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VOL 120, Issue 9 - November 10th, 2022

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02

THURSDAY

NOV. 10,

2022

STAFF

SUBMISSION POLICY

The San Francisco Foghorn is the

official student newspaper of the

University of San Francisco and is

sponsored by the Associated Students

of the University of San Francisco

(ASUSF).

The thoughts and opinions expressed

herein are those of the individual writers

and do not necessarily reflect those

of the Foghorn staff, the administration,

the faculty, staff or the students

of the University of San Francisco.

Contents of each issue are the sole

responsibilities of the editors.

An All-American

Publication

ad maiorem dei

gloriam

415.422.5444

sffoghorn.com

The San Francisco Foghorn is free of

charge.

Advertising matter printed herein is

solely for informational purposes.

Such printing is not to be construed

as written or implied sponsorship

or endorsement of such commercial

enterprises or ventures by the San

Francisco Foghorn.

©MMIV-MMV, San Francisco Foghorn.

All rights reserved. No material

printed herein may be reproduced

without prior permission of the Editor

in Chief.

SAN FRANCISCO

FOGHORN

Freedom and Fairness

Editor in Chief

ZOE BINDER

zebinder@dons.usfca.edu

News Editor

MEGAN ROBERTSON

mrrobertson2@dons.usfca.edu

Opinion Editor

SAGE BLISS-RIOS MACE

srmace@dons.usfca.edu

Scene Editor

JORDAN PREMMER

jepremmer@dons.usfca.edu

Sports Editor

CHASE DARDEN

cbdarden@dons.usfca.edu

Photography Editor

ELISE EMARD

ememard@dons.usfca.edu

General Reporter

JORDAN DELFIUGO

jgdelfiugo@dons.usfca.edu

General Reporter

TALEAH JOHNSON

tjohnson1@dons.usfca.edu

Managing Editor

NORA WARD

naward2@dons.usfca.edu

Copy Editor

SAVANNAH DEWBERRY

skdewberry@dons.usfca.edu

Layout Editor

DOMINIQUE CADENAS CALVO

dicadenascalvo@dons.usfca.edu

Layout Editor

AVA LORD

ajlord@dons.usfca.edu

Social Media Manager

KATIE INTHAVONG

kkinthavong@dons.usfca.edu

Online Editor

HAYLEY DIEMAR

htdiemar@dons.usfca.edu

Advisor

TERESA MOORE

2130 FULTON STREET, UC #417

SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94117

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accepted from students, faculty, staff

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All materials must be signed and

include your printed name, university

status (class standing or title), address,

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Anonymous submissions are not

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property of the San Francisco Foghorn.

Staff editorials are written by the

Foghorn editorial staff and represent a

group consensus.

The San Francisco Foghorn Opinion

page is a forum for the free, fair and

civil exchange of ideas. Contributors’

opinions are not meant to reflect

the views of the Foghorn staff or the

University of San Francisco.

Students interested in contributing to

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STAFF EDITORIAL

PUBLIC SAFETY MUST GO HAND-IN-HAND

WITH RACIAL JUSTICE

GRAPHIC BY DOMINIQUE CADENAS CALVO/SF FOGHORN

At the time of writing, we are

entering into the Nov. 8 general election,

which will decide, among other

things, the fate of the San Francisco

District Attorney office. Vying for

the position are four candidates of

varying experience and background:

Brooke Jenkins, John Hamasaki, Joe

Alioto Veronese, and Maurice Chenier.

Whoever is elected will bear the

responsibility of increasing public

safety, actively listening to the public,

and enacting criminal justice reform.

Given the immense influence of the

role, it is imperative that San Franciscans

hold the new DA accountable to

promises of criminal justice reform.

The Thurgood Marshall Institute

lists the DA’s powers, including

the power to investigate accusations

of crime and bring charges, as well as the power

to review old cases for possible wrongful conviction.

The DA can also create alternatives to incarceration

and create “specialized units” to address

“prevalent issues within the community.”

This means the DA can address the root causes

of crime, as opposed to defaulting to policing and

mass incarceration.

In 2020, under then-DA Chesa Boudin, the

DA’s office established the San Francisco Restorative

Justice Collaborative. According to their

website, the collaborative aims to “repair the relationship

between the Asian American and African

American communities in San Francisco,”

and to “generate long term healing, rather than a

band-aid response to high-profile incidents.” The

collaboration works with several youth outreach

programs and community organizations.

The role of DA is a tightrope of balancing

differing views on how to achieve criminal justice.

Despite the progress Boudin’s office made

with the collaborative, his term came to an

abrupt end with the 2022 special recall election.

Only 46% of San Francisco’s eligible voters

showed up to the polls for the recall, and of those

voters 55% voted in favor of ousting Boudin.

Mayor London Breed appointed Brooke Jenkins

as the interim DA in his place.

Jenkins is facing a mix of support and backlash

over the ambiguities of her stance on criminal

justice reform. Upon starting in the role of

DA, Jenkins said she was “progressive,” but in

the same breath advocated for policies known

to disproportionately penalize low-income folks

and people of color. These include giving prosecutors

the discretion to charge juvenile offenders as

adults and the power to request cash bail as well

as gang enhancements.

Given the blatant racial disparities within

San Francisco’s justice system, the city needs a

DA that prioritizes racial justice. According to research

conducted by the San Francisco City and

County Safety and Justice Challenge Innovation

Fund, the per capita rate of incarceration for

Black people in San Francisco is 17 times higher

than white people — with men of color typically

receiving longer sentences than their white counterparts.

Over this past year, we have seen the ways

voting and petitioning for recall has impacted

the DA’s office. Most recently, protestors at San

Francisco State University caused Jenkins to leave

a debate over her perceived decision to delay the

trial of SF police officer Chris Samayoa, who

is facing manslaughter charges for the death of

Keita O’Neil.

San Franciscans must stay committed to

holding the DA accountable and driving forward

change. While the conversation around racial

justice and criminal reform often ends in a stalemate,

we should expect the DA’s office to take

concrete steps to ensure equity.

CORRECTIONS FROM OCT. 27TH & NOV.

3RD ISSUES:

NOV 3:

“USF announces new data ethics fellows:”

Savannah Dewberry conducted the survey of USF

students for feedback on data collection.

“ASUSF Senate resolution promotes menstrual

product accessibility:” Sofia Fontana, the social

justice chair of the Senate’s advocacy committee,

was misattributed as the Senate’s pre-medicine

representative.

OCT 27:

“Get to know Provost Oparah:” Erin Brigham’s

name was misspelled.

“Masks become optional on the Hilltop:” Morgan

Brumm’s name was misspelled.

“The world needs traditional ecological knowledge:”

information about Dr. Gregory Cajete’s

research was drawn from “Earthzine.”

03

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