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Ampuku Abdominal Acupressure

THE CLASSICS AT THE HEART OF JAPANESE BODYWORK Ampuku, or traditional Japanese abdominal treatment, is a highly refined form of manual therapy. Its origins are closely related to Anma practice and Ampuku provided the base of what later would become known as Shiatsu. In all the Japanese healing arts the abdomen or ‘Hara’ is seen as an important energetic centre of the body that should be part of any successful bodywork practice. Something that was emphasized by Shiatsu master Shinzuto Masunaga who saw Ampuku as a very important part of Shiatsu. He rightly emphasized that Ampuku could contribute enormously towards helping the critically ill and those patients who require calm but penetrating manipulation. Ampuku therapy not only allows the patient to remain tranquil, it also rehabilitates the patient’s internal functioning and is an important part of diagnosis. This book is for all manual therapists interested to deepen their practice, by offering access to the information on Ampuku contained in Ōta Shinsai’s ‘Ampuku Zukai’ and Fujibayashi Ryohaku’s ‘Anma Tebiki’, the two illustrated classics at the core of Japanese bodywork. More than the translations of these two major works this book offers a practical guide by Philippe Vandenabeele, a senior Shiatsu teacher and practitioner on how to apply the different Ampuku techniques and he unveils their deeper meaning. It will provide the manual therapist a unique opportunity to explore the healing potentials offered by this traditional Japanese healing art. Includes: First complete translation of the Ampuku Zukai in English together with the Illustrations of the original first edition of the Ampuku Zukai First translation of the chapters on Hara diagnosis and Ampuku from de Anma Tebiki Together with the illustrations of the original first edition of the Anma Tebiki Overview and explanations of all the acupressure points used in the Ampuku Zukai and Anma Tebiki An in-depth explanation of the techniques described in those two Edo period books. ​More information: www.shinzui-bodywork.com

THE CLASSICS AT THE HEART OF JAPANESE BODYWORK
Ampuku, or traditional Japanese abdominal treatment, is a highly refined form of manual therapy. Its origins are closely related to Anma practice and Ampuku provided the base of what later would become known as Shiatsu.

In all the Japanese healing arts the abdomen or ‘Hara’ is seen as an important energetic centre of the body that should be part of any successful bodywork practice. Something that was emphasized by Shiatsu master Shinzuto Masunaga who saw Ampuku as a very important part of Shiatsu. He rightly emphasized that Ampuku could contribute enormously towards helping the critically ill and those patients who require calm but penetrating manipulation. Ampuku therapy not only allows the patient to remain tranquil, it also rehabilitates the patient’s internal functioning and is an important part of diagnosis.

This book is for all manual therapists interested to deepen their practice, by offering access to the information on Ampuku contained in Ōta Shinsai’s ‘Ampuku Zukai’ and Fujibayashi Ryohaku’s ‘Anma Tebiki’, the two illustrated classics at the core of Japanese bodywork.

More than the translations of these two major works this book offers a practical guide by Philippe Vandenabeele, a senior Shiatsu teacher and practitioner on how to apply the different Ampuku techniques and he unveils their deeper meaning.

It will provide the manual therapist a unique opportunity to explore the healing potentials offered by this traditional Japanese healing art.

Includes:
First complete translation of the Ampuku Zukai in English
together with the Illustrations of the original first edition of the Ampuku Zukai
First translation of the chapters on Hara diagnosis and Ampuku from de Anma Tebiki
Together with the illustrations of the original first edition of the Anma Tebiki
Overview and explanations of all the acupressure points used in the Ampuku Zukai and Anma Tebiki
An in-depth explanation of the techniques described in those two Edo period books.

​More information: www.shinzui-bodywork.com

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按<br />

腹<br />

AMPUKU<br />

<strong>Abdominal</strong> <strong>Acupressure</strong><br />

THE CLASSICS AT THE HEART<br />

OF JAPANESE BODYWORK<br />

VOLUME 1<br />

PHILIPPE VANDENABEELE


AMPUKU <strong>Abdominal</strong> <strong>Acupressure</strong><br />

Introduction 7<br />

AMPUKU The Classics at the Heart of Japanese Bodywork<br />

Philippe Vandenabeele<br />

© 2020 Shinzui Bodywork International Institute.<br />

All rights reserved for all countries.<br />

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or<br />

reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the express<br />

written permission from the author except for brief quotations<br />

embodied in critical articles and reviews.<br />

Author and Editor: Philippe Vandenabeele<br />

Jōnan-ku, Fukuoka, Japan.<br />

Translations: Hiroko Kobayashi and the Shinzui Translation<br />

Team: Sayuri, Akiko, Johanna and Philippe.<br />

Illustrations: All Illustrations in this book belong to the<br />

Shinzui Bodywork International Institute collection.<br />

Photos: The pictures on page 23, 29 and 161 are<br />

by Lieve Sinaeve www.fotosinaeve.be<br />

Book design: Alexander Laue<br />

ISBN : 978-4-600-00502-3<br />

Publisher: Shinzui Bodywork International<br />

Jōnan-ku, Fukuoka, Japan.<br />

www.shinzui-bodywork.com<br />

Disclaimer: The techniques contained in this book are intended to be<br />

used by trained manual therapy practitioners. Readers should not use<br />

any of the techniques in this book without receiving proper training<br />

from a certified teacher or training centre. Neither the Publisher nor the<br />

Author assumes any responsibility for any damage, loss or injury arising<br />

out of the use of the material in this book. It is the sole responsibility<br />

of the treating manual practitioner, relying on their own professional<br />

skill and knowledge, to determine the best treatment for any individual<br />

patient.<br />

Origins of bodywork in Japan 9<br />

The <strong>Ampuku</strong> Classics 19<br />

<strong>Ampuku</strong> Adominal <strong>Acupressure</strong> Points<br />

• The Large Intestine Channel 33<br />

• The Stomach Channel 37<br />

• The Spleen Channel 45<br />

• The Bladder Channel 49<br />

• The Kidney Channel ?? 55<br />

• The Triple Heater Channel 61<br />

• The Gall Bladder Channel 65<br />

• The Liver Channel 71<br />

• The Conception Vessel Channel 75<br />

• The Governing Vessel Channel 81<br />

• Extra Points 85<br />

Anma Tebiki 89<br />

<strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai 109<br />

Bibliography 156<br />

Index 158<br />

3


THE CLASSICS AT THE HEART OF JAPANESE BODYWORK<br />

The ancient masters were profound,<br />

subtle and responsive<br />

The depth of their wisdom was unfathomable<br />

We have no way to describe it<br />

All we can do is describe them vaguely<br />

They were watchful,<br />

like men crossing a winter stream<br />

Prudent, like one who is aware of their neighbours<br />

Reserved, like visiting guests<br />

Ephemeral, like melting ice<br />

Simple, like uncarved wood<br />

Receptive, like a valley<br />

Opaque, like muddy pools<br />

Can you wait quietly while the mud settles?<br />

Can you remain still until the moment of action?<br />

Do not seek fulfilment<br />

By not seeking fulfilment,<br />

you can stay one with the Dao<br />

Lao Tzu<br />

4<br />

5


THE CLASSICS AT THE HEART OF JAPANESE BODYWORK<br />

Introduction to Volume 1<br />

Welcome to this first volume on the art of <strong>Ampuku</strong>.<br />

For all those interested in the history and roots of<br />

Japanese bodywork I wanted to offer access to the<br />

information contained in the ‘<strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai’ and<br />

the ‘Anma Tebiki’. This also gives readers direct<br />

access to the words of Ōta Shinsai and Fujibayashi<br />

Ryohaku.<br />

I strongly believe that in order fully to understand<br />

our profession, it is important to understand its<br />

origins. Over the five years it has taken me to complete<br />

this project I have learned many things that<br />

I was not aware of before starting the journey. It<br />

has given me the opportunity to learn more about<br />

the rich and deep bodywork traditions of Japan<br />

and it has also given me more insight into the<br />

Japanese culture and language. Most of all I am<br />

grateful for how it has enriched my work, both as a<br />

practitioner in my endeavours to help my patients,<br />

and as a teacher in my attempts to transmit this<br />

ancient wisdom to my students. It is my wish that<br />

this book will be of service to any reader looking<br />

to acquire a deeper insight into the beautiful and<br />

powerful art of <strong>Ampuku</strong>.<br />

that translating is much more challenging than I<br />

had ever imagined.<br />

In the second volume of the series I focus on how I<br />

have incorporated <strong>Ampuku</strong> techniques into my own<br />

bodywork practice. I have recorded how I combine<br />

these techniques with what I have learned during<br />

my thirty years of clinical practice and study. It<br />

is my intention to share my experience of giving<br />

thousands of treatments as well as what I have<br />

learned from my teachers.<br />

I give heartfelt thanks to my wife for all her encouragement,<br />

to my parents and brother-in-law, to my<br />

daughter Olivia and to the many other people who<br />

have supported me during this project. My thanks<br />

also go out to all the teachers, colleagues, patients<br />

and students that I have met along my path.<br />

Philippe Vandenabeele<br />

Fukuoka, Japan<br />

May 2020<br />

With regard to the chapters on the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai<br />

and Anma Tebiki, I have done my absolute utmost<br />

to provide faithful translations of the original texts,<br />

while keeping the flavour of the old language intact<br />

wherever possible. If there are inaccuracies, they<br />

are only due to my own ignorance of this vast field<br />

of difficult old material. The informed reader is<br />

most welcome to contact me in the case of any<br />

error. Through working on this book, I have learned<br />

6<br />

7


The origins of<br />

bodywork in Japan<br />

‘In the legendary age of the wondrous gods, the<br />

divine Ōnamuchi-no-mikoto and Sukunahikonano-mikoto<br />

gathered their strength and, with great<br />

dedication, they cured all those who resided beneath<br />

the heavens; they resolved to treat the afflictions of<br />

humans and beasts alike.’1<br />

The Japanese healing arts trace their origins back<br />

through Japan’s mythical past. The kami2, or Japanese<br />

gods and spirits, are considered to be highly<br />

influential in shaping Japanese culture. In fact,<br />

the Kojiki (Chronicle of Ancient Matters, 712 CE),<br />

describes the creation of the ‘Eight Great Islands’<br />

of Japan. Izanagi and his sister-wife Izanami, kami<br />

from among the seventh and last generation of<br />

gods to emerge after the formation of heaven and<br />

earth, were asked by earlier generations of kami<br />

to create order out of the shapeless chaos of the<br />

world. They stood on the ‘heavenly bridge’ and<br />

stirred the inchoate mass with a jewelled sword.<br />

A drop of brine which fell from its tip created the<br />

first island of Onogoro.<br />

alive in the thousands of shrines found all over the<br />

country, where priests perform shamanistic rituals<br />

and recite incantations. The deities and forces of<br />

nature are invoked in the causes of good fortune,<br />

success, good health and to ward off calamities,<br />

cleanse impurities etc. This ancient tradition is<br />

also expressed through the many local festivals<br />

held all around the country and is personified in<br />

the lineage of the imperial family4. The Omamori<br />

(Shinto amulets) are still very popular and worn<br />

by many and the kamidana5 (household altars) are<br />

found in almost every home. Most of all this ancient<br />

tradition of kami worship is still very present in the<br />

hearts and minds of the Japanese people.<br />

Ōnamuchi-no-mikoto and Sukunahikona-no-mikoto<br />

(quoted above) are closely linked together, among<br />

the early gods, and are seen as the forefathers of<br />

Japanese medicine. Ōnamuchi is one of the central<br />

deities in the myths recorded in the Kojiki and in<br />

The Kojiki is an influential early record which<br />

brings together myths, legends, songs, lineages<br />

and other oral traditions, and serves as a sacred<br />

text for Shinto3. Kami worship is still a living reality<br />

in modern day Japan. The tradition is kept<br />

1<br />

Ōta Shinsai “<strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai”<br />

2<br />

Gods, deities and nature spirits.<br />

3<br />

Kami worship in modern times is generally referred to as Shinto<br />

4 The first Emperor Jimmu was, according to myth, directly<br />

descended from the Sun Goddess Amaterasu<br />

5<br />

Home shrine<br />

8 9


The <strong>Ampuku</strong> Classics<br />

As we have seen, there were two major books written<br />

and published in the late Edo period describing<br />

the art of <strong>Ampuku</strong>. They are the ‘<strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai’,<br />

按 腹 図 解 , by Ōta Shinsai, first published in 1827,<br />

and the ‘Anma Tebiki’, 按 摩 手 引 , by Fujibayashi<br />

Ryohaku, from 1835. Both of these are richly illustrated<br />

woodblock-printed books.<br />

From the title of <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai: 按 腹 図 解 , it is clear<br />

for anyone familiar with the Japanese language, that<br />

this book is an illustrated guide to the art of <strong>Ampuku</strong>.<br />

The first Japanese kanji1, 按 an, in this context<br />

means ‘holding, considering and investigating’. So<br />

an can be read here as holding the hand still or applying<br />

pressure, although it also encompasses the<br />

other meanings of ‘investigating and considering’.<br />

The second character, 腹 fuku, represents ‘abdomen,<br />

belly, Hara or stomach’. When separate, the<br />

pronunciation for the kanji 按 is ‘an’ and for 腹 it is<br />

‘fuku’. However, when combining them to become<br />

按 腹 - abdominal acupressure - this is pronounced<br />

‘<strong>Ampuku</strong>’. The kanji 図 zu represents ‘drawing, picture,<br />

illustration, chart, graph, sight or scene’, and<br />

解 kai means ‘explanation, notes, understanding or<br />

key’. Together I have translated these as ‘illustrated<br />

guide’. Therefore the full title for the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai<br />

按 腹 図 解 is ‘An Illustrated Guide to <strong>Ampuku</strong>’.<br />

The Anma Tebiki, 按 摩 手 引 , is an illustrated guide to<br />

the art of Anma, 按 摩 . Anma is an ancient method of<br />

bodywork that originally came from China, where it<br />

was known as Anmo. Over the centuries in Japan it<br />

developed its own distinct form. It can be translated<br />

as 按 ‘an’ - to press and 摩 ‘ma’ - to rub. Its more<br />

hidden meaning is to apply pressure to tonify and<br />

to rub to disperse. It is known in today’s Shiatsu<br />

as Ho - tonifying treatment and Sha - dispersing<br />

treatment2. At the core of the Anma Tebiki are the<br />

chapters dealing with Fukushin - Hara diagnosis -<br />

and with <strong>Ampuku</strong>. In the Anma Tebiki, the <strong>Ampuku</strong><br />

techniques are described by Fujibayashi Ryohaku<br />

as the ‘supreme’ techniques in bodywork which<br />

‘must be applied after elaborate, unhurried and<br />

thorough training’.<br />

Both these classic texts were originally produced using<br />

the ‘bound-pocket’ style, also known as stitched<br />

binding. This style allowed a much greater variety<br />

of appearance than other forms of binding3 and<br />

was very popular during the Edo period. Thin paper<br />

sheets were printed on one side only and then folded<br />

in two. The pages were then placed on top of each<br />

other and the free edges fastened using thin paper<br />

strips. After that the book covers were added and<br />

everything was bound together with thread.<br />

The <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai<br />

Ōta Shinsai repeatedly emphasises that he has written<br />

his guide to <strong>Ampuku</strong> in the vernacular style, with a<br />

broad public readership in mind. With his desire to<br />

spread the information as widely as possible, there<br />

must have been many of the original printed copies<br />

in circulation when it was first published, but very<br />

few survive today. After an international search of<br />

1<br />

Japanese character<br />

2<br />

Shizuto Masunaga, ‘Shiatsu et Médecine Orientale’<br />

3<br />

Fukurotoji<br />

18 19


collections in universities and private libraries I was<br />

others with great success, attracting people from<br />

Practitioners and teachers seen as authorities<br />

On the left we have an illustration from the original<br />

very lucky to find a few examples of the first edition.<br />

far and wide. Some have claimed that Japanese<br />

in the field of Anma, and of Shiatsu, refer to this<br />

1827 Edo period first print. On the right we have the<br />

This original <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai was printed on 30 folding<br />

Anma massage originated with Ōta Shinsai and<br />

book as being one of the main written sources of<br />

same illustration from the later 1887 Meiji period<br />

leaves and is richly and beautifully illustrated by the<br />

that he was a contemporary of Sugiyama Waichi<br />

their art. Over time the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai saw many<br />

edition. We can see that in the Meiji edition the<br />

renowned artist Murata Yosikoto. This artist was also<br />

in the late 1600s5, however I have so far not been<br />

different editions and below you can see examples<br />

Japanese text is from a later date, where the kanji<br />

known as Murata Kagen and among other important<br />

able to find any evidence for this. What is certain is<br />

from two of these.<br />

are rendered separately. In striking contrast, the<br />

books graced with his distinctive style is the 1830<br />

that his book truly speaks to the imagination and<br />

Edo period text is written in a much more flowing<br />

Min no kōji retsujo zue4, from which we include the<br />

has influenced many generations of practitioners<br />

style, allowing us to appreciate the artistic dexterity<br />

illustration below. Here you see a father instructing<br />

since it was first published.<br />

of the calligrapher Urabe Ryosai.<br />

his daughter in how to give him a treatment, while<br />

he refers to a manual and demonstrates with his<br />

The Classic for restoring health through <strong>Ampuku</strong><br />

hand exactly how she should perform the technique.<br />

Perhaps he is consulting the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai?<br />

Central to Ōta Shinsai’s work is his understanding<br />

that disease arises whenever the patient’s basic<br />

Ki6 becomes stagnant. He saw human life as being<br />

animated by the ceaseless flow of Ki, such that<br />

even a small degree of stagnation can cause illness,<br />

and when this life force is severely blocked it<br />

leads to death. Through applying <strong>Ampuku</strong> he was<br />

confident that he could help to dissolve stagnation<br />

and consequently he could treat all diseases. By<br />

applying <strong>Ampuku</strong> to the abdomen he understood<br />

The written text of the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai is as beautiful<br />

as its illustrations, being rendered by the master calligrapher<br />

Urabe Ryosai. The text and the illustrations<br />

together make this book a really exquisite piece of art.<br />

how to release stagnation to restore the smooth<br />

flow of Ki and ‘thus stabilise the intestines, regulate<br />

the gut, stretch out the muscles, moisten the skin,<br />

replenish energy, improve digestion and bowel<br />

movement, improve memory, improve physical<br />

Very little is known about Ōta Shinsai, other than<br />

that he was a practitioner from Osaka who became<br />

fitness, improve blood flow and joint movement<br />

as well as hasten recovery from chronic illnesses.’<br />

gravely ill when he was 30. According to his own accounts,<br />

no treatment helped until the techniques of<br />

<strong>Ampuku</strong> came to him and, almost miraculously, he<br />

used them to heal himself. He then went on to treat<br />

1827 Edo period edition 1887 Meiji period edition<br />

4 明 希 慈 列 女 図 会 https://pulverer.si.edu/node/860/title/1<br />

5<br />

Kiiko Matsumoto and Stephen Birch “Hara Diagnosis: Reflections on the Sea”<br />

6<br />

Yuan Qi<br />

20 21


THE CLASSICS AT THE HEART OF JAPANESE BODYWORK<br />

AMPUKU<br />

手<br />

陽<br />

明<br />

大<br />

腸<br />

經<br />

<strong>Abdominal</strong> <strong>Acupressure</strong> Points<br />

THE LARGE INTESTINE CHANNEL<br />

手<br />

陽<br />

明<br />

大<br />

腸<br />

經<br />

Hand Yang Ming<br />

What follows is the list of acupressure<br />

points used in the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai and<br />

the Anma Tebiki.<br />

32<br />

33


LI-15 – Shoulder Bone 肩 髃<br />

肩 shoulder<br />

髃 clavicle<br />

Anterior and inferior to the acromion in a<br />

depression found with the arm abducted.<br />

Meeting point of the Large Intestine channel<br />

with the Yang Qiao Mai.<br />

• Removes obstruction from the channel<br />

• Expels wind and clears heat<br />

• Alleviates pain and benefits the shoulder<br />

joint<br />

• Regulates ki and blood<br />

• Resolves phlegm and dissipates nodules<br />

LI-15<br />

34 35


THE CLASSICS AT THE HEART OF JAPANESE BODYWORK<br />

AMPUKU<br />

足<br />

阳<br />

明<br />

胃<br />

经<br />

<strong>Abdominal</strong> <strong>Acupressure</strong> Points<br />

THE STOMACH CHANNEL<br />

足<br />

阳<br />

明<br />

胃<br />

经<br />

Foot Yang Ming<br />

36<br />

37


ST-4 – Earth Granary 地 倉<br />

地 earth<br />

倉 granary, storehouse<br />

Directly below the pupil, lateral to the corner of<br />

the mouth. Meeting point of the Stomach and<br />

Large Intestine channels with the Yang Qiao<br />

Mai and Conception Vessels.<br />

• Expels wind<br />

• Removes obstructions from the channel<br />

• Alleviates pain<br />

• Benefits the tendons and muscles<br />

ST-18 – Breast Root 乳 根<br />

乳 breast<br />

根 root<br />

At the base of the breast, 4 cun 1 lateral to the<br />

anterior midline, in the fifth intercostal space<br />

• Regulates Stomach ki<br />

• Benefits the breasts and lactation<br />

• Frees the chest and alleviates cough<br />

and wheezing<br />

1<br />

Thumb measurement: The width of the interphalangeal joint of the patient’s thumb is taken as 1 cun.<br />

38 39


ST-19 – Not Contained 不 容<br />

不 not, negative<br />

容 to contain, to hold<br />

On the abdomen, 2 cun lateral to the anterior midline<br />

and 6 cun above the navel, level with CV-14<br />

• Regulates the Stomach<br />

• Harmonises the middle burner<br />

• Descends rebellious ki<br />

• Alleviates cough and wheezing<br />

ST-20 – Assuming Fullness 承 満<br />

承 to support, to receive<br />

満 full, fullness<br />

On the abdomen, 2 cun lateral to the anterior midline<br />

and 5 cun above the navel, level with CV-13<br />

• Harmonises the middle burner<br />

• Descends rebellious Lung and Stomach-ki<br />

ST-21 – Beam Gate 梁 門<br />

梁 crossbeam, beam<br />

門 gate , door<br />

On the abdomen, 2 cun lateral to the anterior midline<br />

and 6 cun above the navel, level with CV-14<br />

• Regulates ki and alleviates pain<br />

• Removes food stagnation<br />

• Harmonises the middle burner<br />

• Raises ki and stops diarrhoea<br />

ST-22 – Pass Gate 關 門<br />

關 gate, barrier; to close<br />

門 gate, door<br />

On the abdomen, 2 cun lateral to the anterior midline<br />

and 3 cun above the navel, level with CV-11<br />

• Regulates ki and alleviates pain<br />

• Regulates the intestines and benefits<br />

urination<br />

• Regulates the “lower gate of the stomach”<br />

ST-23 – Supreme Unity 太 乙<br />

太 supreme, most<br />

乙 one; intestines of a fish; second of the<br />

heavenly stems<br />

On the abdomen, 2 cun lateral to the midline and<br />

2 cun above the navel, level with CV-10<br />

• Clears the Heart<br />

• Transforms phlegm and calms the spirit<br />

• Harmonises the middle burner<br />

太 乙 is the name of a star related to the abdomen<br />

in Chinese astrology<br />

ST-24 – Slippery Flesh Gate 滑 肉 門<br />

滑 slippery<br />

肉 flesh, muscle<br />

門 gate, door<br />

On the abdomen, 2 cun lateral to the anterior midline<br />

and 6 cun above the navel, level with CV-14<br />

• Regulates the Stomach<br />

• Harmonises the middle burner<br />

• Descends rebellious ki<br />

• Alleviates cough and wheezing<br />

ST-25 – Celestial Pivot 天 樞<br />

天 celestial, heaven, vital<br />

樞 pivot, axis<br />

On the abdomen, 2 cun lateral to the navel.<br />

Front Collecting point of the Large Intestine channel<br />

• Promotes the function of the intestines<br />

• Regulates the Spleen and Stomach<br />

• Clears dampness and damp-heat<br />

• Regulates ki and blood<br />

• Relieves food stagnation<br />

天 樞 the central star in the Northern Dipper<br />

40 41


ST-32 – Crouching Rabbit 伏 兔<br />

伏 to bend over; to hide<br />

兔 rabbit<br />

On the thigh, on a line drawn between the lateral<br />

border of the patella and the anterior superior<br />

iliac spine, in a depression 6 cun above the superior<br />

border of the patella<br />

• Removes obstruction from the channel<br />

• Alleviates pain<br />

• Expels cold and dampness<br />

ST-31 – Thigh Joint 髀 關<br />

髀 thigh<br />

關 gate, joint<br />

On the upper thigh, in the depression lateral to<br />

the sartorius muscle, at the junction of a vertical<br />

line drawn downward from the anterior superior<br />

iliac spine, and a horizontal line drawn level with<br />

the lower border of the pubic symphysis<br />

• Removes obstruction from the channel<br />

• Expels wind and dampness<br />

• Alleviates pain<br />

ST-36 – Three Li 三 里<br />

三 three<br />

里 to rectify; measurement of distance<br />

Below the knee, 3 cun inferior to ST-35, one finger<br />

breath lateral to the anterior crest of the tibia<br />

He-sea point<br />

Earth point of the Stomach channel<br />

Regulates Spleen, Stomach and Kidney<br />

Command point of the abdomen<br />

Point of the Sea of Water and Grain<br />

Heavenly Star point<br />

• Benefits the Stomach and Spleen<br />

• Fortifies the Spleen and resolves dampness<br />

• Regulates the nutritive and defensive ki<br />

• Tonifies ki and nourishes blood and yin<br />

• Clears fire and calms the spirit<br />

• Activates the channel and alleviates pain<br />

• Raises yang and restores consciousness<br />

42 43


ANMA TEBIKI<br />

按<br />

摩<br />

手<br />

引<br />

The following pages are the chapters<br />

on Fukushin and <strong>Ampuku</strong> from<br />

Fujibayashi Ryohaku’s text,<br />

‘Anma Tebiki’, written in 1799 and<br />

published in 1835.<br />

88 89


Fukushin<br />

Diagnosis of the abdomen - Fukushin<br />

After becoming trained and skilled in Dōin 1 one should<br />

learn the techniques of <strong>Ampuku</strong>. Even if one’s Dōin<br />

technique is excellent, no intended outcome can be<br />

expected without knowledge of the illnesses which<br />

occur inside the belly 2 . So now the inside-belly illnesses<br />

and the locations of them are shown here, to<br />

be shared and widely understood by practitioners.<br />

While the pictures here cannot cover our complete<br />

method, if practitioners understand these pictures<br />

really well they can cure various diseases.<br />

1<br />

1/ Shokuhi no Hara<br />

Hara of Food Stagnation<br />

食 痞 の 腹<br />

This picture shows stiffness around the lower left<br />

chest area due to food stagnation. When the Stomach<br />

and Spleen don’t function well, stiffness will appear<br />

around the level of the 7th and 9th vertebrae.<br />

This can cause nausea, and/or pains.<br />

Introduction<br />

Fukushin<br />

1<br />

Healing massage<br />

2<br />

In our translation ‘belly’ and ‘Hara’ are used interchangeably - the reader should know that they refer to the same general area<br />

90 91


<strong>Ampuku</strong><br />

1/ Kori no Te<br />

Technique of Apical Beat<br />

巨 里 の 手<br />

This picture shows the technique where the practitioner<br />

senses and reads the patient’s apical heart<br />

beats. This is to learn more about the patient’s Kyo/<br />

Jitsu ( 虚 実 ) condition, and to soothe the patient’s<br />

mind.<br />

Once the practitioner has understood the illness<br />

inside the belly, by studying the previous illustrations<br />

that show how to perform Fukushin, they<br />

should practice <strong>Ampuku</strong> to cure those illnesses.<br />

However, if the practitioner is not skilled enough<br />

and is an unskilled <strong>Ampuku</strong> practitioner, it will<br />

damage organs rather than healing them. <strong>Ampuku</strong><br />

must be applied only after an elaborate, unhurried<br />

and thorough training.<br />

1<br />

Introduction<br />

<strong>Ampuku</strong><br />

96 97


2/ Migi Kyokotsu<br />

Technique of Right Ribs7<br />

右 の 胸 骨 の 手<br />

4/ Ikei no Te<br />

Technique of Stomach Meridian<br />

胃 経 の 手<br />

This picture shows how to perform ‘Bunpai’ between<br />

the ribs on the receiver’s right-hand side. The direction<br />

of rubbing should be away from the sternum<br />

towards the side and from top to bottom. With the<br />

fingertips, rub in a smooth manner between the ribs<br />

(being careful not to apply too much pressure).<br />

This picture shows how to give a swift and rhythmical<br />

rub with the palm along the Stomach meridian.<br />

Do this on the left and right sides alternately, starting<br />

from just below the breasts to the level of the CV-8<br />

‘Spirit Gateway’ acupressure point.<br />

3/ Hidari Rokkotsu<br />

Technique of Left Ribs<br />

左 の 肋 骨 の 手<br />

5/ Bunpai no Te<br />

Technique of Drainage<br />

分 排 の 手<br />

This picture shows how to perform ‘Bunpai’ between<br />

the ribs on the receiver’s left-hand side. The rubbing<br />

direction should be away from the sternum only.<br />

The practitioner should start rubbing from the solar<br />

plexus towards the sides of the body up to around<br />

the LV-13 ‘Camphorwood Gate’ acupressure points.<br />

Rub forward in the direction away from practitioner,<br />

then back in the direction towards the practitioner.<br />

Apply this technique on both sides alternately.<br />

5<br />

4<br />

3<br />

2<br />

7 In the original text he refers to the sternum, but when reading the description and looking at the illustration of the technique it is<br />

clear that he is referring to the ribs<br />

98 99


AMPUKU<br />

ZUKAI<br />

按<br />

腹<br />

圖<br />

解<br />

What follows is a complete<br />

translation of the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai,<br />

‘An Illustrated Guide to <strong>Ampuku</strong>’<br />

written by Ōta Shinsai and first<br />

published in 1827.<br />

108 109


1 The editor uses a famous epithet found in waka poetry here. This practice was often the mark of a cultured writer. From poem 17 by<br />

Ariwara no Narihira in the Hyakunin Isshu collection.<br />

Foreword<br />

In the legendary age of the wondrous gods1, the<br />

divine Ōnamuchi-no-mikoto2 and Skunahikonano-mikoto3<br />

gathered their strength and, with great<br />

dedication, they cured all those who resided beneath<br />

the heavens; they resolved to treat the afflictions of<br />

humans and beasts alike.<br />

But then eons4 flew by and we arrived at an age<br />

where the Tatami rock-bridge of the Kume islands<br />

was rent asunder and those healing skills were lost<br />

in the passage of time.<br />

During his reign, the Emperor Kinmei granted audience<br />

to the grand scholars of the Five Classics from<br />

the kingdom of Baekje: date-keepers, medics, and<br />

herbalists among them. They appeared before<br />

him one after another, springing up like hemlock<br />

saplings5. The Emperor in fact had more Chinese<br />

in his employ than at the imperial court in China so<br />

he was able to acquire a vast array of knowledge<br />

from them. This great wealth of historical records<br />

is only available to us thanks to his initiative, and<br />

our medical practitioners, as well as those from<br />

China, have handed down this knowledge to future<br />

generations.<br />

Has Dōin Ankyō6 not been transmitted in the same<br />

fashion? Has knowledge of those skills not been<br />

revived in our sovereign state? There is evidence<br />

of its usage in more recent history, in a passage<br />

of the ‘Tale of Eiga’7, where a woman was said to<br />

have practised Haratori8 , though that account is<br />

over seven hundred years old and knowledge of<br />

these techniques is now as murky as the swamp<br />

of Ikaho9. There is another account of its use - the<br />

oldest one in fact - from overseas. It can be found in<br />

none other than the father of medical literature, a<br />

classic entitled ‘The Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon’.<br />

However, it has since become outdated and no such<br />

evidence can be found now in the medical annals<br />

of later generations.<br />

For the whole of the last two hundred years in our<br />

sovereign state, Watagami’s 10 raging tides have<br />

indeed subsided, bringing the peace of Anguo 11 . This<br />

glorious era has blessed us with good fortune and<br />

allowed all who live beneath the heavens, from the<br />

highest to the lowest, to enjoy this most peaceful<br />

time. Yet in this time of prosperity, tens of thousands<br />

have wasted away never having prospered, and<br />

thousands have met their end without a living heir.<br />

That is the dire state of affairs to which our nation’s<br />

medical teaching has brought us.<br />

It is because of this that both manuals and ‘experts’<br />

in this discipline of medicine have proliferated and<br />

are now as abundant as katsura leaves in the countryside;<br />

one should say that we are fully equipped<br />

with medical knowledge. While all other practitioners<br />

have abandoned the Dōin Ankyō techniques,<br />

distinguished physicians Doctors Kōga and Kagawa<br />

from the Shimmering Capital are restoring Japanese<br />

2<br />

The Shinto god of medicine (among other things) before he received the august name Ōkuninush<br />

3<br />

God of healing and of brewing sake who assisted Ōkuninushi in building the world and protection against disease and wild animals<br />

4<br />

The editor uses yet another epithet, this time from the Man’yōshū<br />

5<br />

Another epithet from the Man’yōshū - Hemlock trees are fast-growing conifers<br />

6<br />

Manual therapy that originated in China and was later further developed in Japan<br />

7<br />

An epic centred on the life of courtier Fujiwara no Michinaga, written over a century from 1028 to 1107<br />

8<br />

<strong>Abdominal</strong> massage.<br />

9<br />

A reference to a line in the Tale of Genji<br />

10 A sea deity from the Kojiki<br />

11<br />

A city in the Hebei Province of China, nicknamed ‘the medicine capital’<br />

110 111


33<br />

A small protuberance on the occiput.<br />

Illustrated Techniques<br />

for the Prone Position<br />

Lay the patient chest-down, as depicted,<br />

with the patient’s face turned to the left or<br />

right. Depending on their preference, rest<br />

their head on a pillow or a similar object.<br />

Kneel on the patient’s left side. Place the<br />

palm of your left hand near the patients<br />

GV-4 ‘Life Gate’, then stroke with your right<br />

palm along the spine, and along the Bladder<br />

channels parallel, starting from the<br />

GV-14 ‘Great Hammer’ acupressure point<br />

towards the area of GV-4 ‘Life Gate’. Repeat<br />

this step six to seven times.<br />

Using your fingertips, evaluate and apply<br />

pressure to the following acupressure<br />

points: GV-20 ‘Hundred Meetings’,<br />

GV-19 ‘Behind the Vertex’, the inion, GB-20<br />

‘Wind Pool’ and along the hairline at the<br />

back of the head. Proceed by kneading<br />

the scapula, particularly TH-14 ‘Shoulder<br />

Bone Hole’, LI-15 ‘Shoulder Bone’, and GB-<br />

21 ‘Shoulder Well’. From the patient’s right<br />

LI-15 ‘Shoulder Bone’ point, use kaishaku<br />

along the arm, the inner and outer sides of<br />

the elbow and the wrist, palm, and back<br />

of the hand, all the way to each fingertip.<br />

After that, return to LI-15 ‘Shoulder Bone’,<br />

this time proceeding along the arm to the<br />

fingertips using the chōma technique.<br />

Then repeat the full sequence for the left<br />

arm.<br />

Next turn your attention to the back,<br />

using kaishaku one vertebra at a time<br />

from GV-14 ‘Great Hammer’ down to the<br />

tailbone. Then work the Bladder channels<br />

along the back in the same fashion.<br />

Press along the major muscles in the<br />

waist and hip area, in particular the acupressure<br />

points GB-30 ‘Jumping Round’,<br />

BL-53 ‘Bladder Huang’, and BL-54 ‘Sequential<br />

Limit’. Continue by kneading<br />

the area around BL-36 ‘Support’, BL-39<br />

‘Bend Yang’, GB-32 ‘Central River’, ST-<br />

32 ‘Crouching Rabbit’, and GB-31 ‘Wind<br />

City’, as well as the kneecap area and<br />

the inner and outer calves. Then proceed<br />

to relieve tension at BL-40 ‘Bend Middle’<br />

and BL-57 ‘Mountain Support’ using the<br />

same kaishaku technique, kneading and<br />

rubbing to relieve tension in the calf<br />

muscles.<br />

Next use kaishaku on the foot, between<br />

the metatarsal bones, around the heel,<br />

on the sides of the foot and the sole of<br />

the foot, applying pressure to KI-1 ‘Gushing<br />

Spring’ and KI-2 ‘Blazing Valley’. Use<br />

kaishaku to relieve tension in the toes.<br />

With your right hand press the two Hikon<br />

‘Tumor Root’ acupressure points on either<br />

side of the spine, while using your<br />

left palm to apply chōma to the leg, from<br />

GB-30 ‘Jumping Round’ down to the<br />

toes. Repeat this several times.<br />

Now with the left hand, press both Hikon<br />

‘Tumor Root’ points, and slowly slide<br />

your right palm down from GV-14 ‘Great<br />

Hammer’ to Hikon ‘Tumor Root’. Maintain<br />

pressure on the Hikon ‘Tumor Root’<br />

points with both thumbs, keep the pressure<br />

long enough then gently release.<br />

Let the patient turn onto his back, then<br />

proceed to the next step of the procedure.<br />

124 125


Diagram<br />

(left to right,<br />

top to bottom):<br />

Diagram<br />

(in descending order):<br />

ST-32<br />

Crouching Rabbit<br />

GV-20<br />

Hundred Meetings<br />

BL-40<br />

Bend Middle<br />

GV-19<br />

Behind the Vertex<br />

BL-39<br />

Bend Yang<br />

GV-18<br />

Unyielding Space<br />

GB-30<br />

Jumping Circle<br />

Inion<br />

(Centre)<br />

GB-31<br />

Wind Market<br />

GB-12<br />

Completion Bone<br />

GB-32<br />

Central River<br />

(Left and Right)<br />

GB-21<br />

Shoulder Well<br />

GV-16<br />

Wind Mansion<br />

TH-14<br />

Shoulder Bone Hole<br />

GB-20<br />

Wind Pool<br />

EX-LE8<br />

Inner Ankle<br />

EX<br />

Yōgan1<br />

KD-2<br />

KD-1<br />

Blazing Valley<br />

Gushing Spring<br />

BL-31 to BL-34<br />

Eight Liao<br />

Coccyx<br />

Along the Spine:<br />

Vertebrae 1 to 21<br />

1<br />

‘Lumbar Eyes’ (3.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous process of the fourth lumbar vertebra)<br />

126 127


4/ Kōki<br />

降 氣<br />

5/ Rotō<br />

櫓 盪<br />

Push down rebellious Ki in the<br />

arterie<br />

Roll the abdominals with<br />

a ferryman’s stroke<br />

Apply pressure on the left and right ST-<br />

25 ‘Celestial Pivot’ points with your left<br />

thumb and forefinger, as depicted. Then<br />

with your right thumb and forefinger, push<br />

down on each pair of points starting from<br />

ST-19 ‘Not Contained’ all the way to ST-25<br />

Place your open hands on the abdomen as<br />

depicted, with your fingertips on the right<br />

side, and the tips of your thumbs towards<br />

the left. Mimicking the movements of a<br />

rower pulling on his oars, roll the abdominals<br />

in a wavelike motion.<br />

‘Celestial Pivot’ as the patient exhales. Repeat<br />

this several times.<br />

Diagram<br />

(in descending order):<br />

ST-19<br />

ST-20<br />

ST-21<br />

ST-22<br />

ST-23<br />

ST-24<br />

ST-25<br />

Not Contained<br />

Assuming Fullness<br />

Beam Gate<br />

Pass Gate<br />

Supreme Unity<br />

Slippery Flesh Gate<br />

Celestial Pivot<br />

136 137


Information about Fukuoka:<br />

On location in Fukuoka, Japan<br />

Combine training and vacation!<br />

We are based in Fukuoka, Japan. It’s a beautiful<br />

city on the north coast of Japan’s Kyushu Island.<br />

And a perfect place to combine your Shinzui Bodywork<br />

Method training with a vacation to Japan.<br />

modern architecture, its food and culture... all in<br />

a growing, vibrant city. In a small area you’ll find<br />

beaches and mountains, Japan’s oldest Zen temple,<br />

gourmet restaurants, beautiful parks, shopping<br />

Information about the School:<br />

The Shinzui Bodywork International Institute is a<br />

center for East-West bodywork, based in Japan and<br />

Belgium. It was founded by Philippe Vandenabeele<br />

and Hiroko Kobayashi.<br />

The Institute offers professional training, general<br />

bodywork classes, a postgraduate program and<br />

various other courses including individual sessions.<br />

Fukuoka: mixing old and new<br />

We’ve fallen in love with Fukuoka! Its wonderful<br />

coastal setting, its mix of ancient temples and<br />

Shinzui Bodywork School<br />

Foundation and postgraduate training program<br />

Shinzui Bodywork Method, a whole-body<br />

manual therapy, firmly rooted in Eastern bodywork<br />

traditions, with special focus on abdominal work<br />

and meridian work, enriched with Western visceral,<br />

fascial and musculoskeletal bodywork.<br />

and more. It’s been called “a microcosm of Japan”.<br />

With it’s vibe of ‘East meets West’, Fukuoka is the<br />

perfect place for our Shinzui Bodywork institute and<br />

courses!<br />

Compared to larger cities such as Tokyo or Osaka,<br />

Fukuoka is very compact. It takes just 10 minutes<br />

to get from Fukuoka international airport to the<br />

city center.<br />

Shinzui Shiatsu School<br />

Basic and complete Shiatsu training program to<br />

become a professional Shiatsu practitioner. We are<br />

a recognized institution and follow the standards<br />

of the Belgian and European Shiatsu Federations.<br />

More information: www.shinzui-bodywork.com<br />

160 161


AMPUKU<br />

<strong>Abdominal</strong> <strong>Acupressure</strong><br />

THE CLASSICS AT THE HEART OF JAPANESE BODYWORK<br />

Philippe Vandenabeele<br />

<strong>Ampuku</strong>, or traditional Japanese abdominal acupressure, is a highly refined form of manual<br />

therapy that provided the base of what later would become known as Shiatsu. Its origins are<br />

also closely related to the earlier Anma practice.<br />

In the Japanese healing arts the abdomen, or ‘Hara’, is seen as an important centre of energy<br />

for the body therefore Hara work should be part of any successful bodywork practice. This was<br />

something that was emphasized by Shiatsu master Shinzuto Masunaga who saw <strong>Ampuku</strong> as<br />

a very important part of Shiatsu. He understood that <strong>Ampuku</strong> could contribute enormously<br />

towards helping the critically ill and those patients who require calm but penetrating manipulation.<br />

<strong>Ampuku</strong> therapy not only allows the patient to remain tranquil, it has also the potential<br />

to rehabilitate the patient’s internal functioning and is an important part of diagnosis.<br />

This book is for all manual therapists interested in deepening their practice, by offering access<br />

to the information on <strong>Ampuku</strong> contained in Ōta Shinsai’s ‘<strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai’ and Fujibayashi<br />

Ryohaku’s ‘Anma Tebiki’, the two illustrated classics at the core of Japanese bodywork that are<br />

provided here in complete English translation for the first time.<br />

Along with the translations of these two major works this book also offers a practical guide<br />

on how to apply the different <strong>Ampuku</strong> techniques by Philippe Vandenabeele, a senior Shiatsu<br />

teacher and practitioner, who unveils their deeper meaning.<br />

This book will provide the manual therapist a unique opportunity to explore the origins and<br />

the healing potentials offered by this traditional Japanese healing art.<br />

Includes:<br />

• First complete translation of the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai in English together with the Illustrations of the original<br />

first edition of the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai<br />

• First translation of the chapters on Hara diagnosis and <strong>Ampuku</strong> from de Anma Tebiki together with<br />

the illustrations of the original first edition of the Anma Tebiki<br />

• Overview and explanations of all the acupressure points used in the <strong>Ampuku</strong> Zukai and Anma Tebiki<br />

• An in-depth explanation of the <strong>Ampuku</strong> techniques described in those two Edo period books.<br />

Philippe Vandenabeele is a manual therapist and teacher based in Fukuoka Japan. With 30<br />

years of clinical and teaching experience, Philippe has consolidated his knowledge, insights<br />

and practical experience to develop his own unique approach: the Shinzui Bodywork Method.<br />

Shinzui Bodywork is a whole-body manual therapy firmly rooted in Eastern bodywork<br />

traditions with special focus on abdominal work, meridian work, and enriched with Western<br />

visceral, fascial and musculoskeletal bodywork.<br />

For:<br />

Manual Therapists / Bodyworkers<br />

Shiatsu students and practitioners<br />

Anma practitioners<br />

Massage therapists<br />

Complementary Medicine<br />

Oriental Medicine

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