March 2019 Envision Equity

jcpsdep

We hope you enjoy the March 2019 Edition of our Envision Equity newsletter.

J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y P U B L I C S C H O O L S

ENVISION

EQUITY

DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND POVERTY PROGRAMS

MARCH 2019

ISSUE NO. 61

FREE

W.E.B.

DUBOIS

ACADEMY

Celebrate the Birthday

of Its Namesake

NAACP & JCPS

Host First of Five

Community Meetings

EDUCATORS RISING

2019 District

Conference Recap

And More!

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Photo, Getty Images


Above, W.E.B. DuBois Assistant Principal Latonya

Frazier gives an overview of W.E.B. DuBois.

DuBois Academy

Celebrate the Birthday of

Its Namesake

By Abdul Sharif, Generalist—Diversity, Equity, and

Poverty Programs

The W.E.B. DuBois Academy celebrated

the 151st birthday of its namesake.

W.E.B. DuBois, born William Edward

Burghardt DuBois, was born on February 23,

1868, in Great Barrington, MA. DuBois, a man of

many talents, was an American sociologist,

historian, author, editor, and activist who was

the most important black protest leader in

the United States during the first half of the

twentieth century. He shared in the creation of

the National Association for the Advancement of

Colored People (NAACP) in 1909 and edited The

Crisis, its magazine, from 1910 to 1934. His

collection of essays The Souls of Black Folk (1903)

is a landmark of African-American literature.

W.E.B. DuBois Academy students learned about

their school’s namesake during their Friday

morning Brotherhood Time. Mr. Jahi Peake, a

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

DuBois Academy art teacher, created a project in which students celebrated W.E.B. DuBois’

birthday through creating

artistic pieces of DuBois’

most notable quotes.

DuBois graduated from

Fisk University, a black

institution at Nashville, TN,

in 1888. He received a Ph.D.

from Harvard University in

1895. His doctoral

dissertation, The

Suppression of the African

Slave-Trade to the United

States of America,

1638-1870, was published

in 1896. Although DuBois

took an advanced degree

in history, he was broadly

trained in the social

sciences; and at a time when sociologists were theorizing about race relations, he was

conducting empirical inquiries into the condition of blacks. For more than a decade, he devoted

himself to sociological investigations of blacks in America, producing 16 research monographs

published between 1897 and 1914 at Atlanta University, where he was a professor, as well as The

Philadelphia Negro; A Social Study (1899), the first case study of a black community in the United

States.

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Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Department

The Model

Recognizing Culturally Responsive and Innovative Classroom Teachers

Name: Kim Williams-Hamilton

School: Shacklette Elementary

Kim Williams-Hamilton was born and raised

in Brooklyn, New York. She has been a

teacher at Shacklette Elementary School

for 8 years. Ms. Hamilton’s favorite grade to

teach is fifth grade.

Ms. Hamilton graduated from Spalding University with

a Masters in Education K-5, and she has a Rank I in

Teacher Leadership and an endorsement in

Technology K-12.


She has wanted to be a teacher since she was in 6th

grade…and she always lets people know that she is

“living her dream!”

Ms. Hamilton loves bowling, playing Texas Hold'em,

and fishing.

Favorite quote: "It's never too late to become what

you might have been."

Favorite movie: Fast and the Furious; The Godfather;

The Five Heartbeats.

Favorite book: Anything by Stephen King or Dean

Koontz

Favorite TV-show: Investigative Discovery, Wheel of

Fortune and Jeopardy

My Best friend: My mom


ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

NAACP HOLDS COMMUNITY

MEETING WITH JCPS

By Dr. Geneva Stark, Specialist—Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs Department

Photo provided by Dr. Geneva Stark.

Mr. Raoul Cunningham, NAACP

President, and Dr. Kathryn

Wallace, NAACP Education Chair,

and one of the NAACP’s premier partners,

Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS),

have hosted public meetings to enlighten

the community on programs and activities of

JCPS. It is imperative that the community is

aware of the programs and activities that

impact our students, schools, and

community.

The NAACP realizes the value and the

appreciation the community has for the

knowledge and information provided at

these meetings. The first meeting was held

on Wednesday, February 13, at Maupin

Above, JCPS Communications Chief Renee Murphy speaks during

the NAACP community meeting at Maupin Elementary School.

Elementary School. JCPS officials present

during the meeting were Dr. John Marshall,

JCPS Equity Officer; Dr. Devon Horton, JCPS

Chief of Schools; and Renee Murphy, JCPS

Chief of Communications.

Renee Murphy spoke about the rebranding

of JCPS. She spoke about the “six days of

attendance” campaign on television and the

importance of students’ coming to school

every day. She also spoke about the need to

capture all of the great stories and things

that happen in our school district that go

unnoticed.

Dr. John Marshall spoke about the Racial

Equity Policy (REP), Racial Equity Analysis

Protocol (REAP) and the Equity Scorecard.

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

Dr. Marshall spoke about the

importance of the district’s mission

to implement the plan with fidelity.

He spoke about each school’s plan

and how the Diversity, Equity and

Poverty Programs Department is

assisting schools. Dr. Marshall also

spoke about the need to hold each

school accountable.

Above, JCPS Chief Equity Officer, Dr. John Marshall speaks during

the NAACP community meeting at Maupin Elementary School.

Photo, provided by Dr. Geneva Stark.

Dr. Devon Horton spoke about

Calibration, Collaboration Visits

(CCV) to schools to help and

support their racial equity plans. He

also spoke about the need to have effective and efficient principals in school buildings. He

spoke about his work with leaders in Coaching Up! Coaching Up! And Coaching Out!

After presentations, the floor was open to members of the audience to ask questions or to

share their thoughts.

The next NAACP/JCPS Community Meeting will take place on February 27, 2019, and will

focus on “Updates of State and District Concerns and Practices.” Guest speakers will

include Dr. Wayne Lewis, Kentucky Education Commissioner, and Dr. Marty Pollio, JCPS

Superintendent.

All meetings will take place in the gymnasium of Maupin Elementary School, 1312 Catalpa

Street, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Above, JCPS Chief of Schools Devon Horton speaks during the NAACP

community meeting at Maupin Elementary School.

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

Above, Dr. Lateefah Id-Deen speaks during her Community

Conversation at the Louisville Urban League.

Dr. Lateefah Id-

Deen Inspires Girls

of Color to Excel in

Math During

Community

Conversation

By Abdul Sharif, Generalist—Diversity, Equity, and

Poverty Programs

Photos, Abdul Sharif.

Dr. Lateefah Id-Deen is an assistant

professor of Mathematics Education in

the Department of Elementary and

Early Childhood Education at Kennesaw State

University in Georgia. She teaches mathematics

methods courses for undergraduate elementary

education majors. Her research examines

vulnerable students’ identities and perspectives

to enhance student-teacher relationships and

their sense of belonging in mathematics

classrooms.

Dr. Id-Deen was raised in East Oakland, CA, and

spent some time in Atlanta, GA. She credits her

grandmother in playing an integral part in her

becoming a teacher. Dr. Id-Deen has four sisters,

one brother, and nieces and nephews whom she

loves dearly. She taught at public and private

schools for a total of six years in Pine Bluff, AR,

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

and Atlanta. Both

contexts helped

her shape the

type of teacher

and teacher

educator she is

today.

On February 18,

Dr. Id-Deen

facilitated a

Community

Conversation as

part of our

February Speaker

Series. Dr. Id-

Above, Dr. Ahmad Washington participates in a breakout sessions during the Community Conversation. Deen spoke

about many of the

challenges facing black girls in JCPS mathematics classrooms. Last year, Dr. Id-Deen conducted

a study of girls of color in JCPS math classes,

and many of the girls met with expressed

frustration, apprehension, and a fear of

mathematics. During the Community

Conversation, Dr. Id-Deen presented quotes from

her study to create a dialogue with attendees.

Community Conversation participants were

paired in groups to come up with their own

solutions to some of the issues girls of color are

experiencing in JCPS mathematics classrooms.

Some of the solutions that audience members

came up with included teachers making a better effort to connect math to high-paying careers,

such as engineering; connecting mathematics back to African culture; and building a stronger

bond between girls of color and their teachers, among others.

On February 19, Dr. Id-Deen conducted a professional-development (PD) session for District

Staff at Atherton High School. Teachers and administrators left Dr. Id-Deen’s PD with a better

understanding of how to address the lack of interest that many girls of color have toward

mathematics.

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

JCPS HOSTS EDUCATORS

RISING DISTRICT CONFERENCE

By Abdul Sharif, Generalist—Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs Department

Photos, Abdul Sharif.

E

ducators Rising cultivates highly skilled

educators by guiding young people on a path

to becoming accomplished teachers.

Educators Rising is a national organization

for middle school, high school, and college

students. The mission of Educators Rising is

to foster the recruitment and development of

prospective educators worldwide through

the dissemination of innovative

programming and relevant research. JCPS

has more than 100 students who are active in

the activities, community services events,

and competitions sponsored by Educators

Rising. This organization attracts, equips, and

Above, an Educators Rising student displays her competition certificate.

provides experiences for students who are

exploring teaching as a future career.

Students are given the opportunity to

compete at a district, state, and national

level in competitions supporting growth and

curriculum in the field of education.

On February 6, the Diversity, Equity, and

Poverty (DEP) Programs Department of JCPS

sponsored a district conference for the

Educators Rising organization. The

conference included three workshops

presented by community members:

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

•“The Miseducation of You,”

presented by DEP resource teacher

Shashray McCormack

•“College Student Advocacy 101,”

presented by University of Louisville

(UofL) Minority Teacher Recruitment

Program coordinator Sherry Durham

•“The Backpack of a Counselor,”

presented Louisville Male High

School counselor Jasmine Drinkard

Above, Jasmin Drinkard facilitates a presentation.

The conference also hosted a college

fair attended by more than 13 Kentucky colleges and universities from around the state. JCPS

students were also able to compete in five competitions, which included Ethical Dilemma,

Public Speaking, Exploring Careers (administration, teaching and support services), Children’s

Literature (Pre-K and K–3), and Researching Learning Challenges.

Dr. Ron Chi, former

principal of The

Learning Center (TLC) at

Linlee was the keynote

speaker for the

conference. Beginning

July 1, Chi will travel

overseas to China,

South Korea, and

Estonia to pursue his

passion of creating a

global education

standard. He is hoping

to bridge

Above, Dr. Ron Chi speaks to students during his keynote presentation.

communication and collaboration between Frankfort students and students in Seoul, but as

the district has focused on improving collaboration locally, that communication has been put

on pause. Chi said he wants to reopen those lines of communications. Other countries have a

variety of real-world skills they value more than America does. Sharing those values can only

serve to improve American education, he added. Dr. Chi said that the only way America can

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

compete globally is to

embrace a global

understanding of

education and he

encouraged Educators

Rising participants to

consider teaching

abroad as well as in

Kentucky.

School administrators,

teachers, and school

personnel are

extremely proud of the

hard work and dedication exhibited by the students in the Educators Rising organization.

Through this organization, JCPS is able to promote a positive image of education to

students, parents, and the community while promulgating information about teaching!

For more information about the Educators Rising program, please contact program

coordinator Taylor Utley at 485-6331.

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

March 2019

Check out our monthly update video featuring JCPS Chief of

Communications Renee Murphy, Community Engagement

Coordinator Delquan Dorsey, and Generalist Abdul Sharif, to find out

what DEP has coming up this month!

Click Here to Play

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Resource

Teacher

Spotlight

Kadia Turner

ENVISION EQUITY SEPTEMBER 2018

Kadia Turner is an experienced educator

who brings a wealth of knowledge from

across the educational sector to advocate

for children. It was as an undergraduate at

Emory University when she became acutely aware of

the “Savage Inequalities” facing our nation’s students

of color, urban youth, and students in poverty. This

knowledge propelled her to earn a Bachelor of Arts in

Elementary Education, and begin her career in urban

Atlanta. While earning a Master of Educational

Leadership at the University of Georgia she moved

from inner city classrooms facing poverty to rural

classroom facing poverty all brimming with brilliance.

It was through this experience that she came to

believe that it is up to us as educators to keep our

country’s promises to its children . This passion has

driven her to educate students in public and private

school, before and after school, and throughout the

summer. Mrs. Turner has found joy, laughter, wisdom

and peace in books since she was a child, and seeks to

share that magical experience with children

everywhere. She has served in JCPS for over 10 years

at the Elementary level. Understanding that

excellence will not be achieved without equity keeps

her focused on improving educational outcomes for

our nation’s most disenfranchised students. Kadia is

thrilled to have the chance to share and grow with

other educators knowing that we can be the change

we want to see.

Click here for video story.

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Photo provided by Katia Turner.


ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

2019 GIRLS

EMPOWERMENT

CONFERENCE

The Jefferson County Public School (JCPS) District and several community

partners present the second annual Girls Empowerment Conference. This event

will be held on Thursday, March 21, 2019, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the University

of Louisville Shelby Campus. The purpose of the event is to build character, enrich

leadership skills, enhance self-esteem, and provide a holistic approach to

educating young girls of color. While participating in the conference, the targeted

girls will explore various aspects of their identity and build positive and

meaningful relationships with encouraging role models.

To register your student or for more information please contact Sylena R.

Fishback at 485-7967 or sylena.fishback@jefferson.kyschools.us.

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

NOMINATE AN

EDUCATOR OF

COLOR!

Nominations are now being accepted for the 2019 Educators of Color Celebration.

The celebration will be held on Friday, April 12th at the Kentucky Center for

African American Heritage at 6 p.m. Click here to download a nomination form! Or

click here to R.S.V.P. to attend!

J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y P U B L I C S C H O O L S

2019

D I V E R S I T Y , E Q U I T Y , A N D P O V E R T Y

EDUCATORS OF

COLOR CELEBRATION

Please join us for the second annual Educators of Color Celebration. This event

will be held on Friday, April 12, 2019 at 6 pm. The purpose of the event is to

recognize the amazing teachers, administrators, and school support staff of

color within JCPS. We believe educators of color make a positive and lasting

impact on students across our district. Our celebration will acknowledge the

champions in our classrooms who lead students to academic success each day.

APRIL 12, 2019 | 6 p.m.

KENTUCKY CENTER FOR AFRICAN-AMERICAN HERITAGE

1701 W. Muhammad Ali Blvd.

Attire is dress to impress. Dinner will be served.

To R.S.V.P., please contact Delquan Dorsey at 485-3506 or

delquan.dorsey@jefferson.kyschools.us.

Greater Louisville Alliance of

Black School Educators

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

JCPS Hosts Final Racial Equity

Policy Community Meeting

By Abdul Sharif, Generalist—Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs Department

The Office of Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs invites you to attend the fourth

and final Racial Equity Policy Community Meeting of the 2018-19 school year. So far

this year, our office has facilitated community meetings at Central High School

Magnet Career Academy (MCA), Chancey Elementary School, Maupin Elementary School,

and the Academy @ Shawnee. Our next meeting will take place on Thursday, March 21, at

the W.E.B. DuBois Academy, located at 4425 Preston Highway.

If you would like to attend, please R.S.V.P. by calling 485-3655

or emailing delquan.dorsey@jefferson.kyschools.us.

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

The Unteachables

By Gordon Korman

Balzer + Bray, 2019

Ages 8-12

Books for Young Readers

Carter Reads the Newspaper

By Deborah Hopkinson

Illustrated by Don Tate

Peachtree Publishers, 2019

Ages 6-10

Mr. Kermit is one school year away from early retirement.

The end of the year cannot come too soon. Mr. Kermit’s

passion for teaching died years ago when a cheating scandal

destroyed his promising career. When he is assigned to

SCS-8, or “unteachables,” he figures that is just fine. He

doesn’t want to teach and they don’t want to learn. Once he

gets to know the kids in SCS-8 he discovers that maybe they

aren’t so unteachable and maybe he isn’t quite as burned out

as he thought.

Amal Unbound

By Aisha Saeed

Nancy Paulson Books, 2018

Ages 10 and up

Dr. Carter G. Woodson is an important figure in United

States history, but textbooks rarely mention him. Dr.

Woodson was born just after the Civil War and was the son

of former slaves. From a young age, he was taught the

importance of being informed, of standing up for yourself,

and of knowing your story. As he grew up, Dr. Woodson

learned that many people believed that African Americans

didn’t have a history of their own. Incensed, Woodson

determined to study history to prove what he already knew:

African Americans had a unique and rich history. He went to

Harvard to earn a PhD in History, becoming the second

African American to earn a doctorate (W.E.B. Du Bois was

first). He spent his career studying and writing about African

American history. He created the Negro History Week to

celebrate the accomplishments of great African Americans,

which eventually became Black History Month. Carter

Reads the Newspaper traces the extraordinary story of the

man who would become the father of African American

history.

12-year-old Amal knows that life can be unfair. It is

unfair that she is expected to stay home from school to

help with her younger sisters after her mother gives

birth. It is unfair that girls are so unappreciated that her

whole village openly pities the family for having yet

another. It is unfair that the village landlord is cruel and

pushes families into debt to keep them under his

control. But it is not until she makes an impulsive

mistake that she comes to realize not only just how

unfair life can be, but also how much of a difference one

person can make.

Information provided by Tori Sachtleben, Louisville Free Public Library

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019


Professional Development

Opportunities

Title Session Code Date & Time Location Contact

Culturally Appropriate

Integration of

Activities

Neurodiversity

Approach for Learners

18-1996519 March 6

4:15 to 6:45 p.m.

18-1996492 March 7

4:00 to 5:30 p.m.

Poverty Simulation 18-1996509 March 11

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Culturally Responsive

Reading

18-1996489 March 14

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Seneca High

UA Local 502

4340 Crittenden Drive

Marion C. Moore

School

Engelhard Elementary

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

Let Them BE: Be

Excellent, Be Engaged,

Be Excited

18-1997217 March 19

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Atherton High

Vanessa McPhail

(502) 485-3631

Being the Change:

Rejecting Anti-Bias

Pedagogy

18-1998604 March 20

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Marion C. Moore

School

DEP

(502) 485-3506

Culturally Responsive

Classroom

Management:

Disruption That Leads

to Engagement

18-1998629 March 20

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Marion C. Moore

School

DEP

(502) 485-3506

Racial Equity Analysis

Protocol (REAP)

18-1998611 March 20

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Marion C. Moore

School

DEP

(502) 485-3506

Reaching and Teaching

Black Boys Through

Literacy

18-1998617 March 20

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Marion C. Moore

School

DEP

(502) 485-3506

Windows and Mirrors:

Who Do Your Students

See?

18-1998635 March 20

4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Marion C. Moore

School

DEP

(502) 485-3506

Poverty and Brain

Development

18-1996498 March 20

4:30 to 6:00 p.m.

Seneca High

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

SBDM: Introduction

to School-Based

Decision Making

18-1995908 (PD)

18-1996844 (EILA)

March 23

9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

VanHoose Education

Center

Dr. Shawna Stenton

(502) 485-3056

Speaker and Film

Series: Viva La Causa

18-1996506 March 25

3:30 to 5:00 p.m.

Muhammad Ali Center

Dr. Monica Lakhwani

(502) 485-7269

Adultifying Girls of

Color: Implicit Sexism

and Stigma

18-1999073 March 27

4:45 to 6:45 p.m.

C.B. Young Jr. Service

Center

Vanessa McPhail

(502) 485-3631

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

English Conversation Club

Wednesdays, 7 p.m. – Main Library, 301

York Street

Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. – Bon Air Library,

2816 Del Rio Place & Shively Library,

3920 Dixie Highway

Saturdays, 3 p.m. – Iroquois Library, 601

W. Woodlawn Ave.

English Conversation Club allows nonnative

speakers to practice English in a

relaxed, informal setting with others. If

you are learning the English language, or

would like to practice conversing in

English, come join us at the Conversation

Club. Participants should have some basic

knowledge of the English language before

joining. For English as a Second

Language (ESL) students, this is a great

way to use what you have learned in ESL

classes.

Immigration: Stories of Status

Tuesday, March 12, 6:30 p.m.

Main Library. 301 York Street

Louisville Free Public Library invites

you to a fast class on immigration in

America today. The class, co-hosted by

Catholic Charities of Louisville and

Louisville Public Media, will feature

personal stories and explore legal

differences in the statuses of immigrants,

migrants, refugees, asylum-seekers and

job-seekers. Stephen George, president

and general manager of LPM, will

moderate a panel of experts and facilitate

storytelling by Louisvillians who

immigrated to the U.S. The goal of the

conversation is to unpack the complicated

realities of immigration in America today.

Panelists and storytellers include:

Rebecca Sim, Catholic Charities of

Louisville; Mark Martinez, Martinez

Immigration Law PLLC; Barbara

Menefee, Dinsmore & Shohl., Ahmed

Hussein, Agnes Kovacs and Karina

Barillas. The event is free and open to the

public, but registration is requested. Call

502-574-1623 to reserve your spot. This

is a #BeGolden event presented by

Catholic Charities of Louisville and

Louisville Public Media.

Women of the World Celebration

Saturday, March 9, 1 p.m.

Iroquois Library, 601 W. Woodlawn Ave.

This annual celebration spotlights women

and girls from around the world, living

here in Louisville and empowering their

communities. Enjoy food, dance, and

music with women from a variety of

international backgrounds.

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

2019

Diversity Equity, and Poverty & Student Equity and Community Engagement

EQUITY IN HIGHER EDUCATION

C O N F E R E N C E

This conference will include motivational speakers to

encourage students to achieve greatness into life after

high school! Speakers will discuss various topics (i.e.,

budgeting and loans, college-life, housing, and

vocations/trades). These discussions will provide

students, (Juniors and Seniors) with information, tips,

and encouragement in transitioning to college and/or

career life. In addition, the conference will offer several

undergraduate scholarships for qualified high school

Seniors that have applied for and earned a scholarship

through our Student Equity & Community Engagement

program. Lunch will be provided and transportation

can be provided to students if needed. Juniors and

Seniors please apply to attend our 2019 conference

now!

March 21, 2019

University of Louisville Student Activities Center, 2100

South Floyd Street. W116 & 117

9 a.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Sponsored by the University of Louisville OYES (Order

Your Educational Steps) Program, and Student Equity

and Community Engagement

Click here for application

Deadline is March 11, 2019

For more information, please contact 485-3650.

Keynote Speaker

Mr. Twany Beckham,

author and national

basketball champion.

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Why LGBTQ?

Demographic Data

LGBTQ Youth:

● 3.2 million LGBTQ youth

● 6% of all young people (8-18)

● 57% feel unsafe at school

● 85% experienced verbal abuse

BE

A

BIG

!

Mentoring Works!

● 94% of youth in our program reported

that they have confidence to achieve

their goals.

● 85% said they overcame adversity with

the help of their Big.

● 75% are more likely to receive a 4 year

degree.

● They expressed that they are twice as

likely to experience life satisfaction.

Mentoring through

1-to-1 relationships can

help LGBTQ youth facing

adversity find success in

education & life!

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14 TH JUNE

REGISTRATION OPENS NOV. 1, 2018 - www.feat5K.com

For information on sponsorship opportunities: FEAT5k@FEATofLouisville.org

12019

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ENVISION EQUITY MARCH 2019

J E F F E R S O N C O U N T Y P U B L I C S C H O O L S

2019

DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND POVERTY DEPARTMENT

SPEAKER

SERIES

With Dr. LaRhonda Mathies

Dr. LaRhonda Mathies is a life-long resident of Louisville and grew up in Smoketown

and the West End. Dr. Mathies began her professional career with Jefferson County

Public Schools (JCPS) in 2002 as an elementary art teacher and later transitioned into

middle school where she served for 10 years. In 2012 she became an instructional

coach and is currently serving in that role at The Academy @ Shawnee. She is a

graduate of duPont Manual High School and earned her bachelor’s and master’s

degrees in art education from the University of Kentucky. She completed her principal

certification from Indiana University Southeast and doctorate in educational leadership

and organizational development from the University of Louisville. Her doctoral research

examined perceptions of persistently disciplined Black girls and the school-to-prison

pipeline in urban settings. Her work underscores the significance of increased attention

to strengths-based approaches to meet educational needs of Black girls and the

implementation of culturally responsive pedagogy, programs and policies.

After completing her doctorate she co-founded ColorBraveJCPS, a coalition of educators with the vision of elevating

social justice through education. They seek to proliferate emancipatory learning that bolsters equity, accessibility and

inclusivity for historically marginalized populations in urban public education. ColorBraveJCPS has facilitated book

study’s, workshops, professional development, coaching sessions and panel discussions for educators, students and

community members. Dr. Mathies is a passionate servant leader with an unwavering belief in empowering all students

to thrive in multiculturally equitable, socioeconomically aware, and globally informed learning environments. She has

been recognized by JCPS Diversity Equity & Poverty Department with the Educator of Color Award, the Hilliard Lyons

Excellence in Teaching Award and the University of Louisville Community Change Agent Award.

Community Conversation

March 18, 2019, 6 – 8 PM

Louisville Urban League

Professional Development (PD)

March 19, 2018, 4:30 – 6 :30 PM

Atherton High School

PD# 18-1997217

Topic: Let Them B.E.--Be Excellent, Be

Engaged, Be Excited

For more information, please contact Telva Hogan at 485-7318 or telva.hogan@jefferson.kyschools.us.

Please register for Professional Development (PD) sessions on pdCentral using the provided PD number.

https://apps3.jefferson.kyschools.us/pdCentralProd/UserLogin.aspx

Editor—Catherine Collesano

Editor, Photo Contributor—Abdul Sharif

Credits

Envision Equity is a publication of the JCPS Department of Diversity, Equity, and Poverty Programs. All

submissions should be sent to Catherine Collesano at catherine.collesano@jefferson.kyschools.us or Abdul

Sharif at abdul.sharif2@jefferson.kyschools.us. If you are interested in becoming a subscriber or a

contributor to Envision Equity, please contact one of the editors at the above email address.

www.jefferson.kyschools.us

Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer Offering Equal Educational Opportunities

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