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Virus: Vax<br />

persuaders step<br />

up efforts<br />

Soccer: RHS<br />

teams set to host<br />

newcastle<br />

4<br />

Opinion<br />

Clair McFarland<br />

Page 2<br />

The<br />

Nation<br />

Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong> • 8 pages • Volume 115, No. 43<br />

Page 3<br />

Summery<br />

Ranger<br />

High: 83 Low: 49<br />

Sports<br />

FREMONT COUNTY’S DAILY NEWSPAPER<br />

50 cents<br />

WYOMING DIGEST<br />

WEA IN SEARCH OF K-12 FUNDING<br />

CHeYenne (Wne) – Although state<br />

lawmakers adjourned earlier this month<br />

without addressing Wyoming’s dire K-12<br />

funding outlook, the Wyoming education<br />

Association is determined to keep a solutions-oriented<br />

conversation alive.<br />

“While education funding is a massive<br />

issue in Wyoming, it is truthfully a symptom<br />

of a much larger and more significant<br />

issue: our state’s economic management,”<br />

Tate Mullen, government relations director<br />

for the WeA, said at a virtual meeting<br />

Monday evening. “Our state’s economy has<br />

to be diversified. This doesn’t mean building<br />

on existing industries, but bringing in<br />

new industries that will provide economic<br />

stability to the state and its residents.”<br />

“There seems to be a substantial disconnect<br />

between understanding the importance<br />

and value of education – which I think the<br />

people of Wyoming get. But the disconnect<br />

seems to be how those services are paid for<br />

(and) where those dollars come from,”<br />

Mullen said. “What we must address is the<br />

(lack) of political will to address this issue.”<br />

STATE WORKER DISTURBED PEACE<br />

CHeYenne (Wne) – Wyoming<br />

Division of Criminal Investigation employee<br />

Tina Trimble has pleaded guilty in<br />

Cheyenne Municipal Court to disturbance<br />

of the peace (rude behavior).<br />

Trimble accosted local business order<br />

Christie King after King asked Trimble to<br />

pick up a receipt. Trimble began verbally<br />

fighting with King and got close to her,<br />

according to court documents. King’s arms<br />

were full at the time, but she was able to<br />

push Trimble back and told Trimble, “You<br />

need to back up.”<br />

Trimble moved toward King again, and<br />

King “used a front leg kick to gain distance<br />

from Trimble.”<br />

Trimble and King were then physically<br />

fighting, with King receiving scrapes on her<br />

elbow and an injury to her head. Trimble<br />

admitted to grabbing King’s hair during the<br />

incident, according to court documents.<br />

LOCAL TEACHER ON SNACK WRAPPER<br />

LARAMIe (Wne) — A Laramie<br />

teacher is featured on the wrapper of a bar<br />

made by Boulder, Colorado-based company<br />

Bobo’s Baked goods as part of a national<br />

promotion to honor teachers and healthcare<br />

workers.<br />

Annette Falcon teaches Spanish at the<br />

University of Wyoming Lab School, and<br />

her masked visage appears on the front of<br />

Bobo’s limited-edition “Hero” chocolate<br />

chip oat bars.<br />

Falcon has taught Spanish for more than<br />

25 years. At the Lab School, she teaches<br />

grades K-8.<br />

GET YOUR VACCINE<br />

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RIVERTON<br />

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VISIT VACCINEFINDER.ORG<br />

FOR MORe InFORMATIOn<br />

Library lyrics<br />

Singer-guitarist Quinn Cerovski entertained Wednesday afternoon at the Riverton<br />

Branch Library “chalk the walk” activity. Look for more chalk the walk pictures in a<br />

coming Ranger edition.<br />

Photo by Steve Peck<br />

Probe of railcar explosion deaths could<br />

last months; no OSHA comment now<br />

By Katie Roenigk<br />

Staff Writer<br />

Work force safety officials say their investigation<br />

into last week’s fatal railcar explosion in Shoshoni<br />

could continue for several months.<br />

Until then, the Occupational Safety and Health<br />

Administration will offer no comment on the incident,<br />

Wyoming Department of Workforce Services communications<br />

manager Ty Stockton said Wednesday.<br />

Stockton also noted that OSHA may not have jurisdiction<br />

over the incident, which occurred at a railcar<br />

repair yard and could fall under the purview of the<br />

Federal Railroad Association instead.<br />

The investigation is ongoing despite the jurisdictional<br />

questions, Stockton said, adding that OSHA<br />

does not approach the incident from a “criminal or<br />

otherwise standpoint,” but rather “in terms of workplace<br />

safety and whether the rules were followed.”<br />

Wyoming even has an occupational epidemiologist<br />

who determines whether each workplace safety incident<br />

represents a “one-off sort of thing” or signals a<br />

need to “make some changes (to) protect workers,”<br />

Stockton said.<br />

Other elements of the case – for example, the question<br />

of cause – often are investigated by partnering<br />

agencies like local fire departments and police departments,<br />

“depending on the incident,” he said.<br />

Workers Memorial Day<br />

Stockton took the opportunity to point out that<br />

Wednesday was Workers Memorial Day – “a day to<br />

pay tribute to people who have died on the job.”<br />

Two local men died in last week’s explosion: Dallas<br />

Mitchell, 28, of Riverton, and Daniel Conway, 18, of<br />

Shoshoni, both employees of Wasatch Rail Repair.<br />

Officials said the men were inside of a railcar tanker<br />

conducting routine maintenance when an explosion<br />

occurred at about 3:25 p.m. Wednesday, <strong>April</strong> 21.<br />

Shoshoni Police Department chief Chris Konija said<br />

the spark that ignited the explosion likely was produced<br />

by the work the men were doing inside of the<br />

tanker – using a grinder to remove paint and perform<br />

an ultrasound test checking the thickness and integrity<br />

of the welds inside of the vessel.<br />

“The common practice is for a metal wheel to<br />

remove some of the paint so the test can be conducted<br />

against the metal,” Konija said. “That is believed to be<br />

what provided the spark, or source of the initial ignition.”<br />

What remains unknown, Konija said, is how the<br />

gaseous concentration in the container reached a combustible<br />

density level.<br />

“We’re trying to explain (that),” he said.<br />

“There are multiple theories of how that came to<br />

be, but we don’t have enough information at this time<br />

to make a determination of exactly why that level was<br />

present.”<br />

Safety protocols would have dictated that the railcar<br />

workers test the tanker for explosiveness, breathability,<br />

and oxygen saturation before entering the confined<br />

space, Konija said, and if the test had indicated<br />

the air was unsafe, “they would not have entered, as far<br />

as my understanding of the proper procedures.”<br />

“<br />

You have a few people that are<br />

rebels. I know a lot of people<br />

that have been written up<br />

because they weren’t wearing<br />

their mask.<br />

By Katie Roenigk<br />

Staff Writer<br />

DUSTY HARRIS<br />

Wyoming Honor Farm inmate<br />

COVID<br />

behind bars<br />

A diagnosis in prison<br />

brings considerations<br />

different from ‘outside’<br />

Prison inmates in Wyoming who have had to<br />

endure weeks-long periods of isolation during the<br />

COVID-19 pandemic have come up with unique<br />

strategies to cope with the quarantine requirements.<br />

Some were able to pass the time watching television<br />

or playing video games, while inmates without<br />

those resources turned to books and calisthenics to<br />

occupy their minds and bodies.<br />

For Wyoming Honor Farm inmate Josiah<br />

Arthur, 23, the key was exercise.<br />

“Most of the time I’d just work out (to) stay<br />

sane,” Arthur said this month. “I had no other<br />

choice.”<br />

Other people told him they spent time drawing,<br />

writing letters, or writing poetry.<br />

“(There were) all kinds of things that would keep<br />

them busy,” Arthur<br />

said.<br />

Rachelle Lynch,<br />

23, said the prison<br />

quarantine experience<br />

was “lonely” –<br />

but she also appreciated<br />

the opportunity<br />

to protect herself<br />

from COVID-19.<br />

“I thought it was<br />

SECOND IN A SERIES<br />

a great idea, actually,” Lynch said, remembering her<br />

reaction when she was placed in quarantine for the<br />

first time at the Wyoming Women’s Center in Lusk.<br />

“I mean, it’s tough, because you can’t be around<br />

people as much. But on the plus side, you’re not<br />

getting sick, either.”<br />

Lynch, who said she has a “very weak immune<br />

system,” noted that she was “so scared” of catching<br />

COVID-19.<br />

But she was more concerned about her friends<br />

and relatives outside of the prison walls, whom she<br />

felt were more likely to be exposed to the virus than<br />

she was in prison, where inmates had to follow rigorous<br />

safety protocols.<br />

“They’re out there,” Lynch said of her loved<br />

ones. “Your family is out there getting sick. …<br />

They’re getting sick, and you’re worried about<br />

them, (but) you can’t leave. You can’t be there with<br />

them. And that’s hard.”<br />

Family ties<br />

Conversely, for some longtime inmates, Lynch<br />

said the pandemic has actually allowed more contact<br />

with family and friends.<br />

She has spoken with several people who told her<br />

it was a “big process” to arrange for in-person visits<br />

at the women’s center before COVID-19 arrived in<br />

Wyoming, with only a limited number of individuals<br />

allowed on each inmate’s “visit list.”<br />

During the pandemic, however, the visitation<br />

process has been altered to incorporate remote<br />

video calls, allowing more people participate.<br />

The change meant one inmate was able to see<br />

her children for the first time in seven years, Lynch<br />

q Please see “Virus,” page 5<br />

Riverton, Wyo. 307-856-2244 • Lander, Wyo. 307-332-3559 • www.dailyranger.com • Thursday inserts: Menards


WORLD & NATION<br />

Page 2 Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong><br />

U.S. recovery<br />

from COVID<br />

recession is<br />

showing<br />

momentum<br />

WASHIngTOn (AP) —<br />

Powered by consumers and fueled<br />

by government aid, the U.S. economy<br />

is achieving a remarkably fast<br />

recovery from the recession that<br />

ripped through the nation last year<br />

on the heels of the coronavirus and<br />

cost tens of millions of Americans<br />

their jobs and businesses.<br />

The economy grew last quarter<br />

at a vigorous 6.4 percent annual<br />

rate, the government said<br />

Thursday, and expectations are<br />

that the current quarter will be<br />

even better. The number of<br />

people seeking unemployment<br />

aid — a rough reflection of layoffs<br />

— last week reached its lowest<br />

point since the pandemic struck.<br />

And the national Association of<br />

Realtors said Thursday that more<br />

Americans signed contracts to buy<br />

homes in March, reflecting a<br />

strong housing market as summer<br />

approaches.<br />

economists say that widespread<br />

vaccinations and declining viral<br />

cases, the reopening of more businesses,<br />

a huge infusion of federal<br />

spending and healthy job gains<br />

should help sustain steady growth.<br />

For <strong>2021</strong> as a whole, they expect<br />

the economy to expand close to 7<br />

percent, which would mark the<br />

fastest calendar-year growth since<br />

1984.<br />

In March, U.S.<br />

employers added 916,000 jobs —<br />

the biggest burst of hiring since<br />

August. At the same time, retail<br />

spending has surged, manufacturing<br />

output is up and consumer<br />

confidence has reached its highest<br />

point since the pandemic began.<br />

“We are seeing all the engines<br />

of the economy rev up,” said<br />

gregory Daco, chief economist at<br />

Oxford economics.<br />

The<br />

Ranger<br />

(USPS 874-900) • www.dailyranger.com<br />

Steven R. Peck, Publisher<br />

Robert A. Peck (1949-2007)<br />

Roy Peck (1949-1983)<br />

Carl Manning, Circulation Manager<br />

856-1696 — after 6:30 p.m.<br />

Published Tuesday through Friday<br />

afternoons and Sunday<br />

at 421 E. Main St.<br />

Riverton, WY 82501<br />

e-mail: fremontnews@wyoming.com<br />

TELEPHONES<br />

Riverton 856-2244 Lander 332-3559<br />

In-County Rates by Carrier<br />

Regular<br />

Senior<br />

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In-County Rates by Mail<br />

Regular<br />

Senior<br />

$18.00 3 months $14.00<br />

$34.00 6 months $27.00<br />

$65.00 1 year $52.00<br />

Outside Fremont County<br />

Mail Only<br />

3 months $21.00<br />

6 months $40.00<br />

1 year $75.00<br />

No Senior Citizen Discount rates<br />

outside Fremont County<br />

9-month Student Rate $35.00<br />

by mail only<br />

1-year<br />

Serviceman Rate $35.00<br />

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to<br />

Circulation<br />

The Ranger<br />

P.O. Box 993<br />

Riverton, WY 82501-0993<br />

Periodicals Postage Paid at<br />

Riverton, Wyoming<br />

Vol. 115, No. 43<br />

Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong><br />

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS,<br />

MEMBER OF WYOMING PRESS<br />

ASSOCIATION,<br />

INLAND DAILY PRESS<br />

ASSOCIATION<br />

and NATIONAL NEWSPAPER<br />

ASSOCIATION<br />

2020 FIRST-PRIZE WINNER<br />

WYOMING<br />

PRESS<br />

ASSOCIATION<br />

<strong>2021</strong> MEMBER<br />

DIGEST<br />

BIDEN SPEECH: GOVERNMENT IS GOOD, SO ARE JOBS<br />

The<br />

WASHIngTOn (AP) — President Joe Biden returned to<br />

the U.S. Capitol, his home for more than three decades, and<br />

used his first address to Congress to make the case that the era<br />

of big government is back.<br />

Biden said the U.S. is “on the move again” after struggling<br />

through a devastating pandemic that killed more than 570,000<br />

Americans, disrupted the economy and shook daily life. And<br />

he pitched an expansive — and expensive — vision to rebuild<br />

the nation’s roads, bridges, water pipes and other infrastructure,<br />

bolster public education and extend a wide swath of other<br />

benefits.<br />

Biden uttered the word “jobs” a whopping 43 times. It’s perhaps<br />

no surprise for an administration that has made beating<br />

back the pandemic and getting Americans back to work the<br />

central guideposts for success.<br />

Biden noted that the economy has gained some 1.3 million<br />

new jobs in the first few months of his administration — more<br />

than any in the first 100 days of any presidency. But he quickly<br />

pivoted to the need to pass his American Jobs Plan if the country<br />

is going to sustain momentum and get back to the historic<br />

low levels of unemployment before the pandemic.<br />

He also aimed to frame his push for the U.S. to meet its<br />

international obligations to slow the impact of climate change<br />

as, ultimately, a jobs plan.<br />

NC SHERIFF: 4 DEAD, SUSPECT KILLED IN STANDOFF<br />

BOOne, n.C. (AP) — Two deputies were killed and three<br />

other people including a suspected gunman were found dead<br />

after a lengthy standoff in north Carolina, a sheriff’s office said<br />

Thursday.<br />

The Watauga County Sheriff’s office said Sgt. Chris Ward<br />

and K-9 Deputy Logan Fox were dispatched to a home in<br />

Boone at 9:44 a.m. Wednesday after the homeowner and his<br />

family didn’t report to work or answer telephone calls. Both<br />

were hit by gunfire. Other officers were able to pull out Ward,<br />

who later died at a hospital. Fox died at the scene.<br />

“The individual suspected of killing the two officers is also<br />

suspected of killing two civilians in the residence,” the statement<br />

said. Sheriff Len Hagaman said they were the suspect’s<br />

mother and stepfather, WSOC-TV reported.<br />

A Boone Police officer, a Boone firefighter and an<br />

Appalachian State University police officer were shot at during<br />

an initial attempt to rescue the deputies, and the Boone police<br />

officer was hit, but he escaped injury to his Kevlar helmet<br />

equipment, Hagaman told WSOC.<br />

Morganton Department of Public Safety Maj. Ryan Lander<br />

told The news Herald just before 11 p.m. that the suspect<br />

appeared to have killed himself, the newspaper reported.<br />

Hagaman said Ward died at a hospital in Johnson City,<br />

Tennessee.<br />

“This is an incredibly tragic situation and our thoughts and<br />

prayers are with everyone involved as well as their families and<br />

our community,” Hagaman said.<br />

SUPREME COURT RULES 6-3 FOR IMMIGRANT<br />

WASHIngTOn (AP) — An unusual coalition of Supreme<br />

Court justices joined Thursday to rule in favor of an immigrant<br />

fighting deportation in a case that the court said turned<br />

on the meaning of the shortest word, “a.”<br />

By a 6-3 vote, the court sided with Agusto niz-Chavez, a<br />

guatemalan immigrant who has been in the United States<br />

since 2005. eight years later, he received a notice to appear at a<br />

deportation hearing but this notice did not include a date or<br />

time. Two months after that, a second notice instructed him<br />

when and where to show up.<br />

By sending notice of a deportation hearing, the government<br />

can stop the clock on immigrants hoping to show they have<br />

been in the United States for at least 10 straight years. The 10-<br />

year mark makes it easier under federal law to ask to be<br />

allowed to remain in the country.<br />

The court was deciding whether immigration officials had<br />

to include all the relevant information in a single notice.<br />

Justice neil gorsuch wrote in his majority opinion that they<br />

do, criticizing the government’s “notice by installment.”<br />

Two other conservative justices, Clarence Thomas and Amy<br />

Coney Barrett, signed on, as did the court’s three liberal members,<br />

Stephen Breyer, elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor. The<br />

case was argued during the Trump administration.<br />

“Anyone who has applied for a passport, filed for Social<br />

Security benefits, or sought a license understands the government’s<br />

affinity for forms. Make a mistake or skip a page? go<br />

back and try again, sometimes with a penalty for the trouble.<br />

But it turns out the federal government finds some of its forms<br />

frustrating too,” gorsuch wrote.<br />

INDIANS TURN TO BLACK MARKET AS VIRUS SURGES<br />

neW DeLHI (AP) — Ashish Poddar kept an ice pack on<br />

hand as he waited outside a new Delhi hospital for a black<br />

market dealer to deliver two drugs for his father, who was gasping<br />

for breath inside with COVID-19.<br />

But the drugs never arrived, the ice that was intended to<br />

keep the medicines cool melted and his father died hours later.<br />

As India faces a devastating surge of new coronavirus infections<br />

overwhelming its health care system, people are taking<br />

desperate measures to try to keep loved ones alive. In some<br />

cases they are turning to unproven medical treatments, in others<br />

to the black market for life-saving medications that are in<br />

short supply.<br />

Poddar had been told by the private hospital treating his<br />

father, Raj Kumar Poddar, that remdesivir, an antiviral, and<br />

tocilizumab, a drug that blunts human immune responses,<br />

were needed to keep the 68-year-old man alive.<br />

Like most hospitals and pharmacies in the Indian capital,<br />

stocks had run out. Desperate, Poddar turned to a dealer who<br />

promised the medicines after taking an advance of almost<br />

$1,000.<br />

“It’s nearby” and “coming” read some of the texts that<br />

Ashish received as he waited.<br />

“I wish he had at least told me that he isn’t going to come. I<br />

could have searched elsewhere,” the grieving son said.<br />

Ranger<br />

Beer, pot,<br />

doughnuts<br />

Officials get creative<br />

with vaccine incentives<br />

CHICAgO (AP) -- Free beer,<br />

pot and doughnuts. Savings<br />

bonds. A chance to win an all-terrain<br />

vehicle. Places around the<br />

U.S. are offering incentives to try<br />

to energize the nation’s slowing<br />

vaccination drive and get<br />

Americans to roll up their sleeves.<br />

These relatively small corporate<br />

promotion efforts have been<br />

accompanied by more serious and<br />

far-reaching attempts by officials<br />

in cities such as Detroit, where<br />

they’re offering $50 to people who<br />

give others a ride to vaccination<br />

sites. Chicago is sending specially<br />

equipped buses into neighborhoods<br />

to deliver vaccines.<br />

Public health officials say the<br />

efforts are crucial to reach people<br />

who haven’t been immunized yet,<br />

whether because they are hesitant<br />

or because they have had trouble<br />

making an appointment or getting<br />

to a vaccination site.<br />

“This is the way we put this<br />

pandemic in the rearview mirror<br />

and move on with our lives,” said<br />

Dr. Steven Stack, Kentucky’s public<br />

health commissioner.<br />

Meanwhile, more activities are<br />

resuming around the U.S. as case<br />

numbers come down. Disneyland<br />

is set to open Friday after being<br />

closed for over a year, while<br />

Indianapolis is planning to welcome<br />

135,000 spectators for the<br />

Indy 500 at the end of May. Still,<br />

rising hospitalizations and caseloads<br />

in the Pacific northwest<br />

prompted Oregon’s governor to<br />

impose restrictions in several counties,<br />

and her Washington counterpart<br />

was expected to follow suit.<br />

Demand for vaccines has started<br />

to fall around the country —<br />

something health officials expected<br />

would happen once the most vulnerable<br />

and most eager to get the<br />

A man wearing a cannabis costume hands out marijuana cigarettes<br />

in New York during a “Joints for Jabs” event, where<br />

adults who showed their COVID-19 vaccination cards<br />

received a free joint.<br />

shot had the opportunity to do so.<br />

now that most older Americans<br />

are fully vaccinated, the effort is<br />

moving into a new phase.<br />

“This will be much more of an<br />

intense ground game where we<br />

have to focus on smaller events,<br />

more tailored to address the needs<br />

and concerns of focused communities,”<br />

Stack said.<br />

nationally, 82 percent of people<br />

over 65 and more than half of all<br />

adults have received at least one<br />

dose of vaccine, according to the<br />

Centers for Disease Control and<br />

Prevention. But while vaccinations<br />

hit a high in mid-<strong>April</strong> at an average<br />

of 3.2 million shots per day,<br />

the number had fallen to 2.5 million<br />

as of last week, and some<br />

places are no longer asking for<br />

their full allotment from the government.<br />

The slowdown in the U.S.<br />

stands in stark contrast to the situation<br />

in the many poorer corners<br />

of the world that are desperate for<br />

vaccine.<br />

Demand has dropped precipitously<br />

in the rugged timberland of<br />

northeastern Washington state,<br />

where Matt Schanz of northeast<br />

Tri County Health District is at a<br />

loss for what to try next.<br />

Seventy-six percent of residents<br />

remain unvaccinated in Pend<br />

Oreille County, and 78 percent in<br />

Ferry County, and a whopping 80<br />

Celebrate Class of '21 Graduation<br />

Includes photos of ALL local area high school grads<br />

including Riverton • Frontier • Lander • Fort Washakie<br />

Arapahoe Charter • Pathfinder • Shoshoni • Wind River<br />

St. Stephen’s • Wyoming Indian • and Dubois<br />

High Schools, as well as CWC and UW Outreach.<br />

Publishes: Wed. & Thurs, May 19 & 20,<br />

Journal, Ranger & Wind River News<br />

Deadline: Friday, May 14, 5pm<br />

Full page: $ 589, includes color, reg. price $ 835<br />

• Half page: $ 289, reg. price $ 415 • Qtr page: $ 159, reg. price $ 210<br />

• 1/8 page: $ 79, reg. price $ 105 • 1/16 page: $ 39, reg. price $ 55<br />

Color, if available at $ 50 per ad<br />

percent in edtevens County have<br />

not had even one shot, compared<br />

with a statewide average of 59 percent.<br />

Wednesday, only 35 people<br />

in all three counties booked a first<br />

dose through the health agency,<br />

down from a daily peak of 500<br />

appointments a few weeks ago.<br />

Schanz ticks off the efforts so far<br />

in the three counties where he is<br />

the health agency’s administrator:<br />

newspaper ads, signs and mailers<br />

sent with utility bills. Drive-thru<br />

vaccination sites at fairgrounds and<br />

fire stations. A call center and<br />

online scheduling. Outreach to<br />

pastors, Republican elected leaders,<br />

employers in the lumber<br />

industry and an aluminum boat<br />

manufacturer.<br />

Family rates also available for private parties (no logos please)<br />

Mark Lennihan, AP<br />

Riverton Community<br />

Blood Drive<br />

Will be held Tuesday, May 11,<br />

from 12:00 – 5:30 p.m. at the<br />

United Methodist Church, 1116<br />

West Park Avenue, Riverton, WY.<br />

Appointments can be made by<br />

calling 307-851-3908 or by<br />

visiting www.vitalant.org and<br />

entering Sponsor Code: Riverton.<br />

You must have an appointment<br />

to donate. Donors must be well<br />

and must also wear a mask. All<br />

donations will be tested for<br />

coronavirus antibodies.<br />

856-2244 332-2323


SPORTS<br />

Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong> Page 3<br />

NATIONAL LEAGUE<br />

East Division W L Pct GB<br />

Atlanta 12 12 .500 _<br />

Philadelphia 12 12 .500 _<br />

new York 9 10 .474 ½<br />

Miami 11 13 .458 1<br />

Washington 9 12 .4<strong>29</strong> 1½<br />

Central Division W L Pct GB<br />

Milwaukee 14 10 .583 _<br />

Pittsburgh 12 12 .500 2<br />

St. Louis 12 12 .500 2<br />

Cincinnati 11 13 .458 3<br />

Chicago 10 14 .417 4<br />

West Division W L Pct GB<br />

Los Angeles 16 9 .640 _<br />

San Francisco 16 9 .640 _<br />

San Diego 14 12 .538 2½<br />

Arizona 12 12 .500 3½<br />

Colorado 9 15 .375 6½<br />

All Times EDT<br />

Tuesday's Games<br />

Pittsburgh 2, Kansas City 1<br />

Boston 2, n.Y. Mets 1<br />

Toronto 9, Washington 5<br />

Atlanta 5, Chicago Cubs 0<br />

St. Louis 5, Philadelphia 2<br />

Milwaukee 5, Miami 4<br />

Arizona 5, San Diego 1<br />

Colorado 7, San Francisco 5, 10 innings<br />

Cincinnati 6, L.A. Dodgers 5<br />

Wednesday's Games<br />

Miami 6, Milwaukee 2<br />

L.A. Dodgers 8, Cincinnati 0<br />

Boston 1, n.Y. Mets 0<br />

Washington 8, Toronto 2<br />

Atlanta 10, Chicago Cubs 0<br />

Kansas City 9, Pittsburgh 6<br />

Philadelphia 5, St. Louis 3<br />

San Diego 12, Arizona 3<br />

San Francisco 7, Colorado 3<br />

Thursday's Games<br />

Philadelphia (nola 2-1) at St. Louis (Kim 1-0),<br />

1:15 p.m.<br />

Chicago Cubs (Alzolay 0-2) at Atlanta (Wilson 1-<br />

1), 7:20 p.m.<br />

L.A. Dodgers (Bauer 3-0) at Milwaukee (Lauer 0-<br />

0), 7:40 p.m.<br />

Colorado (Senzatela 1-3) at Arizona (Weaver 1-2),<br />

9:40 p.m.<br />

Friday's Games<br />

St. Louis at Pittsburgh, 6:35 p.m.<br />

Miami at Washington, 7:05 p.m.<br />

n.Y. Mets at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.<br />

Atlanta at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.<br />

Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m.<br />

L.A. Dodgers at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.<br />

Colorado at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.<br />

San Francisco at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.<br />

EASTERN CONFERENCE<br />

Atlantic Division W L Pct GB<br />

x-Brooklyn 42 20 .677 —<br />

x-Philadelphia 41 21 .661 1<br />

new York 35 28 .556 7½<br />

Boston 33 30 .524 9½<br />

Toronto 26 36 .419 16<br />

Southeast Division W L Pct GB<br />

Atlanta 34 <strong>29</strong> .540 —<br />

Miami 33 30 .524 1<br />

Charlotte 30 32 .484 3½<br />

Washington 28 34 .452 5½<br />

Orlando 19 43 .306 14½<br />

Central Division W L Pct GB<br />

Milwaukee 38 23 .623 —<br />

Indiana <strong>29</strong> 32 .475 9<br />

Chicago 26 36 .419 12½<br />

Cleveland 21 41 .339 17½<br />

Detroit 19 43 .306 19½<br />

x-clinched playoff spot<br />

Tuesday's Games<br />

Portland 133, Indiana 112<br />

Milwaukee 114, Charlotte 104<br />

Oklahoma City 119, Boston 115<br />

Brooklyn 116, Toronto 103<br />

Minnesota 114, Houston 107<br />

Dallas 133, golden State 103<br />

Wednesday's Games<br />

Orlando 109, Cleveland 104<br />

Philadelphia 127, Atlanta 83<br />

new York 113, Chicago 94<br />

Boston 120, Charlotte 111<br />

Washington 116, L.A. Lakers 107<br />

Miami 116, San Antonio 111<br />

Denver 114, new Orleans 112<br />

Portland 130, Memphis 109<br />

Phoenix 109, L.A. Clippers 101<br />

Utah 154, Sacramento 105<br />

Thursday's Games<br />

Brooklyn at Indiana, 7 p.m.<br />

Dallas at Detroit, 7 p.m.<br />

golden State at Minnesota, 8 p.m.<br />

Scoreboard<br />

Major league glance<br />

NBA glance<br />

East Division GP W L OTPts GF GA<br />

Washington 49 32 13 4 68 171 144<br />

Pittsburgh 50 32 15 3 67 170 138<br />

n.Y. Islanders 49 <strong>29</strong> 15 5 63 136 114<br />

Boston 48 28 14 6 62 139 119<br />

n.Y. Rangers 50 26 18 6 58 167 132<br />

Philadelphia 49 22 20 7 51 140 177<br />

new Jersey 49 15 27 7 37 127 174<br />

Buffalo 50 13 30 7 33 122 174<br />

Central Division GP W L OTPts GF GA<br />

x-Carolina 49 32 10 7 71 161 119<br />

x-Florida 51 32 14 5 69 166 141<br />

x-Tampa Bay 49 33 14 2 68 167 1<strong>29</strong><br />

nashville 51 27 22 2 56 141 146<br />

Dallas 49 21 16 12 54 140 1<strong>29</strong><br />

Chicago 49 22 22 5 49 139 158<br />

Detroit 51 17 25 9 43 115 159<br />

Columbus 51 16 25 10 42 122 170<br />

nOTe: Two points for a win, one point for<br />

overtime loss. The top four teams in each division<br />

will qualify for playoffs under this season's<br />

temporary realignment.<br />

x-clinched playoff spot<br />

y-clinched division<br />

All Times EDT<br />

Tuesday's Games<br />

n.Y. Rangers 3, Buffalo 1<br />

Boston 3, Pittsburgh 1<br />

Columbus 1, Detroit 0, SO<br />

Carolina 5, Dallas 1<br />

Washington 1, n.Y. Islanders 0<br />

new Jersey 6, Philadelphia 4<br />

Tampa Bay 7, Chicago 4<br />

Florida 7, nashville 4<br />

Wednesday's Games<br />

Ottawa 6, Vancouver 3<br />

St. Louis 4, Minnesota 3<br />

Toronto 4, Montreal 1<br />

edmonton 3, Winnipeg 1<br />

Vegas 5, Colorado 2<br />

Anaheim 3, Los Angeles 2<br />

San Jose 4, Arizona 2<br />

Thursday's Games<br />

Buffalo at Boston, 7 p.m.<br />

Dallas at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.<br />

Detroit at Carolina, 7 p.m.<br />

(All times Eastern)<br />

Schedule subject to change and/or blackouts<br />

Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong><br />

MLB BASEBALL<br />

4 p.m.<br />

MLBn — Seattle at Houston (joined in progress)<br />

7 p.m.<br />

MLBn — Chicago Cubs at Atlanta OR LA<br />

Dodgers at Milwaukee (7:30 p.m.)<br />

11:30 p.m.<br />

MLBn — Colorado at Arizona (joined in<br />

NHL glance<br />

Sports on TV<br />

AMERICAN LEAGUE<br />

East Division W L Pct GB<br />

Boston 16 9 .640 _<br />

Tampa Bay 13 12 .520 3<br />

Toronto 11 12 .478 4<br />

new York 11 13 .458 4½<br />

Baltimore 10 14 .417 5½<br />

Central Division W L Pct GB<br />

Kansas City 15 8 .652 _<br />

Chicago 12 10 .545 2½<br />

Cleveland 11 12 .478 4<br />

Minnesota 8 15 .348 7<br />

Detroit 8 16 .333 7½<br />

West Division W L Pct GB<br />

Oakland 15 10 .600 _<br />

Houston 13 11 .542 1½<br />

Los Angeles 12 11 .522 2<br />

Seattle 13 12 .520 2<br />

Texas 10 15 .400 5<br />

All Times EDT<br />

Tuesday's Games<br />

Pittsburgh 2, Kansas City 1<br />

Cleveland 7, Minnesota 4<br />

Boston 2, n.Y. Mets 1<br />

n.Y. Yankees 5, Baltimore 1<br />

Toronto 9, Washington 5<br />

Tampa Bay 4, Oakland 3<br />

Houston 2, Seattle 0<br />

Texas 6, L.A. Angels 1<br />

Detroit 5, Chicago White Sox 2<br />

Wednesday's Games<br />

Minnesota 10, Cleveland 2<br />

Boston 1, n.Y. Mets 0<br />

n.Y. Yankees 7, Baltimore 0<br />

Tampa Bay 2, Oakland 0<br />

Washington 8, Toronto 2<br />

Kansas City 9, Pittsburgh 6<br />

L.A. Angels 4, Texas 3<br />

Houston 7, Seattle 5<br />

Detroit at Chicago White Sox, ppd.<br />

Thursday's Games<br />

n.Y. Yankees (Montgomery 1-1) at Baltimore<br />

(López 1-3), 1:05 p.m.<br />

Oakland (Bassitt 2-2) at Tampa Bay (McClanahan<br />

0-0), 1:10 p.m.<br />

Seattle (Kikuchi 0-1) at Houston (garcia 0-2),<br />

2:10 p.m.<br />

Detroit (Mize 1-2) at Chicago White Sox (Rodón<br />

3-0), 5:10 p.m., 1st game<br />

Boston (Pérez 0-1) at Texas (gibson 2-0), 8:05<br />

p.m.<br />

Detroit (Boyd 2-2) at Chicago White Sox (Cease<br />

0-0), 8:10 p.m., 2nd game<br />

Friday's Games<br />

Detroit at n.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m.<br />

Atlanta at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.<br />

Houston at Tampa Bay, 7:10 p.m.<br />

Boston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.<br />

Cleveland at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m.<br />

Kansas City at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.<br />

Baltimore at Oakland, 9:40 p.m.<br />

L.A. Angels at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.<br />

WESTERN CONFERENCE<br />

Southwest Division W L Pct GB<br />

Dallas 34 27 .557 —<br />

Memphis 31 30 .508 3<br />

San Antonio 31 30 .508 3<br />

new Orleans 27 35 .435 7½<br />

Houston 15 47 .242 19½<br />

Northwest Division W L Pct GB<br />

x-Utah 45 17 .726 —<br />

Denver 41 21 .661 4<br />

Portland 34 28 .548 11<br />

Oklahoma City 21 41 .339 24<br />

Minnesota 19 44 .302 26½<br />

Pacific Division W L Pct GB<br />

x-Phoenix 44 18 .710 —<br />

L.A. Clippers 43 21 .672 2<br />

L.A. Lakers 36 26 .581 8<br />

golden State 31 31 .500 13<br />

Sacramento 25 37 .403 19<br />

Milwaukee at Houston, 8 p.m.<br />

new Orleans at Oklahoma City, 9 p.m.<br />

Toronto at Denver, 9 p.m.<br />

Friday's Games<br />

Atlanta at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.<br />

San Antonio at Boston, 7:30 p.m.<br />

Washington at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.<br />

Orlando at Memphis, 8 p.m.<br />

Portland at Brooklyn, 8 p.m.<br />

Milwaukee at Chicago, 9 p.m.<br />

Utah at Phoenix, 10 p.m.<br />

Sacramento at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.<br />

Saturday's Games<br />

Detroit at Charlotte, 7 p.m.<br />

golden State at Houston, 7:30 p.m.<br />

Chicago at Atlanta, 8 p.m.<br />

Indiana at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.<br />

Memphis at Orlando, 8 p.m.<br />

Miami at Cleveland, 8 p.m.<br />

new Orleans at Minnesota, 8 p.m.<br />

Washington at Dallas, 9 p.m.<br />

Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10 p.m.<br />

Toronto at Utah, 10 p.m.<br />

West Division GP W L OTPts GF GA<br />

x-Vegas 48 35 11 2 72 165 105<br />

x-Colorado 47 31 12 4 66 164 117<br />

x-Minnesota 48 31 14 3 65 154 127<br />

St. Louis 47 22 19 6 50 139 146<br />

Arizona 50 21 24 5 47 134 160<br />

San Jose 49 20 24 5 45 135 169<br />

Los Angeles 47 18 23 6 42 126 140<br />

Anaheim 50 15 28 7 37 109 162<br />

North Division GP W L OTPts GF GA<br />

x-Toronto 49 31 13 5 67 163 131<br />

edmonton 47 <strong>29</strong> 16 2 60 153 127<br />

Winnipeg 49 27 19 3 57 150 138<br />

Montreal 48 21 18 9 51 137 140<br />

Calgary 48 21 24 3 45 128 139<br />

Ottawa 50 19 27 4 42 139 174<br />

Vancouver 43 19 21 3 41 117 138<br />

n.Y. Islanders at n.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.<br />

Philadelphia at new Jersey, 7 p.m.<br />

Pittsburgh at Washington, 7 p.m.<br />

Vancouver at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.<br />

Florida at Chicago, 8 p.m.<br />

St. Louis at Minnesota, 8 p.m.<br />

Calgary at edmonton, 9 p.m.<br />

Friday's Games<br />

Winnipeg at Montreal, 7 p.m.<br />

San Jose at Colorado, 9 p.m.<br />

Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m.<br />

Vegas at Arizona, 10 p.m.<br />

Saturday's Games<br />

Buffalo at Boston, 1 p.m.<br />

Tampa Bay at Detroit, 3 p.m.<br />

Columbus at Carolina, 7 p.m.<br />

n.Y. Rangers at n.Y. Islanders, 7 p.m.<br />

new Jersey at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.<br />

Ottawa at Montreal, 7 p.m.<br />

Pittsburgh at Washington, 7 p.m.<br />

Vancouver at Toronto, 7 p.m.<br />

Dallas at nashville, 8 p.m.<br />

Florida at Chicago, 8 p.m.<br />

San Jose at Colorado, 8 p.m.<br />

St. Louis at Minnesota, 8 p.m.<br />

Calgary at edmonton, 10 p.m.<br />

Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m.<br />

Vegas at Arizona, 10 p.m.<br />

progress)<br />

NBA BASKETBALL<br />

7 p.m.<br />

nBATV — Brooklyn at Indiana<br />

NHL HOCKEY<br />

8 p.m.<br />

nBCSn — Florida at Chicago<br />

10:30 p.m.<br />

nBCSn — Calgary at edmonton (joined in<br />

progress)<br />

The<br />

Ranger<br />

Riverton Wolverines Daxton Fisher (17), Korbin Heil and Christian Nimmo surrouned Levi<br />

Stoneking of Douglas as he headed a pass downfield. The Riverton boys have a 3-2 conference<br />

record heading into a 3 p.m. Friday home matchup with Newcastle.<br />

Photos by Steve Peck<br />

RHS booters host Newcastle<br />

q The schedule says<br />

the boys have the earlier<br />

game of the doubleheader<br />

beginning at<br />

3 p.m. Friday, with<br />

the girls next at 5 p.m.<br />

By Steve Peck<br />

Publisher<br />

The Riverton Wolverine soccer<br />

teams have shaken off some bad<br />

early season results, and both now<br />

have winning records in their<br />

respective conferences.<br />

The RHS boys played outstanding<br />

defensive soccer in a Class 3-A<br />

east conference game Friday in<br />

Rawlins, securing a 2-1 victory.<br />

Combined with their 6-0 win at<br />

newcastle and a 3-1 home victory<br />

over Buffalo, the Wolverines have<br />

raised their conference mark to 3-2<br />

after one trip through the 3-A<br />

east.<br />

Both conference losses were<br />

close, 4-2 in Torrington and 1-0 at<br />

home to Douglas.<br />

The second half of the conference<br />

season starts Friday at<br />

Wolverine Field, when coach<br />

Brady Samuelson’s RHS boys host<br />

newcastle in a 3 p.m. start.<br />

Riverton dominated newcastle<br />

6-0 earlier in the season.<br />

Douglas leads the league standings<br />

at 3-0-2. Riverton’s 3-2 mark<br />

is the only other winning record in<br />

the 3-A east.<br />

Hard luck for<br />

Rustler rodeo<br />

in UW arena<br />

The Central Wyoming College<br />

rodeo team traveled to Laramie<br />

over the weekend to compete at<br />

the rodeo hosted by the University<br />

of Wyoming.<br />

The Rustlers had three qualifiers<br />

for Sunday’s finals but no one<br />

was able to stop the clock in the<br />

short round.<br />

For the second week in a row,<br />

sophomore Shelby Weltz made it<br />

back to the short round in goat<br />

tying. She tied for 10th with a<br />

7.3-second run but wasn’t able to<br />

keep her short round goat tied for<br />

the required six seconds, resulting<br />

in a no-time.<br />

Teammate Aubrey Berger made<br />

her first short-round appearance<br />

of the season after stopping the<br />

clock in 3.0 seconds in breakaway<br />

roping, which placed her ninth in<br />

the long round. She missed catching<br />

her calf in the short round,<br />

resulting in a no-time, leaving her<br />

10th in the final standings.<br />

Men’s team captain Cole<br />

Trainor placed fourth in the long<br />

round of steer wrestling after stopping<br />

the clock in 5.3 seconds. He,<br />

too, had some tough luck and didn’t<br />

post a time in the short go,<br />

dropping him to ninth overall.<br />

CWC’s final rodeo of the season<br />

comes this week in greely,<br />

Colorado.<br />

Madison Fossey, left, and Olivia Bradley celebrated Bradley’s<br />

goal against Douglas. RHS hosts Newcastle at 5 p.m. Friday.<br />

Girls<br />

It’s a similar story for coach<br />

Tanya Santee and the Lady<br />

Wolverines. After taking early losses<br />

to 3-A West teams Jackson,<br />

Cody and Worland, Riverton posted<br />

dominating conference wins<br />

over Torrington and Douglas, then<br />

took it to Rawlins 4-0 on Friday in<br />

Carbon County.<br />

The Lady Wolverines also host<br />

FREMONT COUNTY WEATHER<br />

Lander<br />

49 / 72<br />

newcastle this Friday. RHS lost 2-<br />

0 to the Dogies on the road earlier<br />

this month. The schedule lists the<br />

girls game as the second of the<br />

boys/girls doubleheader, scheduled<br />

for 5 p.m.<br />

Round 2 of the league season<br />

will tell the tale of the hotly contested<br />

Class 3-A east conference in<br />

which four of the five teams have a<br />

winning conference record.<br />

Essential Quality<br />

is 2-1 favorite in<br />

Kentucky Derby<br />

LOUISVILLe, Ky. (AP) —<br />

With the rail still open and<br />

Kentucky Derby post positions<br />

dwindling, Brad Cox grew anxious<br />

about the most notable of his two<br />

horses drawing the least desired<br />

spot.<br />

The home-grown trainer soon<br />

breathed easier. essential Quality<br />

got something more palatable,<br />

though the hardest part awaits<br />

with the target firmly on his back.<br />

essential Quality is the 2-1<br />

morning line favorite and will<br />

start from the no. 14 post for<br />

Saturday’s 147th Kentucky Derby<br />

at Churchill Downs.<br />

“It got a little nerve-wracking<br />

with both horses still to go and the<br />

rail still being out there,” Cox said<br />

Tuesday. “I think it’ll be a good<br />

spot. He’s got good tactical speed<br />

that he’ll be able to get into a good<br />

position from there.”<br />

The $3 million, 1 1/4-mile<br />

marquee race for 3-year-old colts<br />

is back on the first Saturday of<br />

May after being delayed to Labor<br />

Day weekend last fall because of<br />

the pandemic.<br />

About 45,000 spectators are<br />

expected at the track.<br />

Rock Your World is the 5-1 second<br />

choice from the no. 15 slot<br />

with Known Agenda the 6-1 third<br />

choice despite drawing the rail in<br />

the 20-horse field. Hot Rod<br />

Charlie drew 8-1 odds as the<br />

fourth choice from the no. 9 slot.<br />

The obvious focus is on<br />

essential Quality, the reigning 2-<br />

year-old champion who enters the<br />

Run for the Roses having won all<br />

five races and with Luis Saez<br />

aboard.<br />

His haul of graded stakes victories<br />

includes a gutsy Blue grass<br />

victory at Keeneland on <strong>April</strong> 3<br />

that vaulted the gray son of Tapit<br />

to the top of the Derby standings<br />

with 140 points and cemented<br />

him as the projected favorite.<br />

He’s one of two entries trained<br />

by Cox, who grew up a few blocks<br />

from Churchill Downs and will<br />

make his Derby debut trying to<br />

become the first Louisville native<br />

to win the race. The eclipse<br />

Award winner will also saddle<br />

Mandaloun from the no. 7 post<br />

as a 15-1 choice, with the bay colt<br />

looking to bounce back from a<br />

disappointing sixth in the<br />

Louisiana Derby.<br />

At least their starting spots are<br />

no longer an issue.<br />

Rock Your World, trained by<br />

John Sadler, has won all three<br />

starts this year after not racing as a<br />

2-year-old.


Page 4 Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Going big<br />

Biden is trying it again, and<br />

he says he wants an argument<br />

In what amounted to an unofficial State of the Union<br />

address, President Biden on Wednesday proposed a bundle<br />

of federal programs so big that the term “gargantuan”<br />

barely applies.<br />

It’s the third federal spending whopper Biden has proposed<br />

since taking office 100 days ago.<br />

The first one, the American Recovery Act, already has<br />

been passed and is being implemented. The second, his<br />

huge infrastructure bill, has been introduced as legislation<br />

and is about to be debated in Congress.<br />

This one, covering jobs, education, child care, unemployment<br />

compensation, job retraining and more, was<br />

unveiled in summary form during the big speech.<br />

The issues identified to be addressed by the bill already<br />

affect virtually every American, including in Fremont<br />

County. If implemented, the proposed remedies would<br />

affect all of us too.<br />

So, in case you think that a speech given at the U.S.<br />

Capitol can’t be local news, think again.<br />

Biden spent the bulk of his career as a legislator. He was<br />

in the U.S. Senate from the early 1970s to the mid-2000s.<br />

It was one of the most lengthy careers ever in the Senate,<br />

so he comes from he sensibility of one who believes in<br />

Congress and legislation.<br />

Unquestionably, the nearly 50-50 split in both houses of<br />

Congress means that there will be substantial and formidable<br />

opposition to anything Biden wants to do, particularly<br />

something so huge as this.<br />

He’s banking on the popularity of the American<br />

Recovery Act, and the corresponding spark in gross<br />

Domestic Product that he cited during the speech, as<br />

ammunition to implement even more big federal programs.<br />

And he’s working fast, because the Democratic Party<br />

majorities he now enjoys, thin as they are, might last only<br />

through the end of next year.<br />

Biden’s view, then, is that the time is now to think big<br />

and act quickly.<br />

Vital to the legislation process will be what form the<br />

Republican opposition takes. The simplest thing to do<br />

would be to invoke the muscle of the filibuster. Sen.<br />

Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader, could announce<br />

that Biden’s plans shouldn’t even come to a vote because<br />

the Republicans simply will halt them using the filibuster,<br />

which requires a 60-vote majority to get something<br />

passed. The best Biden can hope for is 51-50, using vice<br />

President Harris’s vote as the tiebreaker.<br />

Outside all of the policy proposals themselves Biden<br />

outlined in his speech, there was another interesting line,<br />

which reflects how he thinks legislative deliberations<br />

ought to go.<br />

“Let’s argue about it,” he said.<br />

He’s banking on an actual legislative process involving<br />

hearings, testimony, committee votes, floor debate,<br />

amendments and full votes in Congress — all in full view.<br />

His gamble is that if the public sees the issues actually<br />

was being legislated, rather than simply blocked, then support<br />

for them will grow and have a chance to pass.<br />

Frankly, that could be a bit old school in the president’s<br />

thinking.<br />

He might be remembering the 1970s, 1980s, or even<br />

1990s, when actual legislating was done. Since the new<br />

century began, that process has changed a lot. Many<br />

things get introduced, but often that’s about it. The right<br />

signals are sent that legislation either is going to be<br />

rammed through over all opposition or stopped cold<br />

despite all advocacy.<br />

Joe Biden is 78 years old, with a half-century of government<br />

service behind him, and this is how he thinks things<br />

ought to be done. Time might have passed him by on this<br />

approach, but clearly he intends to try, and try hard.<br />

“Let’s argue about it”? Chances are Biden will find plenty<br />

of takers.<br />

— Steven R. Peck<br />

LETTERS TO<br />

THE EDITOR<br />

P.O. Box 993<br />

Riverton, WY 82501<br />

or fremontnews@wyoming.com<br />

All letters must be signed by the writer, and the<br />

writer’s name will appear in print.<br />

OPINION<br />

The<br />

Ranger<br />

How will we revolt if we can’t google the instructions?<br />

Technology is the oppressor.<br />

Oh sure, it seems like a great<br />

idea, sitting in front of a screen,<br />

composing with a few keystrokes,<br />

made by your fingers, moved by<br />

your tendons, motored by your<br />

muscles, responding to your nerve<br />

impulses, governed by your brain.<br />

And who even KnOWS why<br />

your brain chose to do it.<br />

You can share your thoughts,<br />

build a project, send a message,<br />

collaborate, and help others using<br />

the technology available today —<br />

and you can do it on a global<br />

scale.<br />

Sounds more like a friend than<br />

an oppressor.<br />

During the COVID-19 shutdown,<br />

parents turned to YouTube<br />

for at-home chemistry lessons.<br />

Those same parents turned to<br />

YouTube to learn how to cut their<br />

bangs. The kitchen forgave us.<br />

The bangs didn’t.<br />

even before then, most of us<br />

had learned already that a lot of<br />

work can be done from a ramshackle<br />

witness protection hideout<br />

as long as we’ve got good Wi-Fi<br />

and a tablet.<br />

What good, really, did it do us<br />

to shake hands and run around<br />

town when we could accomplish<br />

the same rapport (give or take the<br />

entire human element) by firing<br />

off a few e-mails?<br />

Being an adult is hard. So it’s<br />

good to have a little gizmo that<br />

will remind you to pay your bills<br />

and make your appointments.<br />

And it’s good to let the robot in<br />

your pocket run your entire life,<br />

sell your medical queries to the<br />

pharmaceutical industry, and<br />

anticipate your political leanings<br />

based entirely on how many vegetables<br />

you eat.<br />

Clair McFarland<br />

Well, I wanted to watch Fox<br />

news today but I had a vegetarian<br />

dinner, so…<br />

Still, there’s the electromagnetic<br />

frequency our devices emit. They<br />

cause ailment and brain fuzz, distractedness<br />

and chocolate cravings.<br />

On Sunday, I decided to put all<br />

our devices on airplane mode and<br />

turn off the Wi-Fi router.<br />

After a few failed attempts at<br />

netflix access, The Husband finally<br />

figured out why our house had<br />

gone non-magical, and, in the way<br />

that dads accustomed to fixing<br />

everything ALL THe DAng<br />

TIMe do, he ambled off to my<br />

office to switch the thing back on.<br />

“Oh, don’t do that, honey,” I<br />

breezed. “We’re having an eMF<br />

detox day.”<br />

He looked at me as if I’d<br />

cooked a llama for dinner.<br />

“What.”<br />

“The electromagnetic field<br />

pulses with shockwaves not<br />

attuned to our biological frequencies,<br />

which can grow dangerous if<br />

we don’t give ourselves a chance to<br />

heal,” I explained, thoroughly.<br />

The Husband said that even if<br />

it’s so, we can’t descend into the<br />

dark ages of pre-netflix on just<br />

any whim.<br />

He had, of course, another<br />

motive for keeping the Internet<br />

switched on. The Husband is an<br />

eBay vulture with just one kind of<br />

target. He likes to seek out firstedition,<br />

hardback Stephen King<br />

volumes up for auction with no<br />

bids, then wait until the last<br />

moment to seize the things for<br />

pennies.<br />

His record so far is a final-bid<br />

snipe of $2.50 with half a<br />

nanosecond to spare in the auction.<br />

everywhere he walks, the failed<br />

bidders of eBay can be heard wailing<br />

after him.<br />

“See that? See? See?” says he,<br />

flashing his phone. Invariably, it<br />

displays a ponderous hardback<br />

with King’s name in all-caps,<br />

dwarfing the actual title of the<br />

book on its cover.<br />

Is Stephen King “all that”?<br />

Having only read “The green<br />

Mile,” I can say, yes, Stephen King<br />

is all that, but still not as good as<br />

Aldous Huxley, which is why the<br />

bookshelves in our home are<br />

strictly segregated into “His” and<br />

“Hers.”<br />

“excuse me, dear. The King of<br />

Creep is getting his germs on the<br />

Master of Dystopia.”<br />

“Yes, yes,” sighs he. “I’m only<br />

setting him there for a second<br />

while I alphabetize.”<br />

But on this particular Sunday,<br />

when I decided that technology<br />

was the oppressor, the children<br />

were milling about, wondering<br />

why the iPad was out of gas.<br />

“Whenever I try to make it<br />

show a video it just sort of does<br />

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nothing,” confessed a boy, wondering<br />

whatever became of fundamental<br />

Internet rights in this<br />

world.<br />

I mean, doesn’t everyone have<br />

the right to access the world’s<br />

communal intellect at any given<br />

time? And if we lose that right,<br />

how should we proceed?<br />

How will we stage a revolution<br />

if we can’t even google the<br />

instructions?!<br />

Such is life, son. Such is life.<br />

It wasn’t just the eMF data that<br />

got me thinking of tech as the<br />

slaver. The despot. The tyrant.<br />

It was the fact that, every time I<br />

sit in front of this machine, my<br />

mind travels down a thousand<br />

corridors of intent but very few<br />

actual corridors of action.<br />

Have I responded to all the e-<br />

mails?<br />

Am I caught up on current<br />

events?<br />

Have I printed off every recipe<br />

that I’ll need if an electromagnetic<br />

solar storm wipes out our electronics<br />

for the next several years?<br />

All these thoughts manipulate<br />

my brain, then my nerve dispatches,<br />

muscles, tendons, keys, wordprocessor,<br />

search engine.<br />

Yes, through that chain of stimuli,<br />

I produce news stories or<br />

columns.<br />

And that’s a livelihood.<br />

And I give the tech its due<br />

respect for enabling my work.<br />

But if it happens to be Sunday<br />

(my day off), a more tangible outcome<br />

can be reached by walking<br />

out onto this softening spring<br />

earth, hacking apart a patch of it,<br />

and sticking some seeds into it.<br />

Which – o ye enabling, tyrannical<br />

computer – is exactly what I<br />

am going to do now.<br />

The zipper was first patented in the U.S. this day, 1913<br />

Today is Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, the 119th day of <strong>2021</strong>.<br />

There are 246 days left in the year.<br />

Today’s Highlight in History:<br />

On <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, 1992, a jury in Simi Valley, California, acquitted<br />

four Los Angeles police officers of almost all state<br />

charges in the videotaped beating of motorist Rodney<br />

King; the verdicts were followed by rioting in Los Angeles<br />

resulting in 55 deaths.<br />

On this date:<br />

In 1913, Swedish-born engineer Gideon Sundback of<br />

Hoboken, New Jersey, received a U.S. patent for a “separable<br />

fastener” — later known as the zipper.<br />

In 1945, during World War II, American soldiers<br />

liberated the Dachau (DAH’-khow) concentration<br />

camp. Adolf Hitler married Eva<br />

Braun inside his “Fuhrerbunker” and designated<br />

Adm. Karl Doenitz (DUHR’-nihtz) president.<br />

In 1946, 28 former Japanese officials went<br />

on trial in Tokyo as war criminals; seven ended<br />

up being sentenced to death.<br />

In 1957, the SM-1, the first military nuclear<br />

power plant, was dedicated at Fort Belvoir,<br />

Virginia.<br />

In 1967, Aretha Franklin’s cover of Otis<br />

Redding’s “Respect” was released as a single by Atlantic<br />

Records.<br />

In 1961, “ABC’s Wide World of Sports” premiered, with<br />

Jim McKay as host.<br />

In 1983, Harold Washington was sworn in as the first<br />

Black mayor of Chicago.<br />

In 1991, a cyclone began striking the South Asian<br />

country of Bangladesh; it ended up killing more than<br />

138,000 people, according to the U.S. National Oceanic<br />

and Atmospheric Administration.<br />

In 1997, Staff Sgt. Delmar Simpson, a drill instructor at<br />

Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland, was convicted of<br />

raping six female trainees (he was sentenced to 25 years<br />

in prison and dishonorably discharged). A worldwide treaty<br />

Pfeiffer<br />

to ban chemical weapons went into effect.<br />

In 2000, Tens of thousands of angry Cuban-Americans<br />

marched peacefully through Miami’s Little Havana, protesting<br />

the raid in which armed federal agents yanked 6-yearold<br />

Elian Gonzalez from the home of relatives.<br />

In 2008, Democratic presidential hopeful Barack<br />

Obama denounced his former pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah<br />

Wright, for what he termed “divisive and destructive” remarks<br />

on race.<br />

In 2010, the U.S. Navy officially ended a ban on<br />

women serving on submarines, saying the first women<br />

would be reporting for duty by 2012. The NCAA’s Board of<br />

Directors approved a 68-team format for the<br />

men’s basketball tournament beginning<br />

the next season.<br />

Ten years ago: Britain’s Prince<br />

William and Kate Middleton were<br />

married in an opulent ceremony at<br />

London’s Westminster Abbey. President<br />

Barack Obama visited<br />

Tuscaloosa, Alabama, one of the<br />

sites of deadly tornadoes two days<br />

earlier, saying he had “never seen<br />

devastation like this.”<br />

Five years ago: Hundreds of<br />

rowdy protesters broke through barricades and threw eggs<br />

at police outside a hotel in Burlingame, California, where<br />

Donald Trump addressed the state’s Republican convention.<br />

North Korea sentenced Kim Dong Chul, a U.S. citizen<br />

of Korean heritage, to 10 years in prison after convicting<br />

him of espionage and subversion. Joey Meek, a friend of<br />

Dylann Roof, the white man later convicted of killing nine<br />

Black parishioners during a Bible study at a Charleston,<br />

South Carolina, church pleaded guilty to lying to federal<br />

authorities. (Meek was sentenced in March 2017 to more<br />

than two years in prison.)<br />

One year ago: Scientists announced the first effective<br />

treatment against the coronavirus, the experimental antiviral<br />

medication remdesivir, which they said could speed the<br />

Thurman<br />

recovery of COVID-19 patients. The government estimated<br />

that the U.S. economy shrank at a 4.8% annual rate in the<br />

first quarter of the year as the pandemic shut down much<br />

of the country. The Federal Reserve said it would keep its<br />

key short-term interest rate near zero for the foreseeable<br />

future as part of its effort to bolster the economy. A suburban<br />

Minneapolis nursing home said 47 residents had died<br />

from complications of COVID-19. President Donald Trump<br />

said the federal government would not extend the social<br />

distancing guidelines that were expiring the next day; he<br />

said he would resume his own out-of-state travel. Police<br />

were called to a Brooklyn, New York, neighborhood after a<br />

funeral home overwhelmed by the coronavirus resorted to<br />

storing dozens of bodies on ice in rented trucks<br />

and a passerby complained about the smell; no<br />

criminal charges were filed.<br />

Today’s Birthdays:<br />

Actor Keith Baxter is 88. Conductor Zubin<br />

Mehta is 85. Pop singer Bob Miranda (The<br />

Happenings) is 79. Country singer Duane Allen<br />

(The Oak Ridge Boys) is 78. Singer Tommy<br />

James is 74. Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich.,<br />

is 71. Movie director Phillip Noyce is 71. Comedian<br />

Jerry Seinfeld is 67. Actor Leslie Jordan is<br />

66. Actor Kate Mulgrew is 66. Actor Daniel Day-<br />

Lewis is 64. Actor Michelle Pfeiffer is 63. Actor Eve Plumb<br />

is 63. Rock musician Phil King is 61. Country singer<br />

Stephanie Bentley is 58. Actor Vincent Ventresca is 55.<br />

Singer Carnie Wilson (Wilson Phillips) is 53. Actor Paul<br />

Adelstein is 52. Actor Uma Thurman is 51. International<br />

Tennis Hall of Famer Andre Agassi is 51. Rapper Master P<br />

is 51. Actor Darby Stanchfield is 50. Country singer James<br />

Bonamy is 49. Gospel/rhythm-and-blues singer Erica<br />

Campbell (Mary Mary) is 49. Rock musician Mike Hogan<br />

(The Cranberries) is 48. Actor Tyler Labine is 43. Actor<br />

Megan Boone is 38. Actor-model Taylor Cole is 37. Pop<br />

singer Amy Heidemann (Karmin) is 35. NHL center<br />

Jonathan Toews is 33. Pop singer Foxes is 32. Actor<br />

Grace Kaufman is 19.


Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong> Page 5<br />

The Ranger<br />

TODay<br />

in Fremont County<br />

Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong><br />

CaLENDaR<br />

Saturday, May 1<br />

The Riverton Kiwanis Club’s first community<br />

health fair event is 7-10 a.m. at the<br />

Intertribal Education and Cultural Center at<br />

Central Wyoming College, 2660 Peck Ave. in<br />

Riverton, in tandem with the Wyoming Health<br />

Fair Blood Draw.<br />

Information and resources will be available<br />

from local health care and health-related<br />

companies, and there will be several speakers,<br />

including Vivian Watkins with the<br />

Riverton Medical District at 7:30 a.m., Ken<br />

Holt with Sage West Women’s Health at 8<br />

a.m., CWC psychology instructor Joseph<br />

Fountain at 8:30 a.m., Help for Health chaplain<br />

and poet Echo Klaproth at 9 a.m. and<br />

Scott Hayes with Fremont Counseling at 9:30<br />

a.m.<br />

The Help for Health Hospice 5K Color<br />

Run/Walk <strong>2021</strong> begins at 9 a.m. at 2255<br />

Brunton Court A.<br />

Cost is $25 for adults ages 17 and older,<br />

$15 for children ages 5-16 and free for children<br />

age 4 and younger. There will be prizes<br />

for first- and second-place adults and children.<br />

Attendees are asked to wear a white shirt.<br />

Early registration forms are available at Help<br />

for Health, 716 College View Drive in<br />

Riverton. Day-of-race registration will begin<br />

at 8 a.m. For more information visit helpforhealthwy.com/events.<br />

The Affinity Aspiring Ally Circle will meet<br />

10 a.m. to noon via Zoom. The intended<br />

audience is aspiring allies seeking to stand<br />

with Native Americans and other people of<br />

color. T<br />

he lead facilitator will be L’Dawn Olsen,<br />

equity and inclusion specialist with the<br />

Wyoming Coalition Against Domestic<br />

Violence and Sexual Assault. The event is<br />

free. To register email chesie@vcn.com.<br />

The Wind River Farm to Plate Seed Swap<br />

for new and experienced gardeners is 12-3<br />

p.m. at Lander City Park, 405 Fremont Street<br />

in Lander.<br />

Wednesday, May 5<br />

Three advocates from the Eastern<br />

Shoshone and Northern Arapaho tribes will<br />

discuss Indigenous narratives of the Red<br />

Desert at noon on Zoom.<br />

The public is invited to the free event,<br />

which features a panel discussion on the<br />

ancestral landscape and living cultural corridor<br />

of the Red Desert.<br />

Panelists include Wes Martel, senior Wind<br />

River conservation associate for the Greater<br />

Yellowstone Coalition and former longtime<br />

member of the Eastern Shoshone Business<br />

Council; Jason Baldes, the tribal buffalo coordinator<br />

for the National Wildlife Federation;<br />

and Yufna Soldier Wolf, the Wind River organizer<br />

for the Wyoming Outdoor Council and<br />

former tribal historic preservation officer for<br />

the Northern Arapaho Tribe.<br />

Sign up for the event at bit.ly/3tIkzUi.<br />

The Missing and Murdered Indigenous<br />

People’s March for Justice will begin at 4:30<br />

p.m. at the 789 Casino and Smokeshop,<br />

10367 Wyoming Highway 789 south of<br />

Riverton.<br />

Participants will proceed from there to<br />

Riverton City Park.<br />

A presentation about historic preservation<br />

efforts in Riverton is at 6 p.m. at the Riverton<br />

Museum, 700 E. Park Ave.<br />

The presentation will focus on some of the<br />

most important and recognizable buildings<br />

and homes in Riverton and some of the<br />

preservation efforts being made to protect<br />

these buildings.<br />

The program is free and open to the public.<br />

For more information call 856-2665.<br />

Thursday, May 6<br />

The Bureau of Reclamation will present a<br />

<strong>2021</strong> water supply outlook for Boysen and<br />

Buffalo Bill reservoirs during a virtual public<br />

meeting at 1 p.m.<br />

The meeting will be presented via<br />

Microsoft Teams. Participants only need<br />

internet access and the meeting link; they do<br />

not need to have the Teams program.<br />

The meeting link will be available prior to<br />

and during the meeting at<br />

usbr.gov/gp/wyao/Boysen_BuffaloBill_Water<br />

_Operations.pdf.<br />

The meeting link can be requested by e-<br />

mailing mfollum@usbr.gov. Water supply outlook<br />

information will be available after the<br />

meeting at<br />

usbr.gov/gp/wyao/Boysen_BuffaloBill_Water<br />

_Operations.pdf.<br />

The Riverton High School Job Fair is<br />

noon to 2:30 p.m. on the football field at<br />

RHS, weather permitting.<br />

Students will be excused from class to<br />

attend the job fair. Local employers are<br />

encouraged to participate so students can<br />

drop off resumes, pick up applications, fill<br />

them out, and meet with business representatives.<br />

RSVP at nkrusemeier@fremont25.org<br />

EMERgENCy CaLLS<br />

Information in this column is taken from<br />

official law enforcement reports.<br />

An arrest is a preliminary step in the legal<br />

process. It does not mean that a person has<br />

been found guilty of a crime.<br />

By law, persons who are arrested are<br />

innocent until proven guilty through due legal<br />

processes.<br />

In Riverton Police Department reports:<br />

Vandalism was reported at about 8:15 a.m.<br />

Tuesday in the 700 block of East Park<br />

Avenue. The reporting party said “someone<br />

spray painted over the graffiti that was<br />

already there.”<br />

Vandalism was reported at about 8:30 a.m.<br />

Tuesday on North Pointe Circle. The initial<br />

report indicates the reporting party was<br />

“accusing (her) neighbor of ruining her fence<br />

and throwing rocks on top of her roof.”<br />

Shoplifting was reported at about 8:35<br />

a.m. Tuesday in the 1700 block of North<br />

Federal Boulevard. The initial report indicates<br />

the ticket was created per officer request.<br />

A 16-year-old boy was cited at about 10:15<br />

a.m. Tuesday at Riverton High School, 2001<br />

W. Sunset Drive, for simple assault. The initial<br />

report indicates the ticket was created per<br />

officer request.<br />

An animal problem was reported at about<br />

11:40 a.m. Tuesday on North Eighth Street<br />

West. The initial report was regarding “chickens<br />

on (the) road.”<br />

An animal problem was reported at about<br />

12:20 p.m. Tuesday on Elk Drive. The reporting<br />

party said there was a “prairie dog in their<br />

house vent.”<br />

An animal problem was reported at about<br />

1:30 p.m. Tuesday on North Federal<br />

Boulevard. The reporting party said there<br />

was “a stray cat in the business.”<br />

Fraud was reported at about 1:45 p.m.<br />

Tuesday in the 800 block of North Federal<br />

Boulevard. The reporting party said he was<br />

“unsure how much information he gave a<br />

scam caller.”<br />

A hit and run incident was reported at<br />

about 5:10 p.m. Tuesday in the 100 block of<br />

North Fifth Street East. The initial report indicates<br />

the incident involved a 2018 Chevy<br />

truck.<br />

A robbery was reported at about 6:40 p.m.<br />

Tuesday in the 100 block of South Third<br />

Street East.<br />

The initial report indicates a vehicle was<br />

stolen. The reporting party said “the thief<br />

pointed a gun at her and pulled her at the<br />

side.”<br />

She said the incident involved a maroon<br />

2007 Chevy Tahoe and a “small” .38.<br />

Corey Hill, 27, of Riverton, was arrested at<br />

about 10 p.m. Tuesday in the 400 block of<br />

North Federal Boulevard for two counts of<br />

assault and battery and for public intoxication<br />

and resisting arrest.<br />

Kimberly Potter, 32, of Riverton, was<br />

arrested for driving under the influence and<br />

use and possession of a controlled substance.<br />

The initial report was regarding “people<br />

fighting in (a) room.”<br />

In Fremont County Sheriff’s Office<br />

reports:<br />

A traffic hazard was reported at about 2:35<br />

p.m. Tuesday in the 500 block of Burma<br />

Road near Riverton. The initial report indicates<br />

there were “three horses on the road.”<br />

A traffic hazard was reported at about 3:45<br />

p.m. Tuesday in the 1000 block of Tweed<br />

Lane near Lander.<br />

The initial report was regarding a “trailer<br />

blocking traffic.”<br />

Virus<br />

said.<br />

“With this video visiting, you can visit anybody,”<br />

she said. “A lot of the other ladies here think that’s<br />

really nice. … I think that was a big thing to them.”<br />

The technology also allowed Lynch to attend her<br />

father’s funeral online this spring.<br />

Parent concerns<br />

Honor Farm inmate Daniel Black, 39, has taken<br />

advantage of video calls during his incarceration, too,<br />

and he has been able to call his 10-year-old son on<br />

the phone “almost every other day.”<br />

“I’m kind of fortunate,” Black said.<br />

His son, who attends Rendezvous elementary<br />

School, is living with Black’s mother-in-law, but<br />

Black has been able to weigh in on pandemic-related<br />

decisions during their regular phone calls.<br />

For example, when public schools reopened in the<br />

fall, Black was able to share his opinion that his son<br />

should not resume in-person learning if COVID-19<br />

transmission rates rose above a certain level – especially<br />

because Black’s mother-in-law works at a nursing<br />

home in town.<br />

“She was kind of nervous about it,” he said. “She<br />

didn’t want to transmit it to (her clients). I think she’s<br />

probably high-risk too.”<br />

now that his son has returned to school, Black<br />

said he is glad the boy is able to take advantage of<br />

face-to-face lessons from his instructors.<br />

“He’s getting to the point where you can only<br />

learn so much (over) the Internet,” Black said.<br />

“Sometimes you need the teacher there to explain it<br />

to you.<br />

“Kids need interactions, (and they) need to interact<br />

with other kids.”<br />

Distance rules<br />

Adults have similar social needs, Black said, but he<br />

commended his fellow inmates for their efforts to<br />

stay safely distant from one another during the pandemic.<br />

“We all do our own part,” he said. “We try as best<br />

we can.”<br />

WHF inmates still are not allowed to congregate<br />

in communal rooms, Black said.<br />

Prisoners as well as WDOC staff are required to<br />

wear facial coverings – though some people “get tired<br />

of the mask thing,” he added.<br />

“I guess it’s just like society – you have a few people<br />

that are rebels,” WHF inmate Dusty Harris, 39,<br />

said. “I know a lot of people that have been written<br />

up because they weren’t wearing their mask.”<br />

Some of those people didn’t believe COVID-19<br />

was “that serious of a deal,” Harris said.<br />

Another group thought the coronavirus was “a<br />

conspiracy.”<br />

But in prison, Harris said, opinions about masks<br />

are irrelevant.<br />

“You don’t get to make that choice,” he said.<br />

“WDOC is very particular about safety for their<br />

facilities. … It’s just, this is how they’re handling it,<br />

so this is what we’re going to do.<br />

“(And) from what I’ve seen, they’ve done their job<br />

the best that they could.”<br />

Exposure<br />

One area where it has been especially difficult to<br />

maintain social distancing protocols is the meal hall<br />

according to Harris.<br />

“That is the most crowded place you can go,” he<br />

said. “It’s hard to social distance when you have that<br />

many people. … At times there’s nothing we could<br />

do.”<br />

At the Wyoming State Penitentiary in Rawlins,<br />

Harris said, there weren’t enough tables in the mess<br />

hall to accommodate all of the inmates, so “you had<br />

to pull up these chairs, and you get six people sitting<br />

around the table.”<br />

“You have people sitting on chairs eating by the<br />

wall because it’s so crowded,” he said. “You can’t<br />

social distance yourself.”<br />

Protecting staff, and themselves<br />

Unable to maintain safe distances among themselves,<br />

Harris said the inmates strategized, taking care<br />

to at least keep away from WDOC officers, who<br />

leave the facility on a daily basis.<br />

“They’re the ones that get exposed,” Harris said.<br />

“Most of your inmates were really being careful to<br />

stay separate from the staff, because they feel like …<br />

the only way we were going to get (COVID-19) was<br />

if staff was bringing it in.”<br />

Inmate transfers provided another avenue for<br />

COVID-19 to spread, Harris said, and Black shared<br />

the same perspective.<br />

“It seems like once we get clean here and we’re<br />

good to go then we get another batch in and<br />

(COVID-19) kind of flips through,” he said.<br />

“It’s inevitable how this is all playing out. …<br />

Almost everybody’s had it.”<br />

Diagnosis<br />

Harris described the process as follows: “One guy<br />

gets it, and then the next thing you know the whole<br />

unit is locked down because it’s spread from one guy<br />

right to the next.”<br />

That’s what happened to him in January when he<br />

was diagnosed with COVID-19.<br />

“I was working in the kitchen in Rawlins. and one<br />

of the other guys ended up catching it,” Harris said.<br />

“It just went through our whole unit.”<br />

Black wasn’t sure how he contracted COVID-19,<br />

because he said he was “being really safe,” maintaining<br />

his distance from others and wearing his mask.<br />

“I didn’t think I’d get it, and I ended up getting it,”<br />

he said. “I don’t know (how).”<br />

Harris said he didn’t know he was sick “until I got<br />

the cold sweats.”<br />

But Black said he experienced “all the symptoms”<br />

while infected.<br />

“I had the diarrhea, the shortness of breath, the<br />

Continued from page 1<br />

headaches, the fever, the no smell, the no taste,” he<br />

said. “Then I met some people in here that said<br />

(they) didn’t even have any of those.”<br />

Symptoms varied<br />

Arthur said the only symptom he experienced was<br />

a headache, while WHF inmate Robert Burress, 65,<br />

only lost his sense of smell when he had COVID-19.<br />

“With the food around here, that’s a good thing,”<br />

he joked.<br />

But despite the positive outcome, both men said<br />

they had been nervous about contracting the disease.<br />

“I just heard about a lot of cases of people dying<br />

(of COVID-19),” Arthur said. “I didn’t want to be<br />

one of those people.”<br />

With chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a<br />

recent bout of pneumonia – not to mention his age –<br />

Burress said he “didn’t want to get it” either.<br />

“I was afraid it would probably kill me,” he said. “I<br />

stayed in my room as much as I could. … I’m a pretty<br />

sociable person, (but) I just keep to myself here.”<br />

Regardless, Burress said he eventually was identified<br />

as having had close contact with an inmate who<br />

had been diagnosed with the virus, and he tested positive<br />

soon afterward.<br />

“We’re in pretty close quarters with everybody,”<br />

Burress said. “(There’s) not much of a cushion.”<br />

‘A group effort’<br />

At the women’s center, Lynch said she and many<br />

other inmates were able to avoid contracting<br />

COVID-19 in prison.<br />

“nobody’s getting sick here,” she said, adding, “I<br />

think it’s really a group effort.”<br />

At meals, Lynch said, inmates have been able to<br />

leave every other seat vacant, and when they traverse<br />

the hallways they stay six feet apart. Furniture in the<br />

day room has been separated to maintain social distance<br />

as well, she said, and “you always have your<br />

mask on.”<br />

“The only time your masks are off when you’re in<br />

this facility is when you’re eating chow and when<br />

you’re in your cell,” Lynch said, calling the face cover<br />

ing “normal” for her at this point. “Sometimes I’ll<br />

be sitting in my cell, and I’ll still have my mask on.”<br />

Volunteers, inmates and staff members also<br />

“bleach everything” at the women’s center, Lynch<br />

said, cleaning door handles, phones, and “everything<br />

anybody touches” on an hourly basis.<br />

“I think we did a pretty good job here, for just all<br />

the precautions we took,” she said.<br />

Staff efforts<br />

She especially commended WDOC staff members<br />

for keeping COVID-19 out of the facility.<br />

“I’m thankful and I’m grateful that the staff is<br />

cooperating,” Lynch said.<br />

“They’re the ones who can bring it in here, and<br />

I’m just glad that they haven’t.”<br />

She knows of “a couple” of staff members who<br />

have been diagnosed, but Lynch said they have since<br />

been quarantined and vaccinated, while any inmates<br />

exposed or diagnosed are sent to a separate building<br />

to quarantine.<br />

Vaccination<br />

now, Lynch is vaccinated – as are many of her fellow<br />

inmates – but she said the experience was “kind<br />

of rough,” noting that it isn’t easy to be sick in prison.<br />

“You don’t have access to the medications right<br />

away like you (do) out there,” Lynch said.<br />

“everything is just a process.”<br />

For example, Lynch said inmates must first put<br />

their name on a “movement” sheet, then wait for an<br />

“open movement” period before they can access the<br />

medical department and request pain relief.<br />

“You can’t just wander around this prison,” Lynch<br />

said. “Patience is key here. You have to have a lot of<br />

patience.”<br />

Black, by contrast, thought it was probably “easier”<br />

to go through an illness in WDOC custody.<br />

“(They) kind of watch out for you – if you get it, I<br />

mean,” he said. “They’re on top of it. They will help<br />

you.”<br />

Black said most inmates at the Honor Farm<br />

already have been vaccinated, explaining that he<br />

chose to get the shot so he could safely mingle with<br />

his relatives once he is released in October.<br />

The pandemic may not be over by then, he pointed<br />

out.<br />

“I think it’s going to take a few years for it to all<br />

get back to normal,” he said, envisioning a future in<br />

which people must show proof of vaccination in<br />

order to travel or attend concerts or sporting events.<br />

No second illness<br />

Black said he also wanted to be vaccinated in order<br />

to avoid getting COVID-19 again.<br />

“I don’t want to take that chance,” he said. “It was<br />

bad enough to have it once. That was miserable.”<br />

Harris isn’t worried about reinfection, but like<br />

Black he said he was vaccinated with family in mind<br />

– specifically, his father.<br />

“He’s an elderly guy,” Harris said. “If he got it, it<br />

would probably kill him, because he’s on oxygen and<br />

everything else.<br />

“I don’t want to be around those types of people<br />

and not be vaccinated. I wouldn’t want to be the reason<br />

why my dad would get sick.”<br />

Arthur, who has been vaccinated and is scheduled<br />

to be released from prison in the coming weeks, also<br />

talked about the potential for his relatives to be<br />

exposed to the virus.<br />

“My grandpa is old – he’s 82,” Arthur said. “I kind<br />

of worry about him and my younger sisters catching<br />

COVID.”<br />

For Burress, the choice to vaccinate was easy.<br />

“It wasn’t a tough decision at all,” he said. “I was<br />

just waiting to do it.”


The<br />

Ranger<br />

Page 6 Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong><br />

SPEED BUMP<br />

by Dave Coverly<br />

THE OTHER COAST by Adrian Raeside<br />

THE OTHER COAST by Adrian Raeside<br />

Abigail Van Buren<br />

Widower dating<br />

again wants to leave<br />

the past in the past<br />

DEAR ABBY: I’m 35 and have<br />

een a widower for almost five<br />

ears. I began dating about two<br />

ears ago.<br />

In my adventures of dating I<br />

ave encountered a lot of divorced<br />

oms. I met someone very special<br />

I’ll call her Rose) a year and a half<br />

go. She’s great. We share lots of<br />

aughs and goals, but she does<br />

omething that drives me crazy.<br />

he’s constantly showing me Faceook<br />

memories/photos of her<br />

aughter when she was young.<br />

I never got the chance to have<br />

hildren and rarely bring up my<br />

ast because I feel that’s behind<br />

e. Rose’s ex is “toxic,” according<br />

o her, and from what I’ve witessed,<br />

he’s pretty bad.<br />

I see her daughter two weeks<br />

ut of the month. The girl is very<br />

poiled and entitled, and when<br />

he’s not around, Rose keeps shovng<br />

old photos of her in my face<br />

nd asking, “Isn’t she so cute?”<br />

I can’t relate, and I don’t care for<br />

er daughter. Does that make me a<br />

erk? I feel those old photos of her<br />

aughter are really her memories<br />

ith her ex, and it would be just as<br />

ad if I showed photos of my late<br />

ife and asked, “Isn’t she beautiul?”<br />

Am I wrong? -- UNPARENT<br />

UT WEST<br />

DEAR UNPARENT: If you<br />

lan to continue a relationship<br />

ith Rose, you are going to have to<br />

eal with your feelings about her<br />

aughter, some of which may be<br />

ff base. It is important that you<br />

ommunicate to her the connecion<br />

you make when you see those<br />

hotos.<br />

If your description of the girl is<br />

ccurate, then realize that as long<br />

s she’s a minor, she will be a presnce<br />

in your household. If you and<br />

er mother can’t figure out a workble<br />

arrangement, you shouldn’t<br />

aste any more of Rose’s time or<br />

ours.<br />

DEAR ABBY: “Ron,” the guy<br />

y best friend, “Stella,” is seeing, is<br />

manipulator. My mother was a<br />

ro at manipulating and gaslightng,<br />

something I recognized after<br />

oing to therapy as an adult. I<br />

now it when I see it.<br />

A month ago, I told Stella what<br />

have observed, and it has escaated<br />

to the point that I told her I<br />

o longer want to be around him.<br />

on, who is 40, throws tantrums<br />

nd threatens to leave when he<br />

oesn’t get what he wants.<br />

The last time I saw him was at a<br />

inner Stella hosted. I left early<br />

fter he threw another tantrum.<br />

on texted me an “apology” that<br />

id not address his behavior that<br />

ight, but something else that hapened<br />

a week ago. He then tried to<br />

uilt-trip me by saying my walking<br />

ut hurt our friends and that he<br />

ould stop hanging around beause<br />

he didn’t want them to be<br />

urt like that.<br />

I haven’t responded to Ron’s<br />

apology” and haven’t seen him<br />

ince. I have seen Stella for lunch<br />

nce since the incident. Must I acept<br />

his apology so everything goes<br />

ack to how it was, or not see my<br />

riend until he is out of her life? --<br />

OT A FAN OF HIM<br />

DEAR NOT A FAN: You don’t<br />

have” to accept Ron’s apology any<br />

ore than you have to accept any<br />

ther unappetizing “gift” that is ofered.<br />

But don’t stop seeing Stella.<br />

rom what you have written, she<br />

eeds a levelheaded friend right<br />

ow. If Ron acts up again in your<br />

resence, leave if he makes you unomfortable.<br />

ARIES (March 21-<strong>April</strong> 19).<br />

Because you want to make your<br />

work the best it can be, you’re<br />

willing to entertain new ideas.<br />

You’ll banter, twist and play<br />

around with your resources.<br />

Changes and add-ons will take it<br />

to the next level.<br />

TAURUS (<strong>April</strong> 20-May 20).<br />

The essence of your attractiveness<br />

today is made tangible in the way<br />

you approach common activities<br />

with uncommon grace. Yes, you’re<br />

being observed. In fact, you have<br />

someone’s rapt attention.<br />

GEMINI (May 21-June 21).<br />

Casual relationships continue to<br />

have a profound influence on the<br />

path your life takes. Friendships<br />

lead to the career opportunities,<br />

romantic ties and lifestyle choices<br />

that color your world.<br />

CANCER (June 22-July 22).<br />

No one likes to feel like the person<br />

they are talking to is looking over<br />

their soldier for more interesting<br />

engagements. You are careful to<br />

devote quality attention to the one<br />

you’re with and should accept no<br />

less from others.<br />

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You’ve<br />

known your nearest and dearest<br />

long enough for the relationship<br />

to exist within a large margin of<br />

predictability, and yet... today will<br />

still bring you a surprise.<br />

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).<br />

Complex problems may not require<br />

complex solutions. However,<br />

finding the solution that works<br />

may be a long and winding journey<br />

that seems complicated indeed!<br />

Regardless, stay in it for the<br />

long haul and the satisfying end.<br />

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).<br />

You are invigorated by the creativity<br />

that flows through you when<br />

you’re designing answers. Your aim<br />

is to make something that contributes<br />

to an easier, more harmonious<br />

and lovelier experience of<br />

life.<br />

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).<br />

There are no ideal groups, though<br />

it’s fun to imagine things being<br />

better. Organizational change<br />

tends to happen very slowly;<br />

changing yourself is relatively<br />

quick and doing so will affect the<br />

entire group.<br />

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-<br />

Dec. 21). You want something<br />

Holiday Mathis<br />

YOUR HOROSCOPE<br />

from someone, and this gives a<br />

nervy and uncomfortable tension<br />

to the relationship. It’s hard to<br />

subvert such a thing. You’d be better<br />

off breaking the tension by<br />

calling out your want.<br />

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.<br />

19). You’d rather make things than<br />

own things. You scratch an itch by<br />

making something and giving it<br />

away. You’ll repeat this several<br />

times until one day you’ll decide<br />

to charge for it.<br />

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).<br />

Enthusiasm is Miracle-Gro for<br />

projects, people and bonds. Still,<br />

there’s such a thing as too much.<br />

The wrong dose of excitement<br />

makes people uncomfortable.<br />

Learn what’s appropriate by incrementally<br />

testing the waters.<br />

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).<br />

Nobody is perfect and those who<br />

try and accept everyone’s faults are<br />

saving themselves from a lot of<br />

wasted energy and drama. Busy<br />

people living their purpose (read:<br />

you) don’t have time to mix into<br />

pettiness.<br />

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (<strong>April</strong><br />

<strong>29</strong>). What is the secret to your<br />

good fortune? The same thing<br />

that’s at the heart of all good manners<br />

and best practices: paying attention.<br />

You do it thoroughly and<br />

with style. As for the professional<br />

boon in July; it’s not all about the<br />

money but it sure will feel good<br />

when this allows you to do something<br />

special for your people.<br />

Scorpio and Capricorn adore you.<br />

Your lucky numbers are: 8, 3, 33,<br />

28 and 12.<br />

BABY BLUES by Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott<br />

GARFIELD by Jim Davis<br />

BARNEY GOOGLE AND SNUFFY SMITH by John Rose<br />

ONE BIG HAPPY by Rick Detorie<br />

BLONDIE by Dean Young and John Marshall<br />

BLONDIE by Dean Young and John Marshall<br />

ZITS by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman<br />

Answer to Yesterday’s puzzle<br />

BEETLE BAILEY by Mort Walker<br />

Contact Stan Newman at<br />

STANXWORDS@AOL.COM


Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong> Page 7<br />

The Ranger<br />

Fremont County’s Daily Newspaper<br />

C L A S S I F I E D S<br />

C L A S S I F I E D A D V E R T I S I N G I N D E X<br />

463-1999 or 1-800-428-72<strong>29</strong><br />

5-ANNOUNCEMENTS<br />

10 - Legals<br />

15 - Auctions<br />

20 - Garage Sales<br />

25 - Lost & Found<br />

30 - Free Ads<br />

35 - Club News<br />

40 - Happenings<br />

45 - Public Notices<br />

50 - Adoptions<br />

55 - Personals<br />

60 - Travel<br />

65 - Happy Ads<br />

70 - Political<br />

75 - Entertainment<br />

80 - Music Instruction<br />

85 - Education/Training<br />

90 - Cemetery Plots<br />

95 - Services Offered<br />

100 -REAL ESTATE SALES<br />

110 - Real Estate Wanted<br />

115 - Homes<br />

120 - Townhomes/Condos<br />

122 - Cabins<br />

125 - Commercial Property<br />

130 - VA Properties<br />

135 - Ranches/Land/Farms<br />

140 - Income Property<br />

145 - Resort Property<br />

150 - Lots/Acreage<br />

155 - Mobile Homes<br />

160 - Mortgages/Contracts<br />

240 - LAWN/FARM/RANCH<br />

243 - Farm/Ranch<br />

245 - Plants/Trees/Shrubs<br />

250 - Hay/Grain/Feed<br />

255 - Firewood/Coal<br />

260 - Lawn & Garden Work<br />

265 - Lawn & Garden Equipment<br />

270 - Farm & Ranch Equipment<br />

275 - Industrial Equipment<br />

280 - Pets & Supplies<br />

285 - Livestock Trailers<br />

<strong>29</strong>0 - Horses<br />

<strong>29</strong>5 - Livestock<br />

300 - REAL ESTATE RENTALS<br />

301 - General Real Estate<br />

305 - Houses Unfurnished<br />

310 - Houses Furnished<br />

311 - Duplex for Rent<br />

315 - Apts. Unfurnished<br />

320 - Apts. Furnished<br />

321 - Studio Apartments<br />

325 - Roommates Wanted<br />

330 - Rooms<br />

335 - Townhouses/Condos<br />

340 - Mobile Homes For Rent<br />

345 - Resort<br />

347 - Commercial Shop/Warehouse<br />

350 - Business/Office<br />

355 - Storage Space<br />

360 - Mobile Home Spaces<br />

365 - Wanted to Rent/Own<br />

370 - Pasture Land<br />

375 - EMPLOYMENT<br />

380 - Schools<br />

385 - Help Wanted<br />

390 - Child Care<br />

395 - Situations Wanted<br />

400 - Money to Loan/Pawn Brokers<br />

405 - Business Opportunities<br />

410 - Business For Sale<br />

415 - MERCHANDISE<br />

420 - Miscellaneous<br />

425 - Foods/Health/Beauty<br />

430 - Antiques<br />

435 - Musical Merchandise<br />

440 - Camera/Video Equipment<br />

445 - Jewelry<br />

450 - Office Equipment/Furniture<br />

451 - Computer Products/Video Games<br />

452 - TVs, Stereos, VCR, CDs<br />

453 - Medical Equipment<br />

454 - Arts, Crafts, and Hobbies<br />

455 - Seasonal Merchandise<br />

456 - Appliances<br />

457 - Furniture/Carpet<br />

458 - Baby Items<br />

459 - Clothing/Shoes<br />

460 - Hot Tubs/Spas/Swimming Pools<br />

461 - Building Materials<br />

462 - Restaurant Equipment<br />

463 - Heating/Plumbing<br />

464 - Air Conditioning<br />

465 - Tools & Equipment<br />

466 - Oil Field Equipment<br />

468 - Want to Buy/Trade<br />

470 - Good Things to Eat<br />

475 - RECREATION<br />

479 - General Recreation<br />

480 - Aviation<br />

485 - Boats & Marine<br />

490 - Guns & Ammunition<br />

495 - Sporting Goods<br />

500 - Health & Fitness<br />

505 - Ski Equipment<br />

510 - Camping<br />

515 - Snow Vehicles<br />

517 - R.V. Lots<br />

520 - Travel Trailers<br />

525 - 5th Wheels<br />

530 - Campers<br />

535 - Utility Trailers<br />

540 - Bicycles<br />

545 - TRANSPORTATION<br />

550 - Motorcycles<br />

555 - Parts & Accessories<br />

560 - Heavy Trucks/Equipment<br />

565 - Motor Homes<br />

570 - Vans<br />

575 - All Terrain/Dune Buggies<br />

580 - Auto/Trucks Wanted<br />

585 - Bargain Buggies<br />

590 - Sport Utility Vehicles<br />

595 - Antique/Classic/Custom<br />

600 - Imports<br />

605 - Sports Cars<br />

610 - Trucks-2 Wheel Drive<br />

615 - Trucks-4 Wheel Drive<br />

620 - Autos<br />

Unscramble these Jumbles,<br />

one letter to each square,<br />

to form four ordinary words.<br />

©<strong>2021</strong> Tribune Content Agency, LLC<br />

All Rights Reserved.<br />

“<br />

<br />

THHCA<br />

EUGGO<br />

NRREOY<br />

NFTIEI<br />

5-95 Announcements<br />

20 Garage Sales<br />

106 N 3rd EAST<br />

Sat 8-5 (in door sale)<br />

Antique dress, and baby furniture, Lots<br />

more!<br />

11519 Hwy 26 @ Kinnear Store<br />

May 1st from 8-3, Commemorative John<br />

Wayne plates, remodeling material, home<br />

decor, 3xl mens clothes, there’s something<br />

for everyone!<br />

3731 VILLAGE DRIVE<br />

( AND corner at 3555 Riverside)<br />

Sat 7:30 - ?<br />

Many items including garden tools, old<br />

chipper/shredder, old grill, bedding,<br />

dishes, toys, bicycles, Bamboo patio curtains,<br />

and Free stuff too!<br />

4<strong>29</strong> E. SUNSET<br />

(Calvary Church)<br />

Sat. 8:30 - 3<br />

Variety of stuff, Something for everyone!<br />

IF YOU are afraid in your own home because<br />

of violence or abuse, let us help.<br />

You don’t need to be alone or silent any<br />

longer. The office of Family Violence and<br />

Sexual Assault offers free and confidential<br />

services. Rules for acceptance and particpation<br />

in the program are the same for<br />

veryone without regard to race, color, naional<br />

origin, age, sex or handicap. Please<br />

all 307-856-4734 or 307-332-7215, 24<br />

ours a day, 7 days a week. Collect calls<br />

ccepted.<br />

25 Lost & Found<br />

BLACK CREDIT CARD HOLDER with<br />

snap over the credit cards. Please return<br />

to Ranger Advertising<br />

SUNGLASS left on the counter at the<br />

Ranger in Riverton, on Monday <strong>April</strong><br />

19th. Please come to the Advertising department<br />

to claim.<br />

40 Happenings<br />

ADULT CHILDREN of Alcoholics group<br />

meets on Wednesdays from 11am-1pm at<br />

the Methodist Church (basement side<br />

oor) located at 307 N. Main, Pavillion.<br />

307-856-1192 or 307-856-4979.<br />

AL-ANON MEETINGS are held every<br />

onday at 7pm and Thursdays at 12pm at<br />

St. James Episcopal Church, 519 East<br />

ark, Riverton.<br />

COME AND SHARE Conversation<br />

and Encouragement with others who<br />

understand the ups and downs as you<br />

adjust to life without your loved one.<br />

A Bereavement Support Group meets<br />

every Monday, 1:30-2:30pm, Alternating<br />

etween Riverton and Lander Senior Centers.<br />

For More Information Call<br />

07-856-1206 or visit www.helpforhealthwy.org<br />

DO YOU have a Revolutionary PATRIOT<br />

in you family tree? Consider membership<br />

in the National Society Daughters of the<br />

American Revolution (NSDAR). For more<br />

nformation contact<br />

Get the free JUST JUMBLE app • Follow us on Twitter @PlayJumble<br />

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME<br />

By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek<br />

Now arrange the circled letters<br />

to form the surprise answer, as<br />

suggested by the above cartoon.<br />

-<br />

(Answers tomorrow)<br />

Jumbles: FAUNA IMPEL MEDIUM LOATHE<br />

Answer: By not being late with payments, your credit<br />

score will go up — ALL IN DUE TIME<br />

”<br />

mblankenship@wyoming.com or<br />

cwmurray@wyoming.com<br />

STRANGE BREW<br />

DUBOIS AA is held at the Dubois Town<br />

Hall, 712 Meckem, Tuesdays and Thursdays<br />

at 6pm.<br />

DUPLICATE BRIDGE Club meets at the<br />

Reach Clubhouse Friday afternoons at<br />

12:30pm. Open to the public. Make sure to<br />

bring a Bridge partner. For more information<br />

call 307-856-6356.<br />

FREE CANCER PATIENT TRANSPORTA-<br />

TION. Fremont County Road to Recovery,<br />

offering Free Transportation for Cancer Patients<br />

to their Treatments at Rocky Mountain<br />

Oncology with hopes of expanding<br />

services. Road to Recovery is a support<br />

service through the American Cancer Society.<br />

We are also seeking VOLUNTEER<br />

Drivers. For more information call: 307-<br />

335-5366 or email grttch524@gmail.com.<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

FRESH ACCEPTANCE AA<br />

The meeting schedule is:<br />

7:00am & 7pm - Tuesday, Friday<br />

7:00am - Thursday<br />

10:00am - Saturday<br />

7:00pm - Sunday<br />

118 1/2 North 5th street, Riverton, WY<br />

(Brown House) Contact Phone: 307-350-<br />

2164<br />

Zoom Meetings:<br />

7:00 am - Monday, Tuesday, Thursday,<br />

Friday<br />

7:00 pm - Sunday<br />

Zoom Address:<br />

https//us02web.zoom.us/j/3616388633?pp<br />

wd=QWNDVngzV2tJNStKSXVtaXJB-<br />

SHJFZz09<br />

FRESH AIR AA Group meets at St. James<br />

Episcopal Church, 519 East Park, Riverton,<br />

Sun., Tues., & Thurs., 7pm. Call 307-<br />

851-4839 for more information.<br />

LEGAL AID of Wyoming, Inc. Legal Assistance<br />

for domestic violence victims. 9 a.m.-<br />

4 p.m., Monday – Friday. Legal advice hotline:<br />

877-432-9955.<br />

MONDAYS:<br />

Bereavement Support Group meets from<br />

1:30 to 2:30 p.m. every Monday alternating<br />

between Riverton and Lander senior centers.<br />

For More Information Call 307-856-<br />

1206 or visit www.helpforhealthwy.org.<br />

By John Deering<br />

AL-ANON MEETINGS are held at 7 p.m.<br />

every Monday at St. James Episcopal<br />

Church, 519 E. Park, Riverton.<br />

LANDER NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS<br />

meets at 7 p.m. Mondays at the Trinity<br />

Episcopal Church, 860 S. Third St.<br />

RED PATH AA Meetings take place at 7<br />

p.m. Mondays at St. Stephen’s Mission,<br />

134 Mission Rd.<br />

Free veteran acupuncture 10 a.m. to noon<br />

the first Monday of every month. Walk-in<br />

basis. Located at the Soldiers House 1201<br />

E. Jackson Ave, Riverton.<br />

TUESDAYS:<br />

ALL ARTISTS ARE WELCOME to come to<br />

the Lander Artists Guild meetings held at<br />

noon on the second Tuesday of every<br />

month at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 830<br />

S. Third St., Lander. Open painting 10 a.m.<br />

- 2 p.m., bring a sack lunch. For more information<br />

call Ella McDonell at 349-9689<br />

or Ellen Gartner at 332-57<strong>29</strong>.<br />

Parkinson’s Exercise Group meets every<br />

Tuesday at the senior center at 1-2 p.m.<br />

For more information, contact Marjane Ambler<br />

at 307 332-3732 or the senior center<br />

at 332-2746.<br />

DUBOIS AA held at 6 p.m. Tuesdays,<br />

Dubois Town Hall, 712 Meekem Rd.<br />

SMALL GROUP SERENDIPITY BIBLE<br />

STUDY, FREE, at 6:30 p.m. every Tuesday.<br />

A study for everyone. Seventh-Day<br />

Maranatha Church, 163 S. Fifth St., Lander.<br />

AMERICAN LEGION POST 33 will meet at<br />

7:00pm, the third Tuesday of each month<br />

at the VFW Hall. Contact Mark Keiser at<br />

307-360-3228 for more information.<br />

Free veteran healing touch sessions the<br />

first Tuesday of every month at the Soldiers<br />

House 1201 E. Jackson Ave. Riverton,<br />

WY. Please call Nancy Sehnert to<br />

schedule a 30 minute appointment 850-<br />

6208.<br />

ALL ARTISTS ARE WELCOME to come to<br />

the Lander Artists Guild meetings held at<br />

noon on the second Tuesday of every<br />

month at the Trinity Episcopal Church, 830<br />

S. Third St., Lander. Open painting 10 a.m.<br />

- 2 p.m., bring a sack lunch. For more information<br />

call Ella McDonell at 349-9689<br />

or Ellen Gartner at 332-57<strong>29</strong>.<br />

WEDNESDAYS:<br />

LANDER ROTARY CLUB MEETING: held<br />

at noon every Wednesday at the Oxbow<br />

Restaurant. Call 332-2749 for information.<br />

Visitors welcome.<br />

Open Studio, 6 p.m. Lander Art Center.<br />

LIONS CLUB MEETING held at 6:30 p.m.<br />

on the First and Third Wednesday of every<br />

month at the Oxbow Restaurant, Lander.<br />

332-7164 or 332-5578.<br />

RED PATH AA Meetings take place at 7<br />

p.m. Wednesdays at St. Stephen’s Mission,<br />

134 Mission Rd.<br />

THURSDAYS:<br />

T.O.P.S. 9-10:30 a.m. Thursdays, Two Sisters<br />

Bed and Breakfast, 786 S. Third St.,<br />

Lander. Call Dianna 438-0209.<br />

AL-ANON MEETINGS are held at noon on<br />

Thursdays at St. James Episcopal Church,<br />

519 E. Park, Riverton.<br />

Parkinson’s Exercise Group meets every<br />

Thursday at the senior center at 1-2 p.m.<br />

For more information, contact Marjane Ambler<br />

at 307 332-3732 or the senior center<br />

at 332-2746<br />

THE PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP<br />

The Fremont County Parkinson’s Support<br />

Group meets at 2 p.m. the first Thursday<br />

of every month at the Lander Senior Center.<br />

For more information, contact Marjane<br />

Ambler at 307 332-3732 or the senior center<br />

at 332-2746<br />

DUBOIS AA held at 6 p.m. Thursdays,<br />

Dubois Town Hall, 712 Meekem Rd.<br />

FREMONT COUNTY ATV Association<br />

meets the first Thursday of every month at<br />

7:00 p.m. Jan/Mar/May/July/Sept/Nov at<br />

the commissioners meeting room in the<br />

courthouse in Lander. Feb/<strong>April</strong>/ June/Oct<br />

at the High Plains Power building at 1775<br />

E. Monroe in Riverton. (August-picnic) (December-Christmas<br />

party) Find us on facebook<br />

LANDER NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS<br />

meets at 7 p.m. Thursdays at the Trinity<br />

Episcopal Church, 860 S. Third St.<br />

ACOA: 7-8 p.m., Thursdays 885 Clinchard<br />

St. Contact 349-1890.<br />

NEW BEGINNINGS AA meetings are held<br />

at 5:30pm daily at 118½ North 5th Street<br />

East, Riverton.<br />

PLEASE JOIN THE C & K VOLUNTEERS<br />

knit and crochet for various programs.<br />

Meetings are 2nd & 4th Mon. at 1pm, For<br />

more information and NEW location please<br />

call contact Roni at 307-856-6664. Yarn<br />

available and donations still Welcome!<br />

RED PATH AA meetings take place at St.<br />

Stephen’s Mission, 134 Mission Road,<br />

Mon. & Wed. at 7pm, Sat. at 11am and<br />

Sun., 8am.<br />

RIVERTON ARTISTS GUILD holds its<br />

weekly painting sessions at the Fremont<br />

County Fairgrounds Heritage Hall Bldg.<br />

Wed. from 10-2pm with constructive critique<br />

feedback at the end of every session.<br />

Come and join us. All media and subject<br />

matter are welcome.<br />

RIVERTON COMMUNITY FOOD BANK<br />

Call for appointment. Donations welcomed.<br />

20 Gardens North Drive, Riverton. 307-<br />

463-0141<br />

T.O.P.S. TAKE Off Pounds Sensibly.<br />

Thursday, 9 am, Lander Sr. Center, 205<br />

S. 10th Street Lander, contact Dianna<br />

McIntosh Call 307-438-0209<br />

THE ANONYMOUS AA Group meetings<br />

are held Mon. and Fri. at 7pm at the Pavillion<br />

Community Church, 311 N. Main. Contact<br />

number: 307-856-7635.<br />

THE SOLDIERS PROJECT -WYOMING<br />

CHAPTER PHONE LINE is NOT an emergency<br />

line. All veterans and their loved<br />

ones, there is FREE confidential mental<br />

health care available. Call and leave a<br />

message. Your call is typically answered<br />

within 48 hours. 307-856-1244<br />

WELCOME HOME: Please contact one of<br />

the Veterans Honor Guard concerning any<br />

Military Personnel returning from an area<br />

of conflict so we can give them a Welcome<br />

Home. Contact: Pat Lawson 307-851-7400<br />

or Jim Arndt 307-851-3763.<br />

WYOMING SOCIETY OF<br />

MAYFLOWER DESCENDANTS<br />

The <strong>2021</strong> Annual Meeting of the<br />

Wyoming Society of Mayflower Descendants<br />

will be held on Saturday, May 1st at<br />

11:00 am. It will be held in<br />

Thermopolis at the Hot Springs Library on<br />

344 Arapahoe Street.<br />

WYOMING STAR QUILT GUILD Meets at<br />

7pm on the First Monday of each Month at<br />

the Stitching Corral , 826 West Main<br />

Street. Guests are Welcome. For More Information<br />

ca Vicki at 851-8172 or<br />

Donnabelle at 856-5891.<br />

Please Recycle this Paper!<br />

95 Services Offered<br />

CLEANING HOUSES<br />

weekly and every other week<br />

All Cleansers and Tools Supplied.<br />

Experience & References.<br />

Riverton only please. (307) 240-7338.<br />

100-160 Real Estate Sales<br />

115 Homes for Sale<br />

FOR SALE BY OWNERS<br />

Modular on 2 acres<br />

3 bedroom, 2 bathrooms, 2 car garage.<br />

Located in rural subdivision asking<br />

$320,000 Call 307-851-5704 or 307-851-<br />

8316 for more information.<br />

240-<strong>29</strong>5<br />

Lawn/Farm/Ranch<br />

<strong>29</strong>5 Livestock<br />

BLACK ANGUS BULLS, For Sale. Yearlings<br />

and Two’s. We Select for Fertility,<br />

Mothering Ability, and Growth. Reasonably<br />

priced. Call Shippen Angus at: 307-856-<br />

7531 or 307-858-2440<br />

BLACK ANGUS BULLS, For Sale. Yearlings<br />

and Two’s. We Select for Fertility,<br />

Mothering Ability, and Growth. Reasonably<br />

priced. Call Shippen Angus at: 307-856-<br />

7531 or 307-858-4220<br />

300-370 Real Estate<br />

Rentals<br />

301 General Real Estate Rentals<br />

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY. All<br />

real estate advertising in this newspaper is<br />

subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act,<br />

which makes it illegal to advertise any preference,<br />

limitation or discrimination based<br />

on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial<br />

status or national origin, or intention<br />

to make any such preferences, limitations<br />

or discrimination. Familial status includes<br />

children under that age of 18 living with<br />

parents or legal custodians, and pregnant<br />

women and people securing custody of<br />

children under 18. This newspaper will not<br />

knowingly accept any advertising for real<br />

estate which is in violation of the law. Our<br />

readers are hereby informed that all<br />

dwellings advertised in this paper are available<br />

on an equal opportunity basis. To report<br />

discrimination call Wyoming Fair<br />

Housing at Wyoming Relay (Voice) 1-800-<br />

877-9975 or call HUD toll free at 1-800-<br />

669-9777.<br />

375-410 Employment<br />

385 Help Wanted<br />

DESERT MOUNTAIN<br />

CORPORATION<br />

FAMILY-ORIENTED COMPANY seeking<br />

Class A CDL drivers with T, N endorsements<br />

for WY, MT, UT, NV CO, ID. We haul<br />

non-hazardous commodities; 60% of what<br />

we haul are our own products that we market<br />

and ship to our customers. This provides<br />

our drivers with year-round work, and<br />

they are home the majority of weekends<br />

for their 34 hour re-set. Paid per mile,<br />

DOE: avg. 3000 miles per week. Benefits<br />

after 90 days. Home on major holidays.<br />

Our equipment consists of newer model<br />

hoppers, belt trailers, and tankers. You can<br />

pick up an application at 2095 Chandelle<br />

Blvd (near Airport, Riverton). Call 505-716-<br />

1801<br />

Market Manager Needed!<br />

-friendly, organized, “people person”,<br />

Facebook skills, reliable -<br />

8-10 hours per week, 3-7:30 pm most<br />

Wednesdays May 19-Sept <strong>29</strong>, $150 per<br />

week<br />

Submit cover letter and brief resume to<br />

kbriddle@wyoming.<br />

THIS NEWSPAPER recommends that you<br />

investigate every phase of investment opportunities.<br />

We suggest you consult your<br />

own attorney, and ask for a free pamphlet<br />

or for free further information from the company<br />

making the offer, before investing any<br />

money. You may contact the Attorney<br />

General’s Office, 123 Capitol Bldg.,<br />

Cheyenne, WY 82009.<br />

See More<br />

HELP WANTED,<br />

MERCHANDISE<br />

and RECREATION<br />

on the next page


Page 8 Thursday, <strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong><br />

SUDOKU<br />

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with<br />

several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers<br />

1 to 9 in the empty squares so that each row, each column<br />

and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once.<br />

GED ceremony<br />

385 Help Wanted 385 Help Wanted<br />

VACANCY NOTICE<br />

FREMONT COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT #2<br />

(Dubois, Wyoming)<br />

is accepting applications for the <strong>2021</strong>-2022 School year<br />

K-12 Art Teacher<br />

Elementary Teacher<br />

K-12 Special Education Teacher<br />

TO APPLY: Job Openings at www.fremont2.org<br />

Fremont County School District No. 2 is an equal opportunity employer and does<br />

not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, religion,<br />

sexual orientation or gender identity in relation to admission, treatment of<br />

students, access to programs and activities, or terms and conditions of employment.<br />

Family members posed happily after Danielle Baldes of<br />

Riverton earned her high school equivalency certification<br />

through Central Wyoming College. CWC conducted<br />

its annual ceremony Tuesday night for the newly certified<br />

students. From left, Gabriel and Monika Baldes,<br />

parents of the honoree, graduate Danielle Baldes, and<br />

brother Evan Baldes, pictured after the ceremony at the<br />

Robert A. Peck Arts Center on campus in Riverton.<br />

Photo by Steve Peck<br />

RANGER CARRIERS<br />

Needed Immediately!<br />

Apply at 421 E. Main Street, Riverton.<br />

Please Recycle this Paper!<br />

415-470 Merchandise<br />

468 Want to Buy/Trade<br />

MIKE COLLECTS MUSIC RECORDS.<br />

Call 307-851-4118<br />

475-540 Recreation<br />

520 Travel Trailers<br />

28’ ROAD RANGER Camp Trailer<br />

fully self contained. Excellent condition,<br />

Must see to appreciate! Asking $7000<br />

obo, Call 307-240-1972<br />

525 5th Wheels<br />

BIG HORN 5TH WHEEL 37ft, 3 slides,<br />

great shape, in Riverton. Asking $23,250<br />

Call 970-946-2100<br />

Everybody’s<br />

Talkin’ About<br />

the Classified<br />

Bargains!<br />

Check ‘Em Out!<br />

The Ranger<br />

Classifieds<br />

856-SOLD<br />

(7653)<br />

Public Notices<br />

FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE<br />

(For Publication)<br />

WHEREAS NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN that a default in the payment under the terms<br />

of a secured and perfected Note has occurred. The Note is secured by a Mortgage<br />

dated November 27, 2010 and recorded on December 13, 2010 at REC # 2010-<br />

1339634 in the records of Fremont County, Wyoming from Bonita Hambrick, to Mortgage<br />

Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc. for the<br />

amount of $105,025.00. The Mortgage having been assigned to and now in possession<br />

of Community Loan Servicing, LLC, through an assignment recorded on February 8,<br />

<strong>2021</strong> at REC # <strong>2021</strong>-1424935 in the records of Fremont County, Wyoming.<br />

WHEREAS the Mortgage contains a power of sale, which by reason of the default<br />

that has occurred, the Mortgagee has declared to become operative, and no suit or proceeding<br />

has been instituted to recover the debt secured by the Mortgage, or any part<br />

thereof, nor has any suit or proceeding instituted and the same discontinued and:<br />

WHEREAS written Notice of Intent to Foreclose by Sale and Advertisement has been<br />

served upon the record owner and party in possession of the mortgaged premises at<br />

least ten (10) days prior to commencement of the publication, and the amount due upon<br />

the Mortgage at the date of first publication of this notice of sale being the total sum of<br />

$92,244.53 which consists of the unpaid principal balance of $86,518.88, plus outstanding<br />

charges, attorney fees, costs expected, accruing interest and late charges after the<br />

date of first publication of this notice.<br />

WHEREAS this property being foreclosed upon may be subject to other liens and<br />

encumbrances that will not be extinguished at the sale and any prospective purchaser<br />

should research the status of title before submitting a bid.<br />

NOW, THEREFORE Community Loan Servicing, LLC as Mortgagee, will have the<br />

Mortgage foreclosed as by law provided by having the mortgaged property sold at public<br />

venue by the Sheriff or Deputy Sheriff in and for Fremont County, Wyoming to the highest<br />

bidder for cash on May 15, <strong>2021</strong> at 10:00 AM at the front door of the Fremont County<br />

Courthouse located at 450 North 2nd Street, Lander, Wyoming 82520. For application<br />

on the above described amounts secured by the Mortgage, said mortgaged property<br />

being described as follows, to wit:<br />

Lots 4 and 5, Block 6, Riverview Addition to the City of Riverton, Fremont<br />

County, Wyoming.<br />

With an address of 1105 E Washington Ave, Riverton, Wyoming 82501. Together with<br />

all improvements thereon situated and all fixtures and appurtenances, thereto.<br />

PUB: The Ranger<br />

<strong>April</strong> 15, 22, <strong>29</strong> and May 6, <strong>2021</strong><br />

Community Loan Servicing, LLC<br />

Randall S. Miller & Associates P.C. - CO<br />

Scott D. Toebben, 7-5690<br />

216 16th Street<br />

Suite 1210<br />

Denver, CO 80202<br />

Phone: 720-259-6710<br />

Send legal advertising to Kim Draper<br />

at legals@wyoming.com<br />

Design by Metro Creative Graphics, Inc.<br />

*Source: Coda Ventures Newspaper Ad Effectiveness Service<br />

Public Notices<br />

FREMONT COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 25<br />

REQUEST FOR BIDS<br />

Notice is hereby given that Fremont County School District No. 25 (FCSD25) has issued<br />

a Request for Bids for Canon ImageRUNNER Copiers, Copier Service Contracts<br />

and Other Services.<br />

The bid materials, general instructions, and bid response forms are available at the<br />

FCSD25 Administration Building, 121 North 5th West, Riverton, Wyoming 82501 and<br />

will be mailed to interested parties upon request to Business Manager Lu Beecham at<br />

307-856-9513.<br />

All submitted bids shall be sealed and must be received by Fremont County School<br />

District No. 25, 121 North 5th West, Riverton, Wyoming 82501 no later than Noon, May<br />

10, <strong>2021</strong>. Bids may be delivered in person, via US Postal Service, or via commercial<br />

parcel service. Bids will not be accepted via facsimile transmission, email, or any other<br />

electronic or telephonic means. Any bids received after that time will be returned unopened<br />

to the sender. It is the responsibility of the bidders to arrange appointments for<br />

inspections or to obtain additional information<br />

Only such bids that have been received by the District at the address, time, and date<br />

listed above with complete responses will be considered.<br />

Fremont County School District No. 25 reserves the right to accept or reject any or<br />

all bids, waive any technicalities in the bids, and accept the bids deemed to be the most<br />

advantageous to the District. Fremont County School District No. 25 further reserves<br />

the right to cancel or amend the bid materials at any time and will notify all persons requesting<br />

bid documents accordingly.<br />

PUB: The Ranger<br />

<strong>April</strong> 28 and <strong>29</strong>, <strong>2021</strong><br />

LEGAL NOTICE OF ACTION<br />

To: ANY INTERESTED PARTIES<br />

Notice is hereby given that on the 12th day of <strong>April</strong>, <strong>2021</strong> that Robert McNevins Sloss<br />

Petitioner filed in the Wind River Tribal Court, Fort Washakie, Wyoming, praying that a<br />

Name Change Petition for Robert McNevins Sloss be granted for his name to be<br />

Robert McNevins Pokibro. Any interested party desiring to contest said Name Change<br />

shall do so by filing any objections in writing with the Clerk of said Court no later than<br />

30 days after the last date of publication hereof, or the Name Change Petition shall be<br />

Granted.<br />

Jennifer Moats, Clerk of Court, Wind River Tribal Court, Phone: (307) 332-6702, Fax:<br />

(307) 332-7587, P.O. Box 608, Fort Washakie, Wyoming 82514<br />

PUB: The Ranger<br />

<strong>April</strong> 15, 22, <strong>29</strong> and May 6, <strong>2021</strong><br />

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF FREMONT COUNTY, WYOMING<br />

NINTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT<br />

TYSON R. BECK, )<br />

Plaintiff, )<br />

vs. ) Civil No. 39923<br />

OLENA BECK k/n/a, )<br />

ALONA COMERFORD )<br />

Defendant. )<br />

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION<br />

NOTICE TO TYSON R. BECK, PLAINTIFF<br />

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 322 NORTH 6TH EAST, RIVERTON, WY 82501<br />

You are notified that a Verified Petition to Terminate Parent-Child Relationship and<br />

Parental Rights, Civil Action No. 39923, has been filed in the Wyoming District Court<br />

for the Ninth Judicial District, whose address is Fremont County Courthouse, 450 North<br />

2nd, Lander, WY 82520, seeking to terminate parent-child relationship and parental<br />

rights, in her favor.<br />

Unless you file an Answer or otherwise respond to the Verified Petition to Terminate<br />

Parent-Child Relationship and Parental Rights referenced above within 30 days following<br />

the last date of publication of this notice, a default judgement will be taken against<br />

you. Your Answer must be filed with the Clerk of District Court at the address provided<br />

above.<br />

DATED this 26th day of <strong>April</strong> <strong>2021</strong>.<br />

BY CLERK OF COURT:<br />

Kristi H. Green<br />

Clerk of District Court<br />

PUB: The Ranger<br />

<strong>April</strong> <strong>29</strong> and May 6, 13, 20, <strong>2021</strong>

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