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January 17, 2019 | WHISTLER’S WEEKLY NEWSMAGAZINE | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


JOSE MARIA LECEA

SUSAN ELMAJIAN

AKIHO MATSUNAGA

ZANDER STRATHEARN

DAVID EXRE

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4 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

36

COVER STORY

Dosing the divine

From acid to avatars with Ram Dass - By tobias c. van Veen

14

14

46

56

62

68

Letters

News

Travel

Sports

Food

Arts

Music

PiqueCal

Classifieds

COVER: A unique individual, certainly on an unorganized and unregulated path, trying desperately to

follow his path and listen to his truth. - By Jon Parris

WEEKLY FEATURES

46

8

14

44

46

54

56

62

68

71

WB VISITOR NUMBERS Whistler Blackcomb

saw lower-than-expected visitation over Christmas holiday

period

SWINGING BIG Freestyle Whistler alumnus Maia

Schwinghammer 10th in World Cup moguls debut

PRIDE FEST The Whistler Pride and Ski Festival

returns to the slopes and venues around the village

CATCHING UP Local musician Marcus Ramsay gets

ready for a busy year ahead

PIQUECAL On Thursday and Sunday, check out the

Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre’s Winter Feast and

Performance Program. Also on Sunday, local author Sara

Leach celebrates the launch of her latest book at the Whistler

Public Library at 4 p.m.

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OPENING Remarks

Stay safe

out there

We have all been rejoicing in

the amazing and metres-deep

snow that is blanketing our

home right now—and more is on the

way this weekend.

Plans are being made to get out

and enjoy it, and we can’t help the

By Clare

Ogilvie

edit@piquenewsmagazine.com

ear-splitting grins that accompany the

planning.

But as you make your lists, take a

moment for some sober thought about

the risks that always come with our

outdoor adventure. While not exactly

an albatross around our necks, the little

voice of reason and caution is worth

listening to right now.

We were all affected by the story

of Chris McCrum—the much-loved

and respected Squamish man who

lost his life in an avalanche during a

backcountry trip near Pebble Creek on

Jan. 3. (For fundraisers in his honour,

search “Chris McCrum” at www.

gofundme.com. A Facebook page, Chris

Patrick McCrum Memorial, has also

been started.)

It was a stark reminder of the

dark side of Mother Nature and her

playground.

Indeed, right now it is hard not

to see avalanche deaths and warning

stories across many media in North

America and Europe, which is being

battered with huge snowstorms.

The Washington Post reported Jan. 15

on an overnight avalanche in Ramsau,

central Austria that slammed into a

200-year-old hotel. All 60 visitors

and staff, most of whom were from a

Danish ski club, got out of the building

unharmed.

Much of Europe has been hit

by heavy snowfall, causing travel

disruption and resulting in 26 deaths

in the past few weeks—including ski

patrollers. About 40,000 people were

trapped in one of Austria’s largest ski

resorts earlier this week because of

the avalanche risk, and many of the

country’s ski resorts have closed slopes

and warned holidaymakers about the

dangers, particularly of off-piste skiing.

While we are not quite in the same

situation here, allow that niggle of

apprehension and nerve to settle if you

head into the backcountry—it might

save you (always check the conditions

at avalanche.ca).

Closer to home, think about

that snow on your roof. Is it sliding

off? If it’s not, you might think of

how to get it off without it posing a

danger to yourself or those who might

As we get set to enjoy

more fresh snow this weekend,

don’t let your enthusiasm

cloud your judgement.

unwittingly wander into its slide path.

There are even avalanche hazards in our

neighbourhoods. Cast a wary eye at the

gardens and homes around you and if

you are concerned, then knock on some

doors and let people know.

Last weekend, the AdventureSmart

team came to town to remind us all of the

many lessons we should all know about

playing in Whistler’s outdoors. (Find out

more here: piquenewsmagazine.com/

whistler/how-to-stay-adventuresmartin-the-backcountry-this-winter/

Content?oid=12777876.)

After all, isn’t the point of living

close to the backcountry to go out and

enjoy it—but be home for dinner? But

3 BEDROOM ALPINE MEADOWS TOWNHOUSE

Marek Ujejski

that means being responsible for your

actions while in the outdoors, including

being prepared for self-rescue.

It defeats the purpose of the joy

found in our wilderness playground

for this not to be the experience. If

the weather looks bad, if the warnings

are there, stay home, cross-country

ski in the Callaghan, ski Whistler

Blackcomb—there are thousands of

amazing backcountry days to come.

Our search and rescue teams have

already been out numerous times this

winter. While we will know soon how

busy Whistler Search and Rescue (WSAR)

was in 2018, we know that its volunteer

team experienced a 22-per-cent increase

in emergency responses between March

7, 2017 and March 4, 2018.

WSAR’s 2017 report found that

snowmobiling remained the No. 1

cause for emergency responses, with

11 callouts, and was the “single largest

contributor to trauma by activity.”

That was followed closely by ski

mountaineering, which resulted in 10

emergency responses. Out-of-bounds

skiers (eight), hiking (eight), and

mountain biking (seven), were also

near the top of the list.

As we get set to enjoy more fresh snow

this weekend, don’t let your enthusiasm

cloud your judgment. Remember it might

not be just your life you are putting at

risk though poor decision-making.

Play safe out there. n

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6 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


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Letters TO THE EDITOR

Questioning further

commercialization

of Crown assets

I spend a fair amount of time in the backcountry

year round and its commercialization has

been a closely watched concern of mine for

many years, so I was a little dismayed as I

flipped through this year’s first edition of

the Pique and came across an advertisement

for guided trips to the Wendy Thompson

Hut offered by Mountain Skills Academy &

Adventures.

I have no ill will towards this company and

would have recently been a customer myself

had it not been for a conflict of schedules.

Although I consider myself a libertarian

at heart, I believe that the tenure system,

introduced two decades ago requiring

commercial operators to hold tenure when

operating on Crown land, has prevented

conflicts and abuse of terrain that is seeing

ever-increasing usage.

It appears to me that some operators are

treading into gray zones, or are contravening

their tenure contracts, as there seems to be

little enforcement.

I recall that several years ago, an operator

in my neck of the woods was offering heliassisted

ski touring as part of their operation.

This company is not a heli-ski operation and

from my research into its tenure application,

there was no mention of providing this service.

When a single outfit is arranging for

helicopter transportation to the top of tenuredesignated

ski runs and is providing guides,

accommodations, and meals, I fail to see how

this is not heli-skiing.

I was delighted to see that this service is

no longer being advertised and I hope that it is

no longer on the menu.

So now I am a little confused as to how a

company can offer commercial ski tours based

out of alpine huts that are on Crown land and

are managed by the non-profit Alpine Club of

Canada.

Perhaps both of these companies are

operating within the law; however, I see a

conflict in both examples.

As the population of this corridor continues

to grow, let us tread lightly with the further

commercialization of this magnificent resource

so that it is not lost forever.

Phil Hey

McGillivray Falls

SOMETHING’S GOTTA GIVE

With the bluebird sunny day (on Sunday Jan.

13, came) the day skiers from the Lower

Mainland.

Don’t get me wrong, we want your business

but when it comes to (the increase in) traffic at

the end of the day, it disrupts the flow in our

small mountain town.

What’s the solution? I don’t know, but

here’s one idea that we had during the (2010

Winter) Olympics—(we had three lanes along

the highway) and it worked, sort of, for the

(Olympic) shuttles had their designated lane.

I think two lanes south would be a start.

Since the highway is owned by the province, it

would be nice if it could help us since we make

so much from tourism here and it’s not slowing

down for the rest of the season.

It’s almost like we need traffic flaggers

from Village Gate to Function Junction to help

speed up the flow of traffic exiting town.

When traffic is backed up I think of

restaurants like Rimrock and Red Door that

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8 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


have (patrons with) reservations for 5 p.m.

(who) can’t make it because the taxi, or their

car, is stuck in traffic.

Same with the buses and shuttles, as they

go off schedule, making people late for work.

So something has to give and I really hope

the new council can come up with a long-term

solution to eliminate the Creekside crawl.

Doug Ryan

Whistler

WATER FOR SALE?

I’m asking the Mayor of Whistler Jack Crompton

to send Vail Resorts a letter protesting its sale

of water in a plastic bottle for $4.15.

I don’t know if these are being recycled and

if not are filling up the landfill.

The energy and petro-chemical costs for a

one-time drink are inexcusable.

Maybe the village should consider banning

drinks in plastic bottles and raising the price

to encourage metal-can returns.

Anyway, this skier is voting with his feet.

Too much rain and your skiing is too

expensive.

Also, remove your signs about it being a

family resort. That is, unless your children are

camels.

Paul Filteau

Ontario

THE RIGHT TYPE OF GUEST?

I know many letters have already been written

about our mayor’s recent faux pas on sending a

climate-change letter to a Canadian fossil-fuel

company), so I will be succinct.

We spent years promoting and selling

our beautiful valley and mountains to anyone

and everyone, using phrases like world-class,

always real and many others.

We, as a community, were encouraged to

welcome the world, and we all benefited, my

family included.

Letters TO THE EDITOR

That the world arrived and we should be

surprised, I find comical.

Having worked at many top resorts all

over the globe, and having been involved in

a Winter Olympics before our 2010 Games (I

was not involved in those Games), I find it

interesting that no railway option was built for

the greenest Games ever.”

The fact is that we (workers, locals, skiers,

et al.) really have no other alternative getting

to and from the resort for work or play other

than commuting using the highway.

To point fingers at corporations, companies

or highway users does nothing but distract

all of us making good decisions and finding

solutions on a pressing issue that affects not

just Whistler, but the entire Sea to Sky corridor,

Vancouver, and beyond.

It is time get on message of what we

present, and represent to the world.

Perhaps a public relations firm would be a

good use of tax dollars, considering comments

from current and previous elected officials?

Common sense dictates that if we sell a

product in a competitive market, we should not

and cannot be particular in who buys it.

It seems in Whistler we can, unfortunately.

Paul Andrew Rossi

Whistler

A WORLD LEADER CAN TAINT AN ENTIRE

COUNTRY

It was not expected. Polling hid the truth. A big

country now led by a surprise winner. A country

now alienated on the world stage. Traditional

allies turning away. A leader showing affection

for despot leadership. A leader filled with

contradiction and hypocrisy.

Division stoked with dog-whistle politics.

Sexual misconduct allegations ignored. A

border clouded by misinformation and a

growing backlog. Cabinet buddies making

millions. Donations maxed out with support

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Letters TO THE EDITOR

from foreign-state actors in closed-door

lobbying dinners. Core promises abandoned.

Debt amassing at staggering levels. Ethics

breaches routine. Daily denial of universally

accepted facts ... and more.

And this is just in Canada.

Perri Domm

Whistler

SALUTING THE SNOWPLOW

I enjoyed the recent issue containing your list

of Best of Whistler (Pique, Dec. 27, 2018). It

certainly seemed comprehensive: from pot to

pizza to realtors and dentists.

However, recent heavy snowfalls have

prompted me to think there is a glaring

category omission important to all of us with

homes in Whistler: the crews who operate

snowplows and clear our driveways.

In that context, I would like to nominate

Wilson Patchell. For myself and most of my

neighbours, there is no more reassuring sound

on a snowfall day than that of Wilson’s plow

making its way down Panorama Ridge in Brio

before we are out of bed.

And he is back later in the day to tidy up

the driveways.

He is a pillar of reliability and our winters

would not be the same without him.

Cam Avery

Whistler

UNDER REPORTING REALITY

I listened to a few of those year-end panels

that discuss the year’s stories, the good,

the bad, the ugly and the under reported.

Only two panellists thought the most underreported

story was the fact humanity is about

a decade away from the tipping point into

certain climate catastrophe. Not even the other

panellists concurred.

I read with interest what happens to other

people who drink and couldn’t help seeing

the experience as a metaphor for what we are

doing to Mother Nature. The greenhouse gases

we continue to pour into Her system are raising

Her temperature. Each year, Her forests become

more “acutely inflamed.”

The land left is unable to “absorb water

and nutrients” and consequently dies. The

increasing heat is melting ice caps which

raises ocean levels, is diminishing mountain

glaciers thus drying up life-giving rivers, and

is sucking more and more “moisture” directly

from the land turning it to dust.

The gases mixing with the oceans are

creating acid that is aborting the flora and

fauna in the “womb” of Mother Earth. We are

the “free radicals” who don’t know how to stop

looking for ways to kill Her “cells.”

To answer the first part of Shaughnessy

Bishop-Stall’s question (Pique, “Opening

Remarks,” Jan. 3, 2019), humans drink and

not incidentally are trashing our life-support

system for the same reason.

It is our instinctive reaction to the fact there

is no answer to, “Why am I?”—the question of

meaning that gave birth to humanity 200,000

years ago. Drinking is one of the ways we try to

fill the void. Pass me another drink so I don’t

have to think.

Fortunately for individuals, there are other

ways we try, like our continuing democratic

self-destruction which, however, is unfortunate

for humanity because “divided we fall.”

To answer the second part of Bishop-

Stall’s question there is no cure for a hanger,

only prevention.

Sadly, it looks like the next 10 years will

be “one last toast…” for humanity. We might

be able to turn ourselves around but if we are

“patient” and set “short-term goals” the best

we can hope for is a New Year that is not as

unhappy as it will probably be.

Doug Barr

Whistler

Backcountry Advisory

Conditions may vary and can change rapidly. Check for the most current

conditions before heading out into the backcountry. Daily updates for the areas adjacent to Whistler

Blackcomb are available at 604-938-7676, or surf to www.whistlerblackcomb.com/mountain-info/

snow-report#backcountry or go to www.avalanche.ca.

David Livesey

Financial Advisor

David Livesey & Associates Inc

212-7015 Nesters Rd | Whistler

604-938-6100 | www.cooperators.ca/David-Livesey-Associates

Not all products available in all provinces

Need car insurance

with ICBC?

We do Autoplan! Visit your

ICBC agency at Nesters Plaza.

10 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

AS OF WEDNESDAY, JAN. 16

Avalanche danger has fluctuated through

January, starting with storms and heavy

snowfall, followed by a break in seasonal

temperatures and soaring freezing levels

this past week. A return to more seasonal

conditions are expected this weekend.

Another frontal system will impact the

Whistler area on Thursday with heavier

snowfall amounts accumulating Saturday

and into Sunday. As with all the other

storms this winter, strong to extreme winds

will redistribute falling snow. Expect to see

storm slabs at all elevations and wind slabs

forming at treeline and alpine elevations.

The deepest and most-reactive deposits

of snow will be found in wind-loaded areas,

such as below ridges and roll-overs. Warm

temperatures early in the week formed a

melt-freeze crust on all aspects except northfacing

slopes in the alpine and, at least

initially, the new snow is not expected to bond

well to this crust.

Snow and avalanche conditions can

change quickly, especially during times of

rapid loading from new snow or wind transport.

Have a good plan, have the right gear, and

before heading into avalanche terrain, check

the avalanche bulletin at Avalanche.ca.

Welcome back, winter! n


Letters TO THE EDITOR

SHARP-EYED LIFTY

I wanted to send out a very heartfelt thank you

to the lifty working at the top of Garbo chair

Sunday, Jan. 13.

My day would’ve been over before it started

if it weren’t for your sharp eye noticing my

toecap fall off of my bindings. Even more

incredible was that you were able to find the

screw bit in the snow! Without you, my day

riding in the sun wouldn’t have happened, so a

huge thank you to you!

Kate Turner

Whistler

THE CLOSING OF LOKA YOGA

As a current and 10-year permanent resident of

Whistler and a 20-year part-time resident prior

to that, I am writing to express my heartfelt

thanks to Tina James and Loka Yoga for the

extraordinary contributions they have made to

the residents and community of Whistler and

its surrounding communities over these past

10 years.

In my opinion, Tina and Loka Yoga have not

received the recognition that they have earned

and deserve for their selfless and untiring work

in this community over these years.

I continue to be surprised that Tina has

never been nominated for a public-service

award for her contributions to so many

important organizations in Whistler and the

surrounding communities.

Tina was a volunteer ski patroller for many

years. She has been a staunch supporter of

Bear Smart Society and while it was under the

guidance of Sylvia Dolson, was instrumental

in raising the largest amount of funds to

create programs that continue to help protect

citizens from encounters with bears and help

bears to continue to thrive in their natural

environment.

As an animal-rights activist, Tina has

supported the work of WAG in communities

north of Whistler and has also helped stop

the suffering of animals both in Whistler, the

surrounding communities and other parts of

the world.

Tina and her staff helped raise funds and

goods for the residents of Fort McMurray when

their community was devastated by forest fires

a number of years ago. She and some of her

dedicated staff continue to visit Fort McMurray

to offer yoga classes to provide physical and

emotional support for the residents there and

she continues to be invited to hold yoga classes

there.

Tina and Victoria Grace, one of Loka’s longtime

teachers, have often been called upon to

comfort families grieving from the loss of a

loved one and to help individuals cope with

end-of-life situations.

Tina has done amazing work in building a

close and loving relationship with First Nations

communities north of Whistler. She promotes

their inclusion and participation in cultural

and spiritual events in Whistler and has

regularly, by invitation, participated in cultural

activities in the First Nations communities

north of Whistler. She is considered a beloved

member of their community.

Tina is an extraordinary, dedicated and

very experienced yoga teacher who always

gives 100 per cent of herself and has been

instrumental in creating one of the best and

strongest yoga communities in Whistler, in

Canada and in all of North America.

She is highly regarded in the yoga world

community and she is beloved by her mentors

and students alike. She attracts to her Whistler

workshops and to her retreats held in Canada,

the U.S., England and India, the best yoga

teachers from India, the U.S., England and

other parts of the world.

With her genuine love for yoga and her

kind and generous spirit, Tina has created a

lineage of dedicated yoga teachers that are

helping others transform their lives by studying

and practicing yoga and by adopting peaceful

ways of living with compassion and without

harming. Tina lives her life selflessly, realizing

that we are all connected and by example, her

students and devotees continue to realize and

live that connection.

It is difficult for me to accept that smaller

businesses that practice karma, cannot

survive in Whistler beyond eight years due

to astronomical rent increases implemented

by landlords when rental agreements are up

for renewal. When the wonderful store Merrell

had to close its St. Andrews Way location

a number of years ago due to significant

rent increases initiated by the landlord,

many Whistler residents were dismayed and

disappointed. Tina was also forced to close

her studio location there for the same reason

and ended up moving to her current location

at Nita Lake.

It is a significant loss to our residents

and visitors alike to lose a local business

that has been an excellent tenant for over 10

years, has always paid its rent on time, has

created jobs and provided value and services

to our community and has supported so many

other local businesses and organizations for so

many years.

I urge you to not support landlords and

businesses that do not serve our community.

If you care about this community, please

continue to support Tina James and Loka Yoga

and together we may find a solution so that

Tina and Loka can remain and continue to grow

with us in Whistler.

Nina Allinson

Whistler n

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 11


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How to strata

It can be hard to live with people. Even

the best of friends can grate on one

another after being cooped up in the same

house all winter long. Fights can start

over the smallest things—like playing the

same stupid song for a millionth time or

hanging the toilet paper roll the wrong

way. (And yes, there is a right way.)

By Andrew

Mitchell

For a large chunk of my life, I’ve

had roommates. It was fun—I met a lot

of great people and made some lasting

friendships. My life has been richer for

the experience, more than making up for

missing food and beer, scratched CDs,

sinks full of dishes, and lost sleep due to

some upstairs night terrors.

I was also happy when I met the right

person and that part of my life came to

an end.

Until we moved into a strata. Nobody

drinks my beer when my back is turned

and the mess in the kitchen is all mine, but

sometimes it feels like I’m back to having

roommates again. Hundreds of them this

time. It was a bit of an adjustment.

Don’t get me wrong, there are a lot of

positive things about strata life.

Shared roofs, driveways, walls and

pipes mean more affordable housing,

something that has made home ownership

possible for my family. I don’t have to

mow the lawn on Sunday afternoons or

paint the siding every 10 years—we pay

strata fees to have those things done for

us. Someone also picks up our garbage,

which means I don’t have to drive leaking

bags of days-old compost to the wastetransfer

station a couple of times a week.

My driveway also gets shovelled for me, a

luxury I could never afford if we lived in a

single-family home.

Because it’s a Whistler Housing

Authority (WHA) property, I also get to

live around a lot of like-minded locals in a

community filled with kids and dogs. And

everybody gets along most of the time.

But there can be downsides as well.

There are people that don’t get the

strata concept. They don’t understand what

they signed up for or where their money

goes. Some weren’t aware that their new

home came with a long list of bylaws and

rules that are good for the ‘hood even if

they’re not good for you personally.

There are people in my strata who

refuse to learn how to do garbage,

compost and recycling properly, with the

result that everyone in the strata is paying

higher fees for maintenance, extra trips

by the garbage trucks and contaminated

loads. If the bin is full or compactor isn’t

working, people will just dump their

bags on the floor, resulting in additional

cleanup charges by strata management.

There are people who let their dogs

roam free and don’t pick up their waste.

There’s nothing harder to clean out of a

child’s sneaker treads than three-day-old

dog crap.

And then there are the people who

drive way too fast down our 15 kilometresper-hour

sidewalk-less strata lane, which

is ridiculous because my strata has blind

corners, children on bikes and scooters,

pedestrians, dogs, and other vehicles. I

live in fear that one of the kids in my

neighbourhood will one day be hit by a

careless person hellbent on getting home

all of 10 seconds faster.

Because of the WHA and the way

Whistler is set up, there are a lot of people

now living in stratas that would rather not,

but also don’t have a choice. They don’t

like the rules or noise bylaws or speed

limits or other expectations of behaviour,

but can’t afford to move into non-strata

market housing. At the end of the day,

they’re stuck—and everyone in that strata

is stuck with them.

My advice for anyone moving into a

strata complex is to treat it like you’re 25

and moving back in with your parents.

You’re going to be giving up some things

There’s nothing

harder to clean out

of a child’s sneaker

treads than threeday-old

dog crap.

but you’ll be getting a lot in return.

Do yourself a favour and read your

strata bylaws and meeting minutes.

If there’s a Facebook page for your

neighbourhood, join it. Separate your

waste into the right bins, and if you’re ever

not sure about something then put it in

the garbage to avoid contamination. Break

down your cardboard boxes so trucks can

make fewer trips. Clean up after your dog.

Slow down. Park where you’re supposed

to. Turn down the music at 11 p.m. Stop

your renovation at 8 p.m.

I say all of this having broken several of

the noise bylaws myself, but I can honestly

say I’m trying to be a better roommate

to all my strata neighbours. On balance,

the pros of living in a strata outweigh the

cons—namely the people who aren’t doing

it right. Yet. n

12 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


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14 News

WHISTLER

By Brandon Barrett

bbarrett@piquenewsmagazine.com

Visitation to Whistler Blackcomb

(WB) over the holiday period

was below owner Vail Resorts’

expectations, according to a mid-season

report from the Colorado-based ski-resort

operator.

In a release sent to investors on Friday,

Jan. 11, Vail Resorts said that results over

the holidays at its roster of resorts met

expectations—with the exception of WB

and its Tahoe, Calif. properties, “primarily

driven by increased weather variability

at those resorts over the holidays and

lower than expected destination and

international visitation.”(Vail Resorts

considers destination visitors to be U.S.

guests from outside of Washington State,

while international guests are considered

those from outside of Canada and the U.S.)

While WB doesn’t share firm visitation

numbers, a representative for the

company, speaking on background, said

that visitation leading into and over the

holiday period fell just short of last year’s

busy winter.

Meredith Kunza, Tourism Whistler’s

director of research and destination

development, said in an email that,

although finalized numbers for December

are not yet available, hotel room-night

bookings for the week of Dec. 15 to 22

were pacing nine per cent behind the same

period in 2017. Leading into the Christmas

and New Year’s holidays, room nights for

the week of Dec. 23 to Jan. 2 were pacing

one per cent below last year.

Kunza added that pre-holiday bookings

were “likely impacted by changes to the

school holiday calendar, as both B.C. and

Washington public schools did not begin

their breaks until the weekend before

Christmas this year.”

The sluggish results at WB come as Vail

Resorts saw its season-to-date skier visits

increase by 16.9 per cent at its entire roster

of North American properties compared to

the same period last year. Total lift-ticket

revenue across the company was also up for

the season, by 12.2 per cent, while overall

ski-school revenues rose 9.5 per cent, and

dining revenues were up 14.8 per cent.

As season and Epic pass sales continue to

surge—Vail Resorts expects its total number

of season passholders to exceed 925,000

this year—the price of its ticket-window

offerings remains steep. At press time, an

adult day pass for WB is priced at $169.

“It is great to see the growth across our

business this season as we deliver excellent

guest service at our resorts. Improved

conditions across our western U.S. resorts

helped drive a strong rebound in visitation

and spending, particularly during the key

holiday weeks,” said Rob Katz, Vail Resorts

CEO, in the release.

Despite the conditions, however,

destination guest visitation in North

America was “much lower” than

anticipated in the pre-holiday period, Katz

added, particularly between Dec. 1 and 21.

“We believe this was driven by

destination guests’ concerns from two prior

years of poor pre-holiday conditions at our

U.S. resorts and we did not see the pickup

in short-term bookings we had expected,”

Katz noted.

THE WEATHER FACTOR

The winter has been a tale of two forecasts

in Whistler; for much of November,

unseasonably warm weather had residents

wondering when the ski season would

finally get underway in earnest, while

December saw a deluge of snow that

ended up breaking the month’s historical

snowfall record, with 384 centimetres. That

broke the previous record of 380 cm, set

in 1994. The heavy snow also resulted in

challenging road conditions, with several

dumps throughout the month snarling

traffic on the Sea to Sky Highway.

A spokesperson for Tourism Whistler

confirmed that the organization did

not see an unusual number of booking

cancellations heading into the holidays.

WB was further hampered by

construction delays on its new Blackcomb

Gondola, which was originally slated to

launch in time for the Nov. 22 Opening

Day, but was postponed until mid-

December. Marc Riddell, communications

director for WB, said a combination of

weather and technical challenges posed

by the new lift—the largest of its kind in

North America—led to occasional closures.

“It’s going to improve. It’s one of those

THIS SECTION

VISITATION DOWN Visitation to Whistler Blackcomb this holiday season fell short of

owner Vail Resorts’ expectations.

WB saw lower-than-expected

visitation over holiday period

PHOTO SUBMITTED

VAIL RESORTS SAYS RESULTS LARGELY DUE TO ‘WEATHER VARIABILITY,’ LOW TRAFFIC FROM DESTINATION VISITORS

things where you have to get a lot of flight

time on it, and we’re kind of doing that

while the plane is moving,” he explained.

“It’s a completely new kettle of wax for us

to deal with.”

SHARE PRICES DROP

Whistler Blackcomb’s busy winter in 2017-

18 was largely credited for bolstering Vail

Resorts’ strong end to the fiscal year, which

was impacted by historically low snowfall

to start the winter at its western U.S. resorts.

Those results had the company

predicting a strong start to the 2018-

19 season, and investors’ expectations

followed suit. After falling short on its

targets for the season so far, Katz said

the company expects its full-year resortreported

EBITDA (Earnings Before Interest,

Tax, Depreciation and Amortization) to be

“slightly below” its earlier predictions of

US$718 million to US$750 million.

Vail Resorts’ shares fell by 13 per cent

on Friday, Jan. 11 after the news was

announced. At press time, Vail Resorts’

shares were trading approximately 38 per

cent below the company’s 52-week high of

_______________________________________________________

SEE NEXT PAGE >

16 EMERALD ISSUES Residents speak up for safety, rec access

18 RCMP “Dramatic” collision results in no injuries

22 DES Cheakamus homeowners reject RMOW deal

24 VITAL CAFE Vital SIgns project takes on big issues in 2019

14 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


News WHISTLER

WMMC sells in deal

worth up to $175M

AURORA CANNABIS ACQUIRES LOCAL POT PRODUCER

By Brandon Barrett

One of the world’s largest cannabis

companies has inked a deal worth

up to $175 million to acquire Whistler

Medical Marijuana Corporation (WMMC),

the resort’s first, and so far only licensed

cannabis producer.

Edmonton-based Aurora Cannabis

announced on Monday, Jan. 14 that it had

entered into an all-stock deal, including

certain milestone payments, to acquire

WMMC.

In a release, Aurora CEO Terry Booth

said the deal “adds an iconic, organic

certified BC-based brand with exceptional

traction and a significant price premium in

both the medical and retail markets.”

Founded in 2013, WMMC got on the

groundfloor of Canada’s shifting cannabis

landscape by becoming the country’s

ninth licensed medical marijuana

producer. Today, it remains one of only

a handful of Canadian certified organic

producers, and services both the medical

and recreational market.

“That was very important, that

true, artisan, craft methodology,” said

WMMC founder Chris Pelz. “Because of

who we’ve become as a brand and our

commitment to that level of quality,

there have been parties interested in

(acquiring) Whistler (Medical Marijuana

Corp.) for a long time now.”

The premium pricing of WMMC’s

organic product line—one gram of its

organic flower is priced at $17.99, more

than double the average price of a gram,

according to Statistics Canada—was one of

its key selling points.

“When you do everything by hand, it

costs more, so we get a premium for that,”

Pelz explained.

Partnering with Aurora was a good

“cultural fit,” Pelz said, and will allow

WMMC to expand operations at its two

production facilities, in Whistler and

Pemberton.

“Aurora offered us an opportunity …

to expand in a way that we just couldn’t

without partnering with a global-scale

company. They’re going to make this

next step for Whistler Medical possible,”

Pelz said.

Once the Pemberton facility reaches

full capacity, anticipated for this summer,

WMMC’s total production output is

expected to exceed 5,000 kilograms a

year. In comparison, Aurora’s production

capacity is approximately 100,000

kg a year.

“We intend to accelerate the completion

of Whistler’s expansion project, and

leverage our domestic and international

distribution channels to increase market

reach for their exceptional products,”

Booth said in the release.

Pelz said WMMC’s current staff of 50

will remain onboard in the acquisition. An

additional 50 part- and full-time staff are

expected to be hired this year.

As the founder of one of Canada’s

most recognizable, longstanding cannabis

brands, Pelz is well positioned to offer

advice to the many cannabis producers

and retailers that have expressed interest

in entering the Whistler market. The No. 1

thing he stressed? Patience.

“You’ve got to work it through all

the normal channels. It’s like going for

a rezoning or something—it’s a process,

so it will take some time,” he said. “I just

can’t imagine Whistler won’t have retail

exposure of some sort. I actually look

forward to see how it evolves.”

As for how he reacted to the news of

the deal, Pelz said “My first thought was

that this is the Whistler dream. I’m going to

be able to buy a house, finally, get a Mount

Currie dog and an outrageous sports car.

That was my reaction.” n

FULLY FURNISHED 1/4 OWNERSHIP CONDO/HOTELS IN WHISTLER CREEKSIDE

CONTACT JAMES FOR AVAILABILITY

THINKING OF BUYING OR SELLING?

CALL JAMES FOR MORE INFORMATION.

JAMES COLLINGRIDGE

CALL JAMES, THE LEGENDS &

EVOLUTION SPECIALIST

Direct: 604-902-0132

Toll Free: 1-888-689-0070

james@whistlerrealestate.net

www.whistlerrealestate.net

WB visitation

< FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

US$302.76. The company’s market value

has fallen from US$10.1 billion in late

October, to US$7.56 billion on Friday.

In a letter sent to employees, entitled

“Our Stock Price,” that was obtained by

Pique, Vail Resorts CEO Katz said the

company’s strong performance in recent

years has led to investors setting “the bar

higher and higher. Which is awesome…

but it does not mean you will always hit

the higher bar.

“As our stock went from $200 per

share to $300 per share over the past year,

I tried not to let that get to my head,” Katz

continued. “Similarly, as the stock has

come down, I try to make sure that does

not get me off my stride. Because I know,

what drives value is what we do each and

every day for our guests and for each other.

And I could not be more proud of how we

delivered so far this season.” n

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 15


News WHISTLER

Emerald residents force the issues

REC ACCESS, HIGHWAY SAFETY NEED TO BE ADDRESSED, RESIDENTS SAY

By Braden Dupuis

At a block party in Whistler’s Emerald

Estates neighbourhood last summer,

residents were asked to share different

concerns at a table designated for issues.

Two stood out from the rest: improving

safety on Highway 99 at Emerald, and

restoring access to recreational areas

behind the neighbourhood like One

Duck Lake.

Letters about the two issues were

drafted, signed by more than two

dozen residents, and sent to council for

consideration.

In the case of the latter concern, it

was the second time the issue was raised

at an Emerald block party, said resident

Karin Kausky.

Residents lost access to the recreation

area—which includes trails, a wiffle

ball course, One Duck Lake and vast

swaths of forest—in 2016, when private

development cut off public access.

“This is the second year that we’ve sent

a letter (to mayor and council) requesting

information about what’s happening with

that access, because the neighbours really

value that access, but there still hasn’t

been any sort of solid reply,” Kausky said.

“Hopefully there’s something in the

works and that’s why we haven’t heard,

but it would be great to even know what

they’re working on or what’s a possibility.”

For the Resort Municipality of Whistler’s

(RMOW) part, there doesn’t seem to be an

easy solution.

A municipal spokesperson said in an

email that while the RMOW is aware of

the importance of the area to residents,

it is continuing to explore access options

and there are no updates on the situation

at this point.

“That specific location is a challenge,

and it’s one that we are putting time and

energy into,” said Mayor Jack Crompton,

adding that the RMOW is currently looking

at options.

“At this point we don’t have any

concrete solution to the challenge.”

While access to One Duck is a hot

topic, the highway safety concerns are

more glaring to Dave Clark.

Residents wanting to access the Valley

Trail south to Whistler Village must first

cross Highway 99—not always easy as

traffic has increased in recent years.

“In my opinion, it’s an accident waiting

to happen,” Clark said.

An Emerald resident for the past 12

years, Clark estimates traffic has increased

(depending on the month) by almost 50

per cent since 2011.

He’d like to see a pedestrian-activated

crosswalk installed at the neighbourhood.

Highway 99 is the jurisdiction of the

provincial Ministry of Transportation and

Infrastructure (MOTI). Clark said that past

discussions with the ministry have led him

back to the RMOW.

“(MOTI says) well, you’re talking about

connecting a community to a community

asset; it really has nothing to do with the

highway … go back to the municipality

and ask for a tunnel or an overpass or a

light,’” Clark said.

“I don’t see those as being really

financially feasible options. It, to me,

doesn’t make sense to go and look at

building a three-quarters-of-a-milliondollar

tunnel or a million-dollar pedestrian

overpass like there is at Nordic.

“I really think the Ministry of

Transportation has an obligation to look

at how people cross their asset.”

Ministry engineers have reviewed

intersections at Emerald and concluded

that a left turn lane or pedestrian

crosswalk aren’t warranted right now,

“because of the lower 60 km/h speed

limit and because traffic volumes drop

considerably north of Whistler,” a MOTI

spokesperson said in an email.

“However, staff continue to monitor

traffic flow and turning patterns, and

will undertake another review of these

intersections should traffic volumes

increase significantly.“

In the meantime, drivers are reminded

to obey the speed limits and watch for

pedestrians.

_______________________________________________________

SEE PAGE 18>

16 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Pricing f rom $ 3 . 9 million CAD

Pricing f rom $ 3 . 9 million CAD

W W W . THEPR O M O N T O R Y . C A

W W W . THEPR O M O N T O R Y . C A


News WHISTLER

‘Dramatic’ three-vehicle collision results in

no serious injuries

POLICE BRIEFS: POLICE SEARCHING FOR SUSPECT IN CREDIT-CARD THEFT

By Brandon Barrett

Fortunately for all involved, a “dramatic

collision” involving three vehicles at a

busy village intersection this week resulted

in no serious injuries, said police.

At approximately 2 p.m. on Sunday,

Jan. 13, Whistler RCMP responded to a

report of a multiple-vehicle accident at the

corner of Lorimer Road and Highway 99.

Investigators said it appears a black

Nissan Rouge travelling northbound on

the highway failed to stop for a red light

at Lorimer Road and struck a southbound

pickup truck. The force of the collision

reportedly sent the Rouge airborne, striking

a third vehicle at the intersection before

rolling to a stop.

“Luckily, despite the dramatic collision,

no one was seriously hurt,” said Staff Sgt.

Paul Hayes in a release.

Police said alcohol does not appear to

have been a factor in the crash.

As the investigation continues, police

are asking any eyewitnesses to the accident,

or anyone with in-car camera footage of the

incident, to contact Whistler RCMP at 604-

932-3044 or Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers at

1-800-222-8477 to remain anonymous.

MAN GOES ON SHOPPING SPREE

AFTER STEALING CREDIT CARD

FROM WHISTLER STORE

Local police are asking the public for

help tracking down a suspect who

allegedly stole a credit card from a local

store before making purchases with it

throughout the Whistler area.

At approximately 11 a.m. on

Monday, Jan. 14, Whistler RCMP

received a report of a male that had

entered a store in the 4200 block of

Village Square before grabbing an

employee’s backpack that had been

left behind and running away. Police

said the suspect then used a credit card

found inside the backpack to make

several purchases around Whistler

before the card was deactivated.

The suspect is described as dark

skinned, approximately 6-2 in height,

with a black beard and wearing all black

with a black cap. Anyone who may have

spotted the suspect is asked to contact

Whistler RCMP at 604-932-3044 or Sea to

Sky Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 to

remain anonymous.

Police reminded the public to “secure

Emerald issues

< FROM PAGE 16

Residents with concerns are

encouraged to reach out to the Ministry.

Jordan Sturdy, MLA for the region

and opposition critic for transportation

and infrastructure, said the request for a

crosswalk doesn’t seem unreasonable.

“We put in those pedestrian-activated

ambers on Portage Road a few years ago in

Pemberton … I think it made everybody

their personal belongings in a safe place

while working,” and not to allow people

they do not know access to unsupervised

areas in the workplace. Police also urged

the public to contact credit bureaus and

have fraud alerts placed on their credit

reports to help protect from theft.

Reports should also be filed to

the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre at

antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca or

1-888-495-8501. n

much more confortable,” he said.

“Something like that may be certainly

worth considering.”

Sturdy said he hadn’t heard of the

Emerald concerns yet, but encouraged all

residents to reach out to him.

“If I don’t know about it, I’m

definitely not going to do anything about

it,” he said. n

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News WHISTLER

Cheakamus Crossing homeowners reject

municipality’s DES deal

CURRENT TERMS OF $870K OFFER TO COVER REPAIR COSTS NOT ‘WORKABLE,’ SAYS COMMITTEE HEAD

By Brandon Barrett

Cheakamus Crossing homeowners

have rejected an offer proposed

by the Resort Municipality of Whistler

(RMOW) to help cover costs associated

with the neighbourhood’s controversial

heating system.

In September, Whistler’s outgoing

mayor and council approved an

$870,000 loan to municipal subsidiary

and developer of the former Athletes’

Village, the Whistler 2020 Development

Corporation, to help cover repair and

maintenance costs associated with the

District Energy System (DES).

Touted by officials in the lead-up to

the 2010 Winter Olympics as an energyefficient

and less-costly alternative to

traditional heating, the DES has resulted in

a litany of technical issues and expensive

repair bills for some owners.

“While our clients appreciate the

offer, it does not adequately address their

concerns and contains terms that are

simply unworkable in the circumstances,

as individual owners require varying levels

of redress,” wrote Nav Parhar, lawyer for

Infinity Law, which has been retained by the

174 homeowners in Cheakamus Crossing.

The current offer requires the funds

to be distributed to the neighbourhood’s

five strata corporations, proportional to

the number of units in each strata. Under

the terms of the deal, the respective

strata councils would be responsible for

determining how those funds are divvied

up, which could prove challenging

given the wide range of repair costs

homeowners have incurred.

“This issue comes from two sides,” said

Tony Routley, neighbourhood appointee

to the volunteer DES committee. “It comes

from people who’ve had problems (with

their systems), but it also comes from

people who have experienced very few

problems. Because they go, ‘Well, why am

I signing this? I don’t care. I haven’t really

had any problems.’ We’re caught between

both ends of the spectrum on that.”

Adding to the complications is the

requirement that each strata member agree

to the deal in order for that respective

strata corporation to access the funds. “The

restrictions on the offer make it virtually

impossible to get the money,” Routley said.

Another sticking point for Routley

is the confusion around what costs

would be eligible for coverage under

the proposed offer. When the deal was

announced late last summer, then-Mayor

Nancy Wilhelm-Morden said that, while

the RMOW won’t “dictate the (funding)

criteria,” the municipality’s preference

would be that funds go towards future

repair and maintenance costs, cold

comfort for the owners who have already

incurred costly bills despite two phases

of repair work commissioned by the

RMOW that was supposed to address

significant technical issues.

“There’s a core group that is still

dealing with major issues,” Routley said.

“But there are also a lot of people who

have switched their systems from being

fully on the DES to running all electric …

They’re paying more for electric and it’s

not what they bought in the first place.”

Any deal signed would also relieve the

RMOW of any future liability associated

with the DES, a measure that Routley said

homeowners are amenable to—just not

under the current iteration of the deal.

“I don’t think people mind signing a

waiver, but it has to be under workable

terms,” he said.

Homeowners have instructed Infinity

Law to bring the issue to litigation if it

isn’t resolved by the end of May 2019.

In a statement provided to Pique, the

RMOW said it continues to work with strata

managers to “define guidelines for the

expenditure” of the earmarked funds. “Our

hope is to resolve this through continued

dialogue,” the statement concluded. n

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22 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


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News WHISTLER

Vital Signs project braves new frontiers

‘VITAL CAFÉS’ WILL OFFER MONTHLY DIVE INTO BIGGER ISSUES

By Braden Dupuis

The Community Foundation of

Whistler’s Vital Signs project is

expanding its purview in a big way in 2019.

Inspired by the United Nations’

Sustainable Development Goals, Vital

Signs is hosting a series of monthly talks—

or Vital Cafés—at the Whistler Museum

looking at some massive international

issues and how they relate to Whistler.

“What we’re trying to do is inform. A

better-informed community is a healthy

community,” said Carole Stretch, Vital

Signs project lead.

“We want people to understand

differing points of view in the community,

to meet other people, and to empower

them to participate … we’ve done bigger

conversations with more people, and

what we really, really want to do is get

different people into the conversation.”

The idea is to host the events as

smaller sessions between 10 to 15 people,

Stretch said.

While the Vital Signs report is very

COFFEE BREAK The Community Foundation of Whistler’s Vital Signs project is forging a

new path for 2019.

much looking at the intricacies of life

in Whistler, the Vital Cafés project will

examine the bigger picture before boiling

it back down to the bubble.

“We want to talk about the big issues,

so things like hunger and poverty and

education, good health, wellbeing, decent

work and economic growth, things like

that—sustainability, reconciliation.

There’s a long, long list,” Stretch said.

The first Vital Café is set for Tuesday,

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Jan. 22 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at the

Whistler Museum.

The inaugural event’s theme is

“Thinking Like a Mountain,” in which

guest speakers Kristina Swerhun

and Leslie Anthony of the Whistler

Naturalists will lead a discussion on

ecology-based thinking (admission is

free, but those interested in attending

should register in advance at eventbrite.

com/e/vital-cafe-thinking-like-amountain-tickets-54602242778).

“We’re inviting a local organization

or people in to talk about an aspect of

one of these issues, very quickly, just to

start the conversation, and then what

we’re going to do is try and get people to

relate that to their personal experience,

because personal experience is when you

start to really understand,” Stretch said.

“We’ll relate it to Whistler, but also

then talk about what each individual has

in their control. What is it that we can

individually do?”

The second Vital Café, themed “Yes,

there IS poverty in Whistler,” is set for Feb.

19, and a third, focused on learning and

education, will take place March 19 (find

more info at whistlerfoundation.com).

“We’re hoping we’re going to be

documenting these, and at some point

in the year we’ll be looking at producing

something coming out of this,” Stretch

said, adding that whatever comes from

the new project will complement the Vital

Signs report, released in October of 2018.

Find the report at whistlerfoundation.

com/vital-signs. n

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24 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


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News WHISTLER

Taking the national temperature for #Elxn43

FEDERAL ELECTION SET FOR OCT. 21, 2019

By Braden Dupuis

Following provincial and municipal

elections in back-to-back years (2017

and 2018, respectively), Whistlerites will

head back to the polls this October for

Canada’s 43rd federal election.

In the West Vancouver-Sunshine Coast-

Sea to Sky Country riding, so far only

incumbent Liberal MP Pamela Goldsmith-

Jones has been confirmed as a candidate.

There are some big issues currently

permeating the national consciousness—

the carbon tax, climate change and

immigration among them—but with

election day scheduled for Monday, Oct.

21, and the Liberals and Conservatives

polling closely nationally, it remains

anyone’s election to win.

There are often a variety of issues in

any election that may be unlikely to drive

debate on their own, but can add up to

form an impression with voters, said Max

Cameron, director with the Centre for

the Study of Democratic Institutions at

the University of British Columbia.

“The Liberals were incredibly good in

the last election of just taking a range of

positions that differentiated them from

Harper, and they tapped into a mood for

change that people wanted,” Cameron said.

“Now they are in a different position,

because they’ve got a record to defend;

they’ve been four years in office, and they

no longer represent the party of change.

So does that sort of shift (votes) back to

the Conservatives? Or are the NDP able

to sort of pick up on some of that?”

In 2015, the Conservative Party’s driving

narrative was that Prime Minister Justin

Trudeau, then the least experienced of all

four federal party leaders, was “just not

ready” for the highest office in the land.

Four years later, and that same

narrative could be turned against

Conservative leader Andrew Scheer.

“On the Conservatives, there are a

couple of general views that have been

expressed, and one is that Mr. Scheer is not

experienced yet, and is not well known

and does not have that name recognition

yet,” said UBC political science professor

Allan Tupper. “On the other hand, there

is a positive view that suggests the Liberals

have exposed themselves in several ways

to Conservative critiques.”

The Conservatives have had some

opportunities they maybe didn’t expect,

Tupper said: a greater complexity in

federal/provincial relations, criticism

over the renegotiated NAFTA, and recent

complications with China among them.

“And the issue of the carbon tax is of

course one that the Conservatives feel very

at ease with, and have for awhile, for right

or wrong. They see it as one that’s easily

dealt with politically, and so far you just

simply say, ‘It’s a tax. Taxes are bad, and

this is an unnecessary tax,’” Tupper said.

“There is, of course, a large opposing view

of that, but it’s one with some credence in

the eyes of a lot of people.”

The NDP approaches the vote from

a position of weakness, Cameron noted,

with its own leader, Jagmeet Singh, also

untested and currently without his own

seat in Parliament.

“I think this would be a very different

story if (former NDP leader) Tom Mulcair

was the leader of the NDP, because then

I would worry, if I were a Liberal, about

really hemorrhaging of Liberal support to

the left, and that’s (still) a possibility,” he

said. “Of course, the right could also be

divided by (Maxime) Bernier (leader

of the newly formed People’s Party of

Canada), as that adds another sort of

dynamic element here.”

In 2015, Goldsmith-Jones commanded

a whopping 54.5 per cent of the vote

(36,300 of 66,631 total votes cast), followed

by Conservative John Weston with 17,411.

The NDP’s Larry Koopman finished

third with 6,554 votes, while former

Whistler Mayor Ken Melamed garnered

5,907 for the Green Party.

Voter turnout was an impressive 74

per cent.

Are there issues you would like to see covered

locally ahead of the 43rd Canadian Federal

Election? Email reporter Braden Dupuis at

bdupuis@piquenewsmagazine.com. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 27


News PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

CLEAN UP TIME The Gazex system was fired off at around noon on Dec. 20 on Path 51

on the Duffey Lake Road, resulting in a four-metre deep, 40-metre wide “deposit.”

PHOTO COURTESTY OF THE MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION

Province upgrades Duffey Lake

Road avalanche-control system

GAZEX SYSTEM CUTS DOWN ON CLOSURES

By Joel Barde

Listening to Robb Andersen discuss

the avalanche control system on

the Duffey Lake Road, it’s easy to

find yourself envisioning a scene from an

action movie.

In order to initiate the exploders, a

technician parked on a secure part of

the highway taps in “secret shoot codes”

to their computer, explained Andersen,

who leads the Ministry of Transportation

and Infrastructure’s (MOTI) avalanche

management team.

That, in turn, sends a mix of propane

and oxygen from a control shelter to

the exploders (which look kind of like

big culverts that jet out of the snow at

45-degree angles).

Once the components mix inside

the exploder, a spark is lit, causing an

explosion to shoot towards the snow.

And sometimes—when the conditions are

precarious—they trigger an avalanche.

With more than 1,400 avalanche paths

around the province, throwing bombs

from helicopters remains the province’s

“primary method of reducing risk and

starting avalanches,” explained Andersen,

but remote-controlled systems, which are

proliferating, offer major efficiencies. It

allows the team to trigger avalanches 24/7,

no matter what the weather is like.

“You can’t fly if it’s dark, and you can’t

fly if the weather is poor,” said Andersen.

“We try to target low-traffic volume

times if we can … but if we think there

is a risk, we can’t risk it. We have to close

the highway right away and deal with the

problem.”

This summer saw significant

investments in the Duffey Lake system,

with the province adding a fourth Gazex

exploder on the east side of Path 51 (which

is located directly above Duffey Lake), as

well as upgrading the computer complex

that operates the network.

“The communications are more stable,

and it’s much quicker,” said Andersen.

“It’s actually making the avalanche control

faster, because of quicker communication

between the avalanche technician and the

system on the mountain.”

By way of example, Andersen noted

that the system was fired off at about noon

on Dec. 20, leading to an avalanche that

covered the highway, resulting in a fourmetre

deep, 40-metre wide “deposit.”

With the help of a massive front-end

loader, everything was cleaned up within

an hour and a half.

Andersen said that despite their force,

avalanches don’t tend to damage highways.

Barriers, he noted, are removed from

highways situated on known avalanche

paths, making it easier for maintenance

crews to remove debris and snow.

Over the last 27 years, the province has

“(If) we think there is a risk, we

can’t risk it. We have to close the

highway right away and deal

with the problem.”

- ROBB ANDERSEN

invested approximately $13 million in its

provincial-avalanche program, with more

than $1 million going towards the Duffey

Lake Gazex system.

A Gazex system is also used in the

Kootenay Pass, which is protected by 24

exploders. It, however, is not the only

remote avalanche-control system the

province uses; there are three others.

One system, known as the Wyssen

Avalanche Control system, relies on towers

that are used to remotely drop explosives

into problem slopes.

The system was installed in the Three-

Valley Gap area, west of Revelstoke on

Highway 1, a couple years back, and has

dramatically improved highway reliability

in the area.

“Last year we reduced closure times

by 70 per cent at Three Valley Gap,” said

Andersen. “In the past we’ve had issues

with that highway being closed for a day

or a day and a half, and then traffic gets

backed up and people are sleeping on

people’s couches and stuff like that.”

Which system is used is largely a

factor of which companies bid on the

projects, said Andersen, explaining that

all of the projects go to tender and the

companies that build the systems are

all European.

December’s heavy snowfall led

to a busy month for the Ministry of

Transportation Snow Avalanche Programs

and road maintenance crews. The Duffey

Lake Road incurred six delays, of 20

minutes or less, for avalanche control

on Path 56 in addition to the Dec. 20

closure. The delays represent a 20-percent

increase over seasonal norms.

“I think it may be a little bit busier

than normal in the Duffey,” said

Andersen. “We’ll see what the rest of the

year has in store.”

Andersen encourages the public

to consult the DriveBC.ca website for

information on potential delays for

avalanche control and up-to-date road

conditions. n

28 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


News PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

WSS student

shows support for

Wet’suwet’en

‘IT’S NOT ABOUT THE PIPELINE, IT’S ABOUT CONSENT,’

SAYS NATILYN KYANNA

By Joel Barde

Following last week’s RCMP raid

on the Wet’suwet’en protesters in

northern B.C., shows of solidarity have

been held across the country—including

in Pemberton.

After seeing a woman demonstrating

in downtown Pemberton on Wednesday,

Jan. 9, Natilyn Kyanna—a Grade 9

student at Whistler Secondary School—

decided to join the cause.

“The message I want to send is that

I support Wet’suwet’en, and there needs

to be proper consent,” she said. “It’s not

about the pipeline, it’s about consent.”

Some members of the Wet’suwet’en

First Nation are opposed to a proposed

natural gas pipeline that would cross

their traditional territory, linking the

Dawson Creek area to a processing

plant near Kitimat. Fourteen members

of the nation were arrested at a barricade

near Houston on Jan. 7, when RCMP

enforced a court injunction to allow

TransCanada Coastal Gaslink workers

on the contested territory.

While the project proponent,

TransCanada, has struck agreements with

all of the First Nations band councils

along the route, a group of hereditary

chiefs say that traditional territory falls

under their jurisdiction, and they are

opposed to the pipeline project.

Kyanna, whose father is

Wet’suwet’en, was anxious that the

RCMP was overly aggressive in its raid.

“I am half Wet’suwet’en, and I have

family up there right now,” said Kyanna.

“I was concerned, because my family is

up there.”

To encourage other people to join

her protest, Kyanna put out a call on

Facebook Jan. 9, inviting friends and

Lil’wat Nation chief and council to

join her.

“So tomorrow after school I’m

going to go join that lady and hopefully

she is still out there,” wrote Kyanna

on Facebook. “I am asking everyone

to get informed, and if willing please

come stand with me in support of My

Wet’suw’ten family.”

In the end, only a few members of her

immediate family turned up, including

her mom, Olivia Edmonds.

SOLIDARITY Natilyn Kyanna—a Grade 9 student

at Whistler Secondary School—is supporting the

Wet’suwet’en protesters.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

“It made me really nervous that

(Kyanna) went (into Pemberton to

protest), because I knew there were

going to be people opposed to her,”

said Edmonds, adding that Kyanna is

passionate about the issue, and that

she supported her daughter’s decision

to protest.

“I’ve always left everything up to her,”

said Edmonds. “I just told her to be well

informed, before she decides which way

she feels about it. “

Edmonds said the experience has

been positive for her daughter.

“I think this incident has kind of

brought more out of her, than I’ve seen

before,” she said. “I think it kind of hit

close to home for her.”

Kyanna—who carried an orange

sign with the words “We support

Wet’suwet’en”—said that during the

protest, one negative incident did, in

fact, occur.

“There was this guy—he had this

really big truck with LED lights—and he

read my sign, and he put his high beams

on and flipped me off,” she said.

Despite this, Kyanna said showing

support for the Wet’suwet’en protesters

was important and gratifying.

(See “Science Matters” column for

related article on page 34.) n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 29


News PEMBERTON & THE VALLEY

Brackendale Winter

Eagle Count logs

over 1,000 sightings

THE 33RD ANNUAL EVENT SPOTS HIGHEST NUMBER OF

EAGLES SINCE 2014

Village of Pemberton’s

Emergency Noficaon System

By Alyssa Noel

Volunteers at this year’s Brackendale

Winter Eagle Count might have

endured rain, hail and snow throughout

the day on Jan. 6, but they also saw

rainbows, sun and a total of 1,157 eagles.

“The weather was something

to remember,” said Christopher Di

Corrado, count coordinator with the

Squamish Environment Society. “People

really enjoy getting out and exploring.

Sometimes you see lots of eagles and

sometimes you don’t. The good thing is

we live in such a beautiful place; even if

you don’t see eagles, you probably had a

walk in a beautiful area.”

This year—the count’s 33rd—marked

the second time in around a decade that

volunteers logged over 1,000 eagles (in

2014, 1,617 eagles were tallied). Last

year, volunteers counted just 962 of the

birds—though that was still well above

the record low of 411 in 2016.

The 33-year average is 1,425 eagles.

“It’s a bit of a shock to see that the

numbers did add up to get us over

1,000,” Di Corrado said. “It’s a pleasant

surprise.”

estuary,” Di Corrado said.

Next year, the group hopes to recruit

some volunteer snowmobilers to help

them get further into Upper Squamish,

where snow was deep this year.

“It certainly is a snapshot,” Di

Corrado added. “It could peak earlier,

depending on the salmon runs. We do

keep it around the same time every year.

It’s the start of the Brackendale Eagle

Festival as well. We have maps with trails

showing the areas where people have

gone in the past. We’re doing our best to

replicate the effort year after year.”

One of the goals of the ongoing

eagle count is to get a sense of the local

ecosystem, he added. For example, while

earlier salmon runs were strong this year,

returning chum runs have been low.

“If the salmon runs were quite low

for all species of salmon coming up

the river this year, there must’ve been

a good group in the Upper Squamish,

because there were lots of eagles up

there,” he said. “Other areas where

people expected more eagles, the

numbers had dropped.”

While volunteers hailed from

as far away as Vancouver and Port

Coquitlam this year, there was also

Get emergency

noficaons right to your

mobile device.

“It’s a bit of a shock to see

that the numbers did add

up to get us over 1,000.”

- CHRISTOPHER DI CORRADO

Sign up for alerts at

www.pemberton.ca

VillageOfPemberton

30 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

www.pemberton.ca

In total, 73 volunteers set out on

foot, skis, snowshoes and rafts to seek

out eagles everywhere from the Elaho to

Downtown Squamish and from Paradise

Valley to the Stawamus River.

Two areas saw the majority of the

total birds counted: Upper Squamish

and—less encouragingly—at the

Squamish landfill.

“Instead of being spread out on the

Mamquam or spawning channels in

Brackendale, we had the biggest pockets

in Upper Squamish, which is good. The

second biggest group is the Squamish

landfill, which may indicate there isn’t

a lot of salmon here in town or in the

a strong contingent from Whistler

and Squamish. “It really is quite a

nice community event,” Di Corrado

said. “It’s really good at getting people

together. There’s a core group of people

year after year that really care to get

out there and do this count because it’s

helping us keep track of the amount

of eagles that we have here in the

Squamish area over the winter period.”

The count might be over for another

year, but the Brackendale Eagle Festival is

running throughout the month with music,

an art exhibit and films at the Brackendale

Art Gallery. For more information, visit

brackendaleartgallery.com. n


20th ANNIVERSARY!


32 Dispatches

Though still in its infancy, the

Adventure Tourism Coalition

(ATC) is already recognized

as a major stakeholder in B.C.’s robust

tourism industry. However the head of

the organization said there is still work

to be done to ensure that the economic

importance of the sector is fully recognized.

Launched in April 2016 to give a

wide array of industry stakeholders a

unified voice with government, the

ATC represents 19 adventure-tourism

associations, including Helicat Canada,

Mountain Biking BC, the Wilderness

Tourism Association of BC, and the

Canada West Ski Area Association.

In its meeting with policy makers, the

coalition has highlighted the importance

of the adventure-tourism sector to rural

B.C., where unemployment rates remain

stubbornly high, said ATC chair and

Backcountry Lodges of BC Association

executive director Brad Harrison.

“We’re well positioned to try to help

those economies adjust,” said Harrison.

“As other industries decline in their

significance, we can step up and diversify

the economy in those traditionally oneindustry

towns.”

Harrison said that on balance, the

province appears to be paying closer

attention to the specific needs of

adventure-tourism operators, and that the

ATC is being included in key discussions

regarding planning, stewardship and

conservation. “The Adventure Tourism

Coalition is pretty much always at the

table now,” said Harrison.

He noted that in June, ATC officials

met with provincial officials in Victoria

during national tourism week, attending

a meeting of the B.C. legislature and

setting up a table in the Hall of Honour

alongside other industry heavyweights.

“The other players there were long

established,” said Harrison, adding that

the Tourism Industry Association of BC

(TIABC), Indigenous Tourism BC, and

Destination BC were all represented. “For

us, just to be included in that, was huge

... It shows that we can be a partner and

help make B.C. better for everybody.”

Harrison said that strengthening the

voice of the adventure sector in the

halls of the Ministry of Forests, Lands,

Natural Resource Operations and Rural

Development remains a key priority

for the ATC. Many adventure-tourism

operations have land tenure areas

that are shared by forestry companies,

arrangements that can sometimes lead

to conflict.

“In some parts of B.C., trees standing

are more valuable, economically and

socially, to B.C. and its residents than

they are harvested,” said Harrison. “But

MEET AND GREET Pictured left to right during national tourism week in Victoria: Brad Harrison (chair of

the ATC); Scott Benton of the Wilderness Tourism Association of BC; Kathy MacRae of the Commercial Bear

Viewing Association; Tracy Eyssens and Mary Gerges of Indigenous Tourism BC; and Christopher Nicolson

of Canada West Ski Areas Association.

in other parts of B.C., stand-up timber is

worth more harvested.”

That said, Harrison acknowledged that

there is a reason that the forestry industry

carries so much weight with government,

adding that, “They’ve had a long, long

history of forestry being the big dog.”

A recent incident involving a forestry

company and cat-skiing operation in the

East Kootenays illustrates the importance

of clear communication between

stakeholders, he explained.

In March, a forestry company, which

shares a land-tenure area with the

operator, plowed a road that a cat-skiing

operation used to access the area, causing

its clients to be stranded.

“All the skiers got down to where the

cat pick-up was and had to walk, because

now the cat couldn’t get down the road,”

explained Harrison.

According to Walt Judas—chief

operating officer of the TIABC—the

ATC is doing a good job highlighting

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Coalition highlights importance of adventure

tourism to rural B.C. as it heads into 2019

ATC HIGHLIGHTS LAND TENURE ISSUES AS OBSTACLES TO INDUSTRY GROWTH

By Joel Barde

jbarde@piquenewsmagazine.com

THIS SECTION

the importance of the adventuretourism

sector.

As a sector, it has potential to grow,

and that in order to nurture growth, the

province must adopt policy and legislation

that recognizes its importance, he said.

“The sector employs a lot of people,

particularly in rural British Columbia,

but it has so much more potential to

grow,” said Judas. “It’s being stymied by

tenure and land-use (legislation).”

Judas added that under the current

model, the sector is getting short shrift,

and some natural-resource sectors, “seem

to be able to do a lot on the land, or

come in and take over a parcel of land or

an area that has typically been part of the

adventure-tourism sector.”

The tenure and land-use issues are

causing B.C. to lose business to other

regions, said Judas. “Unless we resolve

some of the other issues, that will

continue to happen, and we will continue

to lose market share,” he concluded. n

33 MOUNTAIN NEWS When overdoses hit mountain towns

34 SCIENCE MATTERS The Wet’suwet’en protest is critical

35 RANGE ROVER Nothing beats a good tree line

36 FEATURE From acid to avatars with spiritual leader Ram Dass

32 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Dispatches OUT OF RANGE

Mountain News: Even in

mountain paradise, opioid

epidemic takes toll

Come,

Be Charmed

By Allen Best

allen.best@comcast.net

CANMORE, Alta.—Banff and the Bow

Valley get their fair share of people

dying young, mostly the result of climbing

accidents and other outdoor activities.

But since 2016 three people have died

from opioid poisoning and scores more

have been admitted to local hospitals

for treatment.

In Banff, at least 10 people have been

hospitalized or visited the emergency

room each year since 2015 because of

opioid use. Down-valley 20 minutes at

Canmore, at the entrance to the park, the

count is a little higher.

Almost all opioid poisoning deaths are

now related to fentanyl. In the first half of

2018, reported the Rocky Mountain Outlook,

fentanyl accounted for 92 per cent of all

opioid-related deaths in Alberta.

In recent months, the RCMP seized

drugs that contained fentanyl as well as

carfentanil, a synthetic derivative considered

100 times more deadly than fentanyl.

Local police said that it could be

worse. “We know that a lot of the drugs

that are being sold here originate either

from Vancouver or from Calgary, and we

see what’s happening in both of those

communities in terms of opioid overdoses

and death. “Why we’re not seeing it as large

here, I don’t really know,” said Staff Sgt.

Mike Buxton-Carr.

But it can take just one bad batch of

drugs in a community to create devastation,

he added.

SMARTWOOL EXITS MOUNTAIN TOWN

BIRTHPLACE FOR DENVER

STEAMBOAST SPRINGS, Colo.—

Smartwool was founded in 1994 by two

ski instructors in Steamboat Springs who

figured out that merino wool could be

used to produce warm, moisture-wicking

clothing that is neither itchy nor stinky, as

wool can be.

In time, Smartwool became a semi-big

business, capturing 55 per cent of market

share for its products, mostly socks but also

other sporting goods items. As smooth as

silk, said one product review.

Though the manufacturing never

was done at Steamboat, the headquarters

remained there even after the company was

sold first to a larger company in 2005, then

to an even larger one, VF Corp. in 2011.

VF Corp is now consolidating offices

for its various brands in Denver’s trendy

lower-downtown neighbourhood. They

include The North Face, Altra, JanSport, and

Eagle Creek. With this move, Steamboat

will lose 90 employees. The new corporate

headquarters will have 800 employees.

The location in Denver is just a few

blocks from the headquarters for the

Alterra Mountain Co., which owns the

Steamboat ski area. Alterra chose Denver

for its headquarters because ski towns are

too expensive. That seems to be part of

the logic for the clothing manufacturer.

A representative of Smartwool told the

Steamboat Pilot that Denver’s transportation

network was a factor. It’s a few blocks from

Union Station, the flight, rail, and bus hub

for the metropolitan area.

“There are a lot of positives in that

particular area, and it’s a really vibrant part

of the city,” said Molly Cuffe, the company’s

director of global communications.

BUSYNESS AND NASTINESS

AT TRAILHEADS

CRESTED BUTTE, Colo.—Backcountry

trailheads near Crested Butte have been

getting congested, more commonly in

summer, but now in winter. Too, there’s

been some nastiness.

The Crested Butte News reported that

Marlene Crosby, the deputy county

manager in Gunnison County, told

elected officials there that people have

been using bigger trailers and other toyhaulers

and also leaving snowmobiles

at the trailhead overnight. The situation

is particularly nettlesome just outside

Crested Butte, where the road over Kebler

Pass is unplowed during winter.

A majority of trailhead users, accept

the good intentions of the county staff

attempting to create order amid the chaos,

“but there are those in that community

that are brutal and vicious,” she said.

Mention was made of the effort along

the Interstate 70 corridor, where Vail

and other local towns as well as Eagle

County have offered to chip in to funding

Forest Service personnel to better manage

the trailheads and other portals to the

backcountry.

Within Crested Butte, Christmas was

a happily crazy time. Phone calls got

dropped, the internet was slow, and lines

at the post office were extraordinarily

long—all a reflection of a ski town

being a ski town, said Mark Reaman, the

newspaper’s editor.

Still, he can’t help observing that it

would be nice to spread out the busyness

more smoothly in January and February.

He’s had that wish for about as long as

there have been destination ski towns. n

The Ecosign ship has lost our sail and

our rudder with the passing of Louise

Buchholz last month.

Louise has been the Office Manager at

Ecosign Mountain Resort Planners since

early 2005 and kept all of us focused on

our jobs, took care of extensive travel

demands and went above and beyond in

every situation.

Her laugh, calm nature, composure

and gracious personality will be sorely

missed by everyone on the Ecosign

team. Her smiling face that greeted

us every morning, and on our way out

of the office in the evening, will be

especially missed.

We miss Louise dearly.

The Ecosign Crew

2018

A tribute to

Louise will

be held at

the Fairmont

Chateau

Whistler

Saturday,

February 2,

from 3 – 5 pm.

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 33


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Pipeline blockade is a sign

of deeper troubles

Recent controversy over a natural gas

pipeline blockade and the differing

priorities of hereditary chiefs and elected

band councillors illustrates a fundamental

problem with our systems of governance

and economics.

Elected councils for the Wet’suwet’en

and other Indigenous bands have signed

lucrative “impact benefit agreements” with

TransCanada (now called TC Energy),

builder of the Coastal GasLink pipeline that

By David

Suzuki

would bring fracked gas 670 kilometres from

Dawson Creek, B.C., to an LNG Canada

liquefaction plant at Kitimat. (A consortium

that includes state-controlled Malaysian,

Chinese and Korean companies owns LNG

Canada.) Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs

oppose pipeline projects that threaten the

health and well-being of people who live in

the territory, which they have never ceded

or surrendered.

Governments of B.C. and Canada claim

agreements with elected band councils

constitute consent, even though Supreme

Court cases—including 1997’s Delgamuukw

versus the Queen, which involved the

Gitxsan and Wet’suwet’en—have recognized

traditional governance forms, including

the hereditary chief and clan system, on

traditional territories. Elected band councils

are more like municipal councils that have

limited jurisdiction only over reserve lands.

The hereditary-chief system was in

place long before settlers and colonizers

arrived. Chiefs, clans and house groups

are responsible to the land and the

people, and chiefs can be removed if they

fail to fulfil their duties. The band-council

system is a product of the Indian Act,

which also gave us residential schools.

The councils can’t be faulted for signing

the agreements. Money and jobs are needed

to support communities that struggle under

the current economic system. But pipelines

and other fossil-fuel projects provide mostly

short-term jobs and economic benefits,

mainly related to pipeline construction. As

with many elected bodies, it’s difficult for

the councils to look beyond immediate

priorities and election-cycle timelines.

The hereditary chiefs take a broader,

longer-term view. A statement from the

Unist’ot’en camp, where hereditary chiefs,

land defenders and supporters have

operated a checkpoint since 2009, said,

“There can be no question now that this is

an issue of Wet’suwet’en Rights and Title.

We have demonstrated that this fight is

about more than a pipeline; it is about

the right of Indigenous peoples around

the world to exercise Free, Prior, and

Informed Consent.”

As my good friend Miles Richardson,

David Suzuki Foundation board member

and former head of the B.C. Treaty

Commission and Haida First Nation, told

the Vancouver Sun: “When you look at

the political world and the relationship

between First Nations and the Crown,

there’s a mighty struggle going on between

two worldviews. There’s the Indigenous

worldview manifested in the nation-tonation

commitment, and the colonial

view, a 200-year-old, failed policy that was

denounced by the Truth and Reconciliation

Commission and apologized for.”

The hereditary chiefs and land

defenders’ worldview goes beyond this

pipeline and even Indigenous issues in

general. Neskonlith First Nation Chief

Judy Wilson, secretary treasurer of the

Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs, told The

Tyee that defenders are standing up for

everyone in the face of global warming and

its impacts on land, air and water. “That’s

what the Indigenous land defenders are

talking about when they say we need

to protect the land and the water,” she

said. “That water is sacred, water is life.

It’s critical and crucial to every Canadian.

Not only in B.C. and Canada, but globally

there has to be an awakening now.”

Canada and B.C. have made important

commitments to reconciliation with

Indigenous Peoples and have agreed to the

principles of the UN Declaration on the

Rights of Indigenous peoples. Forcefully

removing people from their own territories

to give the fossil-fuel industry right of way

flies in the face of those commitments.

Just as the Wet’suwet’en hereditary

chiefs and land defenders are bringing

much-needed awareness to the issues we

all face with environmental degradation,

short-term economic policies and climate

disruption, our governments must commit

to protecting all peoples’ interests, not just

those at large fossil-fuel corporations.

Expanding oilsands production,

offshore drilling, fracked natural gas and

pipelines keep us on a path detrimental

to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples

and to the future of all people. We must

stand with the chiefs and land defenders

in their efforts to protect the land, water

and air that we all rely on for health, wellbeing

and survival.

David Suzuki is a scientist, broadcaster, author

and co-founder of the David Suzuki Foundation.

Written with contributions from David Suzuki

Foundation Senior Editor Ian Hanington. n

34 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Range Rover 35

TREE SKIING Communing with with nature at its most essential level.

WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

A paean to winter trees

I

love being in the trees in winter.

Whether Japan’s beech forests,

Europe’s larch, Norway’s dwarf

birch, B.C.’s conifers, or Aspen’s …

well, aspens … skiing in the trees offers

a different aesthetic than skiing other

By Leslie

Anthony

natural features such as bowls and

chutes. And eastern tree skiing—lacking

the West’s fuzzy warmth and cathedral

spires—is different altogether.

Growing up skiing in Ontario,

Quebec and Vermont, I spent a lot of

time in the trees, whether downhill or

cross-country. In addition to being a way

of enjoying the simple beauty of a winter

day, you could commune with a forest

at its most essential—far outside of the

cacophonic pageantry of summer. I’ll

admit that eastern hardwoods weren’t for

everyone: they were the rough bouncers

at an exclusive club ready to repel anyone

who didn’t belong, and a girded honour

guard to welcome those who did. But

if you liked powder at all it was a club

worth joining.

Skiing hardwood forests feels like

moving through a state of suspended

animation, though there’s plenty going

on—stories being spun in the wood

of hibernating critters and burrowing

insects, of hormones coursing through

roots ready to send sap racing upward

at the first hint of warmth. And yet save

for an occasional creaking in the wind,

all this industry is carried out in silence.

Moving among such trees in winter

is like entering a realm populated by

beings whose sentinel nature is their very

allure—as if they both conjure experience

and bear witness to it. Perhaps they

do. I’m fond of noting that the human

genome contains some 20,000 genes,

while a poplar tree has 45,000. What

does it mean when the complexity of the

human brain is governed by fewer genes

than a block of wood? Perhaps only that

when it comes to DNA, wisdom, stoicism

and vigilance may be more hard-won

than mobility.

In British Columbia, where I now

live, not only do I love skiing the trees,

but I also enjoy the myriad forms they

take—from hunched snowghosts to

towering alabaster arrows of improbable

symmetry. It’s easy to view such

statuesque embodiments as living things

that have simply stalled out from daily

existence, their weighted encasements a

measure of the force of winter—as in the

old Lewis Carrol quote: I wonder if the

snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses

them so gently? And then it covers them up

snug, you know, with a white quilt; and

perhaps it says “Go to sleep, darlings, till

the summer comes again.” But such a view

would be a mistake.

For B.C. snowriders, trees are shelter in

the storm; for the snow that finds its way

into them, they are filter and preservative,

minimizing the effects of wind and sun.

Microclimates also help: a mountain that

spends a lot of quality time in the cloud

deck, its peak perpetually shrouded,

tends to pull down significantly more

snow than neighbouring peaks. Where

such places are found (and I’d count

Whistler among them), it’s the fluffy

turns beneath the branches that rule the

mountain’s personality.

Hitting treeline from the alpine

is an interesting introduction—

zigzagging around krumholtz and other

tightly packed manifestations. But

as you move downslope and larger

trees prevail, things open up—though

never enough to make the next move

completely obvious. And this is where

the “game” takes over. Tree skiing, even

where you can see around them, is still

all decisions, discovery and endless

permutation: make a turn around

one, a new line comes into view and

suddenly everything looks different;

your next turn repeats the trick; then it

happens again, much like a high-speed

video game testing both reflexes and

processing powers. All the while the

slope uncoils over the natural contours

of the mountain, connected by lines

that follow the logic of topography and

water—a logic, you learn, that the trees

follow as well.

For many years I simply skied

through these snowclad trees, paying

little attention to what I saw as a silent

plight for spring to arrive. But a few

years ago, some reading on tree biology

delivered a different impression.

The statuesque nature of B.C.’s

mountain trees, it turns out, is less about

current weather than millions of years

of evolution and the selective power

of ice ages. You see, the west coast’s

firs and spruce and cedar—even mighty

redwoods and sequoia—are snow trees,

exquisitely evolved in form and function

to deal with and make use of the white

stuff. With a heavy load, their apical

symmetry sheds just enough to allow

the branches to bend but not break; in

cold weather they’ll hold enough snow

to protect buds; and melting snow from

branches drips in a circle, feeding roots

that require a steady moisture supply

over winter. Indeed, the entire arc of a

snow tree’s spring, summer and fall are

in play as you ski by it in winter.

In a sense then, these particular trees

“like” snow. And that makes me love

them even more.

Leslie Anthony is a Whistler-based author,

editor, biologist and bon vivant who has

never met a mountain he didn’t like. n

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 35


36 Feature

STORY

Dosing the

From acid to avatars with Ram Dass

By tobias c. van Veen || Photos by Perry Julien / julienphotography.com

36 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 37


Feature STORY

Yoga Isn’t

Just a

Spandex Sport

Most of us Westerners think that yoga is

a bendy-stretchy thing you do to keep

your riding muscles from seizing up

like a coiled spring. But yoga in its full

meaning is a spiritual practice that can

take many shapes and forms: not just

the asanas, or aching positions we know

so well and love—and love to hate—

but a means of living the good life.

Next time you dig deep into an asana,

keep in mind that it’s designed to trip

you out—a pathway to samadhi, or the

experience of ecstatic consciousness. In

its very essence, yoga is a way of being

in the world that encounters the divine,

and that ultimately prepares you for the

greatest transformation of all—death.

More common in the West are the

physical forms of hatha and ashtanga yoga,

with some yoga centres emphasizing

their meditative, ethical and spiritual

sides, while others merely capitalize

on their tummy-toning effects. But in

Hinduism, there are several types: karma

yoga, or the yoga of unselfish action;

jnana yoga, or the path of self-realization

through knowledge; and bhakti yoga, or

the path of loving devotion.

This morning, I was doing the bendy

type, even as I was here on Maui to

experience the path of bhakti, in all of

its forms—meditation, chanting, singing

(kirtan), and loving devotion to the avatars

of the divine. Having reached the fourth

decade of my gross body’s existence—that’s

compared to the subtle body, folks—I had

flown to Maui to immerse myself in “Open

Your Heart in Paradise,” a retreat with none

other than Ram Dass, the ‘60s psychologist

whose research into psychedelics led him

to spiritual praxis. My intentions were

mixed—partly, I wanted to meet a figure

whose influence has hit me in both head

and heart; partly, I also wanted to see if

bhakti had what I was looking for, even

though I really had no idea what, exactly, I

was seeking. Such is the formless intention

of the spirit. Either way, I was in Maui.

Early in the morning (well for me,

anyway), about 100 of us were going

through sunrise salutations, as our

radiant instructor Saraswati Markus

encouraged us on. I worked on my

tight tendons, wondering what past-life

misadventure had left me with the karma

of inflexibility. But my body eventually

gave way, not just to the lunging warrior

in me, but to the overall atmosphere.

Three days of meditation, dharma talks,

nightly kirtan and warm ocean swims

had begun to suffuse my soul like a slowsteeped

tea. I was sleeping only six hours

a night, yet I felt fantastic—in fact, I felt

high all the time.

Perhaps someone put something in the

chai, I scrawl in my journal.

My mind considers other possibilities:

perhaps there is something in the oceanside

Qi’Gong, as we wave our arms about,

mimicking the swaying palm fronds. And

of course there is, just as there is something

in the dharma talks from the founding

figures of meditation and Buddhist practice

in the West: Jack Kornfeld and Trudy

Goodman, Joseph Goldstein and Sharon

Salzberg. And indeed there is something

at the retreat that I rarely encountered in

some 10 years of grad school: wisdom.

I am ingesting more wisdom than I can

handle—not knowledge per se, but in its

Greek philosophical sense, sophia as lived

praxis, from those who have lived a life

or two and can communicate it with the

heart, not just intellect. Krishna Das, as I

note in my journal, is exceptional in this

respect: He has learned to live with faith the

hard way after falling into a long, down-andout

depression when his guru died and “left the

body.” His Long Island demeanour slices right

through the bullshit. For Krishna Das, kirtan

In this motley crew I discover a handful of

psychedelic anarchists and nomadic Sufis,

many of us ex-ravers from bygone eras.

We discover our rhythms during the spinning

nights of kirtan music, and in Ram Dass’

words, form something of a soul pod. I

make friends with initiated elders, aging

flower children, and ex-Marines.

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38 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Feature

devotees, others are true relics of the

hippie movement; but as we later find

out with a massive show of hands from

the attendees, the majority of us are

newcomers to the retreat and to seeing

Ram Dass in the flesh, a fact that seems to

surprise organizer and podcaster Raghu

Markus. The word, it seems, is growing.

In this motley crew I discover a

handful of psychedelic anarchists and

nomadic Sufis, many of us ex-ravers from

the ‘90s. We discover our rhythms during

the spinning nights of kirtan music, and

in Ram Dass’ words, form something

of a soul pod. I make friends with

initiated elders, aging flower children,

two electronic music producers and an

ex-Marine. In a word, I had finally dived

into what I had previously only heard the

meaning of, but not felt in its fullness:

satsang, or the spiritual community.

Waiting for Ram Dass’ mic to work, I

return to my journal.

music is his practice and his life; it is what

keeps his heart alive.

Whatever that something is, it is

reflected in the old tripster’s adage: set

and setting. Set your intentions, create

the setting, and the trip will—with some

luck—unfold into realms of revelation.

“Set and setting,” of course, come from

Ram Dass, in his previous incarnation as

Dr. Richard Alpert, coined with Harvard

research colleague Dr. Timothy Leary. As

for setting my intentions—I find myself

torn between the soft ocean swells and

the jam-packed devotional schedule,

which is to say, between experiencing the

sublime aspects of nature, and the need

for a community of spiritual seekers. As

for setting—the lush tropics of the Napili

Kai Resort is at times supernaturally

serene, and it amplifies an emerging

sense that we’re all in this crazy-making

timelessness together.

Emotions and energies sweep through the

assembly like electric currents, I write.

Going to See

the Acid Guru

It is hot and humid under the giant tent,

and I am crouched up close under the

low-riser stage. Right before me is Ram

Dass, and the batteries in his wireless mic

have died.

The audience of some 300 holds

steady in near silence as Ram Dass—a

non-trivial icon of spiritual psychedelia

dating back to the ‘60s; today a beacon

for karma yoga and Bhakti devotional

love—tries to make himself heard. All

of us wait with bated breath. I glance

around at the audience, held steady in

the moment. Some of us are seated

cross-legged under the giant tent, others

in chairs, as Hawaiian birds chirp their

signature kook kook a loo, and the surf,

a few hundred yards away, crashes on

the shore. I am surrounded by some

four generations of spiritual seekers—

some are well-travelled yogis and Hindu

But why am I really here? Probably because

of a feeling that more than a few of us

Whistler weirdos might well understand:

having felt the magnetic pull of a universe

far more alive and defiantly stranger

than commodity culture, institutional

religion or dried-out atheism will allow

me to admit, I have begun a wandering,

itinerant and entirely unfaithful devotion

to the irreducible nature of inexplicable

experience. This desire to seek out the

many faces of the divine is perhaps less

rare than we think—it’s just that, in a

place like Whistler, we rarely talk about

it. But it’s here, on our cultural fringes,

and it’s also a key part of why this

increasingly commercialized, oversoldout

town exists, at least in its Western

incarnation—it was founded by acid

drop-outs, fishing folk and ski bums who

sought to touch that great, vast spirit of

the mountains, trees, and lakes.

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 39


ackcountry—that sacred feeling that

sends shivers as you traverse a glacier. It’s

not just all adrenaline, there’s something

else shaking in this valley. But where

does one go with it, if not seeking the

path of organized religion?

Getting Dosed

with the Divine

I glance up from my journal. We listen

quietly to the symphony of crashing

surf and tropical sing-song as precisely

nothing happens. The mic is still dead.

Entirely content in this moment—beings

of warm liquid, I scrawl—we slowly melt

into island time, as we wait to receive

darshan (blessings of the guru) from the

acid master.

Ram Dass, some 87 years young,

glances up from his wheelchair. Always

one to play on the moment, he calls

out into the microphone. There is no

response. There is nothing to do. Just the

moment itself. And so he drops his head,

and plays dead.

Seated up front, a few of us become

aware of the puppet show Ram Dass

is putting on. Ram Dass stays perfectly

immobile, eyes downcast, mouth ajar,

head to the side, with one hand still a

quarter raised, as if he’s stopped speaking

mid-sentence. Playing the irony of his

condition to the hilt—his very role, up

onstage, as the awakened guru—by all

accounts he appears as if his batteries

have gone dead.

And by now, we’re beginning to lose

it. Those at the back, some 300 under the

circus tent, have no idea what is going

on. It’s classic R.D., ever the trickster.

But it’s also deadly serious. Ram Dass

is mirroring the fact that he still suffers

from the effects of a severe stroke in 1997

that left him with expressive aphasia,

inhibiting his ability to speak and leaving

half of his body paralyzed. But rather

than let the stroke define him, he now

seems to be play-acting its effects, as if

Ram Dass himself, like an android from

a Philip K. Dick novel, is just another

replicant of the real thing.

As we like to say in academia, it’s a

teachable moment. Indeed, this is how

guru works—by showing you what you

need, rather than what you want—and

it’s not the guru, it’s guru, as a principle

of the avatar, or manifestation of the

divine. And here I am, looking at guru

Ram Dass, who knows he is not guru,

not a realized being (yet?), but a copy

of his guru, Maharaj-ji, who is already

dead. And here Ram Dass is playing fakedead.

Embrace the simulacra, he seems

to be saying. It’s all Maya, illusion, a

meat-puppet show anyway. This minor

revelation hits me right between the eyes.

Ram Dass is playing fake dead. In

Philip K. Dick’s terms, he’s a fake fake.

The Cosmic Evolution

of One Dr. Richard Alpert

There is a magical quality to Ram Dass’

New York City lectures of 1969 that

form the core of his bestselling manual

for the cosmic counterculture, Be Here

Now. GQ editor Will Welch describes

becoming obsessed with him in his

infamous piece, “The Unified Theory of

Ram Dass” (which is a recommended

accompaniment to this article). It is in

part because of these talks, now available

for all on the Ram Dass podcast (now

up to 139!), that I am here, a few

feet from the man who was once fired

from Harvard in 1963 for exploring the

healing properties, therapeutic benefits

and religious potentials of substances

that no one could quite comprehend. He

was then known as Dr. Richard Alpert,

Harvard professor of psychology. Witty,

intellectual, talented beyond belief—he

also played cello and piloted his own

plane—and a bisexual man to boot, he

was also decades ahead of his time.

It’s funny how failure works. Being

axed from an Ivy League institution

instantly elevated Alpert and Leary into

countercultural icons of the psychedelic

‘60s. After Harvard, the two continued

to explore the potentials of psilocybin

and LSD at a mansion in Millbrook,

N.Y., publishing the journal Psychedelic

Review as well as the infamous (and

useful) book The Psychedelic Experience:

A Manual Based on the Tibetan Book

of the Dead (1964). But by 1966, the

two parted ways, with Leary fighting

multiple marijuana possession charges

that eventually landed him in prison in

1970 (and breaking out—an epic saga

involving the Weathermen, the Black

Panther government-in-exile in Algeria,

40 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


T

IN

Feature

affectionately known as Maharaj-ji. It

is Maharaj-ji who gave Ram Dass his

name, which means “Servant of God,”

in the Hindu tradition of Hanuman, the

monkey-king who serves Ram, one of the

10 incarnations of Vishnu.

Mindfulness is touted by Silicon-

Valley big business today—and is

becoming just as much a big business—

not the least because it influenced its

legendary figures: Steve Jobs went to visit

Maharaj-ji after reading Be Here Now,

though he arrived a few months too late,

after his death in 1973. Mark Zuckerberg

went at the suggestion of Jobs, while

Larry Page and Jeffrey Skroll of eBay also

undertook a pilgrimage to the ashram

at Kainchi. If I were to summarise my

point here, it would have to take on

a gravitational metaphor. With Neem

Karoli Baba, we’re dealing with a kind

of singularity, and Ram Dass has been

orbiting the event horizon for some time.

It is the cosmic arc of Ram Dass’ life

that has always interested me: from the

heights of the ivory tower to sleeping

outside of Indian bazaars, from acid guru

to wandering the U.S. in a hippie bus, from

Freudian psychology to Hindu mysticism.

Indeed, this is how guru works—by showing you

what you need, rather than what you want—and

it’s not the guru, it’s guru, as a principle of the

avatar, or manifestation of the divine. And here I

am, looking at guru Ram Dass, who knows he is

not guru, not a realized being (yet) ...

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and an aborted campaign to run for

Governor of California, with the “Come

Together” theme song written by John

Lennon). In 1974, Ram Dass and Leary

fell out when Ram Dass took part in a

press conference condemning Leary for

leaking information to the FBI as part of a

plea deal—claims that were later proven

to be incorrect—and the two eventually

reconciled in the 1980s. But as Tim

began his decades-long battle with the

State, Ram Dass journeyed to India. The

end result of that pivotal trip in 1967 was

nothing less than a total transformation

of identity: he left Richard Alpert

behind and returned as Ram Dass, an

adherent of Bhakti love and devotional

practice thanks to a little known Indian

mystic known as Neem Karoli Baba,

I’ve always felt some affinity, even though

our lives are complete opposites: Ram

Dass was kicked out of the academy, while

I struggle against precarity to get into it;

Ram Dass discovered psychedelics as a

professor, while I raved away my neurons;

yet both of us, it seems, only turned to

spiritual practice after exhausting all

available options.

Then there’s Ram Dass’ moment of

spiritual conversion in India, where his

mind cracked and he gave up on the

Western paradigms of materialism (or

at least, in any reductive sense). It’s still

crazy to think that a simple man in a

blanket, laughing, chuckling, and telling

stories, operating with little fanfare, no

glitz—and no guru scam to speak of—

blew the analytical and critical mind of

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 41


Feature

Dr. Alpert, a man thoroughly enraptured,

at that point, with his own ultra-egoic

“movie of me,” to use Krishna Das’

phrase. It’s this intensity of experiencing

an event—nay, a faith in experiencing the

inexplicable, a rupture in the timeline,

something that flips the script entirely—

that has me thinking there’s something

here to grab onto.

From Psychedelics

to Spirit

After Leary introduced Ram Dass

to psilocybin, he really only one had

research question: what is consciousness?

The question of consciousness—that

infamous yet bungled meaning of life, the

universe, and everything, to paraphrase

Douglas Adams—led Leary and Alpert to

establish a number of experiments that,

to this day, have set the standard for

exploring the therapeutic potentials of

psychedelics. The word psychedelic itself

comes from the Greek psyche and delios,

meaning “mind manifesting.” That said,

psyche ought to be taken not in a narrow,

dualistic sense as the postulations of the

ego, but as that ineffable, unlocatable

stuff of awareness that remains when

the ego is all said and done. And

whether such chemical agents, synthetic

or organic, manifest only a recursive

hallucination of the mind speaking to

itself, or reveal all that which escapes

the organizing principles and filters

of mind—in Aldous Huxley’s word,

opening the “doors of perception” to the

worlding of time/space as such—remains

entirely unresolved in today’s research.

The answer, undoubtedly, is a little bit

of both. Alpert and Leary’s framing of

set and setting reveals how psychedelics

both amplify existing expectations of the

user while, at the same time, offering

the potential to open consciousness to

unthought visionary experiences.

As Magdalena Bokowa discusses in

“The Second Wave,” her Pique feature

from November 2018, psychedelics offer

incredible potential to cure (and not

just treat the symptoms of) depression,

post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety,

and other “psychological” problems

that standard science so often only

attempts to treat with opiates. Above

all, psychedelics, as they implode the

boundaries of the ego, lead one to

confront a fear of death. Our world

of instant gratification so fears death

that it remains uncomfortably stuffed

into the hierarchy of social and familial

separation that defines Western culture.

One experiment in particular from

this era stands out for its audacity, but

also authenticity—the 1962 “Good

Friday Experiment” conducted with

graduate student Walter Pahnke and

the Harvard Divinity School. The first

controlled, double-blind study of drugs

and the mystical experience, it led many

theology students to report that they

had directly apprehended the beauty of

the divine. I can only imagine what my

own early experiences with Presbyterian

service might have been, had the hard

pews, comatose hymns and snoring

sermons been replaced with a comingof-age

ritual in which the divine was

actually manifested—but then, that was

the point of rave culture.

The question of consciousness, for

Alpert, went far beyond psychedelics,

which is where he parted ways with Leary.

Alpert began searching for ways to get

into divine states of consciousness and

not come down. He wanted to go beyond

what the ingestion of an all-too temporary

entheogen—entheos genesis, or re-creating

the divine within—could provide.

A pivotal event led to this moment,

namely his first unforgettable trip with

Leary that Ram Dass narrates in some

detail in Be Here Now. Upon taking this

particular dose of psilocybin—a synthetic

of the mushroom legally manufactured

at the time by pharmaceutical company

Sandoz—all vestiges of his social,

personal, psychological and cultural

identity were stripped away, until he

was left entirely void. He saw himself,

disassociated, as a separate figure,

dismantled, piece by piece. And then,

just when there was nothing left of his

identity, his body disappeared, too.

A sense of horror set in. There was

nothing left, he says, but the awareness

of nothingness itself. It sounds like a

magnificent acid trip straight out of the

Tibetan Book of the Dead, a true fake death

experience, which is to say, an encounter

with the Kantian sublime, as full of

wonder as horror.

“I felt that I must be dying,” reflects

Ram Dass, “since there was nothing in

my universe that led me to believe in life

after leaving the body.” But die he did

not, which led to a profound realization,

that he was still aware: “this aware ‘I’ was

watching the entire drama, including the

panic, with calm compassion.” What was

this, this thisness of consciousness after the

death of the ego and the body, and why

was this thisness calm, and compassionate,

to the death of his own ego?

After this trip—and hundreds of others,

with increasingly higher doses of LSD and

other psychedelics—Alpert began to seek

answers to the metaphysical questions of

life and death that Western science had

disbarred him from even asking. During

his journey to India in 1967, he visited

temples and sadhus, religious ascetics of

Hinduism and Jainism, and studied Eastern

traditions and Buddhist meditation. The

journey itself is worth listening to—for

after many adventures and hardships, he

finally surrendered to a young surfer from

42 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Feature STORY

Long Beach, known as Bhagwan Dass. And

it was Bhagwan Dass who would say to

Alpert, when anxiety set in: “Just be here

now, man.” Alpert, by then a balding and

barefoot pilgrim sleeping outdoors and

begging for food, was learning to let go. It

was Bhagwan Dass who led Alpert into the

foothills of the Himalayas to meet his guru,

Neem Karoli Baba.

From Dosing

Acid to

Divine Avatars

Wrapped in a blanket, Neem Karoli

Baba—often called Maharaj-ji, an

affectionate term—was a peripatetic man

of poverty. Named after the small village

of Neeb Karori, he exhibited few of

the outward markings of a sadhu. He

wore no holy robes, and his head, far

from being adorned in matted locks,

was mostly shaven. He had no money,

and clothes aside, for most of his life

he only owned a broken pot shard from

which he gathered rainwater to drink. He

often disappeared into the forest without

warning, sleeping in culverts and caves.

His devotees were only just beginning

to build temples to house him—as

ashrams to Hanuman, the Hindu god

of devotional love and service—when

Alpert arrived. In short, he was but a

minor (though curiously influential)

figure compared to the grand gurus who

had already attracted the attention of the

West, such as the Beatles’ pilgrimage to

Maharashi Mahesh Yogi.

Yet, despite the low-key nature of

outward appearances, and despite

a personality that sought to dethrone

Alpert’s assumptions of what a “holy

man” should be, within a few minutes of

their meeting, Maharaj-ji had completely

shattered Alpert’s logical apprehension of

the world. He did so by speaking to him

of what only Alpert could know: intimate

details of the death of his mother. Alpert’s

mind was blown this time by spirit, not

psychedelics. But he still wanted to see

what would happen when the two would

mix. Within a few days of meeting, Alpert

gave Maharaj-ji some 900 micrograms of

potent Owsley LSD. Much to his surprise,

the exceedingly high dose seemed to

produce no reaction. During a second

visit to India, Maharaj-ji took 1,200

micrograms, to which he said of the

“yogi medicine:” “To take (LSD) with no

effect, your mind must be firmly fixed

on God.”

Alpert was floored. Surrendering what

he thought were the vestiges of his Jewish

sense of self, he entered into devotional

bhakti practice, expecting to become a

Hindu devotee. Instead, he learned from

Maharaj-ji that all paths to the divine are

one—in Hindi, Sub Ek!—from Krishna to

Christ. And though instructed by Maharajji

not to say a word upon returning to

America, all Ram Dass could do was speak

of what he had seen. Of a different path.

Of a way to expand consciousness through

sadhana. Of a way not to come down.

Of something other than psychedelic

substances—something ineffable, of spirit.

Cosmic

Meat Puppets

I ponder all this—life, the universe, and

everything, as Monty Python would have

it—as I sit at Ram Dass’ feet, just as he

once sat at the feet of Maharaj-ji. Where

do such mystical experiences fit into the

21st century, I wonder? Have we lost

all that is holy? How can I express that

spirit often felt deep in the abode of

the mountains, in the silence of glaciers

punctuated only by the cries of the

raven—while still being critical of those

who would manipulate such siddhis for

power and fame?

While words sometimes fail him, Ram

Dass’ facial expressions often speak all that

need be said, and this moment—always in

this moment, for Ram Dass, this moment

when time becomes elastic, a thing to be

felt, to sink into—is no exception.

As his microphone is fiddled with,

Ram Dass continues to droop his head,

his eyes going blank. Those of us in

front continue to chuckle as he holds

the moment: he has become a broken

robot, a marionette without strings. As

a symbolic gesture, it could not be more

clear: he is but a puppet of his guru.

But then the batteries are restored.

Ram Dass raises his head and good left

arm in greeting, the robot restored to

life. The entire room erupts in laughter.

Once an academic jester, now a seasoned

spiritual prankster, a single glance from

Ram Dass sinks into my consciousness

like a depth charge of the cosmos.

We are but cosmic meat puppets ...

charged with electric spirit.

For more on Ram Dass and the Love

Serve Remember Foundation retreats

and podcasts, visit ramdass.org and

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 43


44 Travel AND Adventure

Flower

power

In the City of Brotherly Love for

the Philadelphia Flower Show

Story and photos

by Karin Leperi

Every March, people

come from around the

world to see thousands

of profuse blooms in

the East Coast city of

Philadelphia. Sometimes

it’s sunny outside and

sometimes there’s snow

on the ground—when I

went last year, the city

had a raging blizzard.

There’s something

to be said for a city

that celebrates flowers

on the cusp of winter

morphing into spring,

and rest assured

that, no matter the

weather, the plethora

of flowers are all

indoors, safe from the

fickle elements of the

outdoors.

44 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


The Philadelphia Flower Show is

produced annually by the Pennsylvania

Horticultural Society (PHS). Dates for

the show this year run from March 2

to 10 at the Pennsylvania Convention

Center. With more than 260,000

people attending annually, it’s billed

as the “largest indoor flower show in

the world.” It’s also the world’s oldest,

making its debut in 1829.

Every year has a different theme and this

year the focus is on “Flower Power.” (Think

1960s and Woodstock, so you might want

to wear some flowers in your hair). This

theme pays tribute to the enormous impact

flowers have on our lives.

“Our lineup of brilliant Flower Show

exhibit designers will capture how flowers

influence the way we feel, think and act

in personal and global ways,” said Sam

Lemheney, PHS chief of shows and events.

Special evening events and daily

attractions will incorporate the “Flower

Power”-era theme as well as note the

50th anniversary of the Woodstock music

festival. At the opening-night dance party,

the ‘60s vibe will bloom at the Flowers

After Hours event with the musical group

The Beat Tells.

The indoor show is a flower

extravaganza, with a rainbow of colours to

excite the senses and the soul. Gardeners,

florists, landscapers, designers and flower

lovers in general flock to the centre to see

displays, interpretative art and even unique

architecture. Four hectares of floorshow

help explore “how flowers convey a wide

range of emotions and messages in a

universal language that transcends cultures

and borders,” according to show organizers

in a release. “Stunning landscapes,

imaginative gardens, and breathtaking floral

displays will interpret flowers’ power to

inspire, decorate, style, and enrich our lives.

Through imaginative exhibits, guests will

see ideas like community, healing, peace,

transformation, and hope brought to life in

surprising, vibrant ways.”

And, for the first time in the U.S. since

1985, Florists’ Transworld Delivery (FTD) is

hosting the premier competition, the FTD

World Cup 2019, which showcases talented

Travel & ADVENTURE

floral designers from around the world.

“The FTD World Cup will be a oncein-a-lifetime

experience and is a wonderful

example of the power that flowers have to

bring people from different cultures and

backgrounds together,” noted Lemheney.

This is the world’s most prestigious

event for the floral industry, with up to 30

countries participating. (The international

floral design competition is only held every

four to six years, and is hosted in different

worldwide locations.)

At last year’s Philadelphia event, I was

overwhelmed with the variety of orchids on

display, spending hours photographing the

tropical gems at an up-close-and-personal

distance—hard to replicate in gardens.

There are reputedly about 28,000 orchid

(Orchidaceae) species: From moth orchids

(Phalaenopsis) and Showy Lady’s Slipper to

the spot-flecked Oncidium, and one of my

favourites: the Rothschild’s slipper orchid

(Paphiopedilum rothschildianum). They range

in size, colour and fragrance, which can

become challenging to the casual orchidlover

in trying to identify the type.

I stayed at the nearby Loews

Philadelphia Hotel, which proved to be

quite convenient for attending events at

the convention centre—even when it was

snowing. The hotel has a central location

in the heart of the city, with many historic

attractions within a short walking distance

of the hotel. The Independence Hall is just

a block away.

Extend your stay with a side visit to

the world-famous Longwood Gardens in

nearby Kennett Square, about a 50-minute

drive. Admission allows you to explore

places such as the Orchid House and the

Mediterranean Garden. Seasonal events

are also featured throughout the year. The

Orchid Extravaganza runs from Jan. 19

to March 24, 2019, a nice add-on to the

flower show. A separate-timed admission

ticket is required for this event, but it is well

worth the premium. Be advised that tickets

sell quickly and range from $23 on nonpeak

days to $30 on peak days for adults.

Tickets for seniors and college students

with valid ID are less, while children aged

four and under are free. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 45


46 Sports

THE SCORE

MAKING IT Maia Schwinghammer excelled in her FIS World Cup debut.

Schwinghammer ties for 10th

in World Cup debut

FELLOW WHISTLERITE GAGNON TAKES CAREER-BEST 13TH IN CALGARY

PHOTO BY MATEUSZ KIELPINSKI/FIS

By Dan Falloon

sports@piquenewsmagazine.com

Former Freestyle Whistler member

Maia Schwinghammer made her

FIS World Cup debut in Calgary

on Jan. 12, and hit the top 10 in her first

contest.

The 17-year-old Schwinghammer

posted a score of 72.37, 6.73 points back

of winner Yulia Galysheva of Kazakhstan

and less than four points off the podium.

France’s Perrine Laffont placed second

while American Jaelin Kauf took third.

Schwinghammer was the third best

Canadian behind two Dufour-Lapointe

sisters, as Justine was fifth and Chloe took

eighth. Meanwhile, fellow Whistlerite

Sofiane Gagnon also took a career best,

placing 13th with a 67.98 tally.

Lastly, Laurianne Desmarais-Gilbert

hit the top 30 in 27th place.

Reflecting on the day, Schwinghammer

said that after cracking the top 16 in

qualifying and advancing to finals,

there was no more stress after she had

exceeded her initial expectations. Any

other accomplishments were a bonus.

“Honestly, it was one of the best

experiences of my life so far. I’ve been

looking forward to it for a really long

time and to come out with the result

that I did was pretty crazy,” she said. “I

was much less nervous in finals. Coming

into the competition, I hadn’t expected

to make the top 16 and to be already in

there, I had no stress. It was all fun.”

What made the final especially

surprising for Schwinghammer was that

she had struggled in training earlier in

the day.

“I didn’t even put down a top-tobottom

(run). I didn’t do my comp run

in training. It really wasn’t going well,”

she said. “But in the competition, I put it

all together.”

Schwinghammer qualified in 15th,

but managed to rise a few spots in finals

after tidying up her approach.

“I had a couple mistakes coming out

of the top jump in my qualification run

and then in finals, I just cleaned it up.

I skied faster. I skied better than I had

been,” she said.

It was helpful, Schwinghammer said,

that she debuted on the familiar Calgary

course where she earned a second-place

finish in last year’s NorAm event and

where she’s cut her teeth.

“I’m a big fan of that course. I really,

really like it and it was good to do it on

home soil,” she said, noting that she enjoys

how steep it is. “All my family came to

watch because it’s pretty close to home, so

I had the whole cheering squad out there.

It’s a good environment there. It was really

nice to do that in finals in Canada.”

Being her rookie season on the

national team, Schwinghammer said she

was told that she would enter the Calgary

competition and the Mont Tremblant,

Que. event later this month. However,

by virtue of her stronger-than-anticipated

debut, she was invited to compete at

the World Cup in Lake Placid, N.Y. with

qualifiers on Jan. 17 and finals on Jan. 18.

“I’d really like to get a good result here,”

she said from New York state. “There’s

talk about potentially going to World

Championships and I’d just like to make

finals again and see where that takes me.”

Though currently based in Saskatoon

where she is completing her final year

of high school, Schwinghammer is a

regular in Whistler, having grown up in

the Freestylerz and Freestyle Whistler

programs.

“I’ve been skiing at Momentum

Camps as long as I can remember,” she

said. “It’s such a great facility for us in

the summer and it’s a great spot to train.”

On the men’s side, Canadian Mikael

Kingsbury put up his third moguls victory

of the season and fourth win overall

to pad his all-time lead. The 26-yearold

bested Sweden’s Walter Wallberg by

THIS SECTION

3.19 points and Whistler-raised Daichi

Hara, representing Japan, by 6.03 points.

Meanwhile, Laurent Dumais hit the top

10 in 10th place, while Philippe Marquis

placed 18th, Pemberton’s Brenden Kelly

was 23rd and Kerrian Chunlaud took

28th. Jordan Kober, meanwhile, snagged

the final spot of the top 30.

“Things turned out to be a little easier

for me today, because some guys got

caught up going down the slope over the

two finals. But I still went with my hardest

trick of the day in the second final,”

Kingsbury said in a release. “When I saw

(in the second final) that nobody had

done something outstanding before me,

and that Benjamin (Clavet) pulled out,

I decided to go with a copy paste of my

first final and that’s what I was able to do,

which earned about the same score. Still,

it wasn’t easy today because it was warm

and the snow texture kept changing, and

that’s why some guys had a tough time.”

Full results are available online at

www.fis-ski.com. n

47 TORONTO BOUND WSS hoopster Kristmanson off to Ryerson

48 WITH STYLE WVSC snowboarders take wins at home

50 CRANKED UP Crankworx announces 2019 schedule

50 RUNNER UP Justin Kripps takes silver in Germany

46 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Sports THE SCORE

Kristmanson

commits to Ryerson

WSS HOOPSTER SET TO TAKE TORONTO

By Dan Falloon

Ayden Kristmanson has been part of

one of the most, if not the most,

successful eras in Whistler Secondary

School hoops history.

But as a Grade 12 student and in the

midst of her final season at the school,

Kristmanson is making preparations for her

post-secondary career, announcing on Jan. 7

that she had committed to Toronto’s Ryerson

Rams beginning with the 2019-20 season.

Kristmanson said she had a few

scholarship offers, including from the

University of Toronto and St. Francis Xavier,

but the opportunity to join a solid Rams

squad (which boasts a 12-2 record so far this

season) combined with one of the country’s

best architecture programs led her to Ryerson.

“I was really keen on going elsewhere.

I wanted to get out of B.C. I was super

keen on going somewhere different than

Whistler,” she said. “Ryerson has always

been one of my top options. The school is

brand new and it’s just different from every

other school I’ve been to.”

Also factoring into her decision was

the chance to go to a different type of

environment than Whistler, which Toronto

will certainly provide.

“It’s kind of hard to go from a small

town to a small town,” she reasoned.

“When I was trying to choose between

schools, I was trying to find the balance of

seeing something new while feeling like it

was the best place for me.

“It’s going to be kind of a shellshock at

first. I’ve never been in the extremely cold

weather that they get there.”

Being a rookie on a veteran team,

Kristmanson won’t jump right in to being

a major contributor, but she’s comfortable

easing into university life and getting the

chance to learn from a group of role models.

“In that first year, I probably won’t be

playing as much as I would if all the kids

on the team are in their first and second

years,” she said. “It’s definitely a balance of

positioning. The people who have been there

for longer are obviously going to play more.

They’re stronger. They have more experience.”

From a skills perspective, Kristmanson

will look to tighten up her defence before

she reports to Ryerson as if she can’t keep

opponents from scoring, she won’t be

granted much opportunity to score herself.

“If you can’t play D, you can’t play

offence. You can’t even be on the floor,”

she said. “I’m a shooter, so I’m always

working on my shot. That’s one thing that

I definitely think I can bring to Ryerson is

being a shooting guard for them.”

As a self-described late bloomer,

Kristmanson is also looking to bulk up, as

at the university level, she’ll be competing

against women, not girls.

Ryerson head coach Carly Clarke said she

first connected with Kristmanson last summer

and brought her to Toronto to have a look.

“I was able to watch some film and

see her work out in person. Just getting to

know her and understand her work ethic,

her passion and determination to grow as

a player was a big factor and that made her

a great fit for us,” she said. “We have strong

interior play and strong guard play now,

too. She’s going to be a great asset to our

perimeter play and she’s going to challenge

our veteran players in practice and push

them to get better.”

Kristmanson started playing in

elementary school with a group of girls

that make up the current Storm squad. She

described the team as “best friends” that

ramped up their interest in high school,

making the provincials in three out of her

four years to this point.

“It’s one of the best experiences

ever,” she said, adding that she doesn’t

expect to be the last Storm member to

commit to a university before the season

is through. “We had never been top 10 at

‘AA’ provincials, ever. We’ve accomplished

some pretty great things.”

RICHMAN COMMITS TO LANGARA

Staying closer to home, Pemberton

Secondary School’s (PSS) Alyssa Richman

has committed to playing at Vancouver’s

Langara College for the upcoming season.

The point guard had been looking at a

few options but after getting the chance to

train with the Falcons over the holiday break,

the comfort she felt helped seal her decision.

“I had a lot of fun and the coach was

great, so I decided to go play there,” she said.

While Richman said her conversations

with the coaching staff haven’t turned to a

specific role yet, she said she’d be given the

chance to hit the floor.

“(Coach Paul Eberhardt) did say that

he plays all of his players, so just because

I’m in my first year it doesn’t mean that I

would be less of a part of a team than the

other girls,” she said.

As for the current season, PSS has had just

two tournaments this year, though the Red

Devils took a third-place finish in Barriere this

past weekend. Richman added that the squad

is looking to qualify for March’s provincial

tournament once again this season. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 47


Sports THE SCORE

Finestone, Pelchat take provincial wins

WHISTLER VALLEY SNOWBOARD CLUB STARS AT HOME COMPETITION

By Dan Falloon

Finn Finestone and Juliette Pelchat

went back-to-back in their first action

of the BC Snowboard Provincial Series on

Jan. 12 and 13.

The 15-year-old Finestone won both

men’s events and the 14-year-old Pelchat

topped both women’s competitions as the

Whistler Valley Snowboard Club (WVSC)

opened its season at Whistler Blackcomb.

Weather conditions forced organizers to

cancel the big-air event planned for Sunday

and bump the two slopestyle competitions

back a day.

Finestone started the weekend with a

score of 91.75, topping Julien Canniccioni

of Team Bueno (86.75) and WVSC

teammate Truth Smith (81.50) and then

improved to an even 94.00 the next day

as he emerged over WVSC’s Liam Stevens

(88.25) and Canniccioni (86.75).

Finestone said he entered the competition

with confidence, which grew each time out

as he was able to push his limits.

“The runs that I ended up winning with

were the biggest runs I’ve ever done in a

contest,” he said. “I had two new tricks I

learned last year, which were two different

double variations, so a switch frontside

double (900) and a back double (1080)

on the jumps. I had a good score on those

two back to back, but the one trick I think

made the score higher was I did a big trick

(frontboard 630 out) off the second rail

that I had learned two days before.”

Finestone acknowledged feeling some

nerves before busting out the new trick, but

with a practice run before finals, said he

gave it a trial run to warm up before feeling

comfortable pulling it out of his toolbox.

“My plan was to do an easy trick on it first

and then do my first finals run. If I stomped

the first finals run to what I wanted it to be

like, then I would extend the (second) run

and add that trick in,” he said. “It worked out

and I managed to land that trick perfectly.”

Pelchat, meanwhile, earned a 70.25 on

Jan. 12 as she shared the podium with

teammates Jackie Carlson (66.25) and

Maggie Crompton (55.50). She nudged her

score up to an even 71.00 on Sunday, trailed

by Carlson (66.25) and Crompton (64.50).

Pelchat explained she found the right

combination of preparedness and nerves

en route to her double-gold weekend. She

felt her execution, as much as her choice of

tricks, was key to her score.

“The flowiness of the tricks (was

important), and I performed them pretty

well,” she said, adding that she performed

tricks such as indie grabs off the bigger jumps

to boost her tally.“I start with a run I know I

can put down and then I build up from there.”

WVSC head coach Rob Picard said the

club contingent of 32 was its largest ever at

a provincial event, which he credits to the

strength of both the sport and the team.

“With our recent snowfalls, we’ve

been having issues getting in the park. We

love the snow, but we haven’t had a lot

of major training up until the weekend

besides working on some skills. It was nice

to see everybody put their run down,” he

said. “Everybody had an idea of what they

wanted to do, they had two days to do it

and everyone walked away pretty happy.”

An additional motivating factor

for many of the club’s athletes is the

upcoming Canada Winter Games in Red

Deer, Alta. from Feb. 15 to March 3. Picard

anticipates that WVSC could send four

of the province’s six slopestyle athletes

to the Games if they perform well in this

weekend’s continuation of the provincial

series at Big White and then an Air Nation

tour event at Sun Peaks from Jan. 22 to 24.

“We’ve got the Big White contest

coming up on the weekend, and the Sun

Peaks one, the results from that will choose

the people that are going to be going to

Canada Games,” Picard said. “I know it’s

important for the families and the kids to

be able to have that opportunity.”

While Finestone was certainly in the

mix coming into the weekend, he also

knows he’s much closer to securing himself

a spot with two wins.

Pelchat added it would mean a lot for her

to qualify for her first national-level event.

“There are going to be a lot more girls

competing and it’ll be against (athletes

from all over) Canada,” she said. n

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48 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 49


Sports THE SCORE

Crankworx reveals

2019 schedule

SPORTS BRIEFS: SAUDAN COULOIR SKI RACE EXTREME

REGISTRATION OPENS; KRIPPS TAKES SILVER

By Dan Falloon

The Crankworx World Tour is down a

stop but up a tour title.

This year’s tour will see three stops,

down from the four it hit the past two

summers, after eliminating the French

festival in Les Gets.

The 2019 schedule will be:

Crankworx Rotorua from March 19 to

24; Crankworx Innsbruck from June 12

to 16; and Crankworx Whistler from Aug.

9 to 18.

This season will also see dual slalom

promoted to a Crankworx Championship,

as the discipline will now be held at all

tour stops with an overall title handed

out at the end of the season.

“In a way, it represents what

Crankworx is all about,” Crankworx

World Tour general manager Darren

Kinnaird said in a release. “It’s a simple,

raw format that brings out riders from

across the spectrum of mountain bike

disciplines and ability. We added our

first Dual Slalom competitions outside

Whistler last year and they absolutely

went off.”

For more information, visit

crankworx.com.

SAUDAN COULOIR SKI RACE EXTREME

REGISTRATION OPENS

The second edition of the rebooted

Saudan Couloir Ski Race Extreme will

expand to include snowboarders.

The race, which in its first incarnation

ran from 1987 until 2001, will feature

pro categories for male and female

snowboarders, as well as three amateur

categories when it runs on Saturday,

April 13 (with the possibility of running

a day earlier if conditions are more

STRAIT AND NARROW Kyle Strait, who won the dual slalom event in Crankworx in 2018,

will take aim at the first tour championship in the discipline in 2019.

favourable). Snowboarding was part of

the race starting in 1993, but never

featured a pro women’s event.

The 3,300-metre race features 41

gates and declines of up to 42 degrees.

More details and registration are

online at www.wssf.com/events/saudanextreme.

PHOTO BY FRASER BRITTON/CRANKWORX

KRIPPS TAKES SECOND

STRAIGHT SILVER

After starting its BMW IBSF World Cup

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of Justin Kripps and Cameron Stones

has performed well in its first races of

the season.

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50 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


unner-up finish in as many races at the

World Cup race at Königssee, Germany

on Jan. 12.

They finished 0.11 seconds back of

Germans Francesco Friedrich and Martin

Grothkopp, while edging out third-place

finishers Johannes Lochner and Christian

Rasp, also of Germany, by 0.32 seconds.

“I just love the big ‘S’ curves here. The

first time I drove here, I came with Pierre

Lueders who was teaching me to drive

and he explained the track really well

then—how to hit these corners to get

the good speed you need to the finish,”

Kripps said in a release. “I usually feel

like I’ll get a good result here, but more

than that, I just like sliding here. I like

most of the tracks around the world, but

I just have a lot of fun on this track.”

Meanwhile, Nick Poloniato and Ryan

Sommer earned a ninth-place finish.

Sports THE SCORE

while third-place finisher Andri Ragletti

of Switzerland posted an 89.06.

“I can’t believe it, it’s insane! I

wasn’t expecting this to come so fast,

so I’m super stoked,” Langevin said in

a release. “I felt really good out there,

I was able to do what I had set out to

do, so that’s a good sign for upcoming

races. The key, now, will be to recreate

that as often as possible and to be as

consistent as possible.”

Fellow Canadian Max Moffatt also

performed well, finishing sixth, while

Etienne Geoffroy Gagnon ended up in

lucky 13th. Noah Morrison, meanwhile,

snuck into the top 30 in 30th place.

On the women’s side, Ontario’s

Megan Oldham put up the top Canadian

result with a ninth-place finish in her

second World Cup event. Switzerland’s

Sarah Hoefflin nicked 15-year-old

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In the Jan. 13 four-man event,

Kripps piloted his sled to a fifth-place

showing, 0.87 seconds off the pace set by

champion Lochner and his sled. Latvia’s

Oskars Kiebermanis led his team to a

second-place finish while Friedrich and

his crew took third.

Poloniato’s team placed 17th.

On the women’s side, Alyssia

Rissling and Kristen Bujnowski slid to

a ninth-place finish, while Christine

de Bruin and Janine McCue tied for

10th. Germany’s Mariama Jamanka and

Annika Drazek earned the win ahead of

second-place Elana Meyers Taylor and

Lake Kwaza of the United States and

fellow Germans Stephanie Schneider

and Ann-Christin Stack.

The men’s and women’s skeleton

races were cancelled because of

inclement weather.

LANGEVIN SECOND AT FONT ROMEU

Canadian Philippe Langevin took by far

his best-ever FIS World Cup result at the

slopestyle event in Font Romeu, France

on Jan. 12.

The 17-year-old topped his previous

best, a 10th-place finish at Stubai, Austria

in November, with a second-place finish

via a score of 90.27. American Alexander

Hall scored a 92.11 to earn the win

American Eileen Gu by 0.49 points to

earn the victory while Giulia Tanno, also

of Switzerland, placed third.

PHILP 21ST AT ADELBODEN

Canadian Trevor Philp was the only

Canadian to post a result in either of

the two Audi FIS World Cup races at

Adelboden, Switzerland on Jan. 12 and 13.

Philp put up a 21st-place showing

in the Jan. 12 giant slalom, with his

two-run time placing him 4.83 seconds

back of champion Marcel Hirscher of

Austria. Norway’s Henrik Kristoffersen

placed second and France’s Thomas

Fanara was third.

No Canadians finished two runs in

the Jan. 13 slalom. Hirscher again took

the win, besting France’s Clement Noel

and Kristoffersen, who were second and

third, respectively.

The women, meanwhile, were in

action at Kronplatz, Italy, on Jan. 15.

Marie-Michele Gagnon was the lone

Canuck to finish the giant slalom, taking

a 22nd-place result, 5.03 seconds back

of winner Mikaela Shiffrin of the United

States. France’s Tessa Worley and Italy’s

Marta Bassino rounded out the podium

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 51


52 Fork IN THE Road

ALWAYS QUESTIONING Jane Burrows, left, with Pique columnist Glenda Bartosh, two old newspaper gals in the

Burrows’ kitchen in Salmon Arm. Burrows passed away on Dec. 29 after suffering with Alzheimer’s disease.

When the ‘Women’s Section’

meets real life

PHOTO BY PETER LISICIN

WOMEN LIKE JANE BURROWS AND THE POWERS OF THE PRESS

Over the holidays, I ran into friends,

old and new, who were asking

about this, my food column, which

I’ve written for Pique since 2007—if you can

believe it.

New pals often assume that since I write

a food col, as it’s known in journo shorthand,

I’m a foodie. Long-term pals, or anyone who

By Glenda

Bartosh

reads me regularly, know nothing’s further

from the truth. The only reason I took over the

food slot years ago from Pique founders Bob

and Kathy Barnett, whose influence is still felt,

was I realized food is a powerful trope you

can use to talk about everything from politics

to history to climate change, and more. You

even get to toss in recipes once in a while.

Of all the leaps from food you can take,

though, the one that seems to throw people

off is art. The conversation usually goes

something like … Art. Huh. You talk about

art in a food column? You betcha.

For the whole time I’ve been writing

this column, and longer, I was working on a

degree at Vancouver’s Emily Carr University

of Art and Design. When I was a skinny

Grade 1 kid, I stumbled into art classes at the

Edmonton Art Gallery after winning 75 cents

and a red ribbon for a circus painting that

won first place at the Edmonton Exhibition.

There was no turning back.

I studied graphic arts long before I knew

there was such a thing as journalism school.

And when I landed in Whistler to take a job

at Paul and Jane Burrows’ Whistler Question,

which I went on to buy, I started the local

arts council as a way of bringing more art in

its many forms to Whistler. It was my first big

lesson in the true power of the press.

When you own the local newspaper,

whether you intend to or not, you naturally

use it to embed whatever you value. Yes, local

issues like whether an elementary school is

needed, or new culverts should be added

to stop wash-outs on Highway 99 are all

important, and we covered those. But in my

case, my not-so-secret agenda was the arts.

Always remember, ads are free for

newspaper owners, no matter how big they

are or often they run, plus I got to run huge

articles with impunity about all the arts

council events and other art happenings

without having to convince anyone else it

was important. When there are few central

news platforms (Charlie Doyle’s cleverlynamed

Whistler Answer was one of them)

the power you wield, and your ensuing

responsibilities, are all the heavier. Which

brings me to Jane Burrows.

It wasn’t just holiday visits that got me

thinking about newspapers and things like

art, and how the two may or may not shape

a community. It was also the passing of Jane

over the holidays.

Jane and Paul Burrows—equal partners

in the founding of the community’s first

newspaper, the Whistler Question, as they

were partners in everything else for the past

50 years—went on after those heady days of

1980s Whistler to become dear friends.

Jane taught me much about the art of

life when you’re a strong, smart woman

negotiating a world where men with their

ingrained values and interests did, and

still largely do, hold the reins of power. A

world where topics like “food” and “art”

are usually relegated to the soft sections

of both newspapers and life—the so-called

“women’s” sections.

But what happens when you’re a woman

who’s also interested in bigger things in life,

and in making traditional “women’s things”

of bigger importance?

To start, I was pretty surprised that Jane

had to “interview” me along with Paul when

I applied for my first job as a Question-able

reporter. Once Paul delivered his machinegun

questions in the old Question office near

the Husky station, he announced, now we’re

driving to Alpine Meadows so my wife, Jane,

can meet you.

Luckily, she and I hit it off. No surprise,

what with two strong, die-hard Canadian

women who grew up in the old-school

“hewers-of-wood, drawers-of-water”

culture—she from the gold-mining heartland

of Kirkland Lake, Ont.; me from the “Oil

Capital” of Edmonton—at the same kitchen

table. (Much of life is still shaped around

kitchen tables.)

Jane was curious and unpretentious, as

many newspaper owners are not, and I

could tell in a heartbeat she was as ethical

and trustworthy as Paul. They were both

key players in early Whistler, including its

ratepayers’ association, and it was clear they

loved their community and wanted to know

what kind of a young, up-start reporter they

might be sharing the reins with. Responsible

newspaper owners would want nothing less.

Jane was direct, but never interfered,

even after I bought the paper. She was

always a good, practical reminder that

whatever topic was important to residents

of a growing ski resort was also important

to its newspaper. That included my interest

in embedding art at Whistler, which she

supported without reservation.

Given her long-time roots in the

community and the fact she was one of the

first teachers at Myrtle Philip Community

School, her “thing” were issues of concern

to parents and families of the day, whether it

was kids’ lessons on the bunny run or at the

new community centre. Those kids are now

adults shaping Whistler.

I don’t think Jane consciously meant

to, but she was also a constant flagbearer

for the many women who shaped

Whistler—women who had far greater

talent, intelligence and reach than could be

confined by your typical household kitchen

or to your typical “women’s” roles. The

Myrtle Philips; the Florence Petersens; the

Christine Rodgers; the Isobel MacLaurins;

and the Joan Richozes of early Whistler.

It’s amazing how many women have

shaped the bent of this town, which actually

says as much about the women as it does

the men.

What’s just as interesting is how many

women have shaped the local newspapers

and, therefore, the community—and still

do today. It’s not lost on me it was the

inseparable husband-wife team of Jane and

Paul Burrows that wielded the enormous

responsibility of curating the news so ethically

and so well and, later, it was Bob and Kathy

Barnett who did the same. In between I, with

a woman’s take, held the reins for a while, as

Stephanie Matches also did at the Question.

Now two more women, Sarah Strother and

Clare Ogilvie, carry on the legacy of strong

women-powered newspapers at Whistler.

Jane and her ideas live amongst us, still.

Glenda Bartosh is an award-winning

journalist who has a large place in her heart

for Jane Burrows. n

52 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


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SWIM • SKATE • SWEAT • SQUASH

Meadow Park Sports Centre is located 4 km north of Whistler Village.

OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Last entry by 9:30 p.m.

GROUP FITNESS SCHEDULE

THU 17 FRI 18 SAT 19 SUN 20 MON 21 TUE 22 WED 23

Spin

TRX

6:15-7:15 a.m.

Circuit

7:30-

8:30a.m.

Sweat, NEW

Strength TIME!

& Stretch

(S3) 9-10a.m.

Aqua Fit

Shallow

9:30-10:30a.m.

Low Impact

Aerobics

10:30-11:30a.m.

NOW INCLUDED!

Zumba

12:15-1p.m.

20/20/20

5:10-6:10p.m.

*Spin

6-7p.m.

*Roll

and

Release

6:45-7:45p.m.

Mind Body

Stretch

8-9 p.m.

Circuit

7:30-

8:30a.m.

Circuit

9-10a.m

*Parent

& Baby

Fit

10:30-11:30a.m.

*Gentle Fit

for Seniors

1-2p.m.

*PWR!

Moves

1:15-2:15p.m.

Circuit

7:30-

8:30a.m.

Low NEW

Impact TIME!

Circuit

9-10a.m.

Zumba

10:30-11:30a.m.

Low

NEW

Impact TIME!

Circuit

7:30-8:30a.m.

Circuit

9-10a.m.

*Parent &

Baby Fit

10:30-11:30a.m.

*Gentle Fit

for Seniors

in the weight

room 1-2p.m.

*PWR!

Moves

1:15-2:15p.m.

Boot Camp

5:10-6:10p.m.

Zumba

6:20-7:20p.m.

TRX & KB

Conditioning

7-8a.m.

Low

Impact

Circuit

9-10a.m.

Aqua

Fit

DEEP

9:30-10:30a.m.

*Parent

& Baby

Yoga

10:30-11:30a.m.

Zumba

12:15-1 p.m.

Strong by

Zumba

5:10-6:10p.m

*Spin

6-7p.m.

*Pilates

Mat

Class

6:45-7:45p.m.

Stretch &

Restore

Yoga

8-9 p.m.

Total Body

Conditioning

7:20-8:20a.m.

Total

Body

Conditioning

9-10a.m.

Nia

10:30- NEW!

11:30a.m.

NOW INCLUDED!

*Gentle Fit

for Seniors

in the weight

room 1-2p.m.

*PWR!

Moves

1:15-2:15p.m.

TRX Mixer

5:10-6:10p.m.

Zumba

6:20-7:20p.m.

Revive -

Stretch &

Roll

7:30-8:30p.m.

ARENA SCHEDULE

THU 17 FRI 18 SAT 19 SUN 20 MON 21 TUE 22 WED 23

W&OT

Drop-In

Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m.

Drop-In

Hockey

10-11:30a.m.

NEW

TIME!

NEW

TIME!

NEW

TIME!

Drop-In

Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m.

NEW

TIME!

Classes with * are

registered or flexible

registration (flex reg)

programs and require

registration of at least 5

people to start.

All other classes are

included in

the price of admission.

See exact schedule of

classess at

the sports centre or

online at:

whistler.ca/recreation

NEW

TIME!

55+ Drop-In

Hockey

8:15-9:45am

Drop-In

Hockey

10-11:30am

NEW

TIME!

Drop-In

Hockey

8:15-9:45a.m.

Pool closure

Thursday, January 24

at 9:30 p.m.

The entire pool and all hot spots at Meadow Park

Sports Centre will close at 9:30 p.m.

The change rooms will close at 9:45 p.m.

whistler.ca/notices

Love the

corduroy?

Let’s save it together.

Walking, running, and dog walking must be

done elsewhere in Whistler while the Lost

Lake Nordic Trails are open.

Public

Skate

12-3p.m.

Public Skate

12-3p.m.

Public Skate

12-3p.m.

Public Skate

12-3p.m.

Public Skate

12-3p.m.

Public Skate

12-3p.m.

Public Skate

12-3pm

Public Skate

6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate

6:30-8p.m.

Public Skate

6:30-8p.m.

POOL SCHEDULE

THU 17 FRI 18 SAT 19 SUN 20 MON 21 TUE 22 WED 23

LEISURE POOL 9a.m. - 9p.m.

LAP POOL, HOT TUB, SAUNA, STEAM ROOM 6a.m. - 10p.m.

whistler.ca/nordic

whistler.ca/recreation | whistler.ca/notices | 604-935-8371

@RMWhistler | @rmwhistler | @rmowhistler


Epicurious?

The Raven Room wants to raise the bar

for Whistler’s cocktail scene

BAR IS BRAINCHILD OF TEAM LED BY BAR OSO ALUM JASON REDMOND AND 21 STEPS’ ALUM LUKE WOODNUTT

The team behind Whistler’s newest

cocktail bar, The Raven Room, took

a decidedly hands-on approach while

renovating the elegant space located in

the Pan Pacific Whistler Village.

By Brandon

Barrett

“We’re in here sanding, doing

drywall, painting, doing physical renos

on the room, and then it’s like, ‘All

right, let’s get a wine program going, a

cocktail program going, let’s do some

hiring, do some PR,’” said co-owner

Jason Redmond. “It’s been a lot of fun.

It’s just really neat to have our own space

and take a sense of pride in the room.”

The Raven Room is the brainchild of

Luke Woodnutt, formerly of 21 Steps,

and Redmond, previously of Araxi and

fellow TopTable restaurant Bar Oso,

where he oversaw the cocktail program

and created the much-loved, awardwinning

Oso Sour.

The ownership team includes

Redmond’s wife Steph and Woodnutt’s

wife Brandi. Erin Stone, formerly of

Stonesedge, has been brought on as head

chef. Redmond said the team is looking to

raise the bar for Whistler’s cocktail scene.

“As great as Whistler is as a worldclass

ski resort and host to people from

all around the world, we found, as it’s

become busier over the years, there’s

been a level of complacency that we’d

like to elevate,” he said.

“We’d rather be a bit more focused

on putting quality in the glass. If it takes

a few more seconds or costs a dollar or

two more, I think it’s worth it.”

Redmond said the cocktail menu will

be “fun, fresh and approachable” with a

particular emphasis on sourcing fresh,

quality ingredients.

“You’re not going to find any

margarita mix here. It’s going to be freshsqueezed

lime juice, which we did right

before service. House infusions. A lot of

fun things behind the scenes that will

allow us to put a great product in the

glass,” Redmond noted. “It’s a lot of

what I have been doing, what Luke has

been doing in the past, but to do it for

ourselves, and to really bring that to the

next crowd of locals and tourists.”

That focus on quality extends to the

kitchen as well. The Raven Room won’t

be home to the average après fare—“no

burgers, no nachos, no wings,” Redmond

explained—and, similar to its cocktail

program, the menu will feature a bevy

of locally sourced, ethically produced

ingredients.

“From seafood to the farms of

Pemberton, there’s a lot of good stuff

around the Sea to Sky. So we’ll utilize

what’s in season and change the menu

accordingly, rather than bringing in stuff

out of a bag, pumping it out and mass

producing,” said Redmond. “We can find

the right price point to give people a

really quality product that’s local and

sustainable.”

Along with catering to the Pan Pacific’s

in-house guests, Redmond envisions The

Raven Room, which will serve food until

midnight, with a particular focus on

small plates, being the go-to late-night

spot for Whistler’s service industry.

“We’re definitely picturing the industry

crowd coming by after work to have a nice

cocktail, see what’s new on the menu, or try

a local craft beer that we will have on tap,”

he said, adding that the bar will feature

eight local craft beers on tap, a rotating

cocktail on tap, as well as an extensive

list of “low-intervention” wines—meaning

minimal chemical or technological

intervention was used in their production.

In terms of the décor, the owners’

commitment to DIY has evidently

paid off, with the space adorned with

rich wood tones, high ceilings and tall

RELEASE YOUR

INNER GLOW

Radiant skin without the downtime!

54 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Epicurious?

MAKING ROOM L to R: Co-owners Luke and Brandi Woodnutt, and Steph and Jason

Redmond want to elevate Whistler’s cocktail scene with The Raven Room, located in the

Pac Pacific Whistler Village.

PHOTO BY CORMAC POWER

windows, creating a sophisticated yet

approachable environment.

“It’s certainly on par with the

best cocktail bars in the world,

and quite a few of them happen to

be in hotels,” Redmond said.

After its soft opening earlier this month,

Redmond said the team is gearing up for

its official grand opening in the coming

weeks. Once fully staffed and up and

running, The Raven Room will open

from 3 p.m. to midnight daily.

Locally owned and operated,

Redmond said it’s been “a bit surreal”

to finally see The Raven Room go

from a long-held dream to a reality.

“It’s been a lot of fun seeing the smiling

faces in the room. A lot of congratulations,

a lot of hugs, a lot of great energy in the

room to start,” he said.

“We really just want to keep people

happy.”

For more information, visit

theravenroom.ca. n

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12:00PM - 3:00PM

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$49 PER ADULT

$25 PER CHILD (5-11 YEARS)

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/FOURSEASONSRESORTWHISTLER

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 55


56 Arts

SCENE

BRIGHT LIGHTS Myriad dance parties are set to take place throughout the village for the

Whistler Pride and Ski Festival.

PHOTO BY DARNELL COLLINS/ SUBMITTED

Whistler Pride and Ski Festival

celebrates snowy season

ANNUAL FESTIVAL RUNS FROM JAN. 20 TO 27 WITH ALL-TIME CONDITIONS ON MOUNTAIN AND JAM-PACKED SCHEDULE

IN THE VILLAGE

By Alyssa Noel

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

Every year, the Whistler Pride

and Ski Festival returns to the

mountain—and the village—

to inject a little colour into the

sometimes-dreary, post-holiday haze

of January.

The year, the festival is gearing up to

mark its 27th installation with skiing,

parties, entertainment and music running

at various venues around town from Jan.

20 to 27.

Pique caught up with Sunil Sinha,

executive festival director, by email ahead

of the kick off to learn more about what’s

in store for this year.

PIQUE: Well, first of all, how stoked

are you that there’s going to be

epic snow for everyone coming to

the festival?

SUNIL SINHA: Record breaking are two of my

favourite words! The resort really is the

star of the festival and she’s not going

to disappoint! I love when guests are

smiling while complaining that their legs

are jelly from the conditions and then we

see them still finding a way to tear up the

dancefloor!

PIQUE: Is there anything new you

can tell us about this year?

SS: The biggest change this year is the

launch of the festival app. Rather than

printed programs, we’re making the

content mobile so that guests can be

notified quickly if there is a change.

It also links directly to our ticketing

site so that people can purchase tickets

and even pre-purchase drink tickets at a

discounted price.

Another change this year is that the

event that had traditionally been our

Friday and Saturday Après is now a full

T-dance. T-dances are the gay version of

the traditional European Tea-Dance. They

are late-day dance parties and they can

get pretty wild. We have the incredibly

talented Corey Craig from New York

on deck for these. His Coreyography

podcasts have developed a somewhat

fanatical following.

PIQUE: Any highlights you’re looking

forward to in particular?

SS: Parade Day is always a highlight. I

love seeing the colours pop against the

white snow. The route for the march

is slightly different this year, ending at

“What matters most to us is that the festival

remains balanced and offers a memorable

and satisfying experience for everyone.”

the Conference Centre rather than the

Olympic rings. We’ll be swinging open

the doors to the T-Dance when the march

arrives and waiving cover for everyone

for the first hour! We really want the

Friday afternoon to be a community

celebration! I’m also looking forward to

THIS SECTION

- SUNIL SINHA

Sip ‘N Dip at Scandinave; last year was

the inaugural year for the Tuesday Night

spa party and it was a huge hit! Can’t

wait to go back.

PIQUE: I recall seeing Pam Ann in

the past as part of the festival

and I see she’s returning again.

Did you get good feedback about

her performance?

SS: We received great feedback about Pam

Ann. She is also very popular with our

community and brings fresh material

every time. The lineup for the meet and

greet with her at the afterparty was huge

and she was wonderful with everyone.

We expect the same this year. We also

have some incredible talent set to open.

Sketch artists and comedians Ryan Steele

and Amy Goodmurphy will be bringing

58 NOTES FROM THE BACK ROW Shyamalan’s dirty teeth

59 ARTS California photographer wins Deep Winter

60 MUSEUM MUSINGS Finding fun at Parkhurst year round

61 PARTIAL RECALL Photos from the past week

56 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Arts SCENE

WHAT’S ON @ THE AUDAIN

Art After Dark: Mindfulness Month

Photo Transfer

Friday, Jan 18 | 3:30 – 5:30pm Youth* | 6:30 – 8:30pm Adult

Join the Audain Art Museum throughout the month of January to

explore the permanent collection through yoga, mindfulness and

more. This week, explore different photo transfer techniques and

effects as you create or add to your visual journal.

*Youth programs 18 & under. Youth under 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Free to members & with admission | All ages

Art After Dark: Mindfulness Month

Yoga @ the Audain

Friday, Jan 18 | 6:30 – 8pm

Instructor Laura Davies will lead you through flowing sessions that

centre on the confluence of art and yoga. Space is limited so arrive

early to secure a spot.

Free to members & with admission | All ages

WAVING FLAG Whistler’s pride parade, naturally, takes place on skis and snowboards

each year.

The Ryan and Amy show to Whistler for

the first time!

PIQUE: The festival has lots of

different elements—skiing,

partying and shows. Which are

the most popular and has that

changed over the years?

SS: It depends on whom you ask. There

are some who come early in the week

just for the skiing (and snowboarding)

but get out early before the party crowd

arrives. Others come just for the social

aspect of the festival. There was a

time when the party crowd may have

been larger than the sport crowd but

these days the focus really is on the

mountain.

When the conditions are like they

will be this year, people will leave the

parties a bit earlier. What matters most

to us is that the festival remains balanced

and offers a memorable and satisfying

experience for everyone.

PIQUE: It’s always interesting to

hear where people are coming

from each year. Where are you

seeing ticket sales?

SS: We are seeing a lot of Americans

booking. This probably has a lot to do

with a very favourable exchange rate and

Vail (Resorts’) cross-border marketing

and pass programs. There is always

interest from Europe, Australia and New

Zealand, too. There is a blog in Brazil

that profiled us earlier this week and

we have had thousands of Brazilians

checking out our site. We may get a few

last-minute bookings for this year but

I’m thinking this could mean an invasion

of Brazilians next year!

PIQUE: Any events in particular that

PHOTO BY CHRIS GEARY/ SUBMITTED

are selling quickly that people

should jump on for tickets?

SS: The Splash pool party is so much

fun. It’s one of the most popular events

and could easily sell out. I recommend

people jump on that one. It’s also wise

to book the Comedy Night tickets

sooner than later. There is always a huge

rush on tickets in the last week but this

year, with the ability to select your seat,

you won’t want to wait.

We also have a second, smaller

comedy show this year on Saturday night

at CABN at the Aava Whistler Hotel. Jackie

Beat goes Downhill Fast! features iconic

drag personae Jackie Beat in a cabaret-style

show, with songs, stories and more. This

is one people won’t want to miss.

PIQUE: Anything else you’d like

to add?

SS: It is important for us that the guests are

having a good time, and that everyone

feels safe and welcome. One of the most

amazing things about the festival is the

sense of camaraderie, that people are

connecting with and making friends with

like-minded folk from all over the globe.

We’re here to celebrate diversity,

inclusion and acceptance. We

Canadians are very fortunate, and it

can be easy to take our liberties for

granted, or to forget the struggles that

others might be going through. Coming

together for an event like Whistler Pride

and Ski Festival allows us to cast those

struggles aside briefly if we want or to

find solidarity—or to do both. At the

end of the day … festivals like this are

necessary. They are inspirational to

some and give hope to others.

For more on the festival, or to purchase tickets,

visit whistlerpride.com. n

Family Studio Sunday

Every Sunday | 12 – 4pm

Join the Museum for a unique and engaging art experience.

Throughout the month of January the theme will be ‘Pattern and

Colour’. This week experiment with using lines of varied kinds to make

an abstract painting.

Free to members & with admission | All ages

Presented by:

Open Daily 10am – 5pm

NEW! Friday 10am – 9pm

(Closed Tuesday)

4350 Blackcomb Way, Whistler

audainartmuseum.com

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 57


Notes FROM THE BACK ROW

Shyamalan’s dirty teeth

I

’m thinking of going down to Toad

Hall and getting a bumper sticker

printed: “Life is too short to watch M.

Night Shyamalan movies.”

Which is unfortunate because the

only new movie opening this week is

Glass, Shyamalan’s latest and a superhero

crossover that mashes up characters

and ideas from two of his previous (and

least-shitty) films.

Unbreakable (2000) starred Bruce

Willis as an everyday dude empowered

with super strength, and Samuel L.

Jackson as an evil dick comic nerd

By Feet

Banks

who keeps putting people in danger in

hopes of luring one of these everyday

superheroes from hiding. Split (2016)

starred James McAvoy as a dude with

a severe multiple personality disorder

and Anya Taylor-Joy as the teen girl he

kidnaps. I bring these up because by all

accounts, you will enjoy Glass more if

you’ve recently re-watched these others.

Beginning just a few weeks after

the end of Split, McAvoy’s “Horde”

of personalities is on the run with

Unbreakable hero David Dunn hot on

his trail. After the opening fight, both

are captured and sent to a criminal psych

ward run by Dr. Staple (Sarah Paulson

from Oceans 8), and guess who else is

in there?

Sam Jackson’s wheelchair-bound

supervillain. So it’s a “comic book”

movie contained to a hospital where the

“battle scenes” are mostly just dialogue.

It’s an interesting premise and someone

like Aaron Sorkin (The Social Network,

Molly’s Game) could probably make

a compelling film out of superheroes

and villains talking at each other, but

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DARK NIGHT M. Night Shyamalan’s latest movie, Glass, mashes up characters from Unbreakable and Split.

Shyamalan is not Sorkin. And so, I fear,

this one will underdeliver, as Shyamalan

always does.

On the other hand, some people

think Shyamalan is brilliant and live for

his end-twist style and swing-for-thefences

fearlessness. The good news with

this one is the acting talent is on point.

Willis is a legend. McAvoy is solid.

Paulson brings fresh vulnerability,

emotion and humour and Sam Jackson

is the most bankable movie star ever

(120 movies and $13 billion box office

worldwide. For comparison, Harrison

Ford weighs in at just under $9 billion on

42 movies, and Nicolas Cage can claim

$4.7 billion over 58 movies).

For my money, the only superhero

movie worth watching right now is

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, an

animated powerhouse that watches

and feels like a comic book come to

life. Freshly spider-bitten teen Miles

LIVE MUSIC!

MONDAY

GAME NIGHT at 8pm

TUESDAY

JAZZ AND BLUES

with Sean Rose

WEDNESDAY

JAM NIGHT

with Kostaman

THURSDAY

KARAOKE

with Monty

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

LIVE @ BLACKS

with our Local Band

Morales watches Spider-Man die trying

to stop giant badass Kingpin from using

a dimension-warping machine to try and

bring back his dead family.

Then a handful of Spider-Heroes

from other dimensions start popping

up, and the fun rolls on from there. This

flick captures the essence of Spider-Man

perfectly and it’s also the best comic

movie of the year, hands down.

On the small screen, I can barely

recommend this one with a clear

conscious (seriously, stop reading right

now), because this flick is probably

gonna give a whole bunch of you anxiety

about the potential deathtraps that lurk

in your own mouths!!!!

Root Cause is a documentary

starring Frazer Bailey, a young, healthy

Aussie filmmaker who finds himself

experiencing anxiety and chronic fatigue

syndrome. The medical solutions don’t

seem to work so then strap in and ride

PHOTO BY JESSICA KOURKOUNIS UNIVERSAL PICTURES

a biological rollercoaster right to your

spine/brain/heart/coffin.

Fear not, the film says not everyone

with a root canal is gonna keel over

immediately (because we all have

different immunities) but the general

message was nothing short of grim.

The thing about science is you don’t

want to jump to conclusions and

it’s really difficult to prove anything

when it comes to the human body

(plus, a placebo can give you benefits

and side effects so who knows what

anything means) but Root Cause is

both fascinating (and terrifying) and

hopefully furthers a conversation that

can help people. (Note: there are a lot

of weird, oddly sexualized montages in

this flick, the Aussies might be ahead of

us in tooth science, but they are still a

weird, macho, beach culture. Don’t say

anything though, or they’ll punch you

in the teeth!) n

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604 932 5940 • 2129 LAKE PLACID RD

58 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Arts SCENE

VILLAGE 8 SHOW SCHEDULE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18TH –

THURSDAY, JANUARY 24TH

GLASS (PG)

DAILY 3:55, 4:10, 6:55, 7:10;

MATINEES SAT, SUN & TUES 12:55, 1:10;

LATE SHOWS FRI, SAT & TUES 9:45, 9:55

HAVE YOU SEEN THE WIZARD? Photographer Ming T. Poon earned the 2019 Deep Winter

victory with winning shots, including pro snowboarder Leanne Pelosi—pictured above,

floating through powder while ‘the wizard’ (a.k.a. pro skier Tobin Seagel) looks on.

California photographer

wins Deep Winter

MING T. POON EARNS TOP SPOT AT 13TH ANNUAL EVENT

By Megan Lalonde

Some Whistler locals might still be

mourning the loss of Blackcomb

Mountain’s Wizard chair, but the grieving

were temporarily comforted by the

appearance of another wizard popping out

from under the peaks last week.

Lake Tahoe, Calif.-based photographer

Ming T. Poon edged out five other

competitors to take the top spot—and the

$5,000 prize—at the 13th annual Deep

Winter Photo Challenge, held at the

Fairmont Chateau Whistler on Friday night,

Jan. 11, with a spectacular slideshow that

fulfilled the deep winter requirement, plus

an added fantastical twist.

Over the holidays, Poon brainstormed

themes with family until he thought,

“What if I’m searching for something?”

he recalls. “I’m not a fantasy guy at all—I

only read non-fiction, pretty much … but

all of a sudden I was like, ‘What if we were

searching for the wizard?’”

After considering the idea’s flexibility

and finding out about Whistler’s beloved,

late Wizard chair, “I was like, “oh my God,”

Poon says. “The theme was good enough

that it could become its own thing and

evolve ... one of the first things I did was I

went on Amazon and bought a couple of

different costumes that I thought could be

potentially cool.”

Poon’s idea resulted in the wizard

popping up everywhere from wanted

posters plastered throughout the village,

captioned “Have you seen the wizard?”

to ski patrol meetings and hiding in the

woods—smoking a pipe in the forest while

Poon’s crew of professional riders skied past

him—to crowd surfing in the Glacier chair

lift line and dropping into powder-covered

pillow lines, to, eventually, chugging a

Kokanee on an old Wizard chair installed in

the upper village.

Despite never having been to Whistler,

PHOTO BY MING T. POON, COURTESY OF WHISTLER BLACKCOMB

or even hearing of the Deep Winter contest

before being invited to participate, Poon

still managed to seek out the best terrain

over the course of the competition.

“I’ve never been in the resort, I’ve never

been to B.C., the only thing I would say that

I had was that I’m familiar with maritime

snowpack … but otherwise everything was

so foreign,” Poon says.

He put together a crew of professional

athletes, including Leanne Pelosi, Jeff

Keenan, Dana Flahr, Ian McIntosh and

Andrea Byrne. As for the wizard, local Eric

Richmond donned the costume and beard

for the first day of shooting, while pro skier

Tobin Seagel slid into the role the following

day—resulting in some impressive shots of

the wizard ripping down the mountain.

“It’s puking out; it’s wet; cold, that

(wizard suit’s) made of cotton or nylon or

whatever and it just starts sucking in water

and freezing, the beard smells like smoke

from Eric the day before … and (Tobin)

totally embraced it and crushed it, and then

there was no way we were getting it off of

him, essentially,” Poon says with a laugh.

Poon also enlisted the help of editor Jeff

Thomas to pull it all together. “He was the

most important,” he adds.

Poon’s show, and his execution

of the theme, earned audible laughs,

cheers and hollers from the sold-out

crowd—not to mention more than a

few singing along with the themeappropriate

accompanying track,

Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody.”

Judges chose Squamish

photographer Kieran Brownie to win

the $2,500 runner-up prize, while Jake

Dyson, a Whistler local by way of

Australia, took home third place and

$1,500 with his show, featuring an allfemale

crew.

Pemberton’s Josh Dooley snagged the

People’s Choice award for his creation—a

title accompanied by $1,000 and a

package from Whistler Heli-Skiing. n

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HAUNTING GOOD TIMES Halloween at Parkhurst was sure to produce creative costumes.

Finding fun at Parkhurst

year round

By Allyn Pringle

We’ve written quite a bit about

Parkhurst and life at the mill

before, and often these stories tell of the

challenges that came with daily life on

Green Lake in the ‘30s to ‘50s. Some of

these challenges included the isolation,

the lack of running water, or the need to

haul buckets of sawdust in order to keep

the stove going. For children such as Ron

and Jim Kitteringham, living at Parkhurst

also meant a long commute to and from

the Alta Lake School.

According to their mother Eleanor,

however, life at Parkhurst also had its

share of entertainment and fun.

The Pacific Great Eastern Railway

may not have been the most convenient

method of travel through the valley,

but it did provide some excitement for

young children at the mill site. When the

Kitteringhams first came to Parkhurst,

most of the trains were steam engines,

or “steamers.” The engineers would

blow the whistle on their approach to

Parkhurst and Ron and Jim would run

out to wave, even during supper.

Later, the “steamers” started to be

replaced by diesel engines, which though

a lot louder, continued to announce

their arrival.

Despite all the whistles of trains,

Eleanor described life at Parkhurst as

peaceful, lacking the traffic or crowds of

a city.

Without more common forms of

entertainment, such as television, the

Kitteringhams spent time listening to

their battery-powered radio and shows

such as The Shadow and the racing

programs. While the family enjoyed the

radio programs, Eleanor regreted the lack

of Sesame Street and other educational

shows when she thought back on

teaching her children.

The journey from Vancouver, though

CLAUSEN COLLECTION

it could be long and inconveniently

timed (the train only ran north on

Monday, Wednesday and Friday), was

also a chance for a social occasion. After

taking the steamship to Squamish, the

Kitteringhams and other passengers

would have time to head to the Squamish

Hotel for a 10-cent glass of beer, ice

cream for the kids, and a chance to chat

until the train headed out.

More social gatherings around

Parkhurst happened each summer

and fall.

In the summer, the logging camps

played regular baseball games at what

was then Charlie Lundstrom’s farm at

the end of Green Lake, an area that today

is still full of mosquitoes and long grass.

Parkhurst even had a building used as

a community hall where families and

other workers could gather.

The last big “do” of the year that

families would attend was usually

Halloween. As Eleanor recalled, the lack

of stores to buy costumes meant coming

up with some pretty ingenious outfits.

After Halloween, most of the families

would leave Parkhurst for the winter.

Neighbours could be scarce at

Parkhurst, especially in the winter when

the Kitteringhams were often the only

family left at the mill. Parkhurst was

located at Mile 43 and some evenings

the Kitteringhams would walk over to

Mile 45 for “a musical evening” with

the Greens. Bob Green would play first

fiddle, Olie Kitteringham second, and

Helen Green would play the banjo while

Eleanor played the kettle drum.

They even formed a band, the Valley

Ramblers, and played for benefit concerts

to raise money for the Squamish Hospital.

Daily life at Parkhurst and Alta Lake

did come with challenges, but the people

who lived here also made sure to enjoy

themselves, whether listening to radio

shows, playing sports or simply spending

time with their neighbours. n

60 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Partial RECALL

Show us

Send your recent snaps to

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

yer pics!

2

3

1

6

5 4

1. Sunny skies 7th Heaven lived up to its name during last week’s sunny forecast. Photo by Neal Gilchrist. 2. Deep Winter The 13th annual Deep Winter Photo Challenge participants celebrated onstage following the

show at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler on Friday, Jan. 11— joined by one special magical guest. For more, turn to page 59. Photo by Megan Lalonde. 3. Roger that Zero Ceiling’s co-executive director Chris Wrightson, left,

and program and development officer Lizi McLaughlin, right, accept a $5,000 check on behalf of Rogers from Joe Polito, general sales manager of Mountain FM/Rogers Communications, on Jan. 16. Photo submitted 4. Into the

inversion Skiers and snowboards were above the clouds on Whistler peak thanks to a picturesque inversion last week. Photo by Neal Gilchrist. 5. AdventureSmart BC AdventureSmart outreach educators Kelly Uren and

PJ Richards spent the weekend, Jan. 12 and 13, in the Callaghan Valley, educating eager trail users about outdoor safety and search-and-rescue prevention. Photo by Megan Lalonde. 6. Rock on Local band Lazy Ghost kept the

crowd cheering all night long at Dusty’s on Saturday, Jan. 13—whether they were playing one of many original songs or drinking out of a shoe. Photo submitted.

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 61


62 Music

NIGHTLIFE

CENTRE STAGE Marcus Ramsay has big plans for 2019.

PHOTO BY TOM PAILLE/ SUBMITTED

Marcus Ramsay maps

out busy year

SEA TO SKY MUSICIAN LAUNCHES NORTHERN IGNITION MUSIC

By Alyssa Noel

arts@piquenewsmagazine.com

Marcus Ramsay has had an

unusual career trajectory for

a Whistler musician. For one,

after graduating from the SAE Institute

Vancouver where he studied music

production and audio engineering, he

moved up the highway to the resort—

and promptly blew out his knee in his

first season.

“I still ski as much as I can and I still

get a pass every year and I go touring with

my friends, but it’s funny, the musician

thing—if you make it work, it doesn’t

work for everyone—it can work in a

Whistler lifestyle,” he says.

Shortly after his move, Ramsay put

together a band, Northern Ignition,

released an EP called The Youngbloods,

and the group won a contest to play the

2016 Pemberton Music Festival, which

marked their first gig.

“It’s been a completely ever-rotating

line up since its inauguration,” Ramsay

says of the band. “It’s funny, this is the

first time ever I’d say there’s a stable

lineup. We’ve done the (Pemberton)

barn dance every year for the last couple

of years. I’m hoping to do a tour this

summer through Western Canada.”

The band name, though, has morphed

into an umbrella under which Ramsay

will move ahead with various pursuits

this year. He’s currently in the midst

of launching Northern Ignition Music,

a music production company based

out of Squamish where he now lives.

His vision is to help local artists create

demos, which will help them pursue

grants, festival gigs and pitch labels and

publishers. But, beyond that, he can also

help them record albums as well.

“I really enjoy creating,” he says. “I

think it would be really beneficial for

artists if there was someone around that

could make them a demo without paying

an arm and leg … My goal really is to be

a network where it’s not really a record

label, per se, but we have a community

of people who are engineers, writers

and artists. And hopefully bring people

together and make really good music

out of it.”

On top of that, Ramsay is working

on his solo music as well (including an

album that’s been in the works for a few

years now). Last fall, he toured through

Switzerland playing for a few weeks

thanks to a connection to a booking

agent through a friend. “They’re amazing

over in Europe. They’re so receptive.

They listen—it’s so nerve wracking,” he

says, with a laugh. “It comes across as a

novelty. You say, ‘I’m a musician from

Canada’ and they want to talk to you

“I really enjoy creating. I think it would

be really beneficial for artists if there was

someone around that could make them a

demo without paying an arm and leg ... ”

about it. It was a really cool experience

in getting all that firsthand.”

Another important connection he

made last year was with pop-country

musician Kristin Carter. Not only has he

played with her on a few gigs, but she also

THIS SECTION

- MARCUS RAMSAY

inspired him to head down to Nashville—

where she lives for three months of the

year—to work on songwriting.

“It was cool to go down there and

write with guys from the states and a lot of

Canadians as well,” he says. “My first hour

in Nashville I walked into a guitar store

and was playing with a gospel singer who’s

big in the U.S. … It’s super humbling. It

ended up being a really cool time.”

While Ramsay plays with a rotating crew

of musicians around town frequently—

including The Rad Pack—you can catch

him next playing alongside Carter at The

Crystal Lounge on Thursday, Jan. 17.

“Keep an eye out for a lot of new

music from Northern Ignition Music

in 2019—other people’s music and

my music,” he says. “I try and fill my

calendar with as many different things

as I can.”

For more, visit northernignitionmusic.

com or follow Ramsay on Instagram at

marcusramsaymusic. n

64 NIGHTLIFE LISTINGS Our guide to pubs, clubs and bars

67 HOROSCOPE More astrological musings from Rob Brezny

68 PIQUE’CAL Our guide to everything else

95 CROSSWORD Discover the answer to “Most current”

62 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Music & NIGHTLIFE

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MAKE MUSIC Jeff Warren, a music professor at Quest University, is also a big mountain

biker. His current research—which he shared during a presentation at the Whistler

Library on Jan. 9—focuses on the connection between music and mountain biking.

Quest University professor

studies connection between

music and mountain biking

SPOILER ALERT: IT’S NOT JUST SLAYER ANYMORE

By Joel Barde

Music might not be the first thing that

comes to mind when you think of

mountain biking, but a Quest University

professor says it’s a huge component of

riders’ experience with the sport.

In his presentation at the Whistler Public

Library on Jan. 9, Jeff Warren discussed the

various ways mountain bike films employ

music and the polarizing reactions those

choices generate.

During his talk, Warren highlighted

several video segments, illustrating

an evolution in the types of songs

filmmakers use.

To start off, Warren played what

many consider to be a masterful example

of pairing music and mountain biking:

Brandon Semenuk’s segment from the 2015

film unReal.

Captured in one spectacular shot, the

segment plays to Buffalo Springfield’s “For

What It’s Worth.”

“From a research perspective, I’m

interested in why some people might

think of this as great and why some might

disagree,” explains Warren, who got into

mountain biking after moving to Squamish

about six years ago.

The clip can be interpreted in many

different ways, from a glorious example

of pairing music to riding, to “a misuse of

a counter-culture protest song that’s been

received as something that’s for civil rights

and anti-war.”

Many, acknowledges Warren, dig

it, whether it’s the idyllic scenery or the

“smoothness of Brandon Semenuk’s riding.”

The use of a laidback ‘60s anthem for

a mountain bike film is representative of

a larger shift in mountain biking culture,

explains Warren. In its early days, the sport

PHOTO SUBMITTED

was dominated by high-energy, guitardriven

music, reflecting the rebellious

nature of the sport. “I don’t think a clip like

that would have gone over 20 years ago,”

he says.

Warren also played a video featuring

Remi Gauvin shredding Squamish, set to an

experimental Bon Iver song. “The pairing of

a musical act, once associated with woodsy

folk and now turning to electronic, is a

provocative pairing,” says Warren. “But it’s

part of a growing trend, expanding the

musical pallet of mountain biking films.”

Warren also notes another trend in

mountain bike films—not using music

at all.

He then showed a clip from Red Bull’s

Raw 100 music video series featuring (once

again) Semenuk and lots of bike noise.

“What’s interesting here is that even

though it claims to be raw, this is a carefully

constructed soundscape that’s every bit as

idealized and aspirational as any of the

other films we looked at with music,” says

Warren. “It creates an ideal that riders aspire

to—to hear the rip of the corners, to hear

the hub disengage in the air.

“Of course, these things do happen

while riding, but they’re in a context of

other sounds that dominate: breathing,

wind rushing through your ears. If we

added those sounds, they would have

covered most of (the others).”

Following his presentation, Warren

said he hopes to turn his research—which

he is working on with Quest sociologist

Dr. John Reid-Hresko—into “at least” a

couple of scholarly articles and potentially

a book.

“We’re hoping to do something that’s

useful as a piece of research, but also

something that might be valuable for a

wider community of people who bike,

advocate for biking, and think about

biking in our communities,” he says. n

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www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 63


Nightlife BARS, CLUBS & PUBS

THU.JAN17

Live Music

CLUB SHRED THURSDAYS

The team at Whistler Blackcomb’s Club Shred are bringing

the party back to Merlin’s Bar & Grill all season long!

Rotating between Whistler local favorites Red Chair and Joni

Toews (from Case Of The Mondays).

d Merlin’s Bar & Grill d 7 pm-midnight

GEORGE

George’s individual style is acoustic/folk, she writes heartcentred

original music and loves to put her own twist on covers.

d Brickworks Public House d 8:30-11:30 pm

KARAOKE NIGHT

Come belt out your best covers at karaoke every Thursday

night from 9 pm!

d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

KRISTIN CARTER AND

MARCUS RAMSAY

Originally from White Rock, B.C., Kristin Carter broke into

the country music scene this summer playing high profile

festivals like Sunfest. Self-funding her debut EP, set for

release later this year, back from her tour around Nashville,

this artist’s momentum is only just beginning!

d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

LOCALS’ NIGHT

Party at Whistler’s longest-running locals’ night. Specials

all night long. For VIP table bookings or guest list, email

info@garfinkels.com.

d Garfinkel’s d 7:30 pm

MARC CHARRON

One-man band on the run, songwriter, world traveler,

original van lifer.

d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

RUCKUS DELUXE

Ruckus Deluxe features former Cirque Du Soleil lead

singer Chad Oliver and Grammy-nominated violinist Ian

Cameron playing Celtic and classics on mandolin, fiddle

and electric guitar.

d Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub d 3:45 & 9 pm

Clubs/DJs

#TBT WITH THE SOUNDS

OF STACHE

Stache has been on a nomadic musical adventure for

almost a decade, travelling the to over 50 countries

and sharing his passion for music with others. Drawing

influences from all four corners of the globe, his appetite,

understanding and energetic delivery will guarantee a funky

smorgasbord of beats. Free.

d Three Below d 9 pm-1 am

COCKTAIL DANCE PARTY

Start your weekend early with a handcrafted cocktail. Then

hit the dancefloor or rock our legendary dancing cage with

help from DJ Peacefrog.

d Buffalo Bills d 7 pm

LEVEL UP – HOUSE & TECHNO

Featuring a rotating selection of DJs playing some of the

best underground electronic dance music in House &

Techno, the ‘Level Up’ nights are set to up your dance game.

Hosted by DJ Miss KosmiK.

d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm-2 am

SHUT UP AND PARTY

Start your weekend off one night early and come get wild

with Whistler’s loosest bar staff. With music from Fidel

Cashflow and DJ Shearer. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP

and other special perks.

d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

THROWBACK THURSDAYS WITH

MR. TWITCH

Enjoy a musical journey of nostalgia curated by Mr. Twitch.

Disco-funk-hip-hop-house and whatever else. Old schoolvibes,

remixes, mash-ups and new stuff to keep you on your

toes. Free.

d Three Below d 9 pm-midnight

THURSDAY LOCALS’ NIGHT

Come join our legendary locals’ night every Thursday,

kicking off the night with a game of skate at 9 pm followed

by DJ Praiz and friends throwing down some dope tracks.

Prizes to be given away each week include concert tickets,

snowboards, electric sunnies, skateboards! Email info@

garfinkels.ca for guest list and VIP options.

d Garfinkel’s d 9 pm-2 am

THURSDAY NIGHT FUNK

FEATURING DJ DAKOTA

DJ Dakota and his one-of-a-kind funkadelic style.

d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

FRI.JAN18

Live Music

COLIN BULLOCK

Colin Bullock melds folk, alt-country, blues and pop into a

signature, sound that uniquely his own.

d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE

Live music by Whistler favourites, Red Chair.

d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

THE HAIRFARMERS

Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The

Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar

and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler

must-see!

d Merlin’s Bar & Grill d 3:30-7:30 pm

LAURA NEDELAK

Laura Nedelak is a singer-songwriter who delivers catchy,

electric guitar riffs and her folk/rock originals. She covers

artists of different genres on the acoustic guitar and

ukulele.

d Cranked Espresso Bar d 5:30-9 pm

LIVE MUSIC

Solo artists perform every week, except on the first Friday of

every month when they swap out for a full band. No cover,

no lineups.

d Whistler Brewing Company d 6-9 pm

RACHEL LEWIS

Catch Rachel Lewis and Phil-T-Beats. Rachel plays your

favourite top-40 hits, new and old, as well as catchy,

upbeat originals!

d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

Clubs/DJs

CHAMPAGNE FRIDAY

Kick off your weekend at Garf’s. Get on the guest list and

join the party: info@garfinkels.ca.

d Garfinkel’s d 7:30 pm

FEEL GOOD FRIDAYS

Start the weekend off right with music by B.C.’s finest

party DJs mixing the best in hip hop, rap, R&B and party

anthems. Whistler’s most energetic dancefloor.

d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm

FRIDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO CLUB

FEATURING DJ TYMETAL

Start your weekend off right with TyMetal’s energizing vibes!

d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

LADIES’ NIGHT

We have a gift for all ladies. Enjoy a glass of champagne then

hit the dancefloor and dance the night away with DJ Peacefrog.

Info@buffalobills.ca for guestlist or table bookings.

d Buffalo Bills d 7 pm

THE CURE LOUNGE SESSIONS

Enjoy lake views on the patio while DJ Smokey sets the tone

with a blend of soulful house tracks.

d Cure Lounge at Nita Lake Lodge d 5 pm

SAT.JAN19

Live Music

BROTHER TWANG

Come wind down your ski day or ramp up your Saturday

night festivities with the boys from Brother Twang.

d FireRock Lounge d 9 pm-midnight

COLIN BULLOCK

Colin Bullock melds folk, alt-country, blues and pop into a

signature, sound that uniquely his own.

d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

GRANT RICHARDSON

A product of Vancouver Island, Grant has been writing and

performing music since he could pick up an instrument. He has

played music with many talented musicians over the years and

has recently completed his debut solo album, Hard Night.

d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

THE HAIRFARMERS

Voted Whistler’s best band every year since 2001, The

Hairfarmers combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar

and percussion covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler

must-see!

d Dusty’s Bar and Grill d 3-6 & 9 pm-midnight

LIVE @ BLACK’S

Every Friday and Saturday, party with local and touring

musicians at Black’s Pub.

d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

MATTHEW HOLLAND

Matthew Holland shreds a wide range of acoustic hits and

sings with an unforgettable raspiness in his voice.

d Cranked Espresso Bar d 5:30-9 pm

MONTY BIGGINS

Monty Biggins performs toe tapping, feel-good tunes in an

Americana style. Featuring modern hits and classic gems.

d Brickworks Public House d 4-7 pm

Clubs/DJs

LADIES’ NIGHT

It’s Whistler’s No. 1 stop for stag and stagette parties. DJ

Turtle and friends mix up everything from hip hop, R&B,

new rap, dance hall and Top 40 bangers. Email guestlist@

moejoes.com for VIP and group perks.

d Moe Joe’s d 9:30 pm

SATURDAY NIGHT ALL LOVE NO

CLUB FEATURING TYMETAL

Let TyMetal provide the soundtrack to your weekend!

d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

SATURDAY NIGHT SHAKER

With music from Fidel Cashflow & DJ C Stylez, two of

Whistler’s hardest working and most loved DJs spinning

the best in Top 40, mash-ups, electro, hip hop and party

anthems that will keep your booty shakin’ all night long.

Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP and other special perks.

d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

SUPREME SATURDAY

DJ Nikky from Vancouver brings the Whistler’s biggest

weekend party and best vibe. VIP champagne parades along

with the hottest hip hop and remixes! For VIP and guest list,

email info@garfinkels.ca.

d Garfinkel’s d 10 pm

THE CURE LOUNGE SESSIONS

Enjoy lake views on the patio while DJ Smokey sets the tone

with a blend of soulful house tracks.

d Cure Lounge at Nita Lake Lodge d 5 pm

SUN.JAN20

Live Music

ACOUSTIC SESSIONS

Gather your pals and listen to some of Whistler’s best local

musicians after treating yourself to our weekly homestyle

Sunday roast.

d Three Below d 8 pm

THE HAIRFARMERS

Voted Whistler’s best band since 2001, The Hairfarmers

combine uncanny vocals with innovative guitar and percussion

covering all your favourite songs. A Whistler must-see!

d Garibaldi Lift Co. (GLC) d 3:30-6:30 & 8-11 pm

MARC CHARRON

One-man band on the run, songwriter, world traveller,

original van lifer.

d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

OPEN MIC JAM NIGHT

An open stage invitation for all who can sing, perform or

even just wanna jam out with our house band. Whistler’s

longest-running jam night every Sunday at Crystal Lounge.

All instruments provided.

d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

SUNDAY SESSIONS

The best locals’ party in Whistler.

d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

Clubs/DJs

GAMES NIGHT AT PANGEA

Challenge your crew: Cards Against Humanity, Jenga,

Settlers of Catan, HedBanz, and many more. Drinks and

food specials all night long.

d Pangea Pod Hotel d 4 pm

SEND IT SUNDAYS

With music from T-Zen and DJ Shearer. Keep your weekend

alive, and join us on Sunday nights for one of Whistler’s

wildest industry nights. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP

plus special perks.

d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

SOULFUL SUNDAYS

Soul Club Whistler spinning that funky soul soundtrack.

d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

THE SUNDAY GLOW PARTY

Moe Joe’s is transformed into a psychedelic, UV-infused

rave cathedral, as Fidel Cashflow, Zapps and La Dooda cook

up an aural feast of house and electro beats. Arrive early to

beat the line.

d Moe Joe’s d 9 pm

SUNDAY NIGHT THEORY

WITH TYMETAL

TyMetal’s unique blend of Rock, Funk and R&B is

unmatched and will leave your ears craving more! The

evolution of Sunday night is here.

d The Keg d 10 pm-1 am

MON.JAN21

Live Music

FVCK MONDAYS

64 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


Nightlife BARS, CLUBS & PUBS

The wildest party in Whistler on a Monday night continues

with music from Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley, The Rogue

Killers and DJ Shearer. Throwing down all the hottest tunes

you know and love. Deep, tech, bass, house, trap, hip hop

and more. Email info@maxxfish.com for VIP plus special

perks.

d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

GREG NEUFELD

Armed with a guitar, stompbox and one of the best, soulful

voices you will ever hear.

d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

MARTINI MONDAY

d Buffalo Bills d 7:30 pm

Clubs/DJs

MEATY MONDAY

Sport and beer what more do you need? How about a chance

to win our famous Meat Raffle? Proceeds donated to charity.

d Tapley’s Pub d 9 pm

MEXICAN MONDAY

Feel the heat by our fireplace and pretend you are back on

the beach.

d FireRock Lounge d 5 pm

MONDAY MADNESS

Fidel Cashflow, Dan Darley and Billy The Kid throw down all

the hottest deep and dirty beats you know and love. Deep

tech, bass, house, trap, plus more.

d Maxx Fish d 9:30 pm

MONDAY NIGHT FEATURING DJ

GAINZ

DJ Gainz has taken over Monday so come get your fix of the

freshest tracks in town!

d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

TRIVIA NIGHT

The Crystal Lounge hosts trivia every Monday night!

Bring your friends and test your knowledge for a night of

fun, laughs, prizes and the chance to “burn your bill.”

Conditions apply.

d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

TUE.JAN22

Live Music

BLACK ‘N’ BLUES

Blues night with Sean Rose.

d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 8 pm

CELLAR SESSIONS

With live music from Neverland Nights and guests, playing

all your rock, alternative and party jams all night long. Plus

DJ sets from Fidel Cashflow.

d Maxx Fish d 9 pm

DANIEL HUGHES

Daniel Hughes is an up-and-coming acoustic artist that’s

quickly turning into one of Whistler’s favourites to watch. He

plays a crowd-pleasing mix of jazz, R&B and pop classics.

d Cranked Espresso Bar d 4:30-7:30 p

GREG NEUFELD

Armed with a guitar, stompbox and one of the best, soulful

voices you will ever hear.

d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

KARAOKE NIGHT

“I Will Survive” won’t sing itself, so come over to Whistler’s

longest-running karaoke night and belt out all your

favourite hits. Arrive early to avoid disappointment.

d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

LOCALS LIVE

Grab your friends and come down to get up to perform on

our open mic.

d FireRock Lounge d 9 pm

WILL ROSS

Folk-tronic, acoustic live looping. Classic rock with a

modern twist. Guitar, harmonica, beatboxing, percussion,

layered into beautiful expression.

d Brickworks Public House d 8:30-11:30 pm

Clubs/DJs

ALLSORTS

Bringing a wide variety of sounds to your Tuesday evening,

ED:WIN will be playing “AllSorts” of music to get you

dancing down at Three Below every Tuesday night. Listen to

hip hop, R&B, house, garage and disco! Free.

d Three Below d 9 pm-1:30 am

BANGERS & MASH : VOL 3

Volume 3 is here! You all know the deal by now... We drop

bangers, you get mashed. UK DJ’s representing Bangers

& Mash on the night. Expect the best in UK garage, bass

house, grime, DnB. Free before 10:30 p.m.

d Garfinkel’s d 9 pm-2 am

BINGO

Channel your inner granny and dominate bingo at the

locals’ living room.

d Tapley’s Pub d 8 pm

TUESDAY NIGHT FEATURING

DJ DAKOTA

Dakota brings his crowd pleasing hip hop vibes to

Tuesday night.

d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

WED.JAN23

Live Music

INDUSTRY NIGHT

Live music from Neverland Nights.

d Buffalo Bills d 6 pm

JAM NIGHT

Jam Night with Kostaman and Friends every Wednesday

night from 9 pm.

d Black’s Pub & Restaurant d 9 pm

JENNAMAE TOGADO

The only Whistler local giving you some acoustic R&B!

Soulful, powerful and sultry. Sounds you can vibe out and

sing along to.

d Brickworks Public House d 8:30-11:30 pm

MATHEW HOLLAND

Matthew Holland shreds a wide range of acoustic hits and

sings with an unforgettable raspiness in his voice.

d Cranked Espresso Bar d 4:30-7:30 pm

RICHARD SAMUELS

With several chart-topping hits, Samuels has a knack for

touching his fans on a deep and intimate level by reflecting

people’s lives in his music.

d Mallard Lounge d 3:30-5:30 & 8-11 pm

STEPHEN VOGLER

Stephen Vogler plays ska, reggae, blues and rock with a

healthy mix of originals and covers.

d Crystal Lounge d 9 pm

Clubs/DJs

WILDIN’ OUT WEDNESDAYS

FEATURING DJ GAINZ

Featuring DJ Gainz the fastest up-and-coming DJ in town.

d The Keg d 10 pm-2 am

in REBATES when you upgrade to a heat pump

For more info visit:

whistler.ca/rebate

for heating AND cooling your home.

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Whistler 2019 Community Life Survey

Have your say!

The Resort Municipality of Whistler’s annual random phone survey

of 300 permanent, 200 part-time residents begins January 21.

Share your thoughts to help track trends and inform municipal

and community decision-making.

• If you receive a call, please take 15 minutes to complete the survey.

• If you don’t receive a call, you will still have a chance to complete

the online survey, which will be launched in a few weeks.

The phone survey is being conducted by Forum Research Inc.

To view past survey results, visit www.whistler.ca/survey.

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 65


CALL FOR

VOLUNTEERS

Outreach Services Available

Monday through Saturday 9am to 4:30 pm

Taylor

604.902.0865

taylor@mywcss.org

Call WCSS Office at 604.932.0113

Lisa

604.902.0476

lisa@mywcss.org

Sharada

604.902.0228

sharada@mywcss.org

Dan

04.938.3902

dan@mywcss.org

24/7 Crisis Line 1.866.661.3311

AGRICULTURAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE

ELECTORAL AREA C

WHAT?

The SLRD is looking for interested residents of Pemberton and

Electoral Area C to serve on the SLRD Electoral Area C Agricultural

Advisory Committee(AAC).

WHO?

Anyone with an interest or expertise in agriculture and related

matters is welcome to apply. Applicants could:

• be a landowner and/or permanent resident of Electoral Area C

or Pemberton

• have an interest in preserving the viability of farming in the

Pemberton Valley and surrounding area

• be from the farming and ranching community

• possess a clear understanding and knowledge of topics

affecting agricultural land

• be available to commit to roughly 4 to 6 meetings per year, for

a one year or two year term

HOW?

Application forms can be obtained on our website in the Agriculture

Planning section in the Policies & Plans section under Planning

& Development Services, or by contacting the SLRD offi ce.

Please submit your application by 5 PM on J anuary 29, 2018. For

additional information please contact Ana Koterniak, Planning and

GIS Technician at: P:604 -894- 6371, ext.237, Email: akoterniak@

slrd.bc.ca

Squamish-Lillooet Regional District Box 219,1350 Aster Street,

Pemberton, BC, V0N2L0 www.slrd.bc.ca

P: 604- 894- 6371 • Toll Free: 1800 -298- 7753 • F: 604- 894- 6526

Email:info@slrd.bc.ca

Notice of Annual General Meeting

Monday February 4th, 7pm

Pemberton Community Center

Come and get involved in local Mountain Biking!

Resort Municipality of Whistler

Sister City YOUTH* Exchange Program

in Karuizawa, Japan

Information Meeting about this year’s program:

Monday, January 14th, 7pm

Whistler Public Library

*Available to youth residing in Whistler, currently in Grades 8 & 9

Tentative Toonie Schedule

Spring: April 16, 30, May 14, 28

Fall: Aug 27, Sept 10, 24

PVTA & PORCA Trail Day: April 13

Information contact: snicoll-russell@whistler.ca

Resort Municipality of Whistler

whistler.ca

Visit: www.porcabikes.com for up to date information

66 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com


ARIES (March 21-April 19): In 1917, leaders of

the Christian sect Jehovah’s Witnesses prophesied

that all Earthly governments would soon disappear

and Christianity would perish. In 1924, they predicted

that the ancient Hebrew prophet Moses would be

resurrected and speak to people everywhere over

the radio. In 1938, they advised their followers not

to get married or have children, because the end

of civilization was nigh. In 1974, they said there

was only a “short time remaining before the wicked

world’s end.” I bring these failed predictions to your

attention, Aries, so as to get you in the mood for my

prediction, which is: all prophecies that have been

made about your life up until now are as wrong as the

Jehovah’s Witnesses’ visions. In 2019, your life will be

bracingly free of old ideas about who you are and who

you’re supposed to be. You will have unprecedented

opportunities to prove that your future is wide open.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Movie critic Roger

Ebert defined the term “idiot plot” as “any film plot

containing problems that would be solved instantly

if all of the characters were not idiots.” I bring this

to your attention because I suspect there has been

a storyline affecting you that in some ways fits that

description. Fortunately, any temptation you might

have had to go along with the delusions of other

people will soon fade. I expect that as a result, you

will catalyze a surge of creative problem-solving. The

idiot plot will transform into a much smarter plot.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 1865, Prussia’s

political leader, Otto von Bismarck, got angry when

an adversary, Rudolf Virchow, suggested cuts to

the proposed military budget. Bismarck challenged

Virchow to a duel. Virchow didn’t want to fight, so

he came up with a clever plan. As the challenged

party, he was authorized to choose the weapons to

be used in the duel. He decided upon two sausages.

His sausage would be cooked; Bismarck’s sausage

would be crammed with parasitic roundworms. It

was a brilliant stratagem. The proposition spooked

Bismarck, who backed down from the duel. Keep this

story in mind if you’re challenged to an argument,

dispute, or conflict in the coming days. It’s best to

figure out a tricky or amusing way to avoid it altogether.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): An imaginative 27-yearold

man with the pseudonym Thewildandcrazyoli

decided he was getting too old to keep his imaginary

friend in his life. So he took out an ad on eBay,

offering to sell that long-time invisible ally, whose

name was John Malipieman. Soon his old buddy was

dispatched to the highest bidder for $3,000. Please

don’t attempt anything like that in the coming weeks,

Cancerian. You need more friends, not fewer—both

of the imaginary and non-imaginary variety. Now is

a ripe time to expand your network of compatriots.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In December 1981, novice

Leo filmmaker James Cameron got sick, fell asleep,

and had a disturbing dream. He saw a truncated

robot armed with kitchen knives crawling away from

an explosion. This nightmare ultimately turned out

to be a godsend for Cameron. It inspired him to

write the script for the 1984 film The Terminator, a

successful creation that launched him on the road

to fame and fortune. I’m expecting a comparable

development in your near future, Leo. An initially

weird or difficult event will actually be a stroke of luck.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Psychologists define

the Spotlight Effect as our tendency to imagine that

other people are acutely attuned to every little nuance

of our behaviour and appearance. The truth is that

they’re not, of course. Most everyone is primarily

occupied with the welter of thoughts buzzing around

inside his or her own head. The good news, Virgo,

is that you are well set up to capitalize on this

phenomenon in the coming weeks. I’m betting you

will achieve a dramatic new liberation: you’ll be freer

than ever before from the power of people’s opinions

Astrology

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Week of January 17th By Rob Brezsny

to inhibit your behaviour or make you self-conscious.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): What North American

community is farthest north? It’s an Alaskan city

that used to be called Barrow, named after a British

admiral. But in 2016, local residents voted to reinstate

the name that the Indigenous Iñupiat people had

once used for the place: Utqiaġvik. In accordance

with astrological omens, I propose that in the coming

weeks, you take inspiration from their decision, Libra.

Return to your roots. Pay homage to your sources.

Restore and revive the spirit of your original influences.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Alaskan town of

Talkeetna has a population of 900, so it doesn’t require

a complicated political structure to manage its needs.

Still, it made a bold statement by electing a cat as its

mayor for 15 years. Stubbs, a part-manx, won his first

campaign as a write-in candidate, and his policies were

so benign—no new taxes, no repressive laws—that he

kept getting re-elected. What might be the equivalent

of having a cat as your supreme leader for a while,

Scorpio? From an astrological perspective, now would

be a favourable time to implement that arrangement.

This phase of your cycle calls for relaxed fun and

amused mellowness and laissez-faire jauntiness.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Trees need to be

buffeted by the wind. It makes them strong. As they

respond to the pressure of breezes and gusts, they

generate a hardier kind of wood called reaction wood.

Without the assistance of the wind’s stress, trees’

internal structure would be weak and they might topple

over as they grew larger. I’m pleased to report that you’re

due to receive the benefits of a phenomenon that’s

metaphorically equivalent to a brisk wind. Exult in this

brisk but low-stress opportunity to toughen yourself up!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Writing at ThePudding,

pop culture commentator Colin Morris reveals the

conclusions he drew after analyzing 15,000 pop songs.

First, the lyrics of today’s tunes have significantly more

repetitiveness than the lyrics of songs in the 1960s.

Second, the most popular songs, both then and now,

have more repetitive lyrics than the average song. Why?

Morris speculates that repetitive songs are catchier.

But in accordance with current astrological omens,

I encourage you Capricorns to be as unrepetitive as

possible in the songs you sing, the messages you

communicate, the moves you make, and the ideas

you articulate. In the coming weeks, put a premium

on originality, unpredictability, complexity, and novelty.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In May 1927, Aquarian

aviator Charles Lindbergh made a pioneering flight in his

one-engine plane from New York to Paris. He became

instantly famous. Years later, Lindbergh testified that

partway through his epic journey he was visited by a

host of odd, vaporous beings who suddenly appeared

in his small cabin. They spoke with him, demonstrating

a sophisticated understanding of navigation and

airplane technology. Lindbergh’s spirits were buoyed.

His concentration, which had been flagging, revived.

He was grateful for their unexpected support. I

foresee a comparable kind of assistance becoming

available to you sometime soon, Aquarius. Don’t waste

any time being skeptical about it; just welcome it.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): More than four

centuries ago, a Piscean samurai named Honda

Tadakatsu became a leading general in the Japanese

army. In the course of his military career, he fought in

more than a hundred battles. Yet he never endured

a major wound and was never beaten by another

samurai. I propose we make him your inspirational

role model for the coming weeks. As you navigate

your way through interesting challenges, I believe that

like him, you’ll lead a charmed life. No wounds. No

traumas. Just a whole lot of educational adventures.

Here’s this week’s homework: Write a one-page essay

entitled “2019 Is the Year I Figure Out What I Really

Want.” Share if you like: FreeWillAstrology.com

In addition to this column, Rob Brezsny creates

EXPANDED AUDIO HOROSCOPES

in-depth weekly forecasts designed to inspire and uplift you. To buy access, phone 1-888-499-4425.

Once you’ve chosen the Block of Time you like, call 1-888-682-8777 to hear Rob’s forecasts.

And be sure to visit his Web site at www.freewillastrology.com

Best Date Night EVER with

BLUESBERRY JAM

SHOWBAND

VALENTINE’S DAY – THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14

MAURY YOUNG ARTS CENTRE | GALLERY BAR 7PM | SHOW 8PM | CASH BAR | 19+

$15

$20 day of

BUY TICKETS: ARTSWHISTLER.COM/LIVE

Squamish Valley Agricultural Plan

Steering Committee

CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS

The SLRD is looking for interested residents of Squamish and SLRD

Electoral Area D to serve on the Squamish Valley Agricultural Plan

Steering Committee (SVAPSC). The SVAPSC will guide and

contribute to the development of a comprehensive Agricultural

Plan for the Squamish Valley. Ideally, applicants should:

• Be a land owner and/or permanent resident of Electoral Area D or

Squamish;

• Be involved with or interested in agriculture and food systems;

• Have an interest in enhancing the productivity of foodlands in the

Squamish area;

• Be available to commit to roughly 4-6 meetings between

February 2019 and March 2020.

Please note you do not need to be a farmer - anyone who has an

interest or expertise in agriculture, food systems, community

economic development and related matters is welcome to apply.

Application forms can be obtained on the SLRD website at

www.slrd.bc.ca/SquamishValleyAgPlan or by contacting the SLRD

office at 604-894-6371/1-800-298-7753, or dropping by the District of

Squamish office at 37955 Second Avenue, Squamish, BC.

Please submit your application by February 1, 2019.

For additional information please contact:

Claire Dewar, Senior Planner

Squamish-Lillooet Regional District

E-mail: cdewar@slrd.bc.ca

This project is funded in

part by Agriculture and

Agri-Food Canada and

the Government of British

Columbia through

programs delivered by

the Investment

Agriculture Foundation of

B.C., and is being led by

the SLRD in partnership

with the DoS and

Squamish Food Policy

Council.

Photo: Tea Cosy DP

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 67


PiqueCal

YOUR GUIDE TO LOCAL EVENTS

FOR EVENTS IN BARS, CLUBS AND PUBS, PLEASE SEE PAGE 64

For a complete guide to events in Whistler, visit piquenewsmagazine.com/events

ONGOING & DAILY

COMMUNITY

PRENATAL CLASSES

This program helps support women and

their partners in making informed decisions

about their prenatal and birth experience.

To sign up, please call Bev Nolan-Newsome,

certified childbirth educator, internationally

certified lactation consultant and registered

doula at 604-894-5389.

> Ongoing

> Whistler

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER MUSEUM

Learn more about Whistler’s culture and

history. Now open by donation.

> Daily 11am-5pm, Thu until 9pm

> Whistler Museum

THURSDAY JAN17

COMMUNITY

BNI MOUNTAIN HIGH

BNI provides a positive and structured

environment for the development and

exchange of quality business referrals. It does

so by helping you build personal relationships

with dozens of other qualified business

professionals. Register by emailing David

Livesey at david_livesey@cooperators.ca. $20.

> 6:45-8:30 am

> The Venue

COMMUNITY

WOMEN’S KARMA YOGA

Drop-in for weekly yoga classes led by an

all-female team of certified 200-hour yoga

instructors. Includes mat use and childminding.

All women, all ability levels welcome. This

program is made possible by yoga instructors

and childminders donating their time. Contact

us to join the team. Free. 604-962-8711.

> 9:30-10:30 am

> Whistler Women’s Centre

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THE CULTURAL CONNECTOR:

A JOURNEY OF ADVENTURE

AND DISCOVERY

As you follow the Cultural Connector

route, you’ll discover the stories that enrich

Whistler’s culture, the venues that celebrate it

and the milestones that we’ve achieved along

the way. The pathway will lead you through

beautiful surroundings and six cultural

institutions: Squamish Lil’wat Cultural

Centre, Whistler Museum, Whistler Public

Library, Maury Young Arts Centre, Lost Lake

PassivHaus, and Audain Art Museum. Free.

> Ongoing

> Maury Young Arts Centre

COMMUNITY

PARENT INFANT DROP-IN

An opportunity to develop a supportive social

network with other parents of young babies.

Speakers and a public-health nurse are often in

attendance. Free.

> 11 am-12:30 pm

> Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

ROTARY CLUB OF WHISTLER

MILLENNIUM

Join the Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium to

learn about what the club is doing to support

your local community and international projects.

Lunch is available for $20. Everyone welcome.

> 12:15 pm

> Pan Pacific Mountain Side

COMMUNITY

DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB

The club meets every week and visitors are

welcome. For a partner, please call

Gill at 604-932-5791.

> 1-5 pm

> Whistler Racquet Club

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

Docents will provide visitors with an

introduction to the Audain Art Museum and its

permanent collection. These drop-in tours are

free with the purchase of admission or museum

membership. 604-962-0413.

> 3 pm

> Audain Art Museum

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

THIRD THURSDAY

Head to the Audain on the Third Thursday of

each month to slow down, focus and spend

time with the museum’s Permanent Collection.

Connections will also be drawn with wider art

movements, groups and trends. This program

is an all ages event. A tour will take place at

5:30pm. Free with general admission.

> 5-7 pm

> Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

LUNA PRESENTS THURSDAY

NIGHT YOGA

Come shake your shanti in a 90-minute

Hatha Flow yoga class. Get in the flow with an

emphasis on breathing and movement. 18-to-

35-year-olds only, free positive vibes for all in

attendance! $3 for non-members, free for Luna

members.

> 5:30-7 pm

> Maury Young Arts Centre

COMMUNITY

FIRST NATIONS WINTER FEAST

AND PERFORMANCE PROGRAM

The First Nations Winter Feast & Performance

will feature a Northwest Coast inspired menu,

Indigenous World Winery wines and craft beer

WHISTLER PRIDE AND SKI FESTIVAL

JAN 20-27

WHISTLER

from local breweries. Performances will take place

throughout dinner service, featuring the SLCC’s

Cultural Ambassadors and the Wells family from

the Lil’wat Nation. For tickets, visit slcc.ca/feast.

> 5:45 pm

> Squamish Lilwat Cultural Centre

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WHISTLER YOUTH BAND

Let the trumpets sing! The Whistler Youth Band is

a beginner band for youth ages 10 and up. Grab

an instrument and make music with friends.

> 6-7:30 pm

> Myrtle Philip Community School

COMMUNITY

DREAMS AND WISHES:

VISION BOARD WORKSHOP

In this workshop, you will take all of your

ideas, thoughts, dreams and wishes and

create a vision board that lets you have fun

while creating what you want for yourself and

claiming it with images, words and colour.

Embrace possibility with a personal, visual

reminder to keep that energy alive for you.

Registration is required, and space is limited!

Email publicservices@whistlerlibrary.ca or call

604-935-8435 to claim a spot.

> 6-7 pm

> Whistler Public Library

FRIDAY JAN18

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB

SWIM SQUAD

Photo: TOURISM WHISTLER / MIKE CRANE

Triathlon focused swim squads. Full details at

whistlertriclub.com/training-sessions. Free to

First Nations Winter Feast & Performance

Thursdays & Sundays until April 2019

Now

Hiring!

Join the SLCC for an unforgettable evening of

indigenous-inspired cuisine, music, dance and

storytelling.

Seating is limited, book online at

slcc.ca/feast or call 604.967.1281

68 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

OPEN 10-8

WE CUT & COLOUR • NOW HIRING

OPEN UNTIL 8PM • SINCE 1994


PiqueCal

COMMUNITY

WHISTLER PRIDE AND SKI FESTIVAL JAN 20-JAN 27

Whistler is proud to host the 27th Annual Whistler Pride and Ski Festival, one of the biggest and

best gay and lesbian ski weeks in North America. The LGBTQI pride week features a packed events

schedule of skiing, snowboarding, parties, arts and culture and social events. For more information

visit whistlerpride.com/events-whistler-pride-and-ski-festival.

> Whistler

members for fall (includes entry into Meadow

Park). Non-members $8 drop-in (includes

entry into Meadow Park).

> 6-7:15 am

> Meadow Park Sports Centre

COMMUNITY

WELCOME CENTRE

MULTICULTURAL MEET UP

Come and say, “hi” if you are new to Canada

and Whistler! Everyone and every age is

welcome. Casual meet up, workshops,

information about living in Canada. Check

calendar at www.welcomewhistler.com for full

details. Contact info@welcomewhistler.com or

604-698-5960.

> 9:30 am-noon

> Whistler Public Library

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

PRESCHOOL STORY TIME

Books, songs and rhymes for preschoolaged

children, accompanied by a caregiver.

Registration is not required.

> 10:30-11 am

> Whistler Public Library

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info.

> 3 & 7 pm

> Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

WHISTLER YOUTH

CENTRE DROP-IN

For ages 13 to 18. We offer ping pong, a

skateboard mini-ramp (skateboards and

helmets to borrow), free Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3

& PS4, guitars, board games, a projector and

widescreen TVs. Free. 604-935-8187.

> 3:30-11 pm

> Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM

For more information on featured events

SATURDAY JAN19

COMMUNITY

SINGING WITH THE BABIES

Learn songs and rhymes to soothe and

entertain baby while encouraging early

language development. For kids up to walking

age. Free.

> 11-11:30 am

> Whistler Public Library

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

MADE IN WHISTLER MARKET

Local artists and artisans sell their goods at the

Made in Whistler Market. Free admission.

> 12-6 pm

> Westin Resort & Spa

COMMUNITY

FAMILY TOGETHER TIME

A parent-directed hour with board games, crafts

and a story corner with felt puppets. A drop-in

program for families of all ages. Free.

> 3:30-4:30 pm

> Whistler Public Library

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info.

> 3 pm

> Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

WHISTLER YOUTH

CENTRE DROP-IN

MULTI-DAY EVENT

See Friday’s listing for more info.

> 6-10 pm

> Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

MOUNTAIN

AVALANCHE AWARENESS DAYS

BC Park Rangers will be hosting avalanche

awareness days at the Red Heather Warming

Hut in Garibaldi Provincial Park on Jan 19 and

20, from 10 am – 3 pm. We will have 4 skills

stations and a quiz and prizes donated from

local businesses. Free.

> 10 am-3 pm

> Red Heather Shelter (Brackendale/

Squamish)

SUNDAY JAN20

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info.

> 3 pm

> Audain Art Museum

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

Come in and enjoy a massive selection of

popular games.

> 4-8 pm

> Cranked Espresso Bar

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

PENGUIN DAYS: BOOK

LAUNCH WITH SARA LEACH

Whistler author Sara Leach will be launching

Penguin Days, her eighth book for young readers,

at Whistler Public Library! This free event is

open to all ages. Sara will be reading from her

new novel and talking about her writing process

and the path to writing the book.

> 4-5 pm

> Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

FIRST NATIONS WINTER FEAST

AND PERFORMANCE PROGRAM

See Thursday’s listing for more info.

> 5:45 pm

> Squamish Lilwat Cultural Centre

MONDAY JAN21

SPORTS

WHISTLER TRI CLUB

SWIM SQUAD

See Friday’s listing for more info.

> 6-7:15 am

> Meadow Park Sports Centre

COMMUNITY

FAMILY APRÈS

Whistler knows how to après and now the

whole family can celebrate a great day on the

slopes with even more fun at Olympic Plaza.

> 3-6 pm

> Whistler Olympic Plaza

COMMUNITY

IMMIGRANT SETTLEMENT

SERVICES

Information and support to help immigrants

and newcomers living and working in Whistler

as they adjust to life in Canada. For more

information or an appointment, call 604-698-

5960 or email info@welcomewhistler.com.

> 3-6 pm

> Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

See Sunday’s listing for more info.

> 4-8 pm

> Cranked Espresso Bar

COMMUNITY

GAMES NIGHT

Visit the Whistler Public Library for a free evening

of board games, popcorn and Oreo cookies. Play

strategy games such as Ticket To Ride, Settlers of

Catan and Carcassonne or traditional favourites

like Monopoly, Scrabble and Clue. Sponsored by

The Friends of the Library.

> 7-9 pm

> Whistler Public Library

TUESDAY JAN22

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

RHYME & SONG

This program gives toddlers, parents and

caregivers the opportunity to learn songs,

rhymes and finger plays together. For more

information, please come to the library,

call 604-935-8436 or email youthservice@

whistlerlibary.ca. Free.

> 10:30-11 am

> Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

CREATING COMMUNITY

AND COHOUSING

Join us on our journey to creating REAL

Sholto Shaw

Will & EstatEs

BusinEss laW

REal EstatE

fREE consultation

In person or by phone

604.932.3211

332-4370 lorimer road

s.shaw@raceandco.com

raceandcompany.com

Recycle? Yes or no?

Get the BC RECYCLEPEDIA App

www.rcbc.ca

RECYCLING COUNCIL OF B.C. MEMBER

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 69


Sea to Sky

PiqueCal

WE DON’T WANT YOUR NAME...

just your information!

1-800-222-8477 (TIPS)

PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given in accordance with the Local Government Act

and the Community Charter that the Squamish-Lillooet Regional District (“SLRD”)

is proposing the adoption of Gun Lake Fire Protection Contribution Local Service

Establishment Bylaw No. 559, 1994, Amendment Bylaw No. 1604-2018 (“Bylaw”).

The Bylaw relates to the Gun Lake Fire Protection Contribution Service Area, which

consists of the community of Gun Lake in SLRD Electoral Area A as the participant

(the “Service Area”) and identifi ed in the map below:

The Bylaw authorizes the SLRD to increase the maximum annual tax requisition

amount for the Service Area from $4,688 to $21,750 and introduces a rate per $’000 for

taxation purposes, which is to allow the Gun Lake Fire Protection Society to develop

a long-term, sustainable model for the provision of, and improvement to, wildfi re

suppression and prevention services to the Gun Lake community:

Current Maximum

Annual Tax Requisition

$4,688 $21,750

Current Maximum

Annual Tax Requisition

Visit us on facebook

Sea to Sky Crime Stoppers

NOTICE OF

ALTERNATIVE

APPROVAL PROCESS

Proposed New Maximum

Annual Tax Requisition

Per parcel (including the 5.25% Provincial fee), this would be:

Proposed New Maximum

Annual Tax Requisition

$17.19 per parcel $79.76 per parcel

The SLRD Board is seeking participating area approval of electors by way of Alternative

Approval Process for the Service Area. The number of eligible electors in the Service Area has

been determined to be 241 and the number of elector responses required to prevent the SLRD

Board from proceeding without the further assent of electors is 24. The deadline for elector

responses in relation to this Alternative Approval Process is 4:30 p.m. on February 19, 2019.

The SLRD Board may proceed with this matter unless, by the deadline stated above, at least

10% (being 24) of the electors of the Service Area indicate that the SLRD Board must obtain

approval by assent vote (referendum).

Elector responses must be given in the form established by the SLRD Board.

Elector response forms are available at www.slrd.bc.ca/gunlakefi reserviceAAP and at the

SLRD offi ce (1350 Aster St., Pemberton, BC). The only persons entitled to sign the forms are

electors of the Service Area. For more information about elector qualifi cations,

see www.slrd.bc.ca/gunlakefi reserviceAAP.

Public inspection of the Bylaw can be made at the SLRD offi ce

(1350 Aster St., Pemberton, BC) from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (Monday-Friday, except holidays)

and at www.slrd.bc.ca/gunlakefi reserviceAAP.

For more information, please contact SLRD Corporate Offi cer K. Clark at

(604) 894-6371 (ext. 230) or kclark@slrd.bc.ca.

70 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

community through the cohousing model

of building a neighbourhood community.

Cohousing is not a commune, not a cooperative.

For more information, visit our website at

thecoastalvillage.ca or call Janey Harper at 778-

840-1529.

> 11:30 am-1:30 pm

COMMUNITY

AGE-FRIENDLY COMMUNITY

PLANNING

Join us for a presentation and discussion about

some of what’s been done to make Whistler

more age-friendly, what’s being done in other

communities, and what might be needed next

in Whistler.

> 3-5 pm

> Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

See Sunday’s listing for more info.

> 4-8 pm

> Cranked Espresso Bar

COMMUNITY

VITAL CAFE: THINKING

LIKE A MOUNTAIN

Vital Cafés are monthly small group

conversations on big issues affecting our

community. Different themes each month,

inspired by the UN Sustainable Development

Goals. January’s Theme: “Thinking like a

Mountain,” ecological thinking with Leslie

Anthony and Kristina Swerhun of the Whistler

Naturalists. Hosted by the Community

Foundation. Free.

> 5-6:30 pm

> Whistler Museum

COMMUNITY

THE MOUNTAIN VILLAGE SOCIAL

GATHERING AND MEETING

What if housing wasn’t just a place to live,

but rather, a way of life? The Coastal Village

is connecting people who want to live in

community with others who have similar

values for the betterment of our health,

happiness and well-being. Free. 778-840-1529.

> 5:30-8:30 pm

> The Mountain Village

COMMUNITY

WE RUN WHISTLER:

WEEKLY GROUP RUN

Group run for intermediate runners and above.

Two distance options: approximately 5 km and

10 km. Check our Facebook page, facebook.

com/groups/werunwhistler for weekly updates.

Headlamps mandatory. #werunwhistler rain or

shine… or snow! Free.

> 5:55 pm

> Lululemon

SPORTS

TENNIS LOCALS NIGHT

Clinic for beginners and casual play for

intermediate and advanced players. Free racket

rental, snacks and beverage included! $20.

604-932-1991.

> 6:30-8:30 pm

> Whistler Racquet Club

Pique in your pants

m.piquenewsmagazine.com

on your smart phone

COMMUNITY

WHISTLER SINGERS

Whistler’s community choir. No auditions and

everyone welcome. 604-932-2979.

> 7-9 pm

> Myrtle Philip Community Centre

WEDNESDAY JAN23

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

BOOK & CRAFT CLUB

Drop in for this casual session, where

preschool-aged children will enjoy a short story

and then use different media to create a fun

craft. A great opportunity for parents to connect

with other parents of young children!

> 10:30-11:30 am

> Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

FAMILY APRÈS

See Monday’s listing for more info.

> 3-6 pm

> Whistler Olympic Plaza

COMMUNITY

GAMES CAFE

See Sunday’s listing for more info.

> 4-8 pm

> Cranked Espresso Bar

SPORTS

INDOOR PICKLEBALL DROP-IN

Have fun with others learning the fastest

growing sport in North America or simply play

a game! All levels welcome. Free paddle rental.

$8. 604-932-1991.

> 10-11:30 am

> Whistler Racquet Club

COMMUNITY

INTERACT CLUB OF WHISTLER

Interact is a club for young people ages 12

to 18 who want to make a difference in their

community, mentored by the Rotary Club

of Whistler and Rotary Club of Whistler

Millennium.

> 4-5 pm

> Maury Young Whistler Youth Centre

COMMUNITY

LEARN ABOUT SUGAR

Come and learn about good and bad

sugars and how they affect our body. Our

expert nutritionist will be here to answer

any questions. For more, email info@

WelcomeWhistler.com.

> 10:30-11:30 am

> Whistler Public Library

COMMUNITY

LET’S GET QUIZZICAL

Are you smarter than the average fifth grader?

Let’s hope so as Stache brings you trivia with a

Whistler twist. All the regular rounds plus our

weekly degenerate round full of public & celebrity

scandals. Great banter and awesome prizes! Free.

> 9-10:30 pm

> Three Below

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

WALK AND TALK SERIES

See Thursday’s listing for more info.

> 3 pm

> Audain Art Museum


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Packages start with

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Bolding .............50¢/word

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778-938-2696

The Bachelor Plan

Party Hostesses

Ski Bunnies

Topless Dealers

Strip Shows

Our pretty promo hostesses will join you

skiing, out for dinner or back at your place

for a fun chalet party. These are real girls

(not pros) who actually look like their photos.

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Foxy, sexy, raven haired, olive skinned

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Melt away your worries with a

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WHISTLER’S #1

NEWS SOURCE

ALWAYS HIRING

ALWAYS HIRING

STAGS! STAGS! STAGS!

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DEALERS ESCORTS

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604 -938- 64 56

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roxysinwhistler.com

roxysinwhistler

piquenewsmagazine.com/events

ACCOMMODATION

LISTINGS, DEFINED:

Long Term Rentals

Monthly rental accommodation

that is available to local renters

for a minimum of 12 months.

Short Term Rentals

Monthly or seasonal rental

accommodation that is available

to local renters for less than 12

months, or where the rental price

varies throughout the year.

Vacation Rentals

Nightly and/or weekly rental

accommodation, available to

visitors over a short period of time.

MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

LONG TERM RENTAL

MANAGEMENT SERVICES

Property Owners seeking Annual

or Seasonal Rental Income from

screened Tenants, please contact

one of our 6 Rental Agents to

discuss revenue, services & fees.

LICENSED RENTAL AGENTS:

Simon Westwood 604-967-1195

simon@WhistlerProperty.com

Forrest Chittick 604-902-7178

forrest@WhistlerProperty.com

Rosie Blaser 604-932-8864

rosie@WhistlerProperty.com

Helene Huang 604-902-0608

helene@WhistlerProperty.com

Duane Kercher 604-932-7849

duane@WhistlerProperty.com

VIEW AVAILABLE

RENTAL LISTINGS AT:

WhistlerProperty.com

www.whistlerwag.com

INDUSTRIAL PARK (PEMBERTON)

Vista Place is a new, leading-edge

residential and business rental

complex minutes from downtown

Pemberton and all the Sea-to-Sky

Corridor has to offer. The

development’s first phase, Vista

Place I, will be completed in early

2019. Spacious contemporary

apartments on the second storey

feature stunning views - and have

been designed with long-term

livability in mind. Versatile secondfloor

office spaces and groundfloor

commercial spaces are ready

to be customized to suit your small

business

vision.

info@vistaplacebc.com

https://vistaplacepemberton.com/

PICK UP YOUR

COPY TODAY

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 71


ook your ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

Accommodation

SEEKING

ACCOMMODATION WANTED

REAL ESTATE

PEMBERTON

MARKETPLACE

FOR SALE - MISC

HOME SERVICES

BUILDING AND RENOVATIONS

HOME SERVICES

1.7x6-short-ad-Kayak-print.pdf 1

MOVING AND STORAGE

E E S K I N G

ACCOMMODATION

COOL AS A MOOSE

IS SEEKING

ACCOMMODATION

FOR OUR STORE

MANAGER.

Mature, Responsible,

Business Professional in

mid-30s, single tenant.

Interested in a six month

lease beginning Feb 1st

but open to negotiations.

Cool As A Moose provides

rent cheques, property

inspections, and can

provide excellent

references.

We take full

responsibility for the

property and can

guarantee a quiet,

respectable tenant.

For more details

please contact

Chelsea at:

5 acres with a million dollar view

One dry cabin plus workshop

Power well septic approval

30 minutes north of Whistler

Views of Mount Currie

$589,000

1-604-813-3000

FAQwhistler

MARKETPLACE

PETS

Alpenlofts Veterinary Hospital

Dental Focus

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

20% OFF DENTAL SERVICES

Dental extractions, medications,

and severe periodontal disease

cause dental procedures to become

costly. That is why preventative

cleaning procedures are so important.

Because we know the importance

of dental health, we are

offering 20% off dental services

Jan & Feb. 604-815-0057

Alpenlofts@gmail.com

www.alpenloftsvet.ca

Facebook.com/AlpenloftsVH

FURNITURE

WHISTLER FURNITURE CO

BEDS IN STOCK!

SAME DAY DELIVERY!

MATTRESSES-BUNK BEDS-

SOFA BEDS-CUSTOM SOFAS

Come and visit Whistler’s funkiest thrift

store and get (almost) everything you

need for your EPIC season! Winter

clothes, skis, boards, boots, bindings,

goggles, toques and more! As well as

all the usual stuff to make that rented

closet feel like a palace. You may even

fi nd some hidden treasure you never

knew needed.

Shopping and Donation hours:

11am - 6pm, 7 days a week

8000 Nesters Road

604-932-1121

Re-Build-It Centre

Furniture, appliances, kitchen cabinets,

doors, plumbing, tools, fl ooring,

hardware, lumber, lighting and more!

Open 10am-5pm, 7 days a week

1003 Lynham Road,

Function Junction 604-932-1125

Recycle, Re-build and Re-invest in

your community. All proceeds support

28 programs and services such as

the food bank, outreach services, and

counseling assistance offered by

Whistler Community Services.

www.mywcss.org

Like us on Facebook @

Whistler Community Service Society

HOME SERVICES

CONTRACTING/SURVEYING

Wiebe

Construction

Services

Serving Whistler for

over 25 years

• Kitchen and Bath

• Renovations & Repairs

• Drywall • Painting

• Finishing

• Minor Electrical

& Plumbing

Ray Wiebe

C

604.935.2432

M

Pat Wiebe

Y

604.902.9300

raymondo99.69@gmail.comCM

FLOORING

SHAW

CARPET & FLOOR CENTRE

Family owned & operated

Open Monday through

Friday 8:30 - 4:30

Saturday 10:00 -4:00

Sundays and Evenings

by appointment only.

3-1365 Alpha Lake Road

Whistler, B.C, V0N1B1

Phone 604-938-1126

email shawcarpet@shaw.ca

CLEANING

VACATION RENTAL CLEANING

& PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Housekeeping - daily, weekly monthly

Move in/out & Construction Cleaning

IICRC Professional carpet cleaning

Caretaker Services

FRIEND

US ON:

CALL SARA

604.848.8987

sara@goldmedalcleaning.ca

goldmedalcleaning.ca

MOVING AND STORAGE

MY

CY

CMY

K

HIGH AND DRY

STORAGE

LOWEST PRICES IN THE

CORRIDOR GAURANTEED

UNITS STARTING AT

$

65

per

month

24 HR ACCESS,

electronic monitoring

Outdoor storage for

RV’s, Boats, Campers,

Vehicles etc $ 2 per LFT.

Call 604.935.9370

or email gphare@shaw.ca

email:

chelsea@

cudmoregroup.com

or call

403-679-1234

Queen mattresses from $289 .99

Bunk Beds from $699 .99

Sofa beds from $1099 .99

NOW OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

whistlerfurniture.ca

2-1020 Millar Creek Road

604.938.4285

72 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

big or small we do it all!

Call 604-902-MOVE

www.alltimemoving.ca

WHISTLER’S

BEST STORAGE

one month

OPENfree

*

7 DAYS/

WEEK

* PREPAY 3 MONTHS

GET 4TH FREE

604.932.1948

1209 Alpha Lake Rd., Function Junction

www.a1ulock.com


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

HOME SERVICES

MOVING AND STORAGE

8080

NESTERS

STORAGE

8080 Nesters Road

Whistler, BC

SPACE NOW

AVAILABLE!

+ Central Location,

5 Minutes North of

Whistler Village

+ 20’ (one-trip)

Shipping Containers

+ Insulated With 1.5” Foam

Ceiling, Walls and Doors

+ Pre-wired 20-Amp

Service With Overhead

Light, Duplex Plug and

Heater on Shelf

+ Limited Number -

10’x8’ Containers,

Overhead Doors, Light,

No Heat now available

+ Paved, 24/7

fenced & gated access.

CONTACT

604.966.8080

8080Nesters@telus.net

www.nestersstorage.ca

NORTHLANDS

STORAGE

STORAGE SPACE

AVAILABLE

BEST PRICES IN WHISTLER

FURNITURE, CARS, BOATS

& MOTORCYCLES ETC

STORAGE AVAILABLE

BEST

PRICES

IN WHISTLER

604.932.1968

piquenewsmagazine.com/events

HOME SERVICES

MOVING AND STORAGE

WALSH

RESTORATION

USE A WALSH CUBE TRUCK FOR

FREE TO MOVE YOUR POSSESSIONS

TO WALSH STORAGE

We Added More Containers!

WALSH

STORAGE

Pemberton Industrial Park

1944 Stone Cutter Place

Owner Residence On-Site

8 X 10 CONTAINERS

+ TAX PER MONTH

$

100

2 HRS FREE TRUCK TIME

8 X 20 CONTAINERS

+ TAX PER MONTH

$

160

4 HRS FREE TRUCK TIME

Call Mike Walsh

604 698 0054

mike.walsh@walshrestoration.ca

Dont forget to

scoop the poop!

It’s not fun to step in,

or to see around town.

Help keep Whistler

clean and pick up after

your dog.

www.whistlerwag.com

Services

HEALTH & WELLBEING

SALON & SPA

BLUE HIGHWAYS

MASSAGE & SPA

massage clinic & spa

GIFT CERTIFICATES

AVAILABLE

Serving Whistler for 25 years in:

Deep Tissue Massage, Relaxation,

Thai & Shiatsu, Therapeutic Massage,

Reflexology, Aromatherapy &

Hot Stone Massage

Registered Therapists

available on request

Registered Massage, Registered

Counselling & Registered Chiropractic

RMT specials on request

604-938-0777

#206 - 4368 MAIN ST.

2ND FLOOR,

MARKET PAVILION

Services

HEALTH & WELLBEING

SALON & SPA

Spiritual Bliss

experience the healing powers

of the ila kundalini massage

save $25 this january

available monday-thursdays, january 1 st - 31 st .

not valid with any other package or discount.

certain conditions apply.

ask about our

RMT locals rate

locals discount available for

all regular-priced spa treatments.

ask our team for further details.

@TheSpaAtNitaLakeLodge

2131 Lake Placid Road

located at Nita Lake Lodge

above Loka Yoga

free parking and village shuttle

604 966 5715

www.nitalakelodge.com/spa

MASSAGE

Luxury Mobile

Massage

Private & Group

Bookings

604-388-4042

www.deepflowhealing.co

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Sally John Physiotherapy

ONE-ON-ONE

PHYSICAL-THERAPY

REGISTERED

PHYSIOTHERAPIST

IN HOME PHYSIOTHERAPY AVAILABLE

CUSTOM-MADE ORTHOTICS

at competitive prices for ski boots

& shoes, including training shoes.

17 years of making orthotics

‘Sally John Physiotherapy’

2997 Alpine Cresent (Alta Vista)

(604) 698-6661

www.sallyjohnphysiotherapy.com

Services

HEALTH & WELLBEING

SPORTS & ACTIVITIES

Spin classes

Tuesday and

Thursday 6-7 pm

Spin TRX 6:15-7:15 am

$12 per class

Sign up for 6 at once

and get 15% off

www.whistler.ca/recreation

604-935-PLAY (7529)

FAQwhistler

Community

NOTICES

GENERAL NOTICES

ROTARY CLUBS

OF WHISTLER

&

PEMBERTON

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m.

BG Urban Grill: 604-905-5090

& Thursdays at 12:15 p.m.

at the Pan Pacific, Mountainside.

www.whistler-rotary.org

Pemberton Rotary Club at the

Pemberton Community Centre,

Wednesdays at 7:15am

www.pembertonrotary.ca

U.S.

Exchange Rate

28%

as recommended by:

PERSONAL MESSAGES

Sea to Sky Healing Room

- For Blessing/Prayer/Encouragement

In the Community Church building,

7422 Dogwood Street, Pemberton.

Every 1st and 3rd Wednesday: 4-6 PM

MEETING PLACE

Welcome Centre at Whistler Public

Library - Information, support,

community connections and ESL practice

groups for newcomers and immigrants.

Meet people, make connections,

volunteer, build your communication

skills in English. Multicultural Meet

Up every Friday 9.30-12pm.604-698-

5960 info@welcomewhistler.com FB:

WhistlerWelcomeCentre

Community

NOTICES

WHISTLER COMMUNITY LISTINGS

Made in Whistler Market- Saturday's

from 12-6p.m. on December 15th, 22nd,

23rd, 29th & 30th. Then every Saturday,

January 2019 through March 2019. Free

Admission at The Westin Resort & Spa in

Whistler.

VOLUNTEERS

Big Brothers, Big Sisters Sea to Sky -

Volunteer to Mentor- just 1hr/week - and

make a difference in a child's life. Call

604-892-3125.

EDUCATION

FIRST AID AND SURVIVAL

Avalanche Skills Training

Courses - Level 1+ & Level 2

Glacier Travel / Crevasse

Rescue Courses

Guided Backcountry

Adventures

(WB Passholder discounts available)

extremelycanadian.com

604-938-9656

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

ARTS & CULTURE

Arts Whistler - Full arts & culture

listings. Comprehensive artist directory

& programs, events & performances

year-round. For info 604-935-8410 or visit

www.artswhistler.com

Pemberton Arts Council - Connect with

other artists, writers, artisans, musicians

& help make Pemberton a vibrant arts

community. Call 604-452-0123 or visit

www.pembertonartscouncil.com

Pemberton Writers - Meet with other

writers to review and critique monthly.

Opportunities for writing in a comfortable

and creative setting. Email crowley7@

telus.net

Sea to Sky Singers - Invites new & former

members to join us for an exciting new

term, the spring & fall terms culminate

with a concert. Choir meets Tues, 7-9pm

at Squamish Academy of Music, 2nd Ave.

Veronica seatoskysingers@gmail.com or

604- 892-7819 www.seatoskysingers.net

Whistler Community Band - Rehearsals

on Tuesdays 7 - 8:15 pm CONTACT

whistlerchorus@gmail.com FOR

LOCATION

Whistler Singers - Resumes September

11th, 2018 for the fall/winter sea- son.

Rehearsals are Tuesdays from 7 to 9pm

at Myrtle Philip School in the Toad Hall

room. Everyone is welcome!

Inquiries can be sent to

whistlersingers@gmail.com

For more info, visit:

https://www.facebook.com/whistlersingers/

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 73


ook your ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS

Donate Used Clothing & Household

Goods- To be distributed to local charities

by Sharon 604-894-6656 for pick up.

is now hiring for the following position:

Front Desk Agent

Room Attendant

Houseman

Ski Concierge

Full-time and Part-time

*seasonal incentives available

Please email resume to hr@listelhotel.com

Thank you for your interest. Only those applicants

being considered for an interview will be contacted.

WHISTLER’S RE-IMAGINED ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Il Caminetto is the newest Whistler restaurant to join the Toptable Group

famiglia! The storied restaurant offers a modern taste of Italy to bring a

fresh, contemporary style of dining to the mountain.

FRONT-OF-HOUSE:

Host or Hostess

Food Expeditor

Server Assistant

We offer year round full and part-time hours, competitive wages, gratuities,

extended medical & dental, potential for future growth within the company, and

an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@ilcaminetto.ca

Currently seeking:

BACK-OF-HOUSE:

Line Cooks

(2-3 years related experience)

Dishwashers

JOURNEYMEN AND APPRENTICES

in Pemberton, Whistler and Squamish

We are looking for motivated employees eager to learn and grow

with our company. Strong communication skills, hard work ethic

with a knowledge of electrical code are all necessary attributes.

Wages negotiable depending on experience and willingness to

take on responsibilities.

• Work Van

• Benefits

• Consistent work right through the year

• Low stress work environment and most pow days.

Email cover letters and resumes to:

SB@NOBLEELECTRIC.CA

WWW.NOBLEELECTRIC.CA

74 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

FULL TIME and PART TIME

POSITIONS

WITH A COMMERCIAL CLEANING COMPANY

• Starting wage of $20.00 per hour.

• Flexible working hours

• Must have a valid Driver’s License

• Ski pass – Options with Whistler Experience

Send resume to:

teamcwhistler@telus.net Or call: 604 935 8715

HOT TUB SERVICE TECHNICIAN

FULL TIME

Dub Tubs - Quality Pool and Hot Tub Services is currently looking

for a Full Time Service Technician; no previous technician

experience necessary, as training is provided.

Service Technician positions involve driving from home to home

maintaining private property hot tubs. The selected candidate

will have great customer service skills and the ability/maturity to

work alone. Valid BC drivers licence and cell phone is required.

Position available to begin immediately.

Wage: $16.00-$18.00/hour

Please send resume to info@dubtubs.com

Playground Builders: Creating Play

Building Hope - Playground Builders is a

registered charity that builds playgrounds

for children in war-torn areas. Learn more,

volunteer or donate at

www.playgroundbuilders.org

Sea to Sky Community Services -

running dozens of programs in Whistler

to help people through times of crisis and

with everyday challenges.

www.sscs.ca 1-877-892-2022

admin@sscs.ca

Stewardship Pemberton Society and

the One Mile Lake Nature Centre-

Connecting community, nature and

people through education, cooperation,

and community involvement. www.

stewardshippemberton.com

Whistler Health Care Foundation -

raises funds for improving health care

resources and services. New board

members welcomed. Contact us at info@

whistlerhealthcarefoundation.org or call

Karen at 604-906-1435.

SPORTS & RECREATION

Alpine Club of Canada Whistler Section-

Outdoor club focused on ski/split

board touring, hiking, mountaineering and

skills training.

More info: accwhistler.ca

Trip Schedule:

accwhistler.ca/trips/

Griffin Squadron Squamish Air Cadets-

Open to youth 12-18yrs at Don Ross

Secondary School on Tues at 6:30pm.

Pemberton Valley Snowmobile Club

Meets first Thurs of each month Dec

- April, 7pm at the Pemberton Comm.

Centre. BCSF/Rutherford trail passes &

liability insurance available for purchase.

Contact 604-894-1155 for info.

Pemberton Valley Trails Association-

Meets the second Wed of each month.

7pm at the Pemberton Recreation Centre.

Call 604-698-6158

Sea to Sky RC Flyers - Model

Aeronautics Association of Canada Club

active in the Sea to Sky Region flying

model airplanes, helicopters and multirotors.

Contact S2SRCFLY@telus.net

Whistler Adaptive Sports Program -

Provides sports & recreation experiences

for people with disabilities. Chelsey

Walker at 604-905-4493 or info@

whistleradaptive.com

Whistler Martial Arts offers - Kishindo

Karate for kids age 4 and up, Capoeira

and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu for kids and adults.

Also Kickboxing, Judo, Yoga and Bellyfit

for adults. Call Cole 932-2226

Women's Karma Yoga - Thursdays,

9:30-10:30, ongoing by donation and

childminding provided. Whistler Women's

Centre: 1519 Spring Creek Drive. Dropin

for weekly yoga classes led by an all

female team of certified yoga instructors.

All women, all ability levels welcome.

hswc.ca | 604-962- 8711

YOUTH ACTIVITIES

1st Whistler Scout Group - outdoor &

adventure program for girls and boys

aged 5-17. Times and locations vary.

More info: http://1stwhistlerscoutgroup.

webs.com.

Contact scoutsatwhistler

@gmail.com or

604-966-4050.


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

YOUTH ACTIVITIES

Whistler Children's Chorus Rehearsal

- Tuesdays at MILLENNIUM PLACE (4 -

5:30 pm) contact whistlerchorus@gmail.

com

Whistler/Pemberton Girl Guides -

Adventures for Girls age 5 & up. Sparks

& Brownies (Gr K,1,2,3) Guides (Gr

4,5,6) Volunteers always welcome.

coastmountaingirlguides@gmail.com

Whistler Youth Centre - Drop - in:

Fridays 3:30 - 11 PM & Saturdays 6 - 10

PM for ages 13 - 18. Located downstairs

in the Maury Young Arts Centre (formerly

Millenium Place). We offer: a Ping pong

table, Pool table, Skateboard mini ramp w.

skateboards and helmets to borrow, Free

Wi-Fi, Xbox One, PS3 & PS4, Guitars,

Board games, Projector and widescreen

TV's. Facebook THEYC Crew, www.

whistleryouthcentre.com or call 604-935-

8187.

LEISURE GROUPS

Duplicate Bridge Club- Whistler

Racquet Club reconvenes in late fall. The

club meets every week and visitors are

welcome. For partner, please call Gill at

640-932-5791.

Knitty Gritty Knit Night- Held every Tues

6-8pm. Free evening open to everyone

with a love for knitting/crocheting.

Beginners welcome. For location and

further details email knittygrittywhistler@

gmail.com or find us on facebook.

Basalt Wine + Salumeria are currently looking to fill the roles of:

HOSTS

LUNCH SERVERS

LINE COOKS

DISHWASHERS

Please send your cover letter and resume to skeenan-naf@crystal-lodge.com

Wages are very competitive (based on experience), great perks and benefits.

Full and Part Time positions available. Come join the best team in Whistler!

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

HOUSING AVAILABLE

FOR FULL TIME

EMPLOYEES, IT’S CHEAP!

Delish Cafe in Function Junction are expanding!

We are currently hiring both part time &

full time positions

Sandwich Ninjas & Bakers

Must have a work hard - play hard attitude! Employee

housing available for the right candidates. Send your

resume to ian@whistlergrocery.com

Mountain Spirit Toastmasters- Builds

communication, public speaking, and

leadership skills . Wednesdays at the

Pan Pacific Mountainside - Singing Pass

Room, 5:30-7pm. Email contact - 8376@

toastmastersclubs.org

www.whistler.toastmastersclubs.org

Pemberton Women's Institute - Meets

the third Mon of each month in the activity

room at St. David's United Church at

7:30pm. New members welcome. Linda

Ronayne at 604-894- 6580

Rotary Club of Whistler - Meets

Tuesdays at 7:15 a.m at BG Bread

Garden Urban Grill 604-905-5090

Rotary Club of Whistler Millennium

- Meets every Thurs at 12:15pm at Pan

Pacific Mountainside. 604-932-7782

Shades of Grey Painters

Meets twice a week -

Tuesdays, Watercolour, 11.00am- 2.30pm

@ The Rec, Pemberton. Thursdays,

Acrylic, 1.00pm-3.30pm @ The Amenities

Building, Pioneer Village, Pemberton. We

are like- minded people that get together

& paint. Gretchen is the painting coach.

$5 to attend.

Whistler Reads - Meets to discuss a new

book every eight weeks. Go to bookbuffet.

com & click on Whistler Reads for the

latest book/event. Paula at

604-907-2804 or wr@bookbuffet.com

COMMUNITY CENTRES

Maury Young Arts Centre - Whistler's

community centre for arts, culture &

inspiration. Performance theatre, art

gallery, daycare, youth centre, meditation

room, meeting facilities. www.artswhistler.

com or 604-935-8410

Pemberton & District Community

Centre - Located at 7390 Cottonwood

St. Fitness Centre, facility rentals, spray

park, playground, children, youth, adult &

seniors programs. For more info

604-894-2340 or pemrecinfo@slrd.bc.ca

Whistler Blackcomb Foundation

Social Services Centre - 1519 Spring

Creek Dr. Features programs & services

from WCSS, The Howe Sound Women's

Centre, Sea to Sky Community Services

& Zero Ceiling. Open Mon-Fri.

EXCITING CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

APPLY TODAY!

Diamond Resorts Canada Ltd., Whistler, BC

Full Time Maintenance/Pool Technician

$18.50 per hour plus benefits

Eligible successful candidates may receive*:

• Extensive benefits package which may include; ski

pass or wellness allowance, disability coverage, travel

insurance and extended health and dental.

• Travel allowance and discounted employee rates at

any Diamond Resort International resort.

• Full-time work year round and a FUN work environment.

*eligibility and conditions based on DRCL policies and practices set

out in general terms and conditions of employment.

Email your resume with the position you wish to apply

for to: embarc_hr@diamondresorts.com

Vehicle Cleaner

Whistler Transit Ltd is seeking a full-time Vehicle

Cleaner (graveyard shifts) with Class 5 driving license

with air brake endorsement. Competitive pay rates.

Benefits included.

Contact us at: recruitment@whistlertransit.ca

The Beacon Pub and Eatery

is currently looking for:

LINE COOKS

DISHWASHERS

HOSTS

DOOR HOST

Wages are very competitive (based on experience),

great perks and benefi ts.

Come join the best team in Whistler!

Interested applicants please email your resume to

skeenan-naf@Crystal-Lodge.com

WE ARE LOOKING TO HIRE:

BUSSERS

HOSTS

(FULL-TIME)

PREP COOK

(day shifts only, prep experience required)

DISHWASHERS

Full-time and year round. We feature evening work

only, staff meals, competitive wages and a

great work environment. So if you’re looking for a

change or some extra hours, come by and see us.

Flexible schedules are available.

REPLY IN PERSON WITH RESUME BETWEEN 3-5 AT QUATTRO -

4319 Main St. in the Pinnacle Hote

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 75


ook your ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

classifieds.piquenewsmagazine.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

MUSEUMS

RDC is looking for a positive and reliable

Asset Coordinator to join our team.

TASKS INCLUDE:

• Oversee RDC Storage

room – Organize, clean

and inventory tracking

of tools and equipment

• Conducting general

tool & equipment

maintenance and

coordinate tool repairs

• Material pick-ups from

vendors to sites,

• Move RDC tools &

equipment to and from

sites

• Garbage/recycling

runs to dump – Help

coordinate sustainability

efforts on site

• Support all sites with

general laboring/

carpentry task as

requested

DOUG BUSH SURVEY SERVICES LTD.

is looking for a

SURVEY FIELD TECHNICIAN

With a two or three year college or technical school program in

geomatics. Three years experience and proficient in the use of

robotic survey instruments and GPS equipment for engineering

and building construction layout, topographic site surveys,

site improvement surveys and precise monitoring. Experience

with AutoCAD Civil 3D also an asset to assist in office with

computations and drawing preparation.

Please call Ian @ 604-932-3314 or

email @ ian@dbss.ca

#18-1370 Alpha Lake Rd. Whistler BC V0N 1B1

Serving Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton

MUST HAVE:

• Core Value #1 - Positive

Solution Oriented

• Core Value #2 - Reliable

You do what you say you will

do, regular follow through on

actions, punctual and strong

attendance.

• Core Value #3 - Performance

Strive to exceed expectations

— Time, Cost, Quality

• Professional personal

presentation

• Ability to communicate

effectively with, co-workers

and sub trades

RDC OFFERS:

• Competitive compensation

• Education opportunities

• Positive work environment

*Assigned tasks will be based on skill set of

successful candidate.

Send us your resume and contact details at:

info@rdcfinehomes.com

ESTIMATOR / PROJECT MANAGER

(PEMBERTON)

Wide Open Welding Ltd is looking for a full-time

Estimator / Project Manager.

The candidate will need to possess the following skill set:

This is a multi-faceted position. The ideal candidate will be highly organized and

detail oriented. Strong interpersonal skills, the ability to express ideas clearly

in both written and oral communication and strong presentation skills. Must

have the ability to analyze issues and determine priorities in an environment of

tight and conflicting deadlines. Proficiency in planning, scheduling, execution

and management of projects. An ability to read drawings and perform take-offs

is a must. Our office is located in Pemberton and the job will entail travelling

to and from job sites in the corridor to conduct site measurements, layouts

and verifications. Candidate MUST have a commitment to excellence and the

production of high quality end results.

Please email your resume to:

contactus@wideopenwelding.com

76 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

We offer competitive wages, a unique

environment, seasonal bonuses,

staff discounts and benefits.

Ask about accommodation.

Come Grow Sport with us at our

Whistler Olympic Legacy Venues

We are recruiting for:

Whistler Athletes’ Centre

(High Performance Training and Accommodation)

Positions for this venue are currently filled

Whistler Sliding Centre

(Bobsleigh, Luge & Skeleton)

Positions for this venue are currently filled

Whistler Olympic Park

(Nordic Skiing, Snowshoeing and Outdoor Activities)

Groomer Operator

Guest Activity Rep

Snow Clearing Operator

Visit our website to view

current postings and to apply:

www.whistlersportlegacies.com/careers

WE ARE HIRING:

Foremen, Carpenters, Labourers, Apprentices

(20cm rule applies)

Please contact Marc@balmoralconstruction.com

Squamish Lil'wat Cultural Centre -

Explore First Nations Art Galleries, and

Interactive Exhibits. Gift Shop & Cafe

are in our admission free area. Open

Tuesday's-Sunday's per week. 10am-

5p.m..

Whistler Museum & Archives Society

- Explore interactive exhibits, listen to

local stories & discover Whistler's journey.

Open daily 11am- 5pm, 4333 Main St.

www.whistlermuseum.org or

604-932- 2019

PROFESSIONAL NETWORKING

BNI Mountain High- Meets at 6:45-

8:30am every Thursday at The Venue.

BNI provides a positive and structured

environment for the development and

exchange of quality business referrals.

It does so by helping you build personal

relationships with dozens of other

qualified business professionals. Register

by emailing blair@blairkaplan.ca.

Whistler Chamber of Commerce - Is the

leading business association in Whistler

that works to create a vibrant & successful

economy. Learn more about the programs

& services at www.whistlerchamber.com

Women of Whistler - Group that provides

opportunities for Whistler businesswomen

to network, gain knowledge & share ideas

in a friendly, relaxed environment. Learn

more at www.womenofwhistler.com

FOR SENIORS

Senior Citizen Organizations - Is an

advocacy group devoted to improving the

quality of life for all seniors. Ernie Bayer

604-576-9734 or ecbayer2@gmail.com

Mature Action Community [MAC]- Is

the voice of Whistler's 55-Plus community.

MAC identifies, and advocates for seniors

programs and services to improve the

quality of life for those wishing to age inplace;

MAC also provides opportunities for

social interaction. Visit www.whistlermac.

org or e-mail info@whistlermac.org

Pemberton Men's Shed - Weekly social

meetings WED. 11-2 in the Seniors/

youth Rec. bldg. beside library. Social

meeting with BYO Bag lunch, card games

and pool/snooker. Help out in YOUR

community, operating the Pemberton Tool

Library.

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

Creating Community and Cohous- ing-

Join us on our journey to creating REAL

community through the cohous- ing model

of building a neighbourhood community.

Cohousing is NOT a com- mune, NOT

a cooperative. Put your toe in the water

and find out more by coming to one of

our weekly meetings or regular social

gatherings. For more information, visit our

website at http://thecoastalvillage.ca/ or

call Janey Harper 778-840-1529.

Earthsave Whistler - Providing info &

support to people who are interested in

making healthier, greener, more peaceful

food choices. earthsavewhistler.com

Healthy Home, Healthy Planet - Expert

in green cleaning offers tricks, info &

advice on the best way to green clean

your home or work space! Call France

604-698-7479. Free private presentation

on request.

www.healthylivingwhistler.com

Regional Recycling - Recycle beverage

containers (full deposit paid) electronics,

appliances, batteries, Lightbulbs, drop-off

times are 9am-5pm on Nesters Rd. Pick

up service 604- 932-3733


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

The Association of Whistler Area

Residents for the Environment

(AWARE) - Whistler's Natural Voice

since 1989. Regular events, project and

volunteer opportunities.

www.awarewhistler.org

info@awarewhistler.org

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

FAMILY RESOURCES

Baby/Child Health Clinics - Free routine

immunizations & newly licensed vaccines

for purchase, growth & development

assessments & plenty of age appropriate

resources avail.

By appointment 604-932-3202

Families Fighting Cancer In The Sea To

Sky - We are a non profit partner with Sea

to Sky Community Services. We provide

financial and practical support to children

and parents with dependants diagnosed

with cancer. Please contact us on our

confidential email: ffcseatosky@gmail.

com, visit our Facebook Page or website

www.familiesfightingcancer.ca

Pemberton Parent Infant Drop-In -

Facilitated by Capri Mohammed, Public

Health Nurse. Every Mon 11am- 12:30pm

at Pemberton Public Library.

Pemberton Strong Start Family Drop-

In- A play group for you and your under-5

child. Signal Hill Elementary, Mon, Tues,

Wed & Fri, 9am-12pm. Thurs only 12pm-

3pm. Call 604-894- 6101 / 604-966- 8857

Whistler Public Library -

Open Mon- Thurs 10am-7pm, Fri 10am-

6pm, Sat & Sun 11am-5pm. Music &

Words, Mon 10am. Rhyme & Song, Tues

11am. Parent & Infant drop-in, Thurs

11am. Preschool Story Time, Fri 10am.

Singing with the babies, Sat 11am. Call

604-935-8433

SOCIAL SERVICES

Counselling Assistance Available -

WCSS subsidizes access to a private

counselor for $35-$50/hr depending on

financial need. Contact an outreach team

member at 604-932-0113

www.mywcss.org

ESL Volunteer Tutor Program -

Volunteer one-to-one tutoring for new immigrants

& Canadian citizens. For more

information or to register, contact the

Whistler Welcome Centre

info@welcomewhistler.com

or call 604.698.5960

Food Bank, Pemberton - Run by Sea

to Sky Community Service. Open every

second Monday. 604 894 6101

Healthy Pregnancy Outreach Program-

Learn how to prepare healthy affordable

meals at this outreach program. Sea to

Sky Community Services 604-894-6101

North Shore Schizophrenia Society -

Services for family, friends & community.

Mental illness info, support & advocacy.

Call Chris Dickenson at 604-966-7334

Pearl's Safe Home - Temporary shelter

for women & children experiencing abuse

in relationships. Locations in Whistler

& Pemberton avail 24/7. All services are

free. 1-877- 890-5711 or 604-892-5711

RMOW Rec Credit - If you are financially

restricted, you may be eligible for a

$127.60 municipal recreation credit.

Contact WCSS at 604.932.0113

www.mywcss.org

Support Counselling - For women

regarding abuse & relationship issues. No

charge. Call 604-894-6101

Victim Services - Assists victims,

witnesses, family members or friends

directly affected by any criminal act or

traumatic event. Call 604-905-1969

Delivery

Driver

Pique is looking for a delivery driver

with a reliable vehicle to deliver Pique

Newsmagazine in Whistler.

Delivery is on Thursday mornings.

Experience is not essential as a full

route list and training will be provided.

Please reply with name, phone

number, and a resume to

lprior@wplpmedia.com

Sundial Boutique Hotel

at 4340 Sundial Crescent, Whistler BC V0N 1B4

is currently hiring for a

Housekeeping Supervisor

This position is FT year around. Wage is $21.75/hr + benefi ts.

Job duties include: Supervising dept duties, inspection of work,

administration, assist with recruiting, perform training and

cleaning duties.

Skill requirements: 1 year’s prior experience as a housekeeping

supervisor”, tourism, administration and customer service.

Please fax or email your resume

with attention to

“Human Resources Department” to:

604-932-7152

hr@sundialhotel.com

Become part of a

dynamic team and

surround yourself with art.

The Audain Art Museum is currently seeking:

Security Supervisor

Full time position available

Guard

Part time positions available

WHISTLER

GETS IT

For complete job descriptions please visit:

audainartmuseum.com

To apply, please email your resume to

bbeacom@audainartmuseum.com

Photo: RAEF.ca

We are currently interviewing:

Project Managers

Site Supervisors

Project Coordinator

Carpenters

Carpenters Helpers

Labourers

Level 2 First Aid Attendant

Please submit resume to: info@evrfinehomes

Whistler’s Premier Estate Builder

Kaze Sushi is looking for

Experienced Sushi Chef

Please apply in person with resume at the

Whistler restaurant from 5:30pm onwards

Call or email Tom on

604-938-4565 or

tokyotom111@hotmail.com

The Pinnacle Hotel Whistler has the following positions available:

HOUSEMAN

MAINTENANCE

ROOM ATTENDANTS

Please reply by email:

parmstrong@pinnaclehotels.ca

www.piquenewsmagazine.com | January 17, 2019 | 77


ook your ad online by 4pm Tuesday:

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

SOCIAL SERVICES

Whistler Food Bank - Located in the

Whistler Blackcomb Foundation Social

Services Centre, 1519 Spring Creek Dr.

Every Mon 10am-12pm. For emergencies

call 604-935-7717 www.mywcss.org

foodbank@mywcss.org

We are the Spa for you

If you are looking for a new place to call home:

• We manifest positive energy

• We have a long term and loyal team

• We treat you fairly and look out for your wellness

• You are listened to

• We give you proper breaks and time to set up between services

• We offer extended medical benefits

• We have potential staff housing at affordable rates

• You can enjoy $5.00 cafeteria meals

• You have the opportunity to work for other Vida locations

in slow season

We are here for you.

Vida Spa at the Fairmont Chateau Whistler

is currently recruiting:

REGISTERED MASSAGE THERAPIST

SPA PRACTITIONER

ESTHETICIAN

GUEST SERVICE AGENT

To join our unique Vida family, email Bonnie@vidaspas.com

Vida Spas - Vancouver & Whistler

Live well. Live long. vidaspas.com

Thank You for applying. Only those considered will be contacted.

GROUP SALES & EVENTS

COORDINATOR

WHISTLER, BC

Toptable Group is seeking a Group Sales & Events Coordinator in

Whistler, BC. This individual will be responsible for coordinating all

group bookings and events at our Whistler restaurants;

Araxi + The Cellar by Araxi, Bar Oso, and Il Caminetto.

EXPERIENCE & QUALIFICATIONS:

• Previous experience in sales and customer service is required

• Previous restaurant experience is an asset

We offer year round full time hours, competitive wages, gratuities,

extended medical & dental, potential for future growth within the company,

and an employee discount at all Toptable restaurants.

Please email your resume & cover letter to:

careers@araxi.com

YOU CAN’T DO

THIS

TOWN

WITHOUT IT

78 | January 17, 2019 | www.piquenewsmagazine.com

We’re Hiring

Cooks, Shift Managers, Servers, Hosts,

Setters and Dishwashers

Visit us at the restaurant anytime to apply in person

or via email at apply.whistler@earls.ca

HR Manager at

the District of Squamish

Play a key role working with and leading the

District's best asset! The District of Squamish is

seeking a Human Resources professional who brings

expertise in labour relations and strategic Human

Resource management to join our team. Our ideal

candidate has an extensive background in all areas

of Human Resources with a significant focus in

labour relations gained from working in a unionized

environment - preferably in the local government

sector.

Visit squamish.ca/careers to find out more!

FREE

PICK IT UP EVERYWHERE

Whistler for the Disabled - Provides info

for people with disabilities on what to do

& where to go.

Visit www.whistlerforthedisabled.com

Whistler Housing Authority - Long- term

rental & ownership housing for Whistler

residents. Visit www.whistlerhousing.ca

Whistler Mental Health & Addiction

Services - If you or someone you know

needs help with a mental health issue or

substance misuse or addiction problem,

we can assist. Mon-Fri 9am-5pm.

604-698-6455

Whistler Multicultural Network -

Settlement information, social support and

programs for newcomers and immigrants

living/working in Whistler. 604-388-5511

www.whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

Whistler Opt Healthy Sexuality Clinic -

Professional sexual health services at a

reduced cost. Free HIV testing. Clinics

at Whistler Health Care Ctr, 2nd floor on

Tues 4:30-7:30pm. Winter hours Thurs.

5:00pm-7:00pm. Confidentiality assured.

Whistler Women's Centre - Provides

confidential support, resources, referrals

and advocacy for women living in the Sea

to Sky corridor. All services are free of

charge and include access to emergency

safe housing, child/youth counselling,

play space and computer access. Drop-In

Centre open Mon 12-230, Tue-Thu 12-5.

1519 Spring Creek Drive. You can also

access our services at the Whistler Public

Library on Mondays from 3-6 p.m.

www.hswc.ca or call (604)962- 8711.

24 HR Crisis Line: 1-877-890- 5711

Whistler WorkBC Employment

Services Centre - Provides free onestop

employment services to job seekers

and employers. Drop in services at

the Pemberton Library Thursdays 1-5

PM, and at the Whistler Public Library

on Mondays from 3-6 PM. For more

information visit www.WhistlerESC.com

or call us at 604-932-1600

SUPPORT GROUPS

Concussion Support Group - Monthly

group for people who've had postconcussion

syndrome for at least six

months. First Thursday of the month, 11-

12:30 at Whistler Health Care Centre. Run

by Sea to Sky Community Services.

1 877 892 2022, ext 404,

concussiongroup@sscs.ca

Epilepsy Support Group- For individuals

& families seeking guidance or support.

Contact eswhistler@gmail.com

Immigrant Peer Educators - Immigrants

providing support and information for those

who may be experiencing challenges

adjusting to a new culture. 604-388-5511

info@whistlermulticulturalnetwork.com

SMART Recovery - (Self-Management

and Recovery Training)

A Cognitive-Behavioural group for individuals

with substance abuse con- cerns.

Pemberton Health Centre (Board Room)

January 17th, 24th, 31st, and February

7th 2019

4:30-6:00pm **drop in welcome.

RELIGION

Jesus Rock Of Ages Ministry- A bible

based church that holds services at

Millennium Place's main floor theatre at

4:30pm. www.jesusrockofages.com


there's no better way to buy and sell than Pique's online marketplace.

COMMUNITY LISTINGS

RELIGION

Roman Catholic Church -

Come celebrate mass at Our Lady of

the Mountains, Whistler on Saturday

5pm, Sunday 9am, Tuesday 5:45pm,

Wednesday 7pm, Thursday/Friday

5:45pm. St. Francis of Assisi, Pemberton

on Sunday 12:30pm and Friday 9am.

St. Christopher's, Mt. Currie on Sunday

11am. 604-905-4781

FUR & FEATHERS

Get Bear Smart Society - Learn more

about coexisting with bears. To report a

conflict, garbage or attractant issue call

604-905-BEAR (2327)

www.bearsmart.com

Pemberton Wildlife Association -

Advocates for the conservation of fish,

wildlife & wilderness recreation. Also

offering target shooting & archery facilities.

www.pembertonwildlifeassociation.com

WAG - Whistler Animals Galore -

A shelter for lost, unwanted, and

homeless cats and dogs. Let us help you

find your purrfect match...adopt a shelter

animal! For more info 604-935-8364

www.whistlerwag.com

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Full Time

The Pony Restaurant is currently seeking

a server to join our team.

The right individual will have experience

in a similar fast paced environment,

be able to offer flexible shifts, be

a great team player, and have a good

knowledge of local craft beers.

To apply, please email your resume or

drop off at the restaurant.

We look forward to hearing from you

events@thepony.ca

www.theponyrestaurant.com

We’re

Hiring!

Great Perks!

Hotel

Food & Beverage

Banquet Chef - FT

Front Office Manager

1st Cook - PT

Guest Services Agent

Pastry Assistant - PT

Steward - FT (AM) & PT

Shuttle Driver – BC class 4, Server Assistant

Unrestricted license required

Expo

Host

Room Attendant

Barista - FT

Ask about our staff housing opportunities

contact us

today

careers@nitalakelodge.com

www.nitalakelodge.com I @nitalakelodge

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

PIQUENEWSMAGAZINE.COM/JOBS

THE FIRST PLACE TO LOOK FOR LOCAL JOB OPENINGS

COME WORK FOR CANADA’S #1 EMPLOYER!

Fairmont was voted Canada’s Top-Rated

Workplace for 2018 by Indeed.com

CURRENT CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Purchasing Manager

Security

Conference Services Manager

Room Attendants

Royal Service Agent – Overnights

Royal Service Agent

Culinary Opportunities

Summer Golf Opportunities

Benefi ts | Meals | Leisure/Ski Pass Allowance

APPLY TODAY AT FAIRMONTCAREERS.COM

Temporary, Seasonal (Summer)

Hiring now for start dates in May.

Based out of Squamish, AmeriCan Adventures

Group Leaders are paid to

camp, road trip, explore and share

Canada’s National Parks and cities

with small groups of foreign passengers.

Pay is 830$/week plus tips and

commissions. Housing, company vehicle,

commercial license reimbursement

and paid training is provided.

amadjobs@americanadventures.com

www.americanadventures.com/workfor-us

Dubh Linn Gate Irish Pub is hiring:

LINE COOK

DISHWASHER

Certified Dental Assistant

for busy family dental clinic

Located 20 minutes north of whistler in the

beautiful pemberton valley.

Work at Whistler’s best location!

Refine or jump-start your culinary career in our

fast-paced and busy kitchen. We offer competitive wages,

tips and a season ski pass. Please stop by the pub

between 10am and 5pm with a copy of your resume.

You can also submit your resume via email to

careers@dubhlinngate.com

Hours negotiable with competitive wage.

Email “info@pembertonvalleydental.ca”

or fax to 604-894-6934

PICK UP

YOUR COPY

TODAY!

Winter 2019 Issue

on select stands and

in Whistler hotel rooms.

We are currently hiring Full Time

Sales Representatives with personality!

Please stop by our Whistler Village location

with your resume to fill out an application

and say Hi to Michelle or Tina.

Staff Accommodation Available

(4154 Village Green)

SOLID CONTRACTING

is currently looking for

LABOURERS,

CARPENTERS,

FINISH CARPENTERS

We offer full-time/flex-time positons

in a positive, safe work environment.

Salary based on experience.

Send us your resume or call

Solidcontracting@gmail.com