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BIMIFF #7 - ENG

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M A G A Z I N E

Year 1 7th Issue

7 T H I S S U E

2 0 2 3


B I M I F F

E D I T O R I A L

01

THE AUTHENTIC IMPACT

OF ITALIAN NEOREALISM

Dear readers,

It is with great pleasure that I introduce the 7th issue

of BIMIFF Magazine, which features as its main

article a study written by me on the Italian Neorealist

movement. It is a subject I have been passionate

about for years and I hope that my approach will

help spread the importance of this film movement in

the history of independent cinema.

FESTIVAL DIRECTOR & DESIGNER

Lucas Marques

instagram.com/lucasdecmarques

FESTIVAL MANAGER & COMMUNICATION

Victor Henrique "Vic Kings" Carvalho Reis

instagram.com/vic.kings

Italian Neorealism is a movement that captured the

reality of Italian working-class life authentically and

sensitively, and its impact on Italian and world

culture is undeniable. I believe it is essential that

people know more about this movement, and our

magazine aims to provide this knowledge to our

readers.

In addition to the main article, this issue features

interviews, analyses, and reviews about new

independent films, highlighting the challenges faced

by independent filmmakers.

As co-editor-in-chief of the BIMIFF Magazine, it is my

goal to provide a space for reflection and discussion

about independent cinema, a field that plays an

important role in our culture. I hope that this issue

will be inspiring and informative for all our readers

and that it will contribute to the appreciation and

development of indie cinema around the world.

With warm regards,

Lucas Marques

Co-Editor-in-Chief of BIMIFF Magazine

FESTIVAL ADMINISTRATOR

Marcelo César Silva

instagram.com/marcelocesars

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT

Editors-in-Chief: Lucas Marques and Vic Kings

Art and Design Editors: Lucas Marques and Vic Kings

Staff Writers: Vic Kings, Richard Caeiro, and Lucas Marques

Contributors: Marcelo César and Pamela Nassour

Digital Editor: Lucas Marques

Social Media Manager: Vic Kings

Translator: Vic Kings

BIMIFF'S PARTNERS

Cult Movies International Film Festival

GIMFA - Gralha International Monthly Film Awards

Latin America Film Awards

MAZ - Associação Artística

The Cyprus Horror Society

MODOK Institute of Arts

Ipanema Film Festival

You can contact BIMIFF on:

bimiff.com

filmfreeway.com/BIMIFF

instagram.com/bimiff_

contact.bimiff@gmail.com


BICYCLE THIEVES

A F I L M B Y V I T T O R I O D E S I C A

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN


L

PROJECT

CONTENTS

LOVE: THE MOST POWERFUL

WAY TO CONNECT PEOPLE

An exclusive interview with the

filmmaker Noelle Joy Sorenson

DREAMS OF THE PAST

Press release

A JOURNEY OF LOVE,

GUILT, AND REDEMPTION

"Between Glances" Review

CHANGE FOR AN ENTITY THAT

BY ITSELF CAUSES VIOLENCE

An exclusive interview with the

filmmaker Bilal Hussain

LATIR AMARGO

Press release

FILLING EMPTINESS

"In" Review

THE MANY CONTRADICTIONS

OF EVERYDAY LIFE

An exclusive interview with the

filmmaker Andrés Hernández

Covarrubias

THE PORN RADIO SHOW

Press release

SELF-DEFENSE, BUT DEFENSE

FOR WHOM?

"Safety First" Review

THE PROBLEMS CAUSED BY

SELFISHNESS AMONG FRIENDS

An exclusive interview with the

filmmaker Marco Felipe Rossi

AN UNINTENDED CONNECTION

Special article by Pamela Nassour

INSPIRING REFLECTIONS ON GENDER

EQUALITY AND WOMEN'S RIGHTS

"My Son" Review

DRINKING A DREAM

Press release

EXPLORING THE LIMITS AND

POTENTIALS OF FILMMAKING

An exclusive interview with the

filmmakers Christos Arfanis and Maria

Agrapidou

04

09

10

12

18

19

23

29

30

33

40

43

45

IN

Press release 48

49

A SENSORY AND SYMBOLIC

EXPERIENCE IN HONOR OF

THE PICTORIAL ARTS 54

"Santa Guerra" Review

MY NAME IS SHAUN 57

Press release

HORROR BEYOND MERE

SCARES

58

"Renaissance" Review

THE ART OF LEAVING SOUL

PRINTS IN THE WORK

An exclusive interview with the filmmaker 62

Carcazan

JUST ANOTHER DAY IN RENO

Press release

ITALIAN NEOREALISM:

THE CINEMATIC

REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD

THROUGH THE

SCREEN

Main article

66

70


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 04

LOVE: THE MOST POWERFUL

WAY TO CONNECT PEOPLE

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH NOELLE JOY SORENSON, DIRECTOR OF

THE FILM “HEART”

BY VIC KINGS AND RICHARD CAEIRO

LOVE: THE MOST POWERFUL WAY TO CONNECT PEOPLE


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 05

L O V E : T H E M O S T P O W E R F U L

W A Y T O C O N N E C T P E O P L E

"HeArt" film scene

LOVE: THE MOST POWERFUL WAY TO CONNECT PEOPLE

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH NOELLE JOY SORENSON, DIRECTOR OF THE FILM “HEART”

by Vic Kings and Richard Caeiro

Noelle Joy Sorenson is an American actress, writer, and now filmmaker. She is a first-time female

director, screenwriter, and producer. The short film "HeArt" is her debut work.

How did you come up with the idea for writing the short film

"HEART"?

I started out with production in mind. I knew I wanted a oneday

shoot, one location, 2 actors, all about relationship. From

there I was inspired to write and really got into these 2

characters and the idea of how do we get past our own stuff.

The film takes place entirely in a single room. What was the

biggest challenge of filming a movie in such a limited and

small environment?

Well, we had no lighting at all, just natural light, which saved

space, since that was less equipment in the room. I almost

feel like the constraints helped lead the creativity, and lead

the story along.

Your on-screen chemistry with actor Josh Berresford is

one of the highlights of the film. How was the casting

process for the role of Shane?

First of all, thank you. I will share this with Josh, he’ll

love that! I’m really glad that came through on film for

the truth of the story. If there’s one thing Shane and

Naomi had going for them, it was sexual chemistry. As

far as casting, it was intuitive, I met Josh at a

professional actor’s class/workshop. I helped him out

with his Bluebloods audition, running lines, etc. We also

worked with each other as readers for the workshop

and Natalie Roy mentioned we worked well together. It

was an aha moment…Josh is Shane, period. Then I just

went about biding my time until I could ask him if he

would do it. He was amazing, very gracious,

immediately agreeing.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 06

Also about the casting, was the role of Naomi always

with you in mind to play her? What are the biggest

challenges of directing and acting at the same time for

you?

Yes. It was challenging to come out of a heated scene-like

the fight scene and take that breath to objectively check

the gate and know if we got it. I was very fortunate to

have a great skeletal crew and co-star, who gave input

and supported the shoot. I think you have to trust your

people, the performance, yourself, and that other

mysterious thing that happens during the creative

process.

The film portrays toxicity in romantic relationships

subtly, in which we have moments of vulnerability and

strength in both characters. How do you believe these

two concepts relate to each other in building complex

and deep characters?

That’s not my writing process, however, if I had to answer

I would say, I think that when the characters are given a

situation that forces them to confront their most

vulnerable spaces as well as the demons that drive them,

we see all their defense mechanisms come into play

which results in those different colors of strength as well

as vulnerability, perhaps that may lend a hand in

creating the complexity within the characters.

"HeArt" behind the scenes

After the ultimate conflict between the protagonists, there

is a total change in the film's color grading, visually

marking a new perspective in Naomi's view. Can you

explain to us more about this artistic choice and its

influence on the internal narrative progression of your

female protagonist?

I love that you brought that up. I absolutely guided every

aspect of editing and consciously chose to change the color

grading at the end for a number of artistic reasons. One

reason was that I wanted the audience to maybe wonder,

was this a dream, or on a deeper level to think, when we are

lost in our demons or defects is that the waking version of a

dream, or nightmare -because I believe that HeArT’s

message is that the only reality is love. Of course, I love

that art is subjective and the audience can walk away with

their own interpretation of the film.

The film presents the conflict between the desire to be

independent and the desire to be in a relationship. Do you

believe that we can find a balance between these two

wishes that often seem to rival each other? What is the

most important message that "HeArt" conveys to the

audience about human nature?

The actor Josh Berresford

Yes, I do, I think it’s complicated but I believe it’s possible.

At least I want to believe that. "HeArt" shows that

connection and love are possible, regardless of the fears

and internal obstacles that we may face. I think that there

is a lot of hope in "HeArT" and that we root for these

characters to make it because if they do then maybe we can

as well.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 07

In your opinion, how important is it to explore themes

related to love and loving relationships in films and

other art forms?

I think it’s important to explore themes that are

universal. Stories about love and relationships have the

power to connect us. We all breathe, eat, drink, laugh, cry,

love, and grieve. At the heart of it all, we are all the same.

And yes I think it’s important for us to all remember that

we are all much more alike than we are different.

You highlight in your film the intimate relationship

between art and emotions, especially in love. How do

other art forms, such as painting and music, inspire your

work as a filmmaker and actress? Can you tell us more

about the biggest influences in your career?

Music! I made a playlist for myself for "HeArT". I would

listen to it in the morning during my hike and I would

see things for the script, then go and edit with my coffee.

Music has always been very important to me. Art moves

me as well. Shane is an artist. I was fortunate enough to

know Stephen Kerner, whose art is housed in museums

and galleries all over the world. He was generous enough

to allow us to borrow a few reproductions for the film.

I am inspired by Stephen and his incredible work so

having it in the film was heaven. I have to say I’m

inspired by so many things as a filmmaker, writer, and

actress. Great basketball players inspire me, great

writers, comedians, I’ve always been inspired by

greatness, I mean hey, why not?. It's good to tap into that

vibe of inspiration. And then of course go into your own

vein of creativity. What do I have to offer? What can I give

the audience? How can I share a vision or an experience?

My biggest influences? I love listening to Tarantino,

Scorsese, and Spielberg as much as I love listening to

Michael Jordan, Kobe Bryant, Dave Chappelle, & Robin

Williams… I just love hearing how people overcame

things, how they stayed inspired, and their work ethic,

and I try to tap into something greater than my

individual self to maybe make something that someone

else will want to see. Most importantly I want it to be

truthful, the truth of life, so we can say to each other,

yeah I get it, I felt like that, or that was hilarious because

it struck a chord of truth and understanding or I have

experienced that. Also, I honestly want to feel connected,

that’s a really big motivator for me, maybe a bit idealistic

but a motivator nonetheless.

"HeArt" film scene with director and actress Noelle Joy Sorenson

"HeArT" is your debut work as a director. Do you have any

new projects in mind for the future, either behind or in

front of the camera?

Yes! I am excited about a streaming series I am writing. The

pilot’s written, in the 5th round of edits, episode 2 is a good

12 pages in. I just finished getting my own self-tape studio

together at home and Josh (Berresford) and I, we are

talking about some possible creative-business

collaborations-so yes there is much to look forward to,

creatively speaking, in front of and behind the camera.

That said, I am very aware that there is much out of my

control. The plan is to work hard and be tenacious. I

believe that the whole "never give up" thing is imperative

in anything you really want to do, along with being true to

yourself.

This was a wonderful interview for me. Thank you so

much, Brazil for these insightful questions. Gave me a lot

to think about.

"HeArt" film scene


ROME, OPEN CITY

A F I L M B Y R O B E R T O R O S S E L L I N I

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN


P R E S S R E L E A S E

09

D R E A M S O F T H E P A S T

SYNOPSIS

A film about peace, love, and war. Dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the end of the Civil War in Russia. The film takes

place at the end of the summer of 1917 when Russia and the whole world were at a crossroads between two eras. None of the

people could even imagine how much his life would change in the very near future. In a strange way, the film's atmosphere

echoes our current reality and what is happening in Russia today. The documentary chronicle of the Kolchak army of 1919

and the White army in the Far East of 1922 is embedded in the finale of the film.

CAST: DMITRI FROLOV, SERGEY OSKOLKOV, LUDMILA KONYAEVA,

OLGA KIRILLOVA, DMITRI IVASHENTSOV

DIRECTOR, WRITER, PRODUCER: DMITRI FROLOV

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY, EDITOR: DMITRI FROLOV

MUSIC BY: SERGEY OSKOLKOV

DMITRI FROLOV BIOGRAPHY:

Dmitri Frolov was born in Leningrad in 1966. He graduated from The

Institute of Film & Television in 1990. He worked at LENFILM Studios and

then for the STV film company as a cameraman, in which capacity he has

worked with many independent filmmakers.

He began to shoot his own films before the start of Perestroika, in the early

1980s, He is one of the leaders of the Russian movie vanguard in post

perestroika age. Films he shoots exclusively for the film company "Svema".

The Svema Production Association is a Soviet and Ukrainian enterprise for

the production of photographic materials.


R E V I E W 10

A JOURNEY OF LOVE,

GUILT, AND REDEMPTION

R E V I E W B Y R I C H A R D C A E I R O

REVIEW


B I M I F F

R E V I E W

BETWEEN GLANCES A FILM BY IVANN WILLIG

R E V I E W B Y R I C H A R D C A E I R O

11

Throughout the plot, we see Sandro trying to redeem

himself for what happened, doing everything he can to

help Maria and make her life easier. He becomes her

"vision", describing the things she cannot see and helping

her in her daily activities.

"Between Glances" film scene

A JOURNEY OF LOVE, GUILT, AND REDEMPTION

The film "Between Glances", directed by Ivann Willig,

portrays the turbulent and delicate relationship

between a couple in the 1960s. With a carefully

constructed narrative, the film can capture the human

essence in its fullness, exploring themes such as regret,

love, betrayal, and redemption.

The story of Sandro (Daniel Satti) and Maria (Marina

Azze) is told through a series of glances that cross, drift

apart, and meet again, showing the complexity of

human relationships and how small gestures can have

a profound impact on people's lives.

The film also presents a spiritualist nature, the

director's religion, which is present subtly and

respectfully throughout the plot. Spirituality is used as

an element of healing and redemption, showing that

even after committing serious mistakes, there is still

the possibility of seeking forgiveness and redeeming

oneself.

The acting of the protagonists is another high point of the

film, with moving and deep performances that transport

the viewer into the story and make them identify with the

characters. The chemistry between the actors is palpable

and conveys all the tension and passion present in Sandro

and Maria's relationship.

Ivann Willig's direction is equally impressive, with elegant

and sophisticated visual language that uses elements such

as the lighting and the soundtrack to create a compelling

and emotional atmosphere. Close-ups are masterfully

used to show the expression of the characters, creating an

effect of intimacy with the viewer.

"Between Glances" is a cinematographic work that moves,

enchants, and provokes reflections on human nature.

With a sensitive narrative and exceptional performances,

the film touches the spectator's heart and mind, leaving an

indelible mark on their memory. The film deserves to be

seen and seen again by everyone who appreciates art and

emotion.

Maria is blind, and Sandro is responsible for what

happened, a fact that is carefully and movingly

explored throughout the film.

Sandro and Maria's relationship is deeply affected by

her blindness, which is the result of an accident caused

by Sandro. He carries guilt and remorse for the

tragedy he caused; this fact ultimately affects the

couple's dynamic.

The director Ivann Willig


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 12

CHANGE FOR AN ENTITY THAT

BY ITSELF CAUSES VIOLENCE

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH BILAL HUSSAIN, DIRECTOR OF THE FILM

“WHERE DID THE LOVE GO”

BY LUCAS MARQUES AND VIC KINGS

CHANGE FOR AN ENTITY THAT BY ITSELF CAUSES VIOLENCE


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 13

C H A N G E F O R A N E N T I T Y T H A T

B Y I T S E L F C A U S E S V I O L E N C E

"Where Did The Love Go" film scene

CHANGE FOR AN ENTITY THAT CAUSES VIOLENCE BY ITSELF

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH BILAL HUSSAIN, DIRECTOR OF THE FILM “WHERE DID THE LOVE GO”

by Lucas Marques and Vic Kings

Bilal Hussain is an award-winning indie filmmaker, he has been making short films for eleven year's 2011 - 2022 (present) He

is a Pakistani-Canadian citizen who lives in Esbjerg, Denmark. Besides work and filmmaking, he has written two crimefiction

books, he has also been a film judge at the "Tokyo Lift-Off Sessions", "Box Short Film Festival", "Istanbul Kisa Golden

Film Festival" & now at the "Thessaloniki Free Short Film Festival". Bilal is now writing his debut Danish feature film, which

will begin shooting next year (2023) in Esbjerg, Denmark.

How did you start making films and what inspired you to

pursue this career? What made you choose the story of

"Where Did The Love Go" as your newest project?

I was studying media at “Glad Fagskole Esbjerg” where I

made two short films “Tycho Brahe” & “Raptores”. After I

finished studying in 2013 I got a job at a local television

station “Tv-Glad Esbjerg” as a reporter, cameraman, and

segment editor, while I worked, I made six other short films

in my spare time. “Jessica” “Drug Life” “Esbjerg: Crime

Family” “The Wheelchair And The Trap” “Jessica: Part Two”

& “Where Did The Love Go”. I have now resigned from the

television station after ten years 2013 - 2023 and in all this

time from 2011 - 2023 (present), I managed to make eight

short films in total. I wanted to be a policeman but due to

my “AAA syndrome”, I can never become one, so I turned my

mind to storytelling which I love to do.

I watched “Criminal Minds” (2005 - 2020) where they

had episodes with serial killers in a fictional universe

so, I wanted to tell a similar story but with my

creation. Also, I wanted to tell you that no one

becomes a psychopath in a day. This is also one of the

lines in the short film which has a reality to it.

"Where Did The Love Go" film scene


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 14

What was it like to work with limited resources and still be

able to tell a compelling story? What was the biggest challenge

you faced during the production?

It was a good experience because I have been making

short films with very few resources for a long time but, as

always, everything worked out because my parents

helped as always. So, there weren’t many challenges this

time. Also, all my actors helped so, it was just like a

family affair on set every time. I am very thankful to my

parents and all my actors.

You are a filmmaker with a great career, having won awards at

several film festivals worldwide. How was the reaction of the

public and critics when watching "Where Did The Love Go" at

film festivals or public screenings?

Yes, I am, thank you. Amazingly, my filmmaking career

has brought me lots of success. I am very thankful to my

parents who are always supporting me and threw out the

years, thanks to all my actors with whom I have had the

pleasure of working with people who also have

supported me a lot. The audience has given me good

feedback, and the film festivals have also found the short

film to their liking. At the moment I have only had one

review which was from here, “Brazil International

Monthly Independent Film Festival”, who really loved

the short film and gave a great review on it. Let’s see how

far “Where Did The Love Go” ends in the future.

The director Bilal Hussain

"Where Did The Love Go" film scene

Do you have plans to expand the story of "Where Did The Love

Go" into a full-length feature film, or are you focused on other

future projects at the moment?

The original idea of “Where Did The Love Go” was a fulllength

feature film but due to “Covid-19” it was shortened

to a short film. But yes, I want to write a feature film on this

storyline. I do have a draft of the feature film written but it

needs rewriting so one day I will write, direct and produce

it. Regarding other projects yes, I am focused on my first

debut Danish feature film which has another storyline

than this one.

As an independent filmmaker, how do you feel about the current

scenario of cinema, which has been experiencing a saturation of

stories that rely more on visual effects than on thoughtful and

creative narratives? How do you think Cinema will change in the

coming years with new technological tools, such as the use of

artificial intelligence to create stories?

This is a wonderful question, I totally agree. The cinema

changed a lot while I have been growing up. I was born in

1992 and growing up the films were amazing because they

had compelling stories and characters, also the direction

and productions were amazing. Nowadays, cinema is more

into making superhero films and other films with lots of

CGI which I am not so fond of. Because I want to see films

with a great storyline rather than an extreme level of CGI

and over-the-edge action. The audience might disagree

with me on this but I can come up with an example “Fast

And The Furious” franchise is getting to be a joke now.

Excuse my sentence by calling it a joke but because the

storyline was about racing and now the films look more

like “Marvel” and “DC Comics” films where the cars are

flying in the air and there is an extreme level of action

which is getting to be boring to watch now. So, I think the

cinema is being ruined by this and I really hope new

filmmakers get a chance in Hollywood to tell compelling

storylines.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 15

What is your opinion about the importance of cop movies in

popular culture and how they affect the public's perception of law

and justice?

Cop movies need to be told in our cinema because there are

good cops and bad cops in our world so, I think it’s important

to tell cop stories from both sides. I strongly believe in law and

order and justice, if I were a policeman I would always put the

bad guys away and help the people who can’t help themselves.

How do you think crime movies portray the reality of the police and

the criminal justice system? In your opinion, is there a

responsibility by filmmakers to accurately portray these issues and

realities?

There are many great cop movies and dramas out there, some

have really good reality-based storylines but some are very

fictional. I think if filmmakers are producing cop movies and

dramas then they need to make them as real as they can get.

Do you believe that the police films are just entertainment or do they

have a deeper purpose, such as alerting the public about social

problems, as well as encouraging change in societies where

corruption and violence are central political issues?

Police films are entertaining at times but they should always

have a deeper purpose because yes, alerting the public is

important on social issues and making a change in our

societies. A good example these days is the drama series

S.W.A.T. It has great police stories and social issues which really

get you thinking about the problems some people face in the

day to day life.

"Where Did The Love Go" film scene

"Where Did The Love Go" film scene

How do you choose the stories you tell in your action films?

In these narratives, how do you deal with more delicate,

complex, and deep themes on a sociological level, such as

police violence and structural racism against BPOCs and

immigrants?

I watch lots of films, it can be from action to romantic

dramas and I always have a mix of one short

film/feature film. I am a deep thinker so, I think a lot

before writing any project. Well, I have never written a

storyline on racism but there are great films and

documentaries out there on this issue. One day I would

love to write a feature film on this issue.

For a large period, such as the 1980s, 1990s, and early 2000s,

cop movies were big blockbusters, projecting actors and

filmmakers into long and successful careers. But in recent

years, the number of films with this theme has been

declining in the world's cinemas, especially after several

scandals and cases of lawlessness and criminality within the

public security departments. In your opinion, is there a

future for police films, in terms of their relevance in popular

culture, as well as their ability to influence public opinion,

encouraging changes aimed at reducing corruption and

abuse of power?

Yes, I totally agree, there were superb cop films at those

times but yes, it's being declined in recent years.

Although there have been good cop films a few times

but not like the old days. In the future, I think there will

be coming cop films because we have all seen police

brutality mostly in the US so, I think if filmmakers are

confident and brave enough to tell these kinds of cop

films then it would be great because then it can

encourage the change in police abuse, power and

corruption in the police force and the public would like

the police more.


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UMBERTO D.

A F I L M B Y V I T T O R I O D E S I C A

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN


P R E S S R E L E A S E

L A T I R A M A R G O

18

SYNOPSIS

Maria and her son Jan are about to start a new life with Tomas and his daughter Sonia but a

dire circumstances will change their lives forever.

CAST: YOLANDA BELVIS, XAVI GARRIDO, DAVID CRIVILLÉ, ANIEZ ATLAS

DIRECTOR, WRITER, AND PRODUCER: YOLANDA BELVIS

PRODUCED BY: YOBEL FILMS

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: IÑAKI GORRAIZ

PRODUCTION DESIGN, HAIR, AND MAKE-UP: YOLANDA BELVIS

SOUND: ALEJADRO FÁBREGAS

EDITING: ANIEZ ATLAS

MUSIC BY: VICTOR MUÑOZ (M:RE)

YOLANDA BELVIS BIOGRAPHY:

Yolanda Belvis has been working as an actress for about a

decade. She won several awards for her performances in

'The Wayward Sisters' and 'Latir Amargo'. She wrote,

produced, and directed the short film 'Latir Amargo' which

has won several awards at film festivals around the world.


R E V I E W 19

FILLING

EMPTINESS...

R E V I E W B Y M A R C E L O C É S A R

REVIEW


B I M I F F

R E V I E W

IN A FILM BY KIM SUN WOO

R E V I E W B Y M A R C E L O C É S A R

20

"In" film scene

FILLING EMPTINESS...

Kleptomania: "An impulse control disorder that results in

an irresistible urge to steal".

Kim Sun-Woo is a young Korean film graduate who

delicately, sensitively, and intelligently manages to treat

the subject of a Miso, a kleptomaniac brilliantly played

by the actress Shin Ha-Yeon.

The spaces where Miso wanders are empty. In her office,

there is no more furniture, just a chair, and walls. In her

house, there is just a bed, a "clothes rack" where she

hangs her belongings, and a bookcase where she deposits

the small stolen things as if it was an altar.

In an absolute plongée shot, we see our character lying in

fetal form, which leads us to the feeling of searching for

her mother. The scene of her emptying her purse

happens just before this scene, leading us to the analysis

that her compulsion may be linked to her childhood and

mother.

In one scene, the door of this empty office reminds Miso

of a passage from her childhood, in which her mother

leaves the house, through a door, with a full bag, and with

the promise of returning bringing something for her.

Every detail of this short film has enormous significance

for us to understand this deviation in the character's

personality.

Miso arrives in front of a restaurant and sees happy people,

chatting joyfully, her reference to that is the bags on their

chairs. Miso's whole search for understanding a happy life

is connected to a bag full of things.

The short ends in a super symbolic way, it's a scene in which

she meets her boyfriend who doesn't seem to be very

attached to her. The two of them are in a coffee shop. She

brings him a present, then he leaves to answer his phone.

She desperately starts taking things out of his backpack and

starts to fill her purse. Suddenly, his backpack gets empty,

leading Miso to put herself inside it: "in".

This scene is profoundly significant because no matter how

much she steals the little things to fill her bag, nothing will

be enough to fill her emptiness. It is everyone's search for a

relationship that fills them, and that one would like to be

fulfilling as well. She gets into his bag. It is a search to be

accepted, absorbed, loved, and wanted... A feeling that

comes from childhood when the mother left the house with

a packed bag, leaving Miso alone and "empty".

Everything is related to belonging to the other, to how we

see ourselves and "fit" into this world. The difficulty in

filling this emptiness, shown here by the action of a

kleptomaniac, is also visible in compulsive eaters who seek

in the excess of food this need to occupy an empty place in

the soul, but the person cannot see this and the stomach, as

well as the bag, serve as a space to be filled.


B I M I F F

R E V I E W

IN A FILM BY KIM SUN WOO

21

Reading Freud and Lacan we verify the economic question of affection. Miso faces the frustration of idealizing

her mother and boyfriend, new forms are sought in the function of the emptiness left in these relationships

that will be compensated by small objects without value, which enables the construction of new ways out for

the drives, all linked to the passage from childhood to adulthood. According to Freud, it is the search for

pleasure, relief, and discharge of internal tension.

Let's keep trying to understand the so complex human psyche and be so grateful to this young filmmaker for

this work, which brilliantly uses the art of cinema to raise such complex issues for our souls.

About the director:

Kim Sun-Woo went to art high school, where he studied writing, art, and directing. His other films are Bump

(2012), selected at Sungkonghoe University Film Festival; "Be Unable To Do Talk" (2013); "Sweet Nightmare"

(2013), selected at the 17th Bucheon International Fantastic Film Festival (Youth Academy Awards); "Between"

(2018); his graduation work is the short film "Favor" (2022).

The director Kim Sun Woo


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B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 23

THE MANY CONTRADICTIONS

IN EVERYDAY LIFE

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH ANDRÉS HERNÁNDEZ

COVARRUBIAS, DIRECTOR OF THE FILM “GRATIFICATION”.

BY LUCAS MARQUES AND VIC KINGS

THE MANY CONTRADICTIONS IN EVERYDAY LIFE


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 24

T H E M A N Y C O N T R A D I C T I O N S

I N E V E R Y D A Y L I F E

"Gratification" film scene

THE MANY CONTRADICTIONS IN EVERYDAY LIFE

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH ANDRÉS HERNÁNDEZ COVARRUBIAS, DIRECTOR OF THE FILM “GRATIFICATION”

by Lucas Marques and Vic KIngs

Andrés Hernández Covarrubias is a Mexican director, screenwriter, and editor, born in Xalapa, Veracruz. He

has collaborated in curating and programming at the independent movie theater “Cinema Nahual”, and is

currently at “Kiltro Cinema”. His productions have been screened and recognized in several countries. His

short film "Gratification" (2020) has been selected and awarded in more than 50 international film festivals.

What inspired you to write and produce

"Gratification"? How was the creative process

behind the short film?

The story was inspired by aspects close to my daily

life (past and present), combined with imaginary

elements to generate fiction without

sensationalism. Everyday life always inspires me.

My personal ideas always clash with my

cinematographic influences. So, I always seek to

alter the reality that I perceive and make it

accessible or interesting to others. I think this is

the most difficult task for a director, to give value

to something that can go unnoticed and give it a

new meaning, something more powerful.

"Gratification" film scene


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 25

The cast is one of the strongest points of your film. How

was the casting process, and what was it like working

with the actors to bring the characters to life in

"Gratification"?

The casting process was long as it was essential to find

actors who could have these characteristics and who had

a real bond. Jorge Lan and the young Juan Pablo

Monterrubio fulfilled everything I needed, and their

interpretations gave meaning to everything.

My intention for both characters is that they are complex

and contradictory to their external image. The adult is

confused and unstable, and the child is more focused. I

have always been interested in reality seen from the

perspective of a child. I think they perceive things in a

raw and honest way. Matías is a fundamental piece in the

story because, like Alfonso, he is a character who has

many internal conflicts that are not visible to the naked

eye. I wanted him to be a kind of mirror character of the

father and somehow make a metaphor about how the

world of adults complicates things and that sometimes

the perspective of a child has no filters and in some way is

clearest.

The central message of the film talks about the search for

affection in relationships between parents and children, a

problem that has been plaguing society for centuries

through patriarchy, sexist culture, toxic masculinity, and

parental abandonment. How do you see the possibility

that cinematic narratives have to bring to the public

reflections on such relevant themes, but that

simultaneously are often ignored or seen as " less

important"?

I am very interested in the contradiction in everyday life. It

is something that I find very curious, but it is also

something that fills me with fear and concern. I have

always been struck by the great meanings that are hidden

behind small or trivial things. I also like to put my

characters in surreal or absurd situations. I'm not so

interested in the grandiose elements, I'm interested in the

imperceptible and internal things of the human psyche, I

think they have a greater meaning than the untimely

actions that often appear on the screen. In my stories, I

always try to make a subtle criticism of the decisions we

make daily in the face of excessive consumerism, and

hidden and normalized violence that appears everywhere.

"Gratification" has a subtle and direct narrative

approach. How did you balance this approach to convey

the tension and internal conflict of the protagonist?

I'm interested in creating films for an active audience

and giving them a chance to praise the little things that

happen in life. As a filmmaker, I must take advantage of

the hidden things of everyday life to seek out anxiety

and empathy at the same time. Also, I like not being so

deterministic in my endings. I am interested in

becoming a clear guide for the audience. Show them the

beginning, the middle, and the end... but the experience

that each one interpreted corresponds only to them.

"Gratification" film scene

What were the biggest challenges you faced during the

production of "Gratification"? How did you overcome

them?

The shooting was calm and very controlled. Since I

worked on the story for a long time, despite its

simplicity. It took me 4 years to land it and to have full

confidence in filming it.

I am originally from Xalapa, a city full of enthusiastic

artists. Gratification was a production that was made

with a reduced budget but had the support of several

local sponsors and crew from other cities (mainly

Mexico City) who were interested in the premise of the

story.

The locations that I had thought of since I wrote the

first treatments of the script were places that I already

had very clear and that I knew, but anyway, each of the

spaces needed a very particular look. Working together

with my production designer, my cinematographer,

and my sound engineer, we analyzed every detail that

involved the script.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 26

Raymond Carver was an American writer and

poet who revitalized the North American literary

scene in the 1980s with works like "What We Talk

When We Talk About Love" and "Cathedral". How

did this writer's unique style serve as an

inspiration for the narrative of your short film?

How did you incorporate this style into your

direction?

Raymond Carver has inspired me with his concise,

minimalist writing style, without stylistic

decorations. His stories are of frustrated, lonely

characters, where lack of communication and

isolation are a constant.

As in my story, Carver's style is characterized by the

day-to-day life of a middle-class family dealing with

mundane and trivial problems. And as the story

progresses, true poetry appears, and I turn

normality into something unique.

Carver writes without melodramatic embellishment

or sensationalism. With pure and direct language,

he manages to present absurdly iconic situations.

This translation into a cinematographic image is my

greatest aspiration. It is something beautiful and

complex.

How do you see the role of simplicity and universal

themes in constructing compelling and profound stories,

as in "Gratification"?

For me, what is really interesting and important is always

behind the big events. The small actions, the details, are

what really gives meaning to everything, and become

something universal, that any audience can identify with,

no matter their geographical location. I believe that the

universal language is found in things that go beyond

specific things that identify a country. I like to unify my

stories with actions that describe the human psyche

without having to speak. For me, the dialogues (or the

music) serve only as the tip of the iceberg, for me, the most

important thing is the subtext that is underneath.

"Gratification" explores themes of fatherhood, the search

for the meaning of life, and also the encounter with

authenticity. How did you expect these themes to resonate

with the audience? Tell us how the film's reception has

been, both from critics and the audience.

As I said before, I always try to unify my stories with

actions and details that anyone can identify. I want to go

back to the way movies were made, like Italian naturalism

or the Mexican cinema of the 70s.

I think this way of thinking has benefited the short film.

Many people have received the work very well. They have

emphasized a well-told story that manages to convey how

seemingly mundane actions (like being late) can carry so

much weight and meaning. They found the directing work

very interesting, and the emotional moments become very

relevant depending on the situation the character is going

through. In addition, the achievement of counting a lot

without words.

The director Andrés Hernández Covarrubias

I've also read that my story is reminiscent of movies like

Viscontti's Bicycle Thief and a James Joyce short story

called "Araby." This was very surprising to me, as to be

honest, I hadn't thought about them, but they are works

that I know very well, and going through them again made

me find that they are very accurate comparisons. This

leaves me very satisfied, for the public manages to draw

correct conclusions from my work, that for me is very

gratifying and helps me to advance as a filmmaker.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 27

"Gratification" film scene

The short film is very focused on Alfonso's

character. How did you work with actor Jorge Lan

to ensure that the protagonist's emotional

journey was both compelling and full of layers?

I like to think that Alfonso is a very Kafkaesque

character. On the surface, he may be very simple,

but if you look deeper, you can find a much more

complex depth. For me, Alfonso represents

complexity dressed in simplicity. I think he is a very

unwelcome character, blinded by his aspirations,

clueless, and incapable of realizing that a small

action is more impressive than an extraordinary

action full of flourishes.

It was a pleasure working on this character with

Jorge Lan. The talks regarding the script were very

good and allowed us to find several edges and paths

to work on. It was a very inside job for him and also

for me. Since each one represented his experiences

to the character. Jorge is a person who has great

humility, he is very honest, and this translates into

his performance.

What are your plans as a director with upcoming films?

Do you have any projects currently in progress?

I am preparing for my next two projects. A short film

entitled "Old Well", is a family story in the Veracruz

countryside that little by little becomes a criminal story.

This script has been on tour in some festivals and

competitions. Production is expected to start in October

2023.

Also, I am developing the script for my first feature film. A

story that I would describe as a tightrope between realism

and surrealism.

I hope to be able to shoot these new ones soon, and while I

wait for the moment I'll keep looking at the day-to-day to

discover the hidden stories, and who knows, I'll come up

with something new.

"Gratification" film scene

"Gratification" behind the scenes


FOUR STEPS IN

THE CLOUDS

A F I L M B Y A L E S S A N D R O B L A S E T T I

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN


P R E S S R E L E A S E

29

T H E P O R N R A D I O S H O W

SYNOPSIS

Lorena (Lauren LoGiudice) is the creator of “THE PORN RADIO SHOW”, a legendary mumblecore New York radio

show. This pilot mockumentary is an homage to her desire to break taboos about sex with great characters. Turn ON

the Radio and get ready for the series! THE PORN RADIO SHOW is Vincenzo de Sio's first mockumentary, it has won

several awards in film festivals around the world. The TV series produced by Filmesque Production is coming soon!

CAST: LAUREN LOGIUDICE, MIMI PEREZ, RONNEY ASCHER, KRISTA

MADAME KOMMANDOR, ADI ISRAEL, EMELY DE PAIVA

DIRECTOR, WRITER, PRODUCER, EDITOR: VINCENZO DE SIO

PRODUCED BY: FILMESQUE PRODUCTION

DISTRIBUTED BY: CLERKS DISTRIBUTION

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: THE MAESTRO

ART AND ANIMATION BY: SU ATES

ORIGINAL MUSIC TRUST BY: MOBY

VINCENZO DE SIO'S BIOGRAPHY:

Vincenzo De Sio was born in Italy in 1981. He graduated in

cinematographic disciplines in the "Scuola di Cinema di Roma" 2006

class. He directs various short films, documentaries, and video clips

and he is based in New York City. He also manages Cinema classes

focused on the young generations. In 2017 he starts working as a

producer and director of animated short films and Won 130 Awards

all over the world. He also is an art photographer, "The Gateway - New

York Autumn Tactics" collection won numerous awards.


R E V I E W 30

SELF-DEFENSE, BUT

DEFENSE FOR WHOM?

R E V I E W B Y L U C A S M A R Q U E S

REVIEW


B I M I F F

R E V I E W

SAFETY FIRST A FILM BY VIC KINGS

R E V I E W B Y L U C A S M A R Q U E S

31

"Safety First" film scene

SELF-DEFENSE, BUT DEFENSE FOR WHOM?

"Safety First" is an impactful and well-constructed

film; it tells the story of a middle-class couple who

makes a tragic mistake by confusing their daughter

with an invading bandit. The film director Vic Kings

handles the plot with skill and sensitivity, creating a

work that besides a strong emotional appeal, has also

an important didactic and social purpose.

The film's main theme is the need to rethink our

approach to firearms. As statistics show, every three

days a child is the victim of a domestic firearm

accident. This alarming fact highlights the urgent need

for a disarmament policy in the country. "Legitimate

Defense" is a true disarmament manifesto, which puts

the issue of weapons and their dangers on the agenda.

Besides this, the film also makes a strong critique of

the reactionary and alienated vision adopted by a part

of the Brazilian middle class.

The protagonist couple represents this vision, concerned

only with their properties and personal safety, without

caring about the causes of the violence that surrounds

them. This attitude is quite common in Brazilian society,

which often blames the victims of violence and ignores

the roots of the problem.

The black-and-white photography is a wise choice by the

director, who uses this aesthetic to create a dark and

melancholic atmosphere that reinforces the drama of the

story. The actors who play the couple, Marina Azze and Zé

Pedro Baroni, deliver convincing and moving

performances, making the tragedy even more palpable

and real.

To conclude, "Safety First" is a film that must be seen and

discussed. Besides its artistic power, it carries an

important social and educational message about the

need to rethink our attitudes toward guns and the

violence that plagues the nation. Vic Kings' work is an

honest and impactful portrait of Brazilian reality, which

invites us to reflect on our choices and actions.

"Safety First" film scene

The director Vic Kings


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B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 33

THE PROBLEMS CAUSED BY

SELFISHNESS AMONG FRIENDS

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH MARCO FELIPE ROSSI, DIRECTOR OF THE

FILM “GO FOOL YOURSELF”.

BY RICHARD CAEIRO AND VIC KINGS

THE PROBLEMS CAUSED BY SELFISHNESS AMONG FRIENDS


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 34

T H E P R O B L E M S C A U S E D B Y

S E L F I S H N E S S A M O N G F R I E N D S

"Go Fool Yourself" film scene

THE PROBLEMS CAUSED BY SELFISHNESS AMONG FRIENDS

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH MARCO FELIPE ROSSI, DIRECTOR OF THE FILM “GO FOOL YOURSELF”.

by Richad Caeiro and Vic Kings

Marco Felipe Rossi is a Brazilian filmmaker and artist who tells stories about how our interpretation of reality can

be misleading and end up putting us in way more emotionally threatening situations than we could ever think was

possible. His "emotional impact first" directing style, makes his unique characters pop up on the screen and pull

the audience into feeling trapped in the truly intense situations he creates.

How did the idea for developing the "Go Fool

Yourself" screenplay come about?

The ideas for my films so far have come from a

desire to talk about how we create problems in

our relationships with others by being too closed

in on our biases of the reality in which we are

living. In this particular film, the idea was to talk

about how many times we purchase dreams of

success for ourselves that are not even ours, and

in this internal contradiction, we end up hurting

the people we love the most in the process.

"Go Fool Yourself" film scene


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 35

What did you and your team encounter as the most

challenging part of the production process?

This project had a great creative challenge and a major

production challenge. The producing one was to shoot 7

scenes in 4 locations in 2 days. It was complex logistics and

very tightly timed, but with some abdications and choices

under pressure that we had to make on set to get

everything filmed, we achieved our final goal. In addition,

there was the creative challenge of making a film that talks

about anxiety and the idea was that it would generate this

in the public as well. For this, we had a good period of

study of camera language and the movements we wanted

to do with it, but this challenge was also present in the

editing because the sense of rhythm and volume of cuts we

chose to place in the film are essential in the attempt to

generate anxiety in those who try to predict where the

story is going before it reveals itself.

How was the casting process for the short film "Go Fool

Yourself"? And how was the main characters' development

between you, as director and screenwriter, and the actors?

The cast selection for this film was done by talking to some

actors I had met in my first short film and some others I

had met in publicity, who kept showing me the people we

chose to work with in the end. The choice was based on a

look at their previous work and understanding the

dramatic potential we saw in them, along with a sense of

identification with what we imagined each character

would look like.

How do you expect the audience to react to the film? Is

there any aspect of the plot that you think might surprise

the spectator?

All the work in the script, camera direction, acting tone,

editing rhythm, and soundtrack are designed to involve

the audience in a trap of anxiety. The idea is that, as the

screenplay gives a high volume of hints of where the story

might be going all the time, the drama with which the

characters handle their situations increases, and the

camera gets lost (in a good way) in trying to follow their

premeditated attitudes, while the cuts get faster and faster

and the soundtrack fills the whole movie speeding up our

pace of thinking and giving an increasingly tense tone to

the movie with each scene. All of this, in the end, shows us

that if you hadn't been so involved with the perspective of

the protagonists of the story, maybe you wouldn't have

been wrong along with them. So the idea is that the

audience gets anxious and is surprised by the big break of

expectations at the end.

The director Marco Felipe Rossi

Do you think "Go Fool Yourself" can bring any reflection or life

lesson to the audience? What is your main message behind the

film?

I like to leave it open for each person to take what they

interpret from the film and think it makes sense in their reality.

Still, I believe that this film is a warning about how closing

ourselves only to our vision of the world can be a double-edged

sword.

In the short film, the ego of the characters influences the group

dynamic and their ability to work together. In your opinion,

what are the main reasons why people let their egos hinder

their ability to work as a team?

I believe that our way of dealing with ourselves is almost

always messed up and confused. It is very easy to think that we

know too much about ourselves and not realize the mental

traps that we create for ourselves. I believe that the impact of

the egos of these characters on themselves is that they are so

self-enclosed that they only see other people as villains or tools

and the events of life as obstacles in their way. I like to call this

the Don Quixote effect, someone who creates giant monsters to

face in a completely normal life.

"Go Fool Yourself" film scene


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 36

How do you think the lack of communication and

the inability to handle conflict contribute to the

problems caused by the characters' egos? What is

the main impact that the characters' egos had on

the development of the story?

I believe that the characters' inability to handle

their conflicts arises from the fact that they are in

such a hurry to achieve their goals that they don't

even allow themselves the time to look at each

other, digest the situation, gather other

perspectives, come to a conclusion and then act. I

believe that they are in such a hurry for success that

they end up making everything that happens

around them into villains or obstacles between

them and this supposed success. Because of this, the

plot's events end up taking such a fatalistic

dimension as they do in the end.

"Go Fool Yourself" film scene

Ego is a common trait in many businesspeople and

entrepreneurs. Do you believe that the film can be an

agent of change to raise the public's awareness about

the importance of working as a team and dealing

individually with their egos?

"Go Fool Yourself" official poster

Absolutely. I was an entrepreneur/ businessman

myself and saw myself directly in this role. Of course,

several things were dramatically intensified for the

film, but certainly this genius complex and this rush

to success that a lot of entrepreneurs and

businesspeople have created a lot of problems for the

people around them. And I believe that although I

don't feel part of the oppressive behavior most of the

time, being a straight white male who grew up among

the elite, my artistic quest today is precisely to raise

awareness of the oppressive figures in our society.

They were the ones I lived with the most, even though

I didn't like it, and now I want to use these

experiences to help open new spaces in which people

from historically oppressed groups can place

themselves, occupying their rightful place in society.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 37

"Go Fool Yourself" film scene

In the film, we can see that there is a critique of the current entrepreneurial culture, especially regarding

issues of responsibility in social dynamics at macro and micro levels. In what way do you believe these

reflections can be put into practice in everyday life, especially in interpersonal relationships?

Even though we have a culture in our country that idealizes and romanticizes entrepreneurship and tries to

sell this dream to many people, leaving several social and individual consequences in people's lives that this

film discusses, when talking about Brazil, I believe that the pit is deeper. For me, it makes more sense

nowadays to wonder why there are so many people willing to purchase this dream of entrepreneurship and

why so many people are willing to face such a hard and lonely journey as if it were their only option. And of

course, in my opinion, we have a generation - the millennials, of which I am a part and include myself in this

criticism - that is already established in the labor market today and we seem to have come into adulthood

obsessed with being recognized as special and unique as our parents always told us to be by the rest of the

world without much effort to cover up our deep insecurities about being just normal people. And it seems to

me that entrepreneurship is seen as a shortcut to these immature goals. And I believe it's up to me to talk so

far about how this issue impacts the individual and affects their relationships. But to solve these issues, I

believe that therapists will help people much more than any attempt at pointing them out that I can give.

But speaking about the Brazilian reality, I believe that there is a social aspect that motivates most people

much more to buy into this entrepreneurial dream: the moment we have been living in the last few years

concerning employability and working conditions in Brazil. We had a series of big entrepreneurs' wishes

carried out by the previous government, which worsens the access of most people to labor rights and

benefits and, in a moment of economic recession like the one we are still going through, the tendency of

dismissal by big companies only increases (this is a theme I talk about in my first film), and now depending

on how the labor relationship is established, it has become even cheaper and easier for companies to

dismiss their employees. Unfortunately, this way, trying to be self-employed or building one's own business

starts to look like a good option. But to do so, people need money, take out loans, assume the risk, and start

to get into more and more debt with the same big businesspeople who wanted more flexibility in the labor

laws. And since we are talking about the economy, this slowly deteriorates our internal market,

concentrating more and more money in the hands of the same people. Meanwhile, the majority of the

population is fooled into the entrepreneurial dream, reproducing many of the toxic behaviors that my film

talks about.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 38

In your opinion, what was the decisive moment in the

plot when the characters lost confidence in each other?

Do you believe that the situation presented in the film

could have been avoided if the characters had resolved

their problems before trying to work together?

I believe that the fraying of the characters' relationship is

something that predates the moment in their lives that

the film shows. I always like to give the impression that

my stories are a slice of a much larger life than just what

we are seeing. I believe that if they had solved their

problems with proper therapy before, we wouldn't even

have a story in this film. For me, with the therapy up to

date, no one would be there. Gui would have chosen a

course that would bring him closer to working with

politics and wouldn't even be studying pedagogy, Gabi

and Caio would see their incompatibility and wouldn't

even be dating, Caio wouldn't have all that ego about

needing to be an entrepreneur and would already be

working in the area more with management, and Gabi

would be a teacher's assistant in a school as a trainee, to

become an elementary school teacher in the future.

Cinema is a collective art and it relies on many other

artistic expressions, such as, for example, music and

theater, in its development process. Can you tell us more

about your influences, inside and outside the 7th Art, in

your career as a filmmaker?

The film "Go Fool Yourself" has been selected and awarded in

film festivals worldwide. How has the short film been received

by the public and critics? Do you already have plans for the

next film project soon?

The film's reception in festivals has been better outside of

Brazil than here. The United States also received my first film

well, but this time France and Italy were even more open. As

for the public, the film is still not open to everyone and I can't

travel around the world going to festivals, so I only had access

to more intense reactions and impressions at the premiere

session that we did and with people I know who want to see it,

then I send it to them. Everyone's reaction has been very nice

and the main comment was how the pace of the film and the

volume of stimuli makes it very dense, making the experience

much more intense than what people are used to with

material that is "only" 15 minutes long.

And I already have a next project, indeed. I just finished

shooting my third short film and now we are editing it. We will

be posting more about it on my Instagram @hanglooseit soon.

In this next project, my quest has moved away from the

suspense and dynamics that are as alarming and tense as in

the first two films. Now I am exploring my place in drama, with

a search for delicacy and sensitivity, dealing with deeper and

more personal themes. Let's see what's coming out!

In cinema, I like stories that explore human issues in a

very auteur voice and that convey a particular feeling

that I wouldn't watch anything like that if that particular

author hadn't been born. Also, films whose authors dare

to address sensitive topics, and put their points of view

out there. With that, I like movies like Spike Jonze's "Her",

all of Yorgos Lanthimos' movies, but especially "The

Lobster", and I also deeply love science fiction and

futuristic movies that don't fail to address sensitive

emotions, like "Arrival" and "Ex Machina".

Now outside of cinema, I also paint abstract art, and I like

the works and cultural influence of Basquiat and Dalí.

And in the Brazilian art scene, who influences me most

for sure is Criolo in first place far ahead of all others,

precisely because he manages to talk about Brazil and

our time with bizarrely genius rhythms and metaphors,

but I also like a lot of things by Baco Exu do Blues, I think

he is the main Brazilian artistic exponential of my

generation so far.

The director Marco Felipe Rossi


THE CHILDREN ARE

WATCHING US

A F I L M B Y V I T T O R I O D E S I C A

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN


B I M I F F S P E C I A L A R T I C L E 40

AN UNINTENDED

CONNECTION

BY PAMELA NASSOUR

AN UNINTENDED CONNECTION


B I M I F F S P E C I A L A R T I C L E

41

A N U N I N T E N D E D

C O N N E C T I O N

AN UNINTENDED CONNECTION

A special article about the powerful connections, intentionally or not, Cinema can provide,

by Pamela Nassour (Lebanon)

The writer, Pamela Nassour, is an award-winning Lebanese filmmaker, film researcher, and educator. Pamela graduated from the

Holy Spirit University of Kaslik USEK with a master's degree in Visual Arts - Cinema and Television. She is currently pursuing

her Ph.D. in Contemporary Latin American Cinema at Saint Joseph University Beirut.

This is a very personal article; or if I may call it: a

reflection of thoughts.

It was a sunny morning; I was gathering my stuff, when I

got approached by a young woman who is a student of

mine, right after I finished delivering my lecture. She

looked at me with wide eyes and said: "I watched what you

uploaded earlier… what you said in the video is actually

what I am feeling right now".

The video she mentioned is an Instagram reel, where I

adapted an experimental style to a film and narrated it. In

this video, I expressed and shared personal struggles that

I experienced. I was putting it out there, as this is how I get

the stress out of my system. Yet, never in the world had I

imagined that I would face such a situation: A person who

identified so much with my work to the point that they

come forward and express it to me.

It did not end there. Suddenly, the young lady started to

have tears in her eyes and took the time to explain to me

in detail why she identified with my video. That morning,

I remember very well that I was rushing to have my coffee

and it wasn’t in my plans to hold a conversation, but when

she got that personal chat with no warning, I froze. Was

that really happening? I do not know her well enough, yet

she decided to open up for me and get as transparent as

one could be, more vulnerable than I could ever imagine.

At that moment, I forgot about the need for caffeine, and

adapting to the “savior mode” was forced on me. A huge

responsibility fell on my shoulder and I couldn’t leave her

devastated like that.

I did my part and tried to offer help and comfort, which

hopefully I did. Yet, let’s go back to the reason why we got

here in the first place.

The video was out, due to my need to reach out. I could

not clutch to anyone, so I did to my camera. I could not

figure out what was happening with my head, so I hoped

this made sense to my lens. I was in a constant search for

answers, in a deep need for comfort, but I did not get any.

Perhaps the camera gave me the needed anesthesia and a

sense of relief, but the pain emerges each time things get

darker. Despite the pain, I touched someone else with my

expression, and maybe many others, I do not know. That

young woman connected to me, seeing in my answers,

while I did not get the privilege of getting any for myself.

After this incident, I started asking myself: “Is it the same

for all filmmakers? Do they get to be ‘saviors’ while they

are the ones hurt that much?”

"Diaries from a distant Andalous" scene, by Pamela Nassour


B I M I F F S P E C I A L A R T I C L E

42

A N U N I N T E N D E D

C O N N E C T I O N

In many masterpieces we have done, inspired by sadness

and pain, we let more depression come. I wonder how

many out there, mainstream and indies, were sitting

behind that monitor, behind that lens trying to find

themselves in a better place, or create themselves a better

place, and be able to remove this heavy burden from their

chest.

As I am writing these words, I remember the time when I

was in Paris, sitting in a theater watching Gaspar Noe’s

film Love, in 3D. Yes, the film is bold. But for me, what was

bold was this exact line from the movie: “How can

something so wonderful bring such great pain?”.

I remember very well that I got in tears when this sentence

hit. I felt numb for a minute. And it took time to gather me

and go back to follow up with the story. For me, in that

theater in Paris, I felt like I got an answer to a deep

question I had as if Murphy's question gave me an answer;

as if Gaspar Noé directed this scene just for me as if he

wrote that line in a mission, a mission to offer a hand of

comfort.

Gaspar Noé's "Love" film scene

Now, I realize this feeling I felt the moment I saw that

scene, somehow is the same feeling that this young

woman who approached me after my lecture felt as she

was watching my video. Yet, what if Gaspar Noé - just like

other directors – did not have an answer at all? What if he

was searching for that connection or for that comfort

himself? Would he know he connected to me or to other

spectators of his art? Did he want to connect in the first

place?

Me, I did not want to. The camera is the tool that makes

sense to me and only to me when everything else goes

wrong, or insane. I am selfish with my camera. I feel like I

want to keep it for myself and not sometimes discuss my

art. Sometimes my art is my savior and no one else’s.

To that young woman who approached me after my

lecture: You gave me an answer. The connection you felt

was unintended. Sometimes, my camera won’t save me. I

realize now that sometimes, my art and I will be the wood

for someone else to clutch to so they don’t drown.

Sometimes I have to sink into that darkness, produce art

all along the way, and accept not to find answers but to

give answers. Cinema is a healer, yet it chooses who and

when to heal.

"Diaries from a distant Andalous" scene, by Pamela Nassour

That was a very personal article, a true reflection of my

thoughts.


R E V I E W 43

INSPIRING REFLECTIONS ON

GENDER EQUALITY AND WOMEN'S RIGHTS

R E V I E W B Y L U C A S M A R Q U E S

REVIEW


B I M I F F

R E V I E W

44

MY SON A FILM BY SAHAR MIRZAEIANFAR AND KAMRAN MOHAMMADI

R E V I E W B Y L U C A S M A R Q U E S

"My Son" film scene

A COURAGEOUS WORK THAT EXPOSES SEXISM AND

MISOGYNY IN IRANIAN SOCIETY, INSPIRING

REFLECTIONS ON GENDER EQUALITY AND WOMEN'S

RIGHTS

The film "MY SON", directed by the talented Iranian

filmmakers Sahar Mirzaeianfar and Kamran Mohammadi,

is a cinematic work that deserves to be applauded for its

courage and sensitivity in addressing such complex and

sensitive topics as sexism, misogyny, and violence against

women in Iran.

The film transports us to Iranian society, where a woman

is brutally murdered by her husband, motivated by the

belief that she was having an extramarital affair. From

there, the film brings us a series of shocking and

conflicting situations that portray the culture of

oppression and submissiveness that still permeates many

societies around the world.

One of the movie's great virtues is its ability not to judge

the characters in a Manichaeistic or simplistic way. The

murderous husband is presented as an ordinary person,

who carries with him the prejudices and limiting ideas

that are common in his society. The son, in turn, is an

ambiguous and complex character whose emotional

journey is as fascinating as it is distressing.

Islamic law, which is the basis of Iranian statutes, establishes

that women have half the legal value of men in various

matters, such as testifying in court, inheritance, and child

custody. In addition, women are required to cover

themselves with the hijab (Islamic veil) in public, under the

penalty of being arrested or charged with fines.

Another serious problem is domestic violence, which is often

considered a private matter and is not treated with the

seriousness and urgency it deserves. Women who report

violence are often discouraged or even punished, and there

are few resources available to victims.

Misogyny is also present in Iran's culture and popular beliefs.

Women are often considered inferior to men and are seen as

their property. This creates a culture in which violence

against women is normalized and tolerated.

Fortunately, many women in Iran and around the world are

fighting for change and a more fair and equal society.

Overall, "MY SON" is a brave, intelligent, and moving film that

addresses key issues responsibly and sensitively. It is a work

that deserves to be seen and discussed, not only in Iran but

also around the world, as an invitation to reflect on the

condition of women and the struggle for equal rights.

Unfortunately, sexism is a very present problem in Iranian

society, as in many other countries around the world.

Women face many forms of discrimination and

oppression in Iran, from laws that grant them fewer rights

than men to domestic violence and sexual abuse.

One of the main sources of oppression against women in

Iran is the country's legislation.

The directors Kamran Mohammadi and Sahar Mirzaeianfar


P R E S S R E L E A S E

45

D R I N K I N G A D R E A M

SYNOPSIS

Sometimes drinking a cup changes everything.

CAST: VAHID TAGHIZADEH, SONIA RAHNAVARD, SAMANEH

KAIANTARY

DIRECTOR, WRITER: MAHMOOD ARIB

PRODUCERS: MAHYAR GHASEMIPOOR, MAHMOOD ARIB

EXECUTIVE PRODUCER: FATEMEH MEHDIPOOR

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: HOSSEIN BADR TALEYIE

EDITOR: HAMED ARIB

MAHMOOD ARIB BIOGRAPHY:

Mahmood Arib is an Iranian filmmaker, photographer, and

translator born in Iran in 1979. His film works include

documentaries and short films that have won several

national and international awards. He has also taught

filmmaking with a focus on cinema and photography at the

Iranian Youth Cinema Association. Mahmood Arib has

translated a book titled "Truth in Photography" written by

"Leslie Mullen" for photographers and visual arts enthusiasts.


OSSESSIONE

A F I L M B Y L U C H I N O V I S C O N T I

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN


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P R E S S R E L E A S E

48

I N

SYNOPSIS

Miso has trauma of her mother leaving her when she was young. She tends to always keep her bag full of

things because of what her mom said before leaving.

CAST: SHIN HA YEON, LEE WON SUK, GWAK SANG WON, AN SE BIN,

KIM MI RA

DIRECTOR, WRITER: KIM SUN WOO

PRODUCER: JEONG IN-HO

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: SON SU JEONG

EDITOR: KIM SU JEONG

SOUND: SEOL JUN SOO

SOUND MIXING: KIM SONG MI

PRODUCTION DESIGNER: WI YEON JU

KIM SUN WOO BIOGRAPHY:

Kim Sun Woo is a Korean filmmaker born in Busan, South Korea, in 1995. He studied

writing, art, directing, and so on at an Art High School. The short film 'Real' is the

first director's work, and the short film "Sweet Nightmare" was screened in front of

people for the first time through the youth academy at the 17th Bucheon

International Fantastic Film Festival. After that, he continued to produce short films

even after entering college. His short film "In", made during graduation, won several

awards in film festivals all around the world. And the short film 'FAVOR' is his

graduation work.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 49

EXPLORING THE LIMITS AND

POTENTIALS OF FILMMAKING

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH CHRISTOS ARFANIS & MARIA AGRAPIDOU,

DIRECTORS OF THE FILM "SLEEPY NIGHT ATHENS BRIGHT".

BY LUCAS MARQUES AND RICHARD CAEIRO

EXPLORING THE LIMITS AND POTENTIALS OF FILMMAKING


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W

50

E X P L O R I N G T H E L I M I T S

A N D P O T E N T I A L S O F

F I L M M A K I N G

The co-directors Maria Agrapidou and Christos Arfanis

EXPLORING THE LIMITS AND POTENTIALS OF FILMMAKING

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH CHRISTOS ARFANIS & MARIA AGRAPIDOU, DIRECTORS OF THE FILM "SLEEPY NIGHT ATHENS BRIGHT".

by Lucas Marques and Richard Caeiro

Christos Arfanis is a multi-award-winning Greek filmmaker (film producer, screenwriter, film director) and

entertainment journalist. He is a member of the Screenwriters Guild of Greece.

Maria Agrapidou was born in Athens. She speaks 6 languages. She graduated with honors as a Dental Surgeon

from a University based in Iasi, Romania, with the title Doctor Medic Stomatology. Furthermore, she worked as a

dentist at the Athens 2004 Olympic Games and Athens 2004 Paralympic Games. She is also an author and Vice

President of Health Committee in the European Union of Women (EUW).

What was the inspiration behind the creation of Sleepy Night Athens Bright?

MARIA & CHRISTOS: Our inspiration for Sleepy Night Athens Bright was our need to experiment in the genre of neonoir,

but also to present the genre through our eyes and vision.

How was the process from developing the idea to executing the film into a work with less than two minutes, especially

in a co-direction?

MARIA & CHRISTOS: Creating a project that is under two minutes is a huge challenge by itself. However, since we

happen to have common thoughts in general as people, the development of the process of making Sleepy Night Athens

Bright was a very easy task to achieve.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W

51

What were the main difficulties encountered during the

production of the film, given its experimental nature?

MARIA & CHRISTOS: Difficulties that arose during the

creation of Sleepy Night Athens Bright were eliminated

by the editing process. The real bet for us was how to

present a complete story in less than two minutes. But,

as we can see from the interest film festivals give in our

work, the awards we receive and the audience's positive

feedback, it seems that we did something right.

Christos and Maria, how do you see experimental

cinema as a creative expression medium? How can it

impact the way people think about movies?

CHRISTOS: Experimental cinema is meant to explore

the limits and potentials of the medium itself, often by

being as radical as possible. What I believe can make

people see the movies more as an artistic piece

compared to the traditional mainstream cinema where

its primary aim is to strike a balance between art and

consumerism, but in the end, the commercial use of film

appears to be the only thing that is being primary

issued.

MARIA: What we have in our soul and in our thoughts,

as filmmakers we must present it to the public.

Experimental cinema, through various images and

sounds, helps us give people the ability to understand

more things about themselves and those around them.

"Sleepy Night Athens Bright" film scene

What message do you both hope to convey to viewers

through Sleepy Night Athens Bright? How do you hope

the audience will respond to the film?

MARIA & CHRISTOS: The message we are hoping to

convey is that within seconds life can change and it's a fine

line that can make someone ends up doing a crime or not.

How do you feel about the idea that each viewer can have

a different interpretation of the film and even create their

own story from it? Do you both believe that the

subjectivity of the viewer is important in any work of art,

or is this particularly relevant in the context of

experimental cinema?

"Sleepy Night Athens Bright" film scene

MARIA & CHRISTOS: There is a charm that the audience

can give their own interpretation and create their own

stories by watching Sleepy Night Athens Bright. However, I

think that this can only work in experimental cinema or

films that leave their endings open to the audience or

deliberately do not show many elements of the characters'

lives.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W

52

Is there a specific personal experience or artistic influence

that led you to create a film as experimental and subjective

as Sleepy Night Athens Bright?

MARIA & CHRISTOS: The full moon and all the myths

surrounding it inspired us to do a film spicier, and special in

that everyone gives their own outcome and definitions.

How do you see the Greek film industry today? Do you

observe that there is room for experimental cinema and

other forms of artistic expression in your country?

MARIA & CHRISTOS: We are optimistic that the Greek film

industry has evolved for the better in recent years, giving

space to creators to engage in experimental cinema and other

visual arts.

Who are some of the contemporary Greek filmmakers you

most admire or who have influenced your approach to

filmmaking?

MARIA & CHRISTOS: While we admire many contemporary

Greek filmmakers, we aim throughout our films to make our

our unique voice to be heard and to present new ideas and

techniques of narrative storytelling.

The co-director Maria Agrapidou

Do you think that Greece's rich history and culture

have a significant influence on art and cultural

expression in general, including cinema? If so, how

does this manifest itself in your work and in other

work that you admire?

The co-director Christos Arfanis

MARIA & CHRISTOS: We are certainly sure that

Greece's rich history and culture have a significant

influence on art and cultural expression in general

and in cinema. Greek theatre has influenced

modern entertainment in many areas such as

Actors with costumes, special effects etc. The Greek

tragedies also teach us the meaning of conflicts in

our lives and how to battle through them. In

tragedies, typically the main protagonist of a

tragedy commits some terrible crime without

realizing how idiotic and also arrogant they've

been. Later on, those characters slowly realize their

wrong decisions having as result world to crumble

around them - a plot that we witness on many films.

The above contribute on us to either enjoy or not a

film, visually or plot wise, as well shapes and

influences our works at some point.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W

53

This is Maria's first project as a filmmaker. How did this interest in boarding the world of filmmaking and the arts

come about?

MARIA: I have always loved to create. As a filmmaker, I give the audience the pleasure of enjoying what I think. The

fact that I wrote the script made it easier for me to act and therefore to direct myself.

"Sleepy Night Athens Bright" film scene

Maria, after this experience as a director, do you have new film projects in mind? And what about you, Christos, can

you tell us more about your upcoming films in development?

MARIA & CHRISTOS: We are already working on another experimental short film, but we still can't reveal much

information. Stay tuned!

"Sleepy Night Athens Bright" film scene


R E V I E W 54

A SENSORY AND SYMBOLIC EXPERIENCE

IN HONOR OF THE PICTORIAL ARTS

R E V I E W B Y R I C H A R D C A E I R O

REVIEW


B I M I F F

R E V I E W

SANTA GUERRA A FILM BY SAMANTHA CASELLA

R E V I E W B Y R I C H A R D C A E I R O

55

"Santa Guerra" film scene

A SENSORY AND SYMBOLIC EXPERIENCE IN

HONOR OF THE PICTORIAL ARTS

Undoubtedly, the film "Santa Guerra" is a cinematic

work of great depth and beauty that takes us on a

journey through powerful and disturbing

symbolism. Director Samantha Casella uses

pictorial art as a starting point, especially the works

of Austrian expressionist Egon Schiele, to create a

film that is both homage to art history and a

reflection on human nature and its intense

emotions.

The film is a sensory and emotional experience that

challenges the viewer to look beyond the surface,

diving into the layers of meaning and interpretation

surrounding each scene. The protagonist's story, a

character who struggles to process trauma in a

timeless, haunted world, is just one of the many

layers of significance in "Santa Guerra". The

symbolism of Schiele's paintings and references to

other artists and mythologies broaden the film's

scope, making it a rich and multifaceted work.

The art direction and photography are exceptional,

creating a visual world that is both beautiful and

disturbing. Music and sound are also used with

great skill to create a dense and immersive

atmosphere that takes us into a state of deep

reflection.

With a unique aesthetic and an engaging narrative,

"Santa Guerra" stands out as a film that transcends

genres and addresses profound and disturbing

themes. Director Samantha Casella uses art as a tool to

explore the human psyche and create a singular

cinematic experience.

The choice of Egon Schiele as a starting point for the

film is particularly inspiring. His intense and

disturbing works express the anguish and loneliness of

the human condition and are perfectly suited for a

story dealing with trauma and psychological

disturbances.

The way the film uses artistic references to create a

unique atmosphere is impressive. The quotes from

Ingmar Bergman's and David Lynch's movies are a

tribute to the directors who influenced Casella's work

but also contribute to the sense of timelessness and

strangeness that permeates the film

"Santa Guerra" film scene


B I M I F F

R E V I E W

SANTA GUERRA A FILM BY SAMANTHA CASELLA

56

The choice of symbolic elements, such as the snake

and the Ouroboros, is another aspect that deserves

highlighting. The use of these symbols to convey ideas

about the renewal and transmigration of souls is

subtle and effective at contributing to the feeling of

mystery that permeates the narrative.

The actors' performances are also praiseworthy.

Eugenia Costantini delivers an intense and moving

performance, while Ekaterina Buscemi brings a

haunting presence to the role of the ghost. The

supporting cast is also skilled and helps create the

film's dreamlike ambiance.

Samantha Casella builds in "Santa Guerra" a work

that dialogues with various art forms and cultural

references, while it possesses its own original and

striking identity. The film transcends the mere

narrative and becomes a sensory and emotional

experience that involves the spectator in an oneiric

and disturbing universe.

Based on references to expressionist painting and the

symbolism of the snake, the director builds an

impacting visual universe, with a dark and shadowy

color palette, but at the same time rich in details and

textures. The ghostly mansion that serves as the

setting for the story is a veritable labyrinth of

corridors, where the protagonist gets lost and finds

herself amidst symbols and elements that refer to her

past and her emotional trajectory.

The use of references to films by directors such as

David Lynch, Ingmar Bergman, and Terrence Malick

is an explicit tribute, but also a demonstration of the

influence of these filmmakers on Casella's signature

style.

The way the director deals with the character

development and the fragmented narrative, which

flows between the past and the present in a nonlinear

way, is a direct reference to Lynch's work.

Meanwhile, the constant presence of death and

spirituality, and the exploration of human traumas

and emotions, recall the universe of Bergman and

Malick.

But even with these influences, "Santa Guerra " is a

singular and original work. The art direction, the

soundtrack, the cinematography, and the editing

create a dense and claustrophobic atmosphere that

involves the viewer from beginning to end. The cast's

performances are precise and restrained,

contributing to the construction of a world that is

both real and fantastic.

The film is an intricate reflection on the human

condition, pain, anguish, and the search for an

identity. The protagonist is a woman who finds

herself divided between different versions of her,

trapped in a labyrinth that is both physical and

psychological at the same time. The way the director

works the issue of identity and duality is one of the

movie's highlights, provoking questions and

reflections about our very existence.

In summary, "Santa Guerra" is a complex and

impactful work that unites diverse art forms in a

singular and original universe. The director

Samantha Casella demonstrates a particular talent

in the film's construction that is at once sensorial,

emotional, and intellectually stimulating. The movie

is a work that deserves to be seen and reviewed,

explored in all its layers and nuances.

The director Samantha Casella


PAISÀ

A F I L M B Y R O B E R T O R O S S E L L I N I

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN


P R E S S R E L E A S E

57

M Y N A M E I S S H A U N

SYNOPSIS

Today's burnout is tonight's bonfire. "My Name is Shaun" is a multi-award-winning short documentary

about the life of a burnt-out creative and slightly jaded hospitality worker trying to stay afloat in London

CAST: SHAUN RIVERS

DIRECTOR, WRITER, PRODUCER: ANN TOPOLSKY

PRODUCED BY: TOPOLSKY PRODUCTION

MUSIC BY: RIVERCHILD

ANN TOPOLSKY BIOGRAPHY:

Ann Topolsky is a Polish filmmaker. Since graduating with a BA degree in

Film and Theatre Art Organisation Production at Film School in Lodz

(Poland) in 2013 she has worked as a Production Assistant (freelance,

professionally) on a number of music videos, shorts, and feature films in the

UK and abroad. She also has an experience in theatres as First Assistant

Director and Personal Director Assistant. Her directors' Mentors are

Krzysztof Kieslowski, Ridley Scott, John Carpenter, James Cameron, Steven

Spielberg, and Tim Burton. She loves heavy metal from the UK, US, and

Scandinavian death metal and stoner rock from Australia.


R E V I E W 58

HORROR BEYOND

MERE SCARES

R E V I E W B Y L U C A S M A R Q U E S

REVIEW


B I M I F F

R E V I E W

RENAISSANCE A FILM BY JUSTIN HEAD

R E V I E W B Y L U C A S M A R Q U E S

59

"Renaissance" film scene

HORROR BEYOND MERE SCARES

The horror genre has often been associated with lowquality

films that rely on clichés and jump scares to

frighten audiences. However, many directors have

explored the genre's possibilities to discuss social and

political issues in a deeper and more sophisticated way.

The genre has the power to explore the dark and

unknown, which makes it an effective tool for discussing

complex and disturbing aspects of society. Horror films

can be used to explore issues of identity, trauma, anxiety,

fear, oppression, and social injustice.

An example is the film "Get Out" directed by Jordan

Peele, which uses horror elements to address systemic

racism and the legacy of slavery in the United States. The

film is a sharp critique of the myth concerning racial

equality in the United States and the way black people

are treated in the country. Another example is the film

"Hereditary," directed by Ari Aster, which uses horror to

discuss trauma, grief, and family issues. The movie shows

how oppressive and disturbing family relationships can

be, and how people are affected by past traumas. Horror

is used to explore the intense emotions that arise in

situations of grief and loss as well as to show how these

emotions can manifest themselves in frightening and

unexpected ways.

The horror genre has the potential to be a strong

instrument for discussing intricate matters in

contemporary society.

When used consciously and carefully, horror can help

expose the tensions and oppressions that exist in our

culture, and help us better understand the human

emotions and experiences that affect us.

"Renaissance" is a film that brings a deep critique to both

the fashion industry and mental health treatment, using

Stacy Lynch's story as a reflection on the inhumane nature

of the pressure to maintain an unattainable standard of

beauty and the challenge of getting heard by health care

professionals.

The film skillfully portrays the destructive world of fashion,

in which models are forced to adopt unhealthy and often

dangerous behaviors to conform to an unachievable beauty

standard. The film not only denounces the fashion industry

but questions society's expectations of women's bodies and

the concept of beauty, which are imposed in an oppressive

and harmful way.

"Renaissance" film scene


B I M I F F

R E V I E W

RENAISSANCE A FILM BY JUSTIN HEAD

60

In addition, "Renaissance" also brings a profound reflection on the dehumanization of medicine, particularly in

psychiatry, in which patients are treated as objects to be diagnosed and treated, without considering their

personal history or emotions. The relationship between Stacy Lynch and her doctor is marked by a severe lack of

empathy, in which the patient's pain and feelings are ignored in favor of a clinical approach, demonstrating how

medicine can dehumanize patients and disregard the complexity of human life.

The film presents a complex and realistic view of schizophrenia, showing how frightening and confusing this

condition can be for those who experience it. Director Justin Head's work is impressive in capturing the

experience of Stacy Lynch, using a visceral and immersive filming style that puts us directly into the character's

troubled mind. The actress's performance is outstanding, bringing life and depth to the character and making her

a moving and terrifying figure.

Lastly, "Renaissance" is a film that impresses with its courage, complexity, and insightful message. It is a relentless

look at the high fashion industry and the dehumanization of medical care, using a narrative that defies audience

expectations and offers a reflection on the nature of beauty, mental health, and human empathy. It is a work that

deserves to be seen by all those who seek to understand the complexity of the human mind and the failings of the

system that is supposed to take care of our health.

The actress Mandy Williams (left) and the director Justin Head (right)


ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN

GERMANY,

YEAR ZERO

A F I L M B Y R O B E R T O R O S S E L L I N I


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W 62

THE ART OF LEAVING SOUL

PRINTS IN THE WORK

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH CARCAZAN, DIRECTOR OF THE FILM

"FILM ONE (OVERCOMING TRILOGY)".

BY LUCAS MARQUES AND RICHARD CAEIRO

THE ART OF LEAVING SOUL PRINTS IN THE WORK


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W

63

T H E A R T O F L E A V I N G

S O U L P R I N T S I N T H E

W O R K

THE ART OF LEAVING SOUL PRINTS IN THE WORK

AN EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH CARCAZAN, DIRECTOR OF THE FILM "FILM ONE (OVERCOMING TRILOGY)".

by Lucas Marques and Richard Caeiro

Animator, artist, and illustrator based in Surrey, United Kingdom. Carcazan is a recent graduate of the Aardman

Academy (SM1) and has just completed a Master's (MA) in Illustration from Falmouth University in December

2022. Previously focused on campaign-based illustration and 2D animation, Carcazan started developing her

stop motion animation practice in July 2021 as part of her MA project work.

What inspired you to create a trilogy of stop-motion animated films on the theme "Places We Go To Escape Fear"?

Initially, it was a final major project for my Masters in Illustration at Falmouth University on how the haptic vehicle of

stop motion animation can best connect with an audience when exploring Places We Go To Escape Fear following one

character through childhood, motherhood, and older age. This developed into the Overcoming Trilogy - I wanted to do

something that felt very real to me both physically and reference-wise.

How did you approach autoethnography in your master's project and how is this reflected in your project "Film One

(Overcoming Trilogy)"?

My project on Aspects of Autoethnography focused on Thinking Through Making and Making Through Knowing. All

the fingerprints I left on the plasticine figures or crafted sets and props all import a personal reality and influence that

adds a type of truth to the work. In this way, whether through experience or observation, I wanted to trace the

character's journeys through headphones, a refuge in motherhood, and then make peace with her memories and

explore how much of the filmmaking process would tease out directorial notes I may not have originally planned.

"Film One (Overcoming Trilogy)" film scene


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W

64

How did you choose the song for each film in the trilogy

and how does it add narrative value to each of the

projects?

I want to thank the artists and their teams who

permitted me to use all three tracks - they were really

fantastic. Each song has had specific resonance with me

throughout my life; for example, The Bomfunk MC's

Freestyler was a solid fixture on my playlist at an age

where I felt I was fastened to the power of beat-heavy

music while learning how to be brave enough to be who

I really am, explore my strengths and frankly it's just a

brilliant song - it has a fervent concentration of beats

and rhythms per minute and this reflected how at that

age, I felt that life had so many complex layers which I

wanted to smooth out by skating through it all... I chose

Moby's Extreme Ways for what will be the second film in

the Trilogy because it is not only my Mum's favorite

song but because Moby has a way of importing

rhythmic pathos in what sounds like a happier song but

is really quite deep. The lyrics echo what the mother

character will be doing by throwing herself into

motherhood to escape being abandoned and shutting

out the world. The final track is This Is Our Home by my

all-time favorite band in the world: A-Ha. The track was

recorded at their Summer Solstice live performance for

MTV and perfectly matches the clear, cool sounds and

melodies needed to accompany the older character

reflecting on her memories, the climax of the Trilogy.

The lyrics also fit perfectly with her thoughts even

though she will have no mouth in the film.

"Film One (Overcoming Trilogy)" film scene

How did you deal with the challenges of creating stopmotion

animation without the use of CGI or digital

alterations in post-production?

By remembering I imposed it on myself! And reminding

myself that sometimes working with limitations fuels

creativity in a resourceful and fresh way. It also arose from

a dedication to the art of stop motion animation, I

appreciate the reasons why these techniques are used, but

I just did not see why one would go through all the

extreme labor of the intense process of stop motion

animation only to then smooth it all out later digitally or

add to it. My project also focused on haptic methods as a

way of leaving soul prints on work as well as fingerprints,

and I did not want anything to interfere with that because

it might erode a level of authenticity. Lastly, I felt

audiences connect more with something that can relate to,

rather than what may appear to be an impersonal world.

How did you explore emotional highlighting through

touch in your stop-motion animation?

"Film One (Overcoming Trilogy)" film scene

That was part of "thinking through making" - the reason I

got into stop motion animation was for a previous worldbuilding

project where I was drawing the world I imagined

for a character so much I ended up thinking "you know

what? Why don't we just GO there..." And I built it, and that

was my stop motion debut (Write to Protest). Touching the

plasticine and forming the character, down to literally

every strand of hair, enables me to connect with her and

act through her knowing that much of my subconscious

self or experiences may escape into the way she moves or

handles situations or even looks. There's a small

percentage of really working with your hands in the art

that gives your work an unplanned life or resonance of its

own, and that's what I love finding out myself too.


B I M I F F I N T E R V I E W

65

What were some of the creative techniques you used

to create organic special effects on camera?

For the strobe lighting effect, I did use alternate

frames where I covered the camera lens with colored

acetate - that was also helpful when sometimes have

to flash from one scene to another. The track lent

itself well to very short sequences all joined together

to reflect the building beats and tones of the song.

The fire-wielding sequence was done with a live-lit

candle (and a bucket of water on standby!). And a

particularly delicate effect where we see the character

skating from beneath the ice saw me animating the

puppet perpendicularly to a sheet of acrylic perspect

which I literally scratched the eye design into it,

frame by frame as she spun over it.

The director Carcazan

What are your plans for the "Overcoming" trilogy and

how do you expect the main character's story to

evolve throughout the three films?

I plan the character to show her life develops in

motherhood (Film Two) and then older age (Film

Three), and I would like it to stand as a body of

formulating work that ultimately serves the audience

by connecting with them and showing that however

bad things may be, we have a power and beauty

within our souls and strength within ourselves to get

through it.

How does the sequence that exemplifies the main

character's lonely existence relate to the overall

theme of "escaping fear"?

The child is not in charge of her circumstances; it is

clear she has no power to control them or leave them,

so she has to get creative about how she can escape it

- people often are, so it's about what can they do to

escape inescapable. A quick fix is through music

through headphones, it blocks out the world around

you and enables your mind to skate a path to your

preferred world through a soundtrack your soul

might prefer.

How do you hope viewers will respond emotionally to

"Film One (Overcoming Trilogy)" and what were your

goals in creating this film?

I hope viewers can find a part of it or its honesty which

resonates with them, and see that there was humor and

hope intended beneath the essentially sad theme and

circumstance; I hope people see it and feel that they are

not the only ones out there who may feel the same and

that they are seen and loved for who they are, and there is

always hope for a happy ending even if we have to make it

ourselves.

What was your experience like doing your big final

project for your Master's degree in Illustration at

Falmouth University and how has this influenced your

career as a stop motion animator?

The MA was the absolute best thing I've done apart from

finding love and helping my family - it totally changed

my life; I found a new "family" of inspiring creative

friends, the tutors conjured the real me out of myself,

and I see and approach projects now with an entirely

different viewpoint and possibility. I would never have

imagined I could attempt stop motion animation if it

were not for this MA, and though it was a choice I made

rather being offered to employ it as a mode of creative

output I pursued it with additional courses at Aardman

Academy to hone my craft as much as possible. There's

no way back now!


P R E S S R E L E A S E

66

J U S T A N O T H E R D A Y I N R E N O

SYNOPSIS

Just Another Day In Reno is an action comedy short film. It features real martial arts and was written,

directed, choreographed, and stars the same person, the filmmaker/actor Nicolas Bullentini. "Just

Another Day In Reno" is a film perfect for anyone who wants a good laugh and especially for anyone

who likes action.

CAST: NICOLAS BULLENTINI, MONICA OROZCO, PATRICK ESSE,

CHRISTIAN SCHUCK

DIRECTOR, WRITER, PRODUCER: NICOLAS BULLENTINI

ASSOCIATE PRODUCERS: ANDREW ARGUELLO, MJ PALO

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY, EDITOR: ANDREW ARGUELLO

DIRECTOR OF SOUND: STEPHEN ZIDECK

SOUND DESIGNER: QUINN COOPER

MUSIC BY: RYAN CLARK

NICOLAS BULLENTINI BIOGRAPHY:

Nicolas Bullentini is an award-winning American filmmaker, writer,

and actor. JUST ANOTHER DAY IN RENO is his latest film, which

has received several official selections, nominations, and awards in

film festivals worldwide, including BIMIFF, in which he and actor

Christian Schuck received the Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor

awards, respectively.


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LA TERRA TREMA

A F I L M B Y L U C H I N O V I S C O N T I

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN


B I M I F F M A I N A R T I C L E 70

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE

CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD

THROUGH THE SCREEN

BY LUCAS MARQUES

ITALIAN NEOREALISM: THE CINEMATIC REVOLUTION THAT

CHANGED THE WORLD THROUGH THE SCREEN


B I M I F F I T A L I A N N E O R E A L I S M : T H E C I N E M A T I C R E V O L U T I O N

71

T H A T C H A N G E D T H E W O R L D T H R O U G H T H E S C R E E N

I T A L I A N N E O R E A L I S M : T H E

C I N E M A T I C R E V O L U T I O N T H A T

C H A N G E D T H E W O R L D T H R O U G H

T H E S C R E E N

"Rome, Open City" film scene

In the 20th century, the World Wars had a

major impact on cinema, affecting everything

from production to subject matters. In Italy and

Germany, production was interrupted or

reduced. The wars were watersheds for the

development of cinematographic language and

themes, marking different phases in Europe

and the USA. French cinema was hegemonic in

the period before the First World War. Between

the wars, cinema was recognized as an art form,

with room for aesthetic research and the

artistic avant-garde. After World War II, in some

countries, cinema was seen as a civilizing

instrument for rebuilding European cultural

identity. In this period, proposals very different

from what was done in Hollywood emerged,

which gave rise to Modern Cinema.

The Neorealist movement, which originated in

Italy, stood out in the resistance against fascism

and the Nazi occupation.

Neo-realist artists sought to denounce the

poverty of the popular classes and social

problems such as unemployment and urban

underemployment, in addition to delicate

themes such as people's relationship with

religion. The language of Neorealist cinema

was characterized by the use of close and

medium shots, without many close-ups, and

by filming on real sets, with much

improvisation with the script and the use of

non-actors. Among the most significant films

and filmmakers of Italian Neorealism are

Alessandro Blasetti's "Four Steps in the

Clouds," Vittorio De Sica's "The Children Are

Watching Us", and Luchino Visconti's

"Ossessione".

The Neorealist movement had its initial

milestone with the release of Rossellini's film

"Rome, Open City" (1944-1945); the movie was

produced soon after the liberation of Rome

and influenced by French poetic realism.


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T H A T C H A N G E D T H E W O R L D T H R O U G H T H E S C R E E N

Although there is no consensus on the

"paternity of the term," it is possible that

Umberto Barbaro was the first to use it when

referring to the film Ossessione, for which he

was an editor, or that Mario Serandrei coined

the term in a review of the film Quai des

Brumes.

Although "Rome, Open City" is considered the

starting point of the Neorealist movement, the

first film of this period was the documentary

Giorni di Gloria, directed by Giuseppe de

Santis, Marcello Pagliero, Mario Serandrei, and

Luchino Visconti. This film presents real and

reconstituted scenes of the Nazi-fascist

occupation, but was released after the film

"Rome, Open City".

Both aesthetically and politically, the ideology

spread among its directors has become an

aesthetic-ideological vehicle of resistance. The

movement stood out for presenting an objective

representation of social reality, being a form of

political commitment.

Neorealist films were characterized by themes

that dealt with the lives of working-class people

in an unfair and fatalistic environment. These

characters were depicted in everyday

situations, searching for better living

conditions, but constantly encountering

frustration.

Although there is a certain consensus as to its

characteristics, the movement did not have an

exact duration. Following the paradigm observed

in most of the aesthetic styles in the History of Art

and Cinema, the birth of this trend happened

gradually, taking some time until the appearance

of a genuinely neo-realist film. And, in the same

way, it suffered a gradual decadence, without a

delimited beginning or endpoint.

The most productive and significant period of the

Italian Neorealist movement was between 1945 and

1948. It was during this period that films such as

"Rome, Open City" by Roberto Rossellini, "Bicycle

Thieves" by Vittorio De Sica, and "Umberto D." by

Vittorio De Sica emerged. These films are

considered some of the masterpieces of the

Neorealism movement and stand out for their

social sensitivity, humanity, and political

commitment.

Italian Neorealism was an important movement in

the history of world cinema and has left a

significant legacy. Its style of an objective depiction

of social reality and political commitment inspired

many filmmakers around the world and influenced

the development of new film movements. The

impact of this movement is still felt today, and the

legacy of the Neorealist filmmakers continues to be

studied and appreciated by film lovers and film

students worldwide.

"Four Steps in the Cloud" film scene


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C H A N G E D T H E W O R L D T H R O U G H T H E S C R E E N

This movement was characterized by presenting a

closer portrayal of the social, cultural, and political

reality of post-war Italy, in contrast to the fascist

aesthetic that predominated during the Mussolini

regime.

The Italian fascist regime, which ruled the country

from 1922 to 1945, had an aesthetic ideology that

aimed to represent society through a moralistic and

positivist view, which suited the legitimization of

the regime more than the reality of the masses. This

worldview was reflected in the cinematographic

production of the time, which was mostly composed

of melodramatic, epic, and romanticized films that

were far removed from the social and daily reality

of the Italian people.

The director Alessandro Blasetti

The neo-realist movement arose precisely to counteract this worldview of the fascist regime, seeking a

closer approach to the reality of the Italian people at the moment contemporary to the production of the

films. Neo-realist filmmakers had as their goal to portray people's lives authentically, without

romanticization or idealization, and to show the social problems that needed to be solved. These films

portray the life of Italians in the post-war period, showing poverty, hunger, corruption, and the struggle

for survival in a society in crisis.

Neo-Realist films were produced on a low budget, using real locations and amateur actors, which made

them more authentic. The style was marked by narrative simplicity, the use of long shots, and the

absence of a soundtrack, which reinforced the feeling of reality.

The commitment of the Neo-Realist filmmakers to truth and social reality was so great that the

movement was identified while the films were being produced, being called Verismo by critics

Pietrangeli and Barbaro. This means that Neo-Realism was identified and named at the same moment of

its artistic production, which shows its importance and innovation for the time.

Verismo emerged in Italy as a literary current between 1875 and 1895. This school was based on realist

principles and was founded by the writers and poets Giovanni Verga and Luigi Capuana. Verism was

influenced by positivism and believed in reason, science, and the experimental method. In addition, it

was also inspired by the French naturalist movement.

This literary movement also had an impact on Italian opera, with the production of Pietro Mascagni's

Cavalleria Rusticana in 1890. Verismo in opera was characterized by realistic descriptions of everyday

life, often violent or sordid, especially for the lower social classes. Unlike Romanticism, Verismo rejected

historical, mythical, and grandiose themes.


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C H A N G E D T H E W O R L D T H R O U G H T H E S C R E E N

From this point on, the film explores the drama

lived by Antonio, who sets out on a frantic

journey through the city of Rome to find his

bicycle, accompanied by his young son. In this

search, it is possible to observe the rawness and

the reality of the daily life of the less favored

classes in post-war Italian society, amidst the

lack of jobs, the scarcity of resources, and urban

violence.

The director Vittorio de Sica

Some people consider that Georges Bizet's Carmen,

in 1875, was the forerunner opera of Verismo. This

literary current prospered until the end of the 19th

century and was succeeded by Impressionism.

Neo-Realism was an artistic movement of great

importance for Italy and the world, as it influenced

not only cinema, but also other areas of the arts such

as literature, painting, and photography. The

movement opened space for new forms of artistic

expression and became a milestone in the history of

world cinema.

To better understand the Neorealism movement, it is

possible to conduct a detailed analysis of the

acclaimed film "Bicycle Thieves".

Directed by Italian filmmaker Vittorio De Sica, the

film portrays the life of Antonio Ricci, an

unemployed worker who gets the opportunity to

work as a poster gluer but to do so, he needs a

bicycle. After a hard sacrifice, he finally manages to

buy a bicycle, but it is stolen in an instant distraction.

"Bicycle Thieves" is a striking example of the

neorealist style, which is characterized by the

search for truth and reality in the living

conditions of the Italian population, without

romantic or artificial elements. De Sica's film

addresses the daily difficulties faced by workers

and poor families, with a humanistic perspective

that seeks to portray the complexity of social and

emotional relationships amidst a scenario of

adversity.

Thus, "Bicycle Thieves" became a milestone in

world cinema and a reference for Italian neorealism,

which sought to explore the art of

cinema as a form of social and political

expression, capable of giving a voice to the most

vulnerable layers of society. The film represents

an artistic and social manifesto that challenges

fascist aesthetics, showing a new vision of cinema

and the world, based on sincerity, truth, and

humanity.

"Bicyle Thieves" film scene


I T A L I A N N E O R E A L I S M : T H E C I N E M A T I C R E V O L U T I O N T H A T

B I M I F F

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INFLUENCE ON THE CINEMA NOVO

Brazilian cinema in the 20th century was marked by

several aesthetic influences and artistic movements

that contributed to its construction and evolution.

Among them, neo-realism stands out, which

influenced several filmmakers in the 50s and 60s,

and was much more than a mere aesthetic trend.

Neo-realism represented a superior vision of

producing films without depending on the major film

industry that dominated the market at the time. This

approach allowed many Brazilian filmmakers to

create their works independently, without needing

the expensive equipment and services of the big

studios.

One of the most important exponents of neorealism

in Brazil was Nelson Pereira dos Santos, whose work

was responsible for launching a new look at poverty

in Brazilian society. His film "Rio 40 Graus", for

example, is considered a landmark in Brazilian

cinema for its true and critical portrayal of life in the

Carioca favelas. The work shows the misery and

contradictions of the big city but also reveals the

hope and resilience of the people who live in this

reality.

The director Luchino Visconti

"Rio Zona Norte" is one of Nelson's works that

portrays the daily struggle of Brazilian

workers, who try to survive amidst the

difficulties of urban life. The first tells the story

of a composer who needs to sell his songs to

survive, while the second shows the confused

and muddled preparation of a wedding by a

couple struggling against the oppression of

lack of money.

But perhaps Nelson Pereira dos Santos' most

remarkable work is "Barren Lives", an

adaptation of Graciliano Ramos' literary work.

This film is a true treatise on the social and

moral conditions of Brazilian society,

portraying the saga of a family fighting for

survival in the middle of the arid backlands.

The film is a testimony to the strength and

resilience of the Brazilian people in the face of

adversity.

The director Roberto Rosselini

Neo-realism directly influenced the Cinema

Novo, a movement led by Glauber Rocha, who

anthropophagized this aesthetic and created a

new cinema with impact. Glauber defended a

cinema made with a handheld camera,

improvising in the street and marginalized

from the industry, committed to truth and

reality.


I T A L I A N N E O R E A L I S M : T H E C I N E M A T I C R E V O L U T I O N T H A T

B I M I F F

C H A N G E D T H E W O R L D T H R O U G H T H E S C R E E N

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"La Terra Trema" film scene

In summary, neo-realism was an artistic movement that left an indelible mark on 20th-century Brazilian

cinema, influencing a generation of filmmakers who sought to portray the life of Brazilians truthfully and

critically. And even today, the legacy of these artists continues to inspire new generations of filmmakers

and artists, who seek to build a cinema committed to the truth and reality of this country.

Conclusively, the cinema of Italian Neorealism was an important contribution to the history of world

cinema. With their realistic and humanistic approach, the films of this movement presented an authentic

and moving portrait of post-war Italy and profoundly influenced the development of modern cinema.

Italian Neorealism proved that cinema can be a deeply engaging and transformative art form, capable of

making us empathize with the characters and connect us to the social and political issues of the world. Its

impact is still felt today, and we must continue to appreciate and study these films to better understand

the history of cinema and humanity as a whole.

"The Children Are Watching Us" film scene


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c o m i n g u p a t t h e

M A G A Z I N E

" S l e e p y N i g h t A t h e n s B r i g h t "

" D r i n k i n g a D r e a m "

" f e l l a w a k e "

" B A I T D E C E P T I O N "

" s t e l l m a g n o l i a "

" g r y d s c a e n : s c o u t e v e - I r o n L o t u s c u t "

" J u s t A n o t h e r D a y I n R e n o "

" l a t i r a m a r g o "

" m y s o n "

a n d m a n y m o r e ! ! !

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