NZPhotographer Issue 22, August 2019

nzphotographer

Whether you’re an enthusiastic weekend snapper or a beginner who wants to learn more about photography, New Zealand Photographer is the fun e-magazine for all Kiwi camera owners – and it’s free!

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ISSUE 22, August 2019

INTERVIEW WITH

RICHARD BROOKER

MIND GAMES: THE ART

OF BLACK AND WHITE

IMAGINE AUCKLAND

COMPETITION WINNERS

MINIMAL LANDSCAPES

BY RICHARD YOUNG

August 2019

1


WELCOME TO ISSUE 22 OF

NZ PHOTOGRAPHER MAGAZINE

HELLO EVERYONE,

I can't resist putting a spin on an

old joke and asking you 'what's

black, white, and read all over?'

Issue 22 of NZ Photographer of

course; our monochrome focused

issue!

Start to see our colourful world in

a different way as you peruse the

following pages, and get inspired

to go out and capture your own

black and white masterpieces.

Articles from Ana and, guest

author, Peter Kurdulija serve up

a double dose of thought and

inspiration as to why you should

shoot in monochrome whilst

Richard Young's article shows

us that we don't have to turn to

black and white to make a photo

minimalistic.

If the Winter Blues have got you

down and you're in need of

new photo location inspiration, see if our Behind The Shot feature with Jason

Blair tempts you out into the snow. No? How about taking to the railway as

Brendon has been doing? Alternatively, our interview with Richard Brooker

might be the inspiration you need whether you find yourself wanting to go find

and photograph abandoned buildings or realise that a complete change of

genre is what you need to shake up your photography for the better.

As well as announcing the winners of the Imagine Auckland competition,

we're pleased to bring you the first in a new series to promote

#WomenInPhotography – Each month we'll be getting to know one of Lesley

Whyte's female photographers as we discover how her photography journey

started and where she hopes it will lead.

Emily Goodwin

Editor NZ Photographer

General Info:

NZPhotographer Issue 22

August 2019

Cover Photo

"Ruapehu"

by Richard Brooker

Publisher:

Excio Group

Website:

www.excio.io/nzphotographer

Group Director:

Ana Lyubich

Editor:

Emily Goodwin

Graphic Design:

Maksim Topyrkin

Advertising Enquiries:

Email hello@excio.io

2 NZPhotographer


REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS

Brendon Gilchrist

Brendon is the man

behind ESB Photography.

He is an avid tramper

who treks from sea to

mountain, and back

again, capturing the

uniqueness of New

Zealand’s unforgiving

landscape.

Ana Lyubich

Co-founder of Excio, Ana's

photography journey

started many years ago

with one of the first Kodak

film cameras. She loves

exploring the unseen

macro world and capturing

genuine people's emotions.

Richard Young

Richard is an awardwinning

landscape and

wildlife photographer who

teaches photography

workshops and runs

photography tours. He

is the founder of New

Zealand Photography

Workshops.

nzphotographer nzp_magazine nzp@excio.io

© 2019 NZPhotographer Magazine

All rights reserved. Reproduction of any material appearing in this magazine in

any form is forbidden without prior consent of the publisher.

Disclaimer:

Opinions of contributing authors do not necessarily reflect the

opinion of the magazine.

August 2019

3


CONTENTS

6

HOW MONOCHROME CAN

CONVEY YOUR DISTINCT

PERCEPTION OF THE WORLD

BY PETER KURDULIJA

BEHIND THE SHOT

WITH JASON BLAIR

6

10

14

24

39

BEHIND THE SHOT

with Jason Blair

CHUGGING ALONG THE RAILWAY

by Brendon Gilchrist

INTERVIEW WITH RICHARD BROOKER

HOW MONOCHROME CAN CONVEY YOUR DISTINCT

PERCEPTION OF THE WORLD

By Peter Kurdulija

IMAGINE AUCKLAND COMPETITION

WINNERS AND BEST ENTRIES

54 #WOMENINPHOTOGRAPHY

GETTING TO KNOW RAEWYN SMITH

62

66

IMPROVING YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY

PHOTO REVIEW SESSION

MINIMAL LANDSCAPES

by Richard Young

24

INTERVIEW

WITH RICHARD BROOKER

70 BEST READERS SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH 14

#WOMENINPHOTOGRAPHY

GETTING TO KNOW RAEWYN SMITH

54


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Behind The Shot

with Jason Blair

HOW DID YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY JOURNEY

START?

I had a keen interest in photography from a young

age. After finding the academic environment of

university wasn’t a good fit for me, I decided to

turn my interest in photography into a possible

career option and enrolled in a Diploma Course in

Photography at UCOL.

Fast forward and I started my company Katabatic

Creative, initially as a way for me to formalise my

side-hustle while I worked a variety of other jobs.

Subsequently the business has grown to incorporate

my commercial and editorial photography business as

well as a graphic design and print studio in Hokitika on

the West Coast.

6 NZPhotographer


Creating a company was the easiest way for me to

compartmentalise and separate business activities

and expenses from personal, which suits the way my

brain works. I’m glad I did it early on as it forced me

to be more serious about the endeavour and I think it

would have been challenging to untangle and set up

further down the track.

BEHIND THE SHOT IS PROUDLY

SUPPORTED BY

August 2019

7


WHAT'S YOUR BIGGEST PHOTOGRAPHY

ACHIEVEMENT?

It’s hard to isolate a single achievement, but

awards wise, I’m very proud of taking home a

Gold in the Commercial category at the NZIPP Iris

Awards in 2013, and subsequently becoming a

Fellow of the Institute (now known as a Master with

two bars).

TELL US ABOUT YOUR POWDER HOUNDS SHOT…

I photographed this during an introduction to ski

touring course run by the West Coast Alpine Club.

I was volunteering to help the instructor, and also

photographing for the club’s usage and my own

interest/portfolio. This combination of being active in

the outdoors, volunteering, and photographing is a

significant thread of my photography outside of my

commercial work.

I enjoy photographing the activities that I love to

participate in, and it’s nice to work without the

pressure and constraint of a commercial brief

(although I do really enjoy that also).

This shot came about while the course participants

were having some “free experimentation” time to get

accustomed to their equipment in a small bowl below

Cheeseman Skifield.

The subject is Troy, who was actually another

volunteer helping out. I spotted him lower down the

hill with Max and Kingston, his dogs, and noticed

that I was close to the edge of the shadow being

cast by the ridge. I moved over to the boundary

of the shadow to place the sun close to the rim of

the ridge and asked Troy to ascend so that he’d

end up between me and the sun. I exposed for

the sky, focused on the ridge top, and captured

a series of frames as he approached and passed

the sun, hoping for a dynamic and strong silhouette

composition.

As it happened, the position of the dogs was the

deciding factor in which frame was the most

appealing, so I selected this one rather than one

where he was directly in front of the sun which I’d

imagined would work best.

DID YOU PLAN TO SHOOT THIS IN B&W OR

WAS IT CONVERTED LATER FROM COLOUR?

Silhouettes always lend themselves to B&W

conversion, and I tend to operate with my camera

monitor displaying monochrome all the time as I find it

helps me focus on composition more so this shot was

always likely to end up a black and white image.

That said, it was really when I tried it with a few

different conversions and saw the interesting cloud

really pop with a “red filter” profile that I was really sure

that this was the best way to present the photograph.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT THIS SHOT, IS THERE

ANYTHING YOU WOULD CHANGE?

I really enjoy a simple, graphic photograph and this

one is particularly satisfying because I pre-visualised

something and was able to construct something very

close to, and perhaps even better than, what I had in

my head.

As I said above, I think the position of the dogs is a key

element here so if I could improve one thing it would

be having the second dog separated from Troy’s

outline and in a more dynamic pose like the first dog

is, and perhaps both dogs right on the horizon of the

ridge so that their legs are visible.

ANY TIPS FOR OUR READERS ON MAKING

PHOTOGRAPHY A CAREER?

Photography is a wonderful art and can make a very

rewarding career, but it isn’t an easy way to make a

living, especially starting out. I would say value your

work, persevere, and seek mentorship.

Black and white image making is wonderful and

rewarding, but it almost certainly won’t pay the bills!

But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t do it. Shoot with

your camera displaying black and white previews

and it will improve your overall photography, as well

as your black and white images, of course.

HOW DID YOU DISCOVER EXCIO?

I won an Excio subscription through the Federated

Mountain Clubs photography competition, I think it

was actually with this image! To be honest though, I’m

still working out exactly what Excio is and how to drive

the platform but I find the concept quite interesting

and look forward to learning and experimenting

more.

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE FUTURE?

I’m currently developing a new personal project

involving photography and video, outdoor recreation,

and mental health. I’m seeking funding to get it off

the ground at present and assembling a team to help

produce it. So hopefully I’ll be very busy with that in

the near future!

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/jaseblair

www.facebook.com/KatabaticCreative

www.katabatic.co.nz

albums.excio.io/profile/Jase


FRESH SHOOTS

PHOTO COMPETITION

We’re inviting photographers to highlight all the wonderful things that make the Wellington

Botanic Garden much more than a garden, while encouraging photographers to focus on

the garden season by season.

For prizes and full Terms & Conditions see: www.excio.io/freshshoots

The last season of the competition is now open:

Winter

22 June - 20 September 2019

CATEGORIES

NATURE

PEOPLE &

EVENTS

CREATIVE

PARTNERS

August 2019

9


Chugging Along The Railway

by Brendon Gilchrist

F5, 1/500s, ISO160, 80mm

10 NZPhotographer


August 2019

11


F5.6, 1/1000s ISO64, 24mm

If you are a train fanatic, this journey will be one

you want to put on your list. Through the mountains

from Christchurch to Greymouth, or vice versa, this

is a trip that will take you through so many different

landscapes that you’ll be wondering why you didn’t

do it sooner.

It’s not just for old retired people, all ages should get

onboard – Pack your suitcases, stay a few nights and

then return on the same train you came on. You could

rent a car and explore some of the west coast gems

like Punakaiki, head on down to glacier country, or just

hang around Greymouth where there is plenty to see

and do.

Still need enticing? Let me take you on my train

journey…

The day starts early as the train leaves at 8.15am from

Christchurch Central Train Station. The carriages are

comfy, warm on this cool winters morning and the

commentary oh so funny making the staff top-notch

and easy to talk to if and when needed.

Upon leaving the station there’s a short section

through the urban jungle along the straight tracks

but the views soon improve as the mountains slowly

get bigger and bigger the further out we go – The

Canterbury plains are one of the biggest plains in

New Zealand and are a magnet as you can see the

Southern Alps.

Cars stop for us when the bells clang at the railway

crossings as we have the right of way to pass through

on our journey to the other side of the island. There are

a few stops on the way out to the mountains to pick

up more passengers, these being Rolleston, Darfield

and then Springfield but you only have a couple of

minutes at each location with no time to exit the train,

each stop getting you one step closer to the highlight

of the trip, a train ride through the mountainside.

At Springfield, the train leaves the main highway

behind, turning off to follow the Waimakariri River and

travelling along the gorge. Somehow, looking into the

river from a train window makes it look more beautiful

and surreal. The crystal clear water from the glacier’s

that feed the river and the way that water has shaped

this landscape over thousands of years is a sight to

behold. With perfect blue sky and no weather systems

to worry about I thought how can this get better?

It wasn’t long untill we entered an area that is well

known for its very cold temperatures, and there was

no disappointment as there was a hoar frost, or what

I call a white winter landscape. It looked so pure with

many small frozen ponds and as we entered and

exited short tunnels this hoar frost just kept going.

I was outside in the viewing carriage so it was cold

and with the train moving at a good speed I found it

hard to get good photos. I wish the train could have

stopped but it was not to be. I worked with what

12 NZPhotographer


I had, one carriage with lots of other people with the

same objective of capturing this Winter wonderland

that just went on and on – I knew this area had hoar

frost but I had no idea the area it covered was so

large so it was the biggest and best surprise of the

day. The best image I got was when we went over

the Broken River bridge, a quick couple of snaps and

I managed to get something stunning.

Once at Arthurs Pass, we got the first opportunity to

exit the train and stretch our legs on the platform

before the darkest part of the trip; the Otira Tunnel.

This tunnel starts at Arthurs Pass and exits the mountain

8.5km later (roughly a 20minute journey) and has a

gradient of 1 in 33 meaning that for every 33 meters

you travel you either gain or lose 1 meter in height.

Construction on the bridge started in 1907 and

finished 11 years later in 1918. At that time it was

the 7th longest tunnel in the world, an incredible

achievement in that day and age.

Upon exiting the tunnel on the West Coast side

we entered into a lush green rainforest beside the

Rolleston River. It left me marveling at how it’s possible

such a stunning location with a scenic railway right

beside it can exist.

Heading towards the old railway town of Otira, the

river changes from the Rolleston to the Otira to the

Taramakau before we take a right-hand turn and

head towards Moana, a small township on the shores

of Lake Brunner where some passengers disembark

and others join us.

Lake Brunner is small, you get a view of it before you

get to Moana and a quick view as you leave, but it

was enough to whet my appetite, a place I would like

to go back to and explore with my sea kayak on a

calm day as the reflections looked like glass from the

train.

By now we’re almost 6 hours into our journey and

approaching our final destination having passed

through many different photo-worthy landscapes.

At Stillwater, a small village on the edge of the Grey

River, the view is spectacular from the railway track;

limestone shaped walls with a deep river running

through it that draws in the white water kayakers and

other visitors who want to see the site of the Brunner

Mine, the place where 65 people were killed in 1896.

Once into Greymouth, our final destination, I had a

1-hour break before I was back on the train for the

reverse journey. To go there and back in 1 day it’s

a 13 hour journey so I do recommend staying a few

nights to split the journey up a bit and give yourself

more time to see what Greymouth and the west coast

has to offer.

3 TIPS FOR PHOTOGRAPHING ON A TRAIN

JOURNEY.

• Have your shutter set to burst mode so that you

don't miss the shot.

• Have settings as if you were taking sports images

so a very high shutter speed to take into account

that the train is travelling at a speed.

• Since your shutter speed is so high you need to

compensate that with your aperture. F4 to F5 will

be enough to have plenty in focus without it being

too dark.

F7.1, 1/800s, ISO64

August 2019

13


Interview with

Richard Brooker

PAREWANUI

F1.4, 1/100s, ISO800

14 NZPhotographer


August 2019

15


• Canon 5DMk4

• EF 16–35 f/2.8

• EF 50 f/1.4

• EF 85 f/1.8

• EF 100 f/2.8 Macro

• EF 70–200 f/2.8

• EF 2x Converter

• Nisi Filters

• RRS panorama head

Over and above this, I have 2 Godox AD200 studio

lights (the wee ones) while I learn studio portraiture.

WOULD YOU SAY YOU HAVE A CERTAIN

PHOTOGRAPHIC STYLE?

No, I do not believe I have a certain style. I can

never decide which ‘look’ I prefer and so, from

a single shoot, I often produce images that look

totally different; each edit suiting the photograph

but no two photographs looking the same. I look

at other peoples’ work and can see the similarities,

or their signature, but I am still looking for that

something that is uniquely ‘me’.

RICHARD, TELL US WHO YOU ARE AND WHAT

YOU DO...

I work as an Oracle database administrator for

enterpriseIT, a Wellington based IT company with

large ambitions. Outside of work, I am a father

to four boys, ages 9 to 16… who now run for their

lives whenever I bring my camera out. Work keeps

me pretty busy during the week, but when the

weekend rolls around, I like to go and photograph

whatever I can.

SO HOW AND WHEN DID YOUR

PHOTOGRAPHY VENTURE BEGIN?

Photography for me started in 2012 when Instagram

was released on the android platform. My first ever

Instagram photo was of a sock, hanging on the

corner of a washing line. In typical Wellington style,

the sock had blown off by the time I had my phone

ready to take the picture.

Borrowing a DSLR from a friend for a roadie

way back in 2013, I developed a penchant for

photographing abandoned buildings. Purchasing

TELL US ABOUT YOUR GEAR…

I have been quite lucky with the camera gear

that I have had over the years. Moving from a

cellphone, my father bought me my first DSLR, a

Canon 60D in 2014. I had two kit lenses with this

camera, an 18–55 and a 55–250mm. Riiiight up

until water entered the camera body while I was

shooting my son on the high ropes at his school

camp (he did very well by the way!).

Insurance came to the party at this point with

a replacement Canon 70D which I augmented

with an EF-S10–22mm wide angle lens. This combo

lasted three years and thousands of k’s until my

grandfather passed away. My grandfather was

an exceptional man and in his infinite wisdom he

left some money to each of his grandchildren,

enough to begin quite a nice kit so this is what I am

currently shooting with:

16 NZPhotographer


PATEA MEAT WORKS

F4.5, 1/20s, ISO640

my own DSLR in 2014 caused my interest in

urban exploration to really take off (I have been

frogmarched off premises more than once for

being where I shouldn’t). There are a surprising

amount of derelict buildings around NZ if you are

prepared to drive a ways.

Since then I have moved through landscape

photography, attempted macro photography, and

am now heading down the road of wanting to be

a people photographer. People express so many

emotions in so many ways; I would like to discover

how to capture that in a way that makes people

wonder what was going on when the photo was

taken. My macro lens makes a very fine portraiture

lens and I’m always looking for people who do not

mind having their photo taken… Hint, hint!

TELL US MORE ABOUT THE ABANDONED

BUILDINGS, WHAT FASCINATED YOU?

I liked to walk where others had been but no

longer frequented. I liked the thrill of being caught.

I do not tend to do this often anymore; I am a

little old now to be vaulting over barbed wire

fences without leaving patches of skin behind but

I have dreams of going to places like Chernobyl,

Detroit, Gary Indiana… places where industry has

subsided leaving behind mechanical monstrosities,

monstrosities waiting to be explored.

The great thing about abandoned places is

that they are generally hidden in plain sight. In

Wellington, there are several places which are

quietly rotting, still in the public eye. Head out

into the country and the number of abandoned

buildings goes up dramatically. All up and down

the North Island there are abandoned structures

waiting. I have not made it down to the South

Island yet, but I’m sure there are plenty to find

down there also.

YOU HINTED AT BEING FROGMARCHED

OFF OF CERTAIN PROPERTIES, ANY OTHER

NARROW ESCAPES YOU CAN TELL US

ABOUT?

North of Wellington, there is an abandoned

Catholic girl’s school, visible from the state

highway. Exploring those buildings taught me a

valuable lesson: make sure you always have a

way out. I was photographing three side by side

toilet stalls and was moving slowly backwards to

see if I could fit them in frame. The door (sans door

handle) closed and I heard the latch ‘click’. Well…

stuck in a toilet, no door handle, I had to ‘squeeze’

out of a smaller-than-ideal hole in the wall to get

out and managed to almost remove my finger in

the process. A quick trip to the hospital, a stern

telling off by the doctor, and I was back planning

new targets within the week!

August 2019

17


TONGARIRO CROSSING

F2.8, 1/1000s, ISO50

YOU SAID YOU’VE ‘MOVED THROUGH

LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY’ – WHAT MADE

YOU MOVE ON?

I spent the longest time shooting landscape

photography and there have been some good

times. I enjoyed capturing long exposures of

moving water (as you’ll remember from issue 5)

from beaches to rivers and waterfalls, there is plenty

of moving water with interesting rock formations

around New Zealand and I have photos from all

over the North Island, Tongariro National Park being

one of my favourite places to shoot.

However, when I was asked to shoot headshots

for The Fashion Creative, I had my first glimpse of

what it’s like to shoot people, people who WANT

their photo taken. The quality of photo’s produced

by TFC is very high; it’s a great place to learn and

great people to learn from. At that point, I decided

that landscapes look better with people in them

and landscapes with people in them are called…

portraits;)

WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR BIGGEST LEARNING

CURVES IN PHOTOGRAPHY?

Technically there were a couple of eureka

moments for me early on after changing from a

cell phone to a DSLR (realising that the f-stop scale

for aperture went down where the others go up

and learning that the peg at the bottom of the

viewfinder was a light meter)!

Photographically, I haven’t stopped learning

and I doubt I ever will. Each type of photography

I’ve tried has had its challenges; for abandoned

buildings it was finding places, finding entry to those

places, trying to get a usable photo from what was

usually a pretty dark place (no power = no lights)

while trying not to get caught and evicted.

For landscapes my problem was trying to capture

the whole dynamic range, maintaining both the

highlights and the shadows – Especially when the

exposure is measured in minutes. This was probably

the most expensive learning curve for me as it

added several expensive filters and a panorama

head to my kit.

As for portraiture, I now own a couple of small

studio lights and am learning how to use them.

Trying to shape the light to get the look that

I want… let’s say I’ve a ways to go yet!

I spend time trolling the internet learning about

photography; Youtube, Phlearn, anything that

has information about whatever subject I am

researching. I have a sister who has been a

photographer for almost 30 years, she is also

a valuable source of information and critique.

I cannot count the number of occasions when

I have been… reminded… of how little I know

about the subject but still, I keep trying.

18 NZPhotographer


ROWELLS

F4, 1/40s, ISO320

NAPIER HOSPITAL

F3.5, 1/30s, ISO200

August 2019

19


KAITOKE

F3.2, 1/2500s, ISO100

MT VIC

F5.6, 1/1600s, ISO200

20 NZPhotographer


RAETIHI

F2.8, 1/6400s, ISO100

LAKE WAIRARAPA

F22, 20s, ISO50

August 2019

21


DO YOU HAVE A FAVOURITE B&W

IMAGE?

I belong to a Lower Hutt group called ‘The

Fashion Creative’ whose members often

collaborate to produce pictures for the

benefit of those involved. There are some

very talented folks in the group. At last years

Christmas dinner, I was shooting Kasey in the

attic of one of the Trentham Racecourse

buildings. One of the photos of Kasey

happened to have the light fall on half her

face (almost like it was intentional) while

she was looking down at the book she was

holding. It did not work so well in colour, but in

black and white it’s magic. This is my favourite

portrait shot from the last few years (it even

hangs on my wall!), everything seemed to just

work.

WHAT TIPS CAN YOU GIVE READERS FOR

SHOOTING IN BLACK AND WHITE?

Watch… learn… read… practice… share…

critique… be critiqued… rinse and repeat…

(Incidentally, this applies to all forms of

photography.)

Tips:

• Make sure your photo includes ‘black’ and

‘white’, not just 50 shades of grey.

• Pay attention to shapes, lines, shadows,

patterns and textures.

• Shoot RAW.

• Contrast is your friend.

• Darker blacks make for brighter whites.

• Adjust the ‘colours’ that make up the image

(B&W sliders in LR).

Photography is like anything, without practice,

there is no improvement. With digital cameras,

all it will cost you is time and storage. There is

no right; there is no wrong; there is only what

you like.

HOW CAN PEOPLE GET OUT OF A

CREATIVE RUT IN PHOTOGRAPHY WHILST

IMPROVING THEIR SKILLS?

Both the 365 Challenge and the 52 Week

Challenge are excellent ways of getting out of

a creative rut, especially when they are task

related: “this week you shall take a photo of…

”.

Another suggestion is to join a camera club.

I have things that interest me and I tend

to pursue those things. Joining a camera

club has opened me up to a whole host of

different ideas that I had not thought of. As

an example, I attended an Eva Polak macro

impressionism workshop. That opened my eyes

to new ways of seeing the very small and has

given me different techniques to apply to

other forms of photography as well.

But even more than that, carry your camera

around with you. Everywhere. Not your whole

kit, but something small that is inconspicuous

and quick to use. That way, while you go

about your daily life, you have an opportunity

to catch moments that you would otherwise

not be prepared for. Who knows, this may

begin a photographic journey in an entirely

new direction.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR INTRODUCTION TO

EXCIO AND WHY YOU LIKE OUR APP…

I met Ana through a good friend when she was

developing Excio and agreed to be a guinea

pig for her while the app was being developed

and tested.

What I enjoy most about the Excio app is

seeing other people’s take on things and

being able to get a little of the backstory

about the photo that I am seeing. There are

as many different ways to take a photograph

as there are photographer’s and Excio is a

platform where not just the photo is being

shared, but often stories about how that photo

came into being and what it represents/

means to the photographer.

There are many talented people on the Excio

platform and with the worldwide coverage

Excio brings, even a small tin pot photographer

has a chance at being appreciated by many.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

instagram.com/thelongsilence

instagram.com/thelongportrait

facebook.com/tuenz

500px.com/thelongsilence

albums.excio.io/profile/The Untrained Eye

22 NZPhotographer


KASEY

F2.8, 1/250s, ISO200

JESS

F2.8, 1/1000s, ISO100

August 2019

23


How Monochrome Can Convey Your

Distinct Perception Of The World

By Peter Kurdulija

24 NZPhotographer


PERPETUAL VOID

August 2019

25


We live in a world surrounded by colour and make

many choices based on it every single day. Colour

helps us see, identify and single out objects and

interests within their cluttered surroundings. It can

trigger and change our emotions. Therefore, I find

it curious that so many of us are attracted to the

genre of photography entirely devoid of it. How can

technological limitation from a time gone by be so

often and purposefully chosen as a valid creative

choice?

Is it simple nostalgia, something deeply rooted in our

culture that fills us with spontaneous appreciation

of its aesthetic qualities or the allure of visual

agelessness? Whatever the answer may be, this style

of photography is not going the way of the dodo any

time soon.

Digital photographs are taken in colour and enter

the monochrome world in a process known as

conversion. The resulting image contains only tones

of a single colour, with grey being the most common

choice. Although we call this variation ‘black & white

photography’, a more accurate term would be

‘greyscale’.

Instead of giving you step by step instructions on how

to achieve this effect and the technical intricacies

(there are already so many tutorials over the Internet)

I want to discuss the motivation behind several of

my images, in an effort to inspire some readers to

craft their future ideas using this freshly discovered

expression choice.

GIVING MUNDANE SCENES AN AIR OF MYSTERY

You can find many interesting photographic subjects

while walking city streets. Night offers a whole new set

of possibilities giving usually ordinary places a range

of different visual qualities, with mystery being one of

them.

In my image ‘Urban Shadows’ I was relying on a slow

shutter speed of 1/5sec. I had to lean against the wall

for extra stability while trying to keep the ISO as low

as possible. This is not always practical, and giving

your ISO a boost is the most common approach when

combating potential blur due to prolonged exposure

times. Another option is using a tripod which would

aid image quality in terms of sharpness, keeping the

camera’s ISO at a low setting.

My image ‘Urban Shadows’ is also a good example

of a high contrast chiaroscuro situation and adds

to the perception of a scene. It is a classic painting

technique that relies on visual dynamics provided by

the tension between strong highlights and shadows, to

further the illusion of three-dimensional depth within a

frame.

MAN-MADE OBJECTS IN MONOCHROME

Monochrome photography is well suited for the

depiction of man-made objects, pretty much a tool

of choice when focusing attention on shapes and

textures. It will give you an opportunity to add volume

to the subjects which have a tendency to look flat,

sculptures for example.

By adding a series of dodging and burning strokes in

post-processing, like painting with an imaginary light

brush, it is possible to add lifelike characteristics to

sculptures as you can see in my images ‘The Struggle’

and ‘Golgotha’ when you turn the page.

TURNING NOTHING INTO SOMETHING

It is not always easy to recognise a potentially good

monochrome image, by simply looking at the colour

scene in front of you. There will be many failures as our

ability to visualise this ‘on the fly’ conversion comes

with time and experience. So while working on your

colour photograph, don’t fixate on one outcome in

post processing or give up on an image altogether

before checking out its monochrome alter ego.

The image ‘They Were Here, I Was There’ was rather

uneventful in its original colour form – The large

land area easily consumed the smaller subjects

and diminished its storytelling potential. Striping the

frame of colour, its main distracting feature, left room

for tonal enhancements and focused the viewer’s

interest squarely on the geometry within, resulting in a

dramatic and puzzling image.

CONVEYING EMOTIONS

When we lose focus of the important and delicate

moments in our daily lives, our photography may

follow us there. It can become cluttered and lose

its ability to engage. As we know that colour and

contrast provide the most important stimuli, eliminating

one of them will significantly promote the other. With

colour gone, the communication will default to its

building blocks – contrasts, lines and textures. The

simplified visual environment offers a much better

chance of focusing the viewer’s attention to emotioninducing

visual cues.

The ‘End of the Pilgrimage’ was conceived during

a trip which had great significance for the person

depicted in it, and for that reason came with a

dose of an emotional charge. It was challenging to

take under the relentless Fiordland rain, making it

technically imperfect but visually gripping. In this allsymbolic

composition, a very small silhouette facing

a grandiose setting is imposing itself without difficulty,

being placed in a lighter part of the frame while at

the same time cutting the perceived horizon. This kind

of narrative is much more difficult to conduct with the

presence of colour.

26 NZPhotographer


In my image ‘Another Day in Paradise’ which was

taken on a visit to the local zoo you’ll see a strange

human-like sorrow radiating from the scene. Without

colour around, the entire emotion is focused on

the contemplating soul far away from its natural

habitat. A familiar natural shape set against the sterile

background geometry captures observer’s attention,

doubling as a mood amplifier in the process.

An attempt to depict eternity after a loss was the

main motivator for the image ‘Perpetual Void’. The

little statue is illuminated by a narrow shaft of light

coming down from the heavens, helping it to stay

compositionally clear of its desaturated background.

MONOCHROME & LONG EXPOSURE

The marriage between monochrome and long

exposure is a match made in heaven. The

monochrome part kicks out all trappings of colour with

long exposure dissolving any dynamic distraction into

a featureless, subject enhancing backdrop. When

paired together, they will turn moving grass into a

mysterious haze and the uncooperative waves, like in

the image ‘Existential Singularity’, to an infinite, flat ice

plate. If you are searching for visual representation of

timelessness, look no further.

PUT YOUR CREATIVITY TO THE TEST

My images are only an idea, a creative trigger for

the most important ingredient that no one can give

or sell – your emotions and distinct perception of the

world. It is essential to stay unique and not be caged

by the lemming mentality of current trends, regardless

of how popular they may be. Remember, the camera

is just a tool that together with that precious creative

bit inside of you, will impress and uplift the rest of us

with visions of our surroundings we didn’t expect or

imagine.

ANOTHER DAY IN PARADISE

August 2019

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THE STRUGGLE

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GOLGOTHA

August 2019

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END OF THE PILGRIMAGE

30 NZPhotographer


August 2019

31


EXISTENTIAL SINGULARITY

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August 2019

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I WAS HERE, THEY WERE THERE

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August 2019

35


URBAN SHADOWS

36 NZPhotographer


August 2019

37


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ready for you when you join Excio

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with a 14-day free trial

Explore the membership benefits

excio.io/portfolio

38 NZPhotographer


Imagine Auckland Competition

Winners and Best Entries

Together with Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) and other partners

we invited photographers to share their moments captured in the city of Auckland in our

"Imagine Auckland" photo competition. The competition received almost 200 entries - See which

photos took top awards on the following pages.

1ST PLACE

Simon Wills

'Takapuna Beach Hamster Wheel'

2ND PLACE

Robert Green

'Golden Gannets'

3RD PLACE

Gabriella Morton

'Hello Milkyway'

HIGHLY COMMENDED:

Susan Blick with 'City Bokeh'

Marvin Condor with 'Framing Auckland Sky Tower'

Heather Marree Owens with 'Dark Edifice'

Roumen Ivanov with 'Night Sky Tower'

Scott Cushman with 'Dawn Twinkle Over Rangitoto Island'

See all images online and vote for your favourite to decide the People's Choice winner until

20 August 2019 at WWW.EXCIO.IO/AUCKLANDVOTES

SPONSORED BY:


WINNER

40 NZPhotographer


TAKAPUNA BEACH

HAMSTER WHEEL

A classic Auckland sunrise shot through the

Hamster Wheel at Takapuna Beach Playground.

Simon Wills

August 2019

41


WINNER

GOLDEN GANNETS

Sunset over the Gannet Colony, Murawai.

Robert Green

42 NZPhotographer


WINNER

HELLO MILKYWAY

F4.4, 1/1000s, /SO800

KAREKARE BEACH

Hello Milkyway, old friend. It's been well over a year

since we last met. I know you're busy up there confining to all the

laws of physics etc, and we both know that the Moon tends to steal

your glory. The clouds down here seem to have a mind of their own,

I don't even think they realise the inconvenience they've caused. But

for what feels like a split moment, all the elements have aligned. I

hope that this doesn't revert back to a rare occurrence, because I do

genuinely enjoy your company! You've proved to me how small we

are in the grand scheme of things. You help me treasure moments

rather then objects, experiences more than materialism, souls over

status and I guess if you wanna put it simply... Life.

Gabriella Morton

August 2019

43


44 NZPhotographer


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

FRAMING AUCKLAND SKY TOWER

It took about 3 visits for everything to fall into place. This morning the sky

went nuts and I was so stoked that I went out to shoot the sunrise.

Marvin Cordon

August 2019 45


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

46 NZPhotographer


NIGHT SKY TOWER

Monumental night view of the Sky Tower.

Roumen Ivanov

August 2019

47


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

48 NZPhotographer


DAWN TWINKLE OVER

RANGITOTO ISLAND

Taken on the coastal walkway between

Takapuna and Milford.

Scott Cushman

August 2019

49


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

50 NZPhotographer


CITY BOKEH

Shot from Mt Eden using a super shallow depth of field on a Lensbaby composer

pro lens. Finding the sweet spot took a bit of work, leaving only the subject sharp;

the city lights create beautiful bokeh with such a wide aperture.

Susan Blick

August 2019

51


HIGHLY

COMMENDED

DARK EDIFICE

Auckland's Sky Tower at night,

shot with the Zenit fisheye lens

on my Canon.

Heather Maree Owens

52 NZPhotographer


#womeninphotography

Getting to Know Raewyn Smith

54 NZPhotographer


NIGHT LIGHTS

August 2019

55


PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOU…

I’m a born and bred Northlander, currently living in

Auckland. I work full time managing a Resene Colorshop

in Botany Downs, Auckland. I am married, a mother of

two sons, and a grandmother of two granddaughters

and one grandson. I’m a passionate gardener (there

is an abundance of roses growing in my garden) and

an avid reader (there is always a book on my bedside

table).

HOW AND WHEN DID YOU GET INTERESTED IN

PHOTOGRAPHY?

I have always had an interest in photography, always

had a camera of some sort going back to the good

old Instamatic. Down the line came a Kodak Digital,

then I progressed to a later model digital. By chance,

I noticed an advertisement for a beginner’s photography

class at Uxbridge Creative Centre in Howick and signed

up. I quickly became hooked! A few months later

I completed an intermediate class. The tutor for both of

these courses was Treve Dromgool so I have her to thank

for my enthusiasm.

DO YOU HAVE A PREFERRED GENRE?

Being a gardener and roses my passion, I particularly love

photographing flowers of all types, especially close up/

macro. But I also like photographing animals, (I have a

dog who is a good poser) along with landscapes and

I rather like black and white. I’d love to photograph more

people, I just need willing models!

WHAT ARE YOU SHOOTING WITH?

I recently purchased a Canon 80D. Most of the photos

featured were shot with my previous camera, a Canon

100D.

WHAT CHALLENGES HAVE YOU COME UP

AGAINST WITH PHOTOGRAPHY?

I really had to think hard about this question. For me

personally, I find the only challenge is finding enough

time to do as much photography as I would like.

Hopefully, in a few years, retirement will make that

happen.

HOW DO YOU PUSH YOURSELF TO IMPROVE AND

WHAT DO YOU DO TO GET OUT OF A CREATIVE

SLUMP?

I follow a lot of photography Facebook groups, watch

YouTube tutorials, and read everything I possibly can

to learn as much as I can. Belonging to Lesley Whyte’s

group is a great way to keep me motivated, especially

by having weekly challenges. Sometimes life gets in the

way but the challenges certainly keep me thinking about

the next subject.

HOW DOES BELONGING TO LESLEY’S

‘#WOMENINPHOTOGRAPHY’ GROUP BENEFIT

YOU?

Through this group I have met lots of other women

with the same passion for photography and we help

each other as we are all at different levels of learning.

(Shout out to fellow member Leanne Silver of Argent

Photography who took the photo of me above!).

I feel that being in an all female group allows women to

feel comfortable asking questions that they may not ask

in a mixed group for fear of being laughed at for asking

what they may think of as a silly question or something

that they should know.

WHAT DO YOU THINK THE ADVANTAGES ARE OF

BEING A FEMALE PHOTOGRAPHER?

Many people feel more comfortable with a female

photographer. I think we have more empathy which

can be an advantage when photographing families/

children.

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS FOR THE FUTURE?

I’m most probably leaning towards selling framed

photography – flowers will obviously feature

predominantly. I am also interested in photographing

people – portraits, lifestyle so am thinking along those

lines.

WHERE CAN WE FIND YOU ONLINE?

www.instagram.com/raewynjsmith

albums.excio.io/profile/photoqueen


VINTAGE ROSES

August 2019

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THE TWO OF US

TE REWA REWA BRIDGE

58 NZPhotographer


A WALK IN WINTER

ARE WE DONE YET

August 2019

59


Mind Games:

The Art of Black

and White

by Ana Lyubich

Thinking of the colour wheel, black and white are

lovers rather than neighbours. They are the complete

opposite of each other yet are the only 2 colours on

the wheel that can work together to create a stunning

and memorable masterpiece on their own.

However, how many of us consciously choose our

colour palettes or white balance offset ahead of time

to create a certain mood in our photo? More likely

you turn a photo to black and white when you realise

“Oh, this photo has too much noise, let’s see how it

looks if we convert it into black & white… oh yeah…

better!”

STEERING THE CONVERSATION

Some people say that photography is a conversation

between the photographer and the viewer. I’d say it’s

a monologue.

As a photographer, especially in our digital era, you

can’t see viewers’ reaction when they see your photo

and you can’t hear what they say most of the time.

Basic comments on social media don’t make it a

“conversation”.

Communication through photography is one-sided

and absolutely based on the visual aspect, this is why

it’s important to structure and create our photographs

in such a way that it generates the “right” response

when we publish our work.

HUMAN PERCEPTION

Opting to remove colour from a photograph is a

brave and bold choice.

When we look at colour photos, we subconsciously

make our own judgements based on what we

see and how it makes us feel, what emotions we

experience. We can see whether the photo is a sunset

or sunrise, how it is processed, whether the colours are

oversaturated or faded, whether they make us feel

warm or cold. We can guess which season the photo

was taken in because we can see certain things in the

photo (colours of tree leaves for instance) and make

an association.

Black and white images are timeless. Removing

colour makes it much more difficult to put a date on

the photo but at the same time can evoke a much

stronger emotion.

Don’t forget that black and all shades of grey are

considered to be the colours of depression. There

have been numerous studies showing that people

who post black and white images on social media

(and by the way, according to a different study, black

60 NZPhotographer


“All colours are the friends of their

neighbours and the lovers of their opposites.”

Marc Chagall, Artist

and white photos tend to generate less engagement

on Instagram!) are trying to “distance” themselves from

reality due to being “lost” and so are more likely to feel

depressed.

Because we see the real world in colour, removing

them from a photo makes us pause, look closely at

what is left, and think as we pay more attention to the

light and shadow, highlights and accents.

CONCLUSION

Black and white photography should be a conscious

choice with the end goal in mind – what message do

you want to get across? How will it make people feel?

The more control you have over the elements and

colours in your photographs, the more say you have in

the interpretation of it.

August 2019

61


62 NZPhotographer

PHOTO BY LEVENTE KADAS


Improving Your Photography

Photo Review Session

by Excio

REVIEW BY:

Samuel Ogunlaja

Commercial Photographer and Teacher/Trainer

COMPOSITION

INITIAL THOUGHTS

This is an extraordinary work of art. A nude

photograph of an anonymous lady shot in

monochrome - very expressive, emotional, and

powerful while still appearing simple.

Photographs such as this are used to express

strong emotions and would easily pass as a

form of surrealism photography. Oftentimes, the

picture may not have an underlying meaning

and would have been captured to incite

emotions in viewer’s or it could be that the

photographer just wanted to lay emphasis on

some elements like lines, shapes, texture etc.

THE GOOD THINGS ABOUT THIS PHOTO

Things that stand out in this photograph which

contribute to it being aesthetically beautiful are

as follows.

HIGH CONTRAST

The presence of the high contrast easily

demarcates the black and white elements in

the photograph. The body of the model is well

highlighted causing the easy differentiation

between the model and the rest of the frame.

The careful and intentional use of light causes

the picture to have lots of depth which allows

the intricate details of the body; like the high

cheek bones, the flattering bust line, the neck,

jawline etc.

LINES AND CURVES

The use of lines and curves to divide space and

to balance elements in certain areas of the

photo is done very well. For instance, the jawline

to the face of the model, the shoulder line on

the left side towards the elbow, down to the arm

leading to the elbow which is also well divided

by the light that comes from the neck.

Interestingly, the photograph contains a lot of

triangular composition. This type of composition

is very different from the popular rule of thirds,

it seeks to balance elements closely related

but that fall in triangular portions of the frame

making the picture more pleasing to the eye.

It often helps to track the relationship between

elements.

The first prominent triangle is the one that starts

from the shoulder on the left side of the picture

to the hand that goes to the arm that leads to

the armpit, towards the collar bone and back

to the shoulder. Another is the small triangle

obvious on the face caused by the highlights.

Yet another perfect triangle is created by the

shadows from the lower part of the elbow

towards the armpit back to the right end of the

frame and back to the elbow. Finally, another

obvious triangle goes from the jawline towards

the second arm that goes up and back to the

jawline.

August 2019

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MAKING THIS PHOTO EVEN BETTER

One thing to point out however, that would

have made this picture better, is the distracting

shadows as a result of the type of lighting used.

LIGHTING

While the use of harsh light was necessary

to get a perfect contrast between the body

and the rest of the frame, the shadows cause

distractions due to the sharp and clear-cut

distinctions. This could prevent the viewers eye

from flowing with the model’s body structure.

The use of a soft light with an increased

intensity would have created softer and better

transitioning from highlights to mid-tones and

obvious shadows.

In the images below, you can see the areas

of sharp transition between lighted areas and

shadows outlined in red. A similar picture, shot

by myself, with the use of soft lights is included

for comparison.

64 NZPhotographer


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August 2019

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y Richar

Minimal La

How to simplify your images t

ARCHWAY ISLANDS, GOLDEN BAY

F11, 8s, ISO100

66 NZPhotographer


ndscapes

o create minimal landscapes.

d Young

August 2019

67


MORNING LIGHT, MARLBOROUGH SOUNDS

F11, 1/125S, ISO100

When arriving at a stunning landscape location, it is

easy to get a bit overwhelmed and often the result of

this is that you try to photograph the whole expansive

vista in front of you. While there is nothing wrong with

this approach, it can sometimes produce an image

with no defined subject and little artistic vision.

The first thing you should ask yourself is; what are you

photographing? Yes, the beautiful view in front of you,

but what part of this is your subject? And what parts of

this view do not add anything to the image or distract

from your subject? I think this is the most important

question when shooting minimal landscapes, as you

need to try and break down what your subject is and

what elements do not add to the image and can

therefore be removed.

SUBJECT

A painter has the luxury of choosing what to include in

their painting, a photographer needs to choose what

to leave out, this is harder than it sounds…

Shooting landscapes with wide-angle lenses can

produce some stunning results, but if not used well,

a wide-angle lens can result in you capturing a very

complex image without any clear subject. For this

reason alone I think it is one of the hardest lenses to

master. I find many photographers will seldom reach

for a longer lens when shooting landscapes and

this can often be a great way to help to simplify a

landscape, by filling the image with your subject so

that the viewer can easily focus on it. By focusing on

a smaller area on a landscape, you can reduce the

number of elements in your photograph, producing

a more minimalist image with a clearer and more

defined subject.

NEGATIVE SPACE

While the use of long lenses can help to simplify a

landscape as discussed above, they can also work

against you when shooting minimal landscapes.

Negative space can be very powerful in an image.

It allows the subject space to breath and can help

68 NZPhotographer


SNOWFIELD, FOX GLACIER

F8, 1/1250s, ISO400

MORING LIGHT, MARLBOROUGH SOUNDS

to amplify the subject when it is displayed against a

larger canvas. When working with negative space you

need to work with background elements that will not

distract from the main subject. Working in conditions

like heavy mist and fresh snow can work brilliantly

for using negative space, likewise so can coastal

landscapes by filling a large part of the image with

the sea or the expansive horizon.

LONG EXPOSURES

Long exposure photography can be an excellent

way to help minimalise landscapes, especially when

working around water. By using longer shutter speeds

you can help to render out some distraction within a

landscape like ripples on the water’s surface and turn

these into a blank canvas. If your main subject is then

framed among this simple background, it can help

not only to define in but also create a photograph

without some of the complex elements that can be

hard to remove by composition alone.

USE OF COLOUR

The use of colour can be a very powerful tool in

photography, bold or contrasting clours can easily

hold our attention to a part of an image, but they

can also make a photograph more complex. When

shooting minimal landscapes, it is often better to

work with a more limited and subtle colour pallet, so

that the eye can focus on form and shape without

stong colours competing. Likewise, with lighting, the

softer light that can be found at the beginning and

end of the day is easier to work with than strong

and contrasting direct sunlight. Black and white

can also be a great option when trying to remove

the distractions found in colour images, creating an

image of minimalist quality simply because of its lack

of colours.

IMPROVE YOUR LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY THIS WINTER ON A WORKSHOP IN TONGARIRO NATIONAL

PARK OR AT MT COOK WITH NEW ZEALAND PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS

August 2019

69


THE GALLERY IS PROUDLY SUPPORTED BY

PORTFOLIO

BEST READERS' SUBMISSIONS THIS MONTH


HE KNOWS

F4, 1/250s, ISO400

Sue Muir

August 2019 71


EVEN SHADOWS USE SMART PHONES

F5,6 1/125s, ISO200

Shadows are our constant companions. Our smart phones are now

permanently integrated into our shadows and life.

Allan Fleischmann

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August 2019

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THE BREATH OF LIFE

F8, 1/200s, ISO400, 32mm

BUFFALO BEACH, WHITIANGA

Mother and Daughter come together to

share the breath of life.

Anita Ruggle-Lussy

August 2019 75


AT REST

F3.5, 1/900s, ISO160, 55mm

MINNIESDALE CHAPEL, TAUPAKI

Resting in peace at Minniesdale Chapel

overlooking the beautiful Kaipara harbour.

Craig Chalmers

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August 2019

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PASSAGE OF TIME

F8, 1/60s, ISO100, 35mm

Rusting quietly at Smash Palace in

the Central North Island.

Craig Chalmers

78 NZPhotographer


August 2019

79


OFF KEY

F8, 1/2s, IS0100, 90mm

ENDEAN'S SAW MILL, WAIMIHA

After many years of good service it's now somewhat tuned

out with this key being the worst of a bad bunch.

Derek Teague

80 NZPhotographer


August 2019

81


AFTERNOON TEA

1/100s, ISO100

Macarons, a cup of tea and a straw hat on a Summers Day!

Di Lewis

82 NZPhotographer


August 2019

83


WAIHI FALLS

F8, 3.2s, IS0100

WAIHI FALLS NEAR DANNEVIRKE

A beautiful waterfall near Dannevirke that worked

perfectly in mono with high contrast lighting conditions.

Dominic Scott

84 NZPhotographer


August 2019

85


WRECK OF THE GAIRLOCH

F11, 30s, lSO100

OAKURA NEAR NEW PLYMOUTH

The last remains of the SS Gairloch which ran aground in 1903. The long

exposure here was designed to try and convey time passing while the

wreck is quietly reclaimed.

Dominic Scott

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August 2019

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MATAIKONA ROCKS

F16, 25s, ISO64

MATAIKONA NEAR CASTLEPOINT

These fascinating rock formations are usually hidden by the sea, but

at low tide you'll see them all the way along the winding gravel road

from Whakataki to the settlement of Mataikona.

Dominic Scott

August 2019

89


A WINTER FEELING

F11, ISO200

CENTRAL OTAGO NEAR NASEBY

Central Otago presents many beautiful

options at this time of the year.

Don McLeod

90 NZPhotographer


August 2019

91


NUMBER 1

My daughter waiting to

participate in soccer

drills in Dubai.

Fairlie Atkinson

92 NZPhotographer


LITTLE WATTLE BIRD

F4.4, 1/1000s, /SO800

POINT ARKWRIGHT, SUNSHINE COAST

This bird was being very protective of a nest in a tree

and so I was able to get quite close.

Kathleen Seaward

August 2019

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DREAMS LOST IN WATER

F 5.6, 1/60s, ISO200, 50mm

THE LOST SPRING, WHITIANGA

Dream state, somewhere between sleep & awakening where

one is floating and attempting to hold on to the dream.

Karen Moffatt-McLeod

August 2019

95


THE PIPE CONNOISSEUR

F11, 1/10s ISO200, 55mm

Never judge a book by it's cover nor a man by his.

Karen Moffatt-McLeod

96 NZPhotographer


August 2019

97


98 NZPhotographer


TURNED LEAF

F5.6, 1/200s, ISO125

Water lilies floating in a pond attached to a overturned leaf.

Linda Cutche

August 2019

99


BLACK BAYOU LAKE TEXAS

TEXAS, USA

Winter cypress trees in Black Bayou Lake, the bark

showing the water levels.

Maureen Pierre

100 NZPhotographer


TESSELLATED ROCK PATTERNS

F14, 1/4s, ISO400

PATONGA, NSW, AUSTRALIA

Nature's patterns in sand stone out in the

Australian bush near the Central Coast coastline.

Murray Lowe

August 2019

101


STONE COTTAGE

F14, 1/125s, ISO 400

Old gold miners cottage in Fruitlands

district, Central Otago.

Murray Lowe

102 NZPhotographer


August 2019 103


EXOSKELETON OF POMPIDOU

F6.3, 1/100s, ISO100

PARIS, FRANCE

One side of the Pompidou Modern Art Centre.

Paul Robertson

104 NZPhotographer


August 2019 105


106 NZPhotographer

FOR NEXT SEASON

F2.8, 1/15s, IS0100

A dandelion on a summer afternoon.

Paul Robertson


FORMED BY NATURE

F4.5, 1/4s, IS0100, 90mm

HAMILTON GARDENS

A simple yet stunning form in nature

with repeating elements albeit no 2

elements the same.

Derek Teague

August 2019 107


THE SOUND OF SHELLS

F8, 1/500s, IS0100

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA

Sydney Opera House minimalism shot during early twilight.

Paul Robertson

108 NZPhotographer


August 2019 109


110 NZPhotographer


SOLITUDE

F11, 1/500s, ISO360, 55mm

WELLINGTON

A couple sitting on a bench at the top of the hill looking

out over the Pacific Ocean - in complete solitude.

Peter Maiden

August 2019

111


KINA

F7.1, 1/25s, ISO100, 200mm

LOFOTEN ISLANDS, NORWAY

I took this photo of a cluster of Kina, and felt that it was better as a black

and white photo as that highlighted the texture of the shells without the

colour being a distraction. With this photo being taken in Norway, the kina

reminded me of home.

Tanya Rowe

112 NZPhotographer


August 2019 113


“ONE DOESN’T STOP

SEEING. ONE DOESN’T

STOP FRAMING. IT

DOESN’T TURN OFF

AND TURN ON. IT’S ON

ALL THE TIME.”

ANNIE LEIBOVITZ

114 NZPhotographer

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