(No previous art experience necessary)

07792 600903 – www.tara-canick.co.uk

Wendy Wilkinson

Hypnotherapist & EFT Practitioner

Joining the wonderful team

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HEALTH & WELLBEING

neck or back pain?

Lin Peters - OSTEOPATH

VALENCE ROAD OSTEOPATHS

for the treatment of:

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tension • frozen shoulders • cranial osteopathy

pre and post natal

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20 Valence Road Lewes 01273 476371

Counselling, Psychotherapy

and Psychological Services

with experienced clinicians

in central Lewes

We work with individuals,

couples, families and groups.

Sam Jahara (UKCP Reg.)

Transactional Analyst

HERBALIST

Kym Murden

BA Hons Dip Phyt

Weaving wellness together

whatever your age.

Herb & Health Workshops

Visit:

kymmurden.com

Appointments 07780 252186

Mark Vahrmeyer (UKCP Reg.)

Integrative Psychotherapist

Dr. Simon Cassar (UKCP Reg.)

Existential Psychotherapist

Jane Craig (HCPC Reg.)

Clinical Psychologist

Magdalena Whitehouse (HCPC Reg.)

Drama Therapist

Thea Beech (UKCP Reg.)

Group Analyst


Directory Spotlight:

Angelica Rossi, Massage Therapist

What style of massage do you

do? Swedish Body Massage. It’s

very holistic, helping with the

lymphatic, digestive and skeletal

systems. It’s good for the skin,

and your circulation, too. There

is a physical side to massage, but

also a spiritual side, too: a lot of

energy healing.

Is every massage different? It

is. I work very intuitively, tuning

into each client’s energies, building up a rapport,

and using the appropriate techniques.

What sort of movements do you make? Effleurage,

kneading, hacking, cupping, friction

movements, thumb pressing, in some cases

pressing with the elbows, too! You learn all these

techniques when you do your studies, then you

develop your own style.

Do you have a uniform? I wear all white; it’s

important to look professional.

Do you play music? I avoid the

normal new age music. I like

playing Indian meditative music.

A lot of my clients like it: it often

helps them to drift off into sleep.

Do you have to look after your

hands? Of course! I manicure,

and moisturise, and do hand

exercises.

Is giving a massage therapeutic

for you, too? I think it is. It’s highly rewarding

helping people to feel uplifted, less stressed and

more relaxed after a massage.

How much do you charge? £25 for an hour’s

full-body massage, £15 for 30 minutes’ back, neck

and shoulders. People say that my prices are very

reasonable; I’d like to be accessible to everybody.

Intrinsic Health, 32, Cliffe High Street,

07401 131153

SPRING IS COMING

Acupuncture, Alexander Technique, Bowen

Technique, Children’s Clinic, Counselling,

Psychotherapy, Family Therapy, Herbal

Medicine, Hypnotherapy, Massage, Nutritional

Therapy, Life Coaching, Physiotherapy, Pilates,

Shiatsu, Hypnobirthing, Podiatry/Chiropody

Think about your health come to the

pharmacy to get advice on healthy eating,

exercise and quitting smoking. We have lots

of information and leaflets to take away

with you. Contact Quit 51 on 08006226968 if

you want to quit smoking.

During winter we lack sunlight and therefore

it's recommended that you take a vitamin D

supplement through the winter months. Ask

at the pharmacy for advice.

Easter closing: We will be closed from

Good Friday 30th March for 4 days and

will reopen Tuesday 3rd April.

(Closed between 1-2pm)


CLIFFE OSTEOPATHS

complementary health clinic

Natural Alternaaves

at the Menopause

Workshop 3rd March in Lewes

& 1:1 Appointments at The Cliffe Clinic

LYNNE RUSSELL BSc FSDSHom MARH MBIH(FR)

www.chantryhealth.com 07970 245118

New Yoga Class

With Suzy Daw

Yoga Teacher & Physiotherapist

Scaravelli Inspired Yoga

Monday Mornings: 10.30-12pm

at the Subud Centre, 26a Station Street, Lewes

Beginners welcome as well as those experienced

£12/10 per class or 6 weeks £66/54 (term time only)

For information contact Suzy on 07939 580743

suzydawyoga@gmail.com | suzannadawyoga.co.uk

OSTEOPATHY

Mandy Fischer BSc (Hons) Ost, DO

Steven Bettles BSc (Hons) Ost, DO

HERBAL MEDICINE & REFLEXOLOGY

Julie Padgham-Undrell BSc (Hons) MCPP

PSYCHOTHERAPY

Julia Rivas BA (Hons), MA Psychotherapy

Tom Lockyer BA (Hons), Dip Cound MBACP

ACUPUNCTURE & HYPNOTHERAPY

Anthea Barbary LicAc MBAcC Dip I Hyp GQHP

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GARAGES

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INSIDE LEFT

JENKINS & STRIPP, 1953

It’s easy to work out when pictures of newsagents

were taken: just take a magnifying glass to the

publications in the shop window, or in this case of

Jenkins and Stripp at 30 Station Street in Lewes,

hanging off the wall.

At first we spotted the Christmas 1953 edition

of Tatler, which came out on November 19th of

that year, then we noticed a copy of the (weekly)

Picture Post, with Queen Elizabeth on the front,

which hit the streets on November 30th. There’s

an ad for Triumph and Tragedy, the last volume

of Winston Churchill’s war memoirs, published

that month: Churchill’s face also fills a November

edition of Life magazine.

The façade has changed significantly, but this is

the building, opposite the Royal Oak, which until

recently housed a café, first the Snack Bar, then

the short-lived PJ’s@30. The building had previously

been used as a newsagent for many decades.

A search through Kelly’s Directory suggests that

F Jenkins and R Stripp took over an existing

newsagent, called ‘HG Hirons’ in 1938; before

that, from at least 1909, Albert Banks had sold

newspapers from the building.

Mr Jenkins seems to have moved to New Zealand,

leaving Mr Stripp (first name Roy, born 1912)

running the shop, and another he later opened in

Malling Street. Before long he was called up and

saw active service in the Royal Navy until 1945.

This photograph, Tom Reeves surmises from the

archive notes, was taken by his father Edward for

‘Newspaper and Stationer’, presumably a trade

magazine. We’re told (by Peter Fellows, on Facebook)

that the well-groomed man is owner Roy

Stripp, the woman his assistant Sheila Cornford.

The Stripps moved to Australia in 1962, running

a shop in the outskirts of Perth. The newsagent

kept its old name until it became ‘JW & JS Stock’

in 1974, known locally as ‘Stocks’, which is how

many will remember it.

In 1953 there were no fewer than ten independent

newsagents in town, and no chains (though WH

Smiths was soon to arrive); we are sad to note that

before our next edition Lewes’ last dedicated indie

newsagent – John and Liz Aitken’s – will close,

though they will still continue their delivery

service. Will we ever see another open up?

Alex Leith

114


Lewes Landlords:

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1 Malling Street, Lewes,

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01273 471 269

bespoke@alistairflemingdesign.co.uk

alistairflemingdesign.co.uk

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