GA 8 Teaching Tools

gallopade

8 th Grade

UNIT #6

Impact of

Civil War on

Georgia

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UNIT 6

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

Social Studies Themes page 1

IMPACT OF CIVIL WAR

ON GEORGIA

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS

These themes provide the underlying framework for many important “big picture” concepts that

your students will be learning throughout this unit. Use these questions to help students apply

what they learn about the Impact of the Civil War on Georgia toward their understanding of

these Enduring Understandings throughout the unit.

CULTURE

The culture of a society is the product of the religion, beliefs,

customs, traditions, and government of that society.

How did cultural differences cause the North and the South to split prior to the Civil War?

Why did southern states feel they needed to secede from the Union?

INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, & INSTITUTIONS

The actions of individuals, groups, and/or institutions affect

society through intended and unintended consequences.

What effects did President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation have on Northerners

and Southerners?

BELIEFS & IDEALS

The beliefs and ideals of a society influence the social,

political, and economic decisions of that society.

How did the idea of popular sovereignty influence people’s decisions prior to the Civil War?

CONFLICT RESOLUTION

Societies resolve conflicts through legal procedures, force,

and/or compromise.

What compromises were passed by the federal government to appease northern and

southern states?

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UNIT 6

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

Social Studies Themes page 2

CONFLICT RESOLUTION

Societies resolve conflicts through legal procedures, force,

and/or compromise.

What compromises were passed by the federal government to appease northern and

southern states?

GOVERNANCE

As a society increases in complexity and interacts with other

societies, the complexity of the government also increases.

Why did the states feel they had more authority than the federal government before the

Civil War?

GAIN FROM TRADE

Parties trade voluntarily when they expect to gain.

Why were Georgia’s delegates split on the decision to secede?

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UNIT 6

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

START WITH

THIS ACTIVITY

Hook & engage

to boost curiosity,

inquiry, motivation,

and results!

IMPACT OF CIVIL WAR

ON GEORGIA

UNIT OPENER

Inquiry-Based Learning

Launch this unit with a lesson on Alexander H. Stephens’ speech of January 1861 against

Georgia’s secession from the Union. The speech can be found on several websites, including:

http://civilwarcauses.org/steph2.htm.

You can provide printed copies, have the speech available via digital devices or whiteboard,

read portions of the speech to the class, or show a video (several can be found online). You can

choose excerpts from the speech if you wish.

If students listen to the speech, encourage them to take notes. If students read a copy of the

speech, tell them to highlight things they find interesting. After students read or listen to the

speech, ask them to share their reaction to it. Guide a class discussion with questions you have

written or use these:

1. Alexander Stephens’ speech represents one side of the secession issue. Is he in favor or

against secession? Answer: against.

2. What reasons did Stephens give against secession? Correct answers include:

• Secession would cost the South a lot of money.

• Southern lives would be lost.

• Southern power in the federal government had always been strong and the South

had gotten almost everything it asked for from the federal government.

• The federal government subsidized many services (postal service, for example), and

the subsidies would end with secession.

3. Do you think Stephens’ speech was effective? Why or why not?

4. Do you think Alexander Stephens would be a strong supporter of the Confederacy if

Georgia secedes?

• Have students make a prediction about this and post the predictions.

• Revisit the predictions when discussing Confederacy leadership.

5. Tell students they are beginning a unit on the Civil War and, in particular, the impact that the

Civil War had on Georgia.

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UNIT 6

NAME: _____________________________________________

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

IMPACT OF CIVIL WAR

ON GEORGIA

DEFINE THESE TERMS BASED ON WHAT YOU ALREADY LEARNED.

(IT’S OK TO FLIP BACK TO PREVIOUS CHAPTERS.)

compromise

confederation

Vocabulary Builder

proclamation

USE A DICTIONARY TO DEFINE THESE TERMS. THEN HIGHLIGHT EACH

TERM THE FIRST TIME YOU SPOT IT IN THE TEXT.

abolition

blockade

campaign

civil

emancipation

nullify

popular sovereignty

secession

tariff

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UNIT 6

Down

NAME: _____________________________________________

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

IMPACT OF CIVIL WAR

ON GEORGIA

Complete the crossword puzzle.

1. formal separation from a political

union (in this case, the United States)

2. a public or official announcement of

an important matter

3. to declare something no longer legal

and binding

Vocabulary Review

5. an alliance of countries, states, or

other political units in which the

individual members maintain their

autonomy

6. a release from bondage; setting free

Across

4. of or relating to a nation or its citizens

5. a settlement of a conflict by each side giving up something in order to get something

7. a series of planned actions that are taken to reach a goal

8. a situation where enemy ships patrol a port to keep weapons, ammunition, food, or other supplies

from moving in or out

9. a tax on imports or exports

10. the idea that government authority comes from people who have agreed to be governed

11. the campaign to end slavery in the United States

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CHAPTER 16

Issues and Events

Divide the Nation

CHAPTER TOOLS:

Tool

When To Use

(start, end, or with which page of Student Workbook)

Multimedia Resource Gallery

Learning Objectives + Correlations

Essential Questions Activity Sheet

throughout

start + ongoing

start + ongoing

Let’s Review page 67

Writing Prompt #1 page 69

Writing Prompt #2 page 70

Primary Source Analysis page 70

Interactive Workbook Scavenger Hunt

Study Guide

ExperTrack * Checkpoint #06a

EOC

EOC

EOC (pretest optional)

*

license required

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CHAPTER 16

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

Learning Objectives & Correlations

GSE:

ISSUES AND EVENTS

DIVIDE NATION

LEARNING TARGETS

Students will be able to:

Î Explain the importance of slavery and how it led to the

Civil War.

Î Explain the importance of states’ rights and how it led to the

Civil War.

Î Explain the importance of nullification and how it led to the

Civil War.

Î Explain the importance of the Compromise of 1850 and

how it led to the Civil War.

Î Explain the importance of the Georgia Platform relative to

the Civil War.

Î Explain the importance of the Dred Scott case and how it

led to the Civil War.

Î Explain the importance of Abraham Lincoln’s election and

how it led to the Civil War.

Î Explain the importance of the debate over secession in

Georgia relative to the Civil War.

CORRELATIONS TO STANDARDS

SS8H5a

Map and Globe Skills: 1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 11

Information Processing Skills: 1, 8, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16

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CHAPTER 16

NAME: _____________________________________________

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

ISSUES AND EVENTS

DIVIDE NATION

What key issues and events led to the Civil War and how were they important?

How did the issue of slavery lead to the Civil War?

Essential Questions

How did the issue of states’ rights lead to the Civil War?

How did the issue of nullification lead to the Civil War?

How did the Compromise of 1850 lead to the Civil War?

What was the importance of the Georgia Platform?

How did the Dred Scott Case lead to the Civil War?

How did the election of Abraham Lincoln lead to the Civil War?

What was the importance of the debate over secession in Georgia?

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NAME: _____________________________________________

THE FUGITIVE SLAVE ACT

HISTORICAL IMPACT

Slave owners paid slave-catchers to capture and

return escaped slaves. The Fugitive Slave Act of

1850 allowed slave-catchers to enter the North to

capture fugitive slaves. Additionally, the Fugitive

Slave Act made it illegal to help escaped slaves,

even in the free Northern states. Anyone caught

helping runaway slaves faced fines and time in

prison. Runaway slaves were no longer safe in

free states! To gain complete freedom, slaves

had to travel even farther north to Canada.

Despite the Fugitive Slave Act, many abolitionists

continued to help slaves on the Underground Railroad.

Explain how the Fugitive Slave Act affected each group of people.

Effects of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850

Southern Slaveowners Runaway Slaves Northern Abolitionists

Let’s Review

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NAME: _____________________________________________

ABRAHAM LINCOLN AND

JEFFERSON DAVIS

REGIONAL DIFFERENCES AND REGIONAL

PERSPECTIVES

Lincoln was born

in Kentucky and

lived most of his

life in Illinois.

Davis was born

in Kentucky and

lived most of his

life in Mississippi.

Abraham Lincoln,

President of the United States

of America

Jefferson Davis,

President of the Confederate States

of America

Our perspective and viewpoints are shaped by life experiences, such as where we grow up.

Use biographies to research the lives of Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis. Then explain

how where they grew up may have influenced their positions on slavery.

Writing Prompt

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

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NAME: _____________________________________________

THE SECESSION MOVEMENT

STUDENT OBSERVATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS

Look at the cartoon and answer the questions on a separate piece of paper.

Primary Source Analysis

"The Secession Movement"

South Carolina

Florida

Alabama

Mississippi

Louisiana

Georgia

We go the whole hog—Old Hickory is dead, and now we’ll have it.

Go it Carolina! We are the boys to “wreck” the Union.

We go it blind, Cotton is King!

1. What is the topic of this political cartoon?

2. What do the riders represent?

Down with the Union. Mississippi “repudiates her bonds.”

Go it boys! We’ll soon taste the “sweets” of secession.

We have some doubts about “the end” of that road and think it

expedient to deviate a little.

3. Who is leading the charge? Why? What is the significance of the order of the figures?

4. A. From what point of view is the cartoon drawn? Explain your reasoning.

B. What can you infer about the artist’s opinion of secessionist states?

What details from the cartoon support your conclusion?

5. What is the main message conveyed by this cartoon?

Cite evidence to support your conclusion.

6. What can you infer about Alabama’s reasons for seceding?

7. Why is Georgia separated from the other states? Explain.

(Do additional research if necessary.)

Courtesy of Library of Congress

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CHAPTER 16

NAME: _____________________________________________

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

ISSUES AND EVENTS

DIVIDE NATION

SCAVENGER HUNT

Interactive Workbook

1. Find and highlight each of these items or facts in your Student Workbook:

A. The definition of nullify

B. The definition of secession

C. Per the Missouri Compromise, where slavery would not be allowed

D. The number of states that seceded from the Union

E. Reasons why the southern states needed slaves

F. The reason why President Jackson put a tariff on imports in 1828

G. How southern states reacted to the tariff

H. Which controversy showed the strong feelings held in the South regarding

states’ rights

I. Where the Compromise of 1850 abolished the slave trade

J. The name of the U.S. senator who helped negotiate compromises regarding slavery

K. What part of the Compromise of 1850 was included to pacify the slave states

L. The name of the politician who wrote the Georgia Platform

M. An explanation of the Georgia Platform

N. An explanation of popular sovereignty

O. Why Dred Scott sued for his freedom

P. How the Supreme Court ruled in the Dred Scott case

Q. Who was elected President of the United States in 1860

R. The main goal of the Republican Party in the 1860s

S. Which state threatened secession if the Republicans won the 1860 election

2. Circle and write PS by a primary source in each chapter of this unit.

3. Underline two reasons northern states opposed slavery in the southern states.

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CHAPTER 16

NAME: _____________________________________________

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

THE ISSUE OF SLAVERY

1. How did the U.S. Constitution deal with slavery?

__________________________________________________________________________________

2. Why was slavery a key issue leading up to the Civil War?

__________________________________________________________________________________

THE NULLIFICATION CONTROVERSY

3. Describe what led to the nullification controversy and what resulted from it.

__________________________________________________________________________________

4. What did the nullification controversy show about the South’s views on states’ rights?

Study Guide page 1

__________________________________________________________________________________

5. How was nullification a key issue leading up to the Civil War?

__________________________________________________________________________________

COMPROMISES

6. What was the result of the Missouri Compromise?

__________________________________________________________________________________

7. What was the result of the Compromise of 1850?

__________________________________________________________________________________

8. Why did Georgians oppose the Compromise of 1850?

__________________________________________________________________________________

9. How was the Compromise of 1850 a key issue leading up the Civil War?

__________________________________________________________________________________

©Gallopade • All Rights Reserved • www.gallopade.com

Permission is granted to use Toolbox only with students for whom a current-year Experience Class Set is purchased.


CHAPTER 17

Georgia’s Role in

the Civil War

CHAPTER TOOLS:

Tool

When To Use

(start, end, or with which page of Student Workbook)

Multimedia Resource Gallery

Learning Objectives + Correlations

Essential Questions Activity Sheet

throughout

start + ongoing

start + ongoing

Graphic Organizer page 73

Artistic Expression page 75

Let’s Review page 76

Primary Source Analysis page 77

Interactive Workbook Scavenger Hunt

Study Guide

ExperTrack * Checkpoint #06b

EOC

EOC

EOC (pretest optional)

*

license required

©Gallopade • All Rights Reserved • www.gallopade.com


CHAPTER 17

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

Learning Objectives & Correlations

GSE:

GEORGIA’S ROLE IN

THE CIVIL WAR

LEARNING TARGETS

Students will be able to:

Î Describe how the Union blockade of Georgia’s coast

affected the Civil War.

Î Describe the effect of the Emancipation Proclamation

on the Civil War and on Georgia.

Î Describe how the Battle of Chickamauga affected the

Civil War.

Î Describe how Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign affected the

Civil War.

Î Describe how Sherman’s March to the Sea affected the

Civil War.

Î Describe Andersonville, what happened there, and its

role in the Civil War.

CORRELATIONS TO STANDARDS

SS8H5b

Map and Globe Skills: 6, 7, 8

Information Processing Skills: 6, 8, 14, 15, 16

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Permission is granted to use Toolbox only with students for whom a current-year Experience Class Set is purchased.


CHAPTER 17

NAME: _____________________________________________

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

GEORGIA’S ROLE IN

THE CIVIL WAR

What was Georgia’s role in the Civil War?

Essential Questions

What role did the Union blockade of Georgia’s coast play in the Civil War?

What role did the Emancipation Proclamation play in the Civil War?

What role did the Battle of Chickamauga play in the Civil War?

What role did Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign play in the Civil War?

What role did Sherman’s March to the Sea play in the Civil War?

What role did Andersonville play in the Civil War?

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NAME: _____________________________________________

TO SECEDE OR NOT SECEDE

DECISION MAKING

In the Choice box 1, write “To Secede” and in Choice box 2, write “Not to Secede.”

Choose the perspective of someone who lived in Georgia in the 1860s. Describe that person on

the back of the graphic organizer. Include name, age, gender, economic status, social position,

job, and other characteristics.

Now, complete the graphic organizer from that perspective.

Graphic Organizer

put glue on the BACK of this striped section

The decision I have to make:

Choice 1: Choice 2:

BENEFITS • PROS • GAIN

COSTS • CONS • GIVE UP

Circle the most important BENEFITS and COSTS

Best Choice:

BENEFITS • PROS • GAIN

COSTS • CONS • GIVE UP

To add this to your interactive workbook, cut along the outside dashed lines, and fold on the solid line.

Put glue on the BACK of the striped area, and glue it to the top of a page it relates to.

Glue it so it is readable when flat, and you can fold it upwards to read the workbook page.

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A CIVIL WAR BATTLE

VISUAL THINKING STRATEGIES

THE CIVIL WAR—CAUSES, EVENTS, & RESULTS

1. Display this image on your whiteboard so all students can look at the image at the same time.

https://i2.wp.com/militaryhistorynow.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/chickamauga.jpg

2. Use the Visual Thinking Strategy process to discuss elements in the picture.

(see info below)

Artistic Expression

3. Afterwards, you can provide additional information about the painting, such as: This is a

painting of a Civil War battle scene from the Battle of Chickamauga. This battle was

fought in September 1863 in the northwest corner of Georgia and in the southeast

corner of Tennessee. The Battle of Chickamauga was the first major battle of the Civil

War fought in Georgia. Casualties were high, second only to the Battle of Gettysburg.

The outcome was a victory for the Confederacy, but both sides suffered high losses.

A Brief Introduction to Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS)

“Visual Thinking Strategies” is an inquiry-based teaching method that uses art to teach visual

literacy, cognitive thinking, and communication skills. Part of the effectiveness of VTS is that it

enables students to use their existing skills to observe and identify things they already know,

and in doing so, they also identify things they don’t know, sparking an inquiry process that they

can explore independently or with peers.

VTS instruction typically includes three key inquiries:

1. What is going on in this picture?

2. What do you see that makes you say that?

3. What more can we find?

Process: Ask question 1, and call on a student to answer. Ask that same student question 2.

Ask question 3, and call on a different student to answer. Follow that answer by asking that

student question 1 (adapt if needed; depending on how they answered question 3), and then

question 2. Then ask question 3 again, and call on another student to answer. Continue this

process. Students will likely start with big picture observations about the overall scene, but as

you cycle through these questions, students may begin to observe details of things happening

in parts of the image, finding stories within the story/artwork.

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NAME: _____________________________________________

SHERMAN AND HIS ARMY

MARCH TO THE SEA

On September 2, 1864, Union General William Tecumseh Sherman and his

troops moved into the city of Atlanta. Sherman ordered any remaining civilians

to leave the city. His troops remained in town until the middle of November,

when Sherman ordered the burning of all the main buildings in Atlanta.

The city’s strength as a railroad and industrial center went up in smoke!

Sherman’s army then set out across Georgia, intending to break the will of

the South. The Union forces were massive, consisting of 5,000 cavalrymen

and 57,000 infantrymen. The army split into two wings that cut a path of

destruction through the heart of Georgia that was 40 to 60 miles wide!

Officers ordered soldiers to destroy rail lines, factories, bridges, and anything else that could

help the southern war effort. The soldiers were under strict orders to leave private homes and

property alone, but those orders were sadly ignored. The state of Georgia was devastated.

The army moved about 15 miles a day, reaching Savannah on December 21, 1864.

Answer the questions. Use additional resources if necessary.

1. What was the goal of Sherman’s “March to the Sea”?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

2. Why did Sherman want to capture Atlanta? What was the importance of that city?

Let’s Review

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

3. Why do you think Sherman’s soldiers ignored instructions and destroyed homes and

businesses?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

4. Sherman said the Union was “not only fighting hostile armies, but a hostile people.”

What do you think he meant by that?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

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NAME: _____________________________________________

ANDERSONVILLE PRISON

STUDENT OBSERVATIONS AND CONCLUSIONS

Primary Source Analysis

Use the photograph

and journal entries to

answer the questions.

Andersonville Prison, Ga., August 17, 1864 — Southeast view of stockade

April 3 – We have stopped wondering at suffering or being surprised at anything. Can’t do the subject justice and so

don’t try. Walk around camp every morning looking for acquaintances, the sick, etc. Can see a dozen most any morning

laying around dead. A great many are terribly afflicted with diarrhea, and scurvy begins to take hold of some. Scurvy is a

bad disease, and taken in connection with the former is sure death. Some have dropsy as well as scurvy, and the swollen

limbs and body are sad to see. To think that these victims have people at home, mothers, wives and sisters, who are

thinking of them and would do much for them if they had the chance, little dreaming of their condition.

May 19 — Nearly twenty thousand men confined here now. New ones coming every day. Rations very small and very poor.

The meal that the bread is made out of is ground, seemingly, cob and all, and it scourges the men fearfully. Things getting

continually worse. Hundreds of cases of dropsy. Men puff out of human shape and are perfectly horrible to look at.

Philo Lewis died today. Could not have weighed at the time of his death more than ninety pounds, and was originally a large

man, weighing not less than one hundred and seventy. Jack Walker, of the 9th Mich. Cavalry, has received the appointment

to assist in carrying out the dead, for which service he receives an extra ration of corn bread.

Union soldier John Ransom, Andersonville Diary, 1864

1. Look at the photograph and imagine you are a Union soldier held prisoner. What can you infer

from the photograph about what your life was like in the summer of 1864 at Andersonville?

2. Read the April 3 journal entry by John Ransom, a Union soldier held prisoner at Andersonville.

What does his journal entry tell you about the conditions of the prison?

3. Andersonville Prison opened in February of 1864. The original design was for 10,000 prisoners.

Read the May 19 journal entry. Explain what you think was the cause for the illnesses.

Be specific and use examples from both diary entries in your answer.

4. Using the image, the journal entries, and what you know about the Civil War, write a journal

entry for June 19.

5. Based on the information in the journal, infer what may have happened to John Ransom.

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CHAPTER 17

NAME: _____________________________________________

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

GEORGIA’S ROLE IN

THE CIVIL WAR

SCAVENGER HUNT

Interactive Workbook

1. Find and highlight each of these items or facts in your Student Workbook:

A. When the Confederate States of America officially formed

B. The name of the Georgia leader who became vice president of the Confederacy

C. Where the first conflict of the Civil War took place

D. Where Union soldiers first attacked in Georgia

E. The purpose of the Union blockade of Southern ports

F. The definition of emancipate

G. An explanation of the Emancipation Proclamation

H. How Southerners and Northerners viewed the Emancipation Proclamation

I. How slaves viewed the Union troops

J. Why Union troops targeted Atlanta

K. The name of the largest Civil War battle in Georgia

L. The name of the general who led the Atlanta Campaign

M. When Union troops burned Atlanta

N. Where the Union troops headed after Atlanta

O. When the Confederacy surrendered

P. The location of the largest Confederate prison camp

Q. A description of the conditions at Andersonville

2. Circle and write PS by a primary source in each chapter of this unit.

3. Draw a star beside the photo of the Georgian elected to be Vice President of

the Confederacy.

4. On the map on page 76, write the dollar amount of damage Sherman’s march

caused in Georgia.

5. Below the photo on page 77, write the number of men who died at Andersonville.

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CHAPTER 17

NAME: _____________________________________________

GEORGIA EXPERIENCE | GRADE 8 | UNIT 6

GEORGIA’S ROLE IN THE CIVIL WAR

1. How did the Union blockade affect Georgia’s role in the Civil War?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

2. How did the Emancipation Proclamation affect slaves?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

3. How did the Emancipation Proclamation affect the Civil War?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

4. What happened at the Battle of Chickamauga? How was it significant to Georgia’s role

in the Civil War?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

Study Guide

5. What happened in Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign? How was it significant to Georgia’s role in

the Civil War?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

6. What happened in Sherman’s March to the Sea? How was it significant to Georgia’s role in

the Civil War?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

7. What was Andersonville’s role in the Civil War? What happened there?

__________________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

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Permission is granted to use Toolbox only with students for whom a current-year Experience Class Set is purchased.

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