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MFAH Annual Report 2022

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The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston<br />

annual report 2021–<strong>2022</strong>


<strong>MFAH</strong><br />

BY THE NUMBERS<br />

July 1, 2021–June 30, <strong>2022</strong><br />

• 794,411 visits to the Museum, the Lillie and Hugh<br />

Roy Cullen Sculpture Garden, Bayou Bend Collection<br />

and Gardens, Rienzi, and the Glassell School of Art<br />

• 222,499 visitors, teachers, and students reached<br />

through learning and interpretation programs on-site,<br />

off-site, and virtually<br />

• 48,476 youth visitors ages 18 and under received<br />

free or discounted access to the <strong>MFAH</strong><br />

• 16,914 K-12 students and their chaperones received<br />

free or discounted tours of the <strong>MFAH</strong><br />

Tuition<br />

Revenue<br />

$2.0<br />

2%<br />

Membership<br />

Revenue<br />

$3.3<br />

4%<br />

Operating<br />

Fund-raising<br />

$20.9<br />

27%<br />

Attendance<br />

$3.7<br />

5%<br />

FY <strong>2022</strong><br />

Operating Revenues<br />

(millions)<br />

Other<br />

$5.3<br />

7%<br />

Endowment<br />

Spending<br />

$42.9<br />

55%<br />

• 3,648 Houstonians were served through in-person<br />

community engagement programs off-site<br />

• 190,341 online visitors, teachers, and students<br />

accessed live-streamed and prerecorded virtual<br />

programs and digital resources<br />

• 137 community partners citywide collaborated<br />

with the <strong>MFAH</strong><br />

• 2,943,622 visits recorded at mfah.org<br />

• 414,800 people followed the <strong>MFAH</strong> on Facebook,<br />

Instagram, and Twitter<br />

• 134,186 researchers and students accessed content<br />

on the ICAA’s Documents of Latin American and<br />

Latino Art website, icaa.mfah.org<br />

• 61,619 individuals identifi ed as members of the<br />

<strong>MFAH</strong> as of June 30, <strong>2022</strong><br />

• 1,976 volunteers and docents served the <strong>MFAH</strong><br />

Fund-raising<br />

$5.2<br />

7%<br />

Auxiliary<br />

Activities<br />

$3.2<br />

5%<br />

Total Revenues: $78.1 million<br />

Exhibitions, Curatorial,<br />

and Collections<br />

$16<br />

23%<br />

FY <strong>2022</strong><br />

Operating Expenses<br />

(millions)<br />

Education,<br />

Libraries,<br />

and Visitor<br />

Engagment<br />

$14.2<br />

21%<br />

Management<br />

and General<br />

$9.8<br />

14% Buildings and<br />

Grounds<br />

and Security<br />

$20.4<br />

30%<br />

Total Expenses: $68.8 million<br />

• 601 permanent and temporary staff were employed<br />

by the <strong>MFAH</strong>


ANNUAL REPORT<br />

July 1, 2021–June 30, <strong>2022</strong><br />

CONTENTS<br />

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston<br />

4 Board of Trustees<br />

5 Committee Chairmen<br />

6 <strong>Report</strong> of the Director<br />

11 Resolutions of the Board of Trustees<br />

14 Accessions<br />

Illustrated works on the cover and on pages 15–75<br />

African Art, 76<br />

American Art, 76<br />

Art of the Indigenous Americas, 76<br />

Art of the Islamic Worlds, 76<br />

Asian Art, 76<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, 77<br />

Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design, 77<br />

European Art, 80<br />

Hirsch Library, 80<br />

Latin American Art, 80<br />

Modern and Contemporary Art, 81<br />

Photography, 82<br />

Prints and Drawings, 89<br />

The Rienzi Collection, 95<br />

96 Exhibitions<br />

Major Loan and Permanent-Collection<br />

Exhibitions, 96<br />

Additional Displays from the Permanent<br />

Collection and Gallery Rotations, 116<br />

120 Departmental Highlights<br />

122 Learning and Interpretation<br />

124 Membership and Guest Services<br />

125 International Center for the Arts<br />

of the Americas<br />

126 Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation<br />

127 The Glassell School of Art<br />

128 Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens<br />

129 Rienzi<br />

130 Development<br />

143 <strong>Report</strong> of the Chief Financial Officer<br />

150 Staff


BOARD OF TRUSTEES<br />

OFFICERS<br />

Mr. Richard D. Kinder<br />

Chairman<br />

Mrs. Anne S. Duncan<br />

Vice-Chairman and Secretary<br />

Mr. Frank J. Hevrdejs<br />

Treasurer<br />

Mrs. Cornelia Cullen Long<br />

Chairman Emerita<br />

LIFE TRUSTEES<br />

Mr. Isaac Arnold, Jr.<br />

Dr. Anne S. Chao<br />

Mrs. Anne S. Duncan<br />

Mrs. Clare Attwell Glassell<br />

Mr. Frank J. Hevrdejs<br />

Mr. E. J. Hudson<br />

Mr. Richard D. Kinder<br />

Mrs. Cornelia Cullen Long<br />

Mrs. Sara Scholes Morgan<br />

Mrs. Nancy Brown Negley<br />

Ms. Anne Schlumberger<br />

Ms. Alice C. Simkins<br />

Mrs. Jeanie Kilroy Wilson<br />

Mr. R. W. Wortham III<br />

Mrs. Lynn Wyatt<br />

ELECTED TRUSTEES<br />

Mrs. Gail Adler<br />

Mrs. Sushila Agrawal<br />

Mr. Jack S. Blanton, Jr.<br />

Mrs. Ann Bookout<br />

Mrs. Polly Bowden<br />

Mr. Brad Bucher<br />

Mr. Rusty Burnett<br />

Mr. Frank N. Carroll<br />

Ms. Bettie Cartwright<br />

Mrs. Mary Cullen<br />

Mrs. Rosanette S. Cullen<br />

Mrs. Rania Daniel<br />

Mrs. Linnet Deily<br />

Ms. Sara Dodd-Denton<br />

Mr. Holbrook F. Dorn<br />

Mrs. Zeina Fares<br />

Mrs. Cherie Flores<br />

Mr. Gregory E. Fourticq, Jr.<br />

Mrs. Barbara G. Gamson<br />

Mrs. Sonia Garza-Monarchi<br />

Mrs. Lela W. Gibbs<br />

Mr. Thomas S. Glanville<br />

Mr. Alfred C. Glassell, III<br />

Mrs. Sandra S. Godfrey<br />

Ms. Carroll R. Goodman<br />

Mr. Martyn E. Goossen<br />

Mr. Samuel F. Gorman<br />

Mrs. Windi Grimes<br />

Ms. Cecily E. Horton<br />

Mr. Ronald E. Huebsch<br />

Mr. Jesse H. Jones II<br />

Mrs. Elise Elkins Joseph<br />

Mr. Evan H. Katz<br />

Mr. George B. Kelly<br />

Ms. Carla Knobloch<br />

Mr. Andrius Kontrimas<br />

Mrs. Colleen Kotts<br />

Mrs. Sima Ladjevardian<br />

Mrs. Rolanette Lawrence<br />

Mr. James E. Maloney<br />

Mrs. Judy Erlich Margolis<br />

Mr. William N. Mathis<br />

Mrs. Kirby Cohn McCool<br />

Mrs. Nidhika Oberoi Mehta<br />

Ms. Nancy Powell Moore<br />

Ms. Joan Morgenstern<br />

Mrs. Laurie Morian<br />

Ms. Franci Neely<br />

Ms. Mary Lawrence Porter<br />

Mrs. Tina Pyne<br />

Mrs. Macey Hodges Reasoner<br />

Mr. H. John Riley, Jr.<br />

Mr. Francisco Rivero<br />

Ms. Beth Robertson<br />

Mrs. Courtney Lanier Sarofim<br />

Mrs. Joan Schnitzer<br />

Dr. Ruth Simmons<br />

Mrs. Eliza Stedman<br />

Mrs. Aliyya Kombargi Stude<br />

Mrs. Judy Spence Tate<br />

Dr. Sarah A. Trotty<br />

Mrs. Phoebe Tudor<br />

Mrs. Martha Katherine Wade<br />

Ms. Merinda Watkins-Martin<br />

Mr. James D. Weaver<br />

Mrs. Margaret Alkek Williams<br />

Mrs. Cyvia G. Wolff<br />

Mrs. Nina O’Leary Zilkha<br />

HONORARY TRUSTEES<br />

AND TRUSTEES EMERITI<br />

Mrs. Nancy O’Connor Abendshein<br />

Mr. Hossein Afshar<br />

Mrs. Carol C. Ballard<br />

Mr. Raphael Bernstein<br />

Ms. Tanya Brillembourg<br />

Mrs. Gisele Chulack<br />

Mrs. Joyce Z. Greenberg<br />

Mrs. Mary Farish Johnston<br />

Mr. Adolpho Leirner<br />

Mr. Thomas V. McMahan<br />

Mrs. Janice McNair<br />

Mrs. Isla Reckling<br />

H. E. Sheikha Hussa Sabah<br />

al-Salem al-Sabah<br />

Mrs. Louisa Stude Sarofim<br />

Ms. Barbara Slifka<br />

Ms. Ann G. Trammell<br />

Mrs. Francita Stuart Koelsch Ulmer<br />

Dr. Alvia J. Wardlaw<br />

Mrs. W. Temple Webber, Jr.<br />

EX-OFFICIO TRUSTEES<br />

Mrs. Rosslyn F. Crawford<br />

Rienzi Committee, Chair<br />

Mrs. Emily Burguieres Dalicandro<br />

The Junior League of Houston,<br />

Representative<br />

Ms. Sharon G. Dies<br />

Bayou Bend Committee, Chair<br />

The Honorable Rodney Ellis<br />

Harris County Commissioner<br />

Dr. Carolyn Evans-Shabazz<br />

Houston City Council,<br />

Representative, District D<br />

Mrs. Necole Irvin<br />

Mayor’s Office of Cultural Affairs,<br />

Director<br />

Ms. Abbie Kamin<br />

Houston City Council,<br />

Representative, District C<br />

Mrs. Vicki Lange<br />

River Oaks Garden Club,<br />

President<br />

Mrs. Melva Martinez Meronek<br />

<strong>MFAH</strong> Volunteer Guild, President<br />

Mrs. Patricia C. Rosencranz<br />

Bayou Bend Docent Organization,<br />

General Chairman<br />

Mrs. Meg Tapp<br />

The Garden Club of Houston,<br />

President<br />

Mr. Gary Tinterow<br />

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston,<br />

Director<br />

We mourn the loss of our former<br />

Trustees George N. Allen Jr. and<br />

Mrs. Jerry E. Finger.<br />

4


COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN<br />

MUSEUM<br />

Mr. Richard D. Kinder<br />

Executive Committee<br />

Mr. Jack S. Blanton, Jr.<br />

Audit Committee<br />

Mr. R. W. Wortham III<br />

Operations and Facilities<br />

Committee<br />

Mr. Richard D. Kinder<br />

Compensation Committee<br />

Mrs. Courtney Lanier Sarofim<br />

Development Committee<br />

Mr. E. J. Hudson<br />

Finance Committee<br />

Mr. H. John Riley, Jr.<br />

Investment Committee<br />

Mr. Frank J. Hevrdejs<br />

Collections Committee<br />

Mr. Frank N. Carroll<br />

Arts of Africa, and the Indigenous<br />

Pacific Islands, Australia, and<br />

the Americas Subcommittee<br />

Mrs. Jeanie Kilroy Wilson<br />

American Painting and<br />

Sculpture Subcommittee<br />

Mrs. Sima Ladjevardian<br />

and Ms. Franci Neely<br />

(Co-Chairs)<br />

Art of the Islamic Worlds<br />

Subcommittee<br />

Mrs. Phoebe Tudor<br />

Arts of Europe and the<br />

Mediterranean Subcommittee<br />

Mr. Brad Bucher<br />

Latin American Art<br />

Subcommittee<br />

Mr. Jack S. Blanton, Jr.<br />

and Mr. Jesse H. Jones II<br />

(Co-Chairs)<br />

Modern and Contemporary<br />

Art Subcommittee<br />

Mr. James Edward Maloney<br />

and Ms. Joan Morgenstern<br />

(Co-Chairs)<br />

Photography Subcommittee<br />

Ms. Franci Neely and<br />

Mr. Michael S. Zilkha<br />

(Co-Chairs)<br />

Mrs. Lynn Wyatt<br />

(Founding Chair)<br />

Film Subcommittee<br />

BAYOU BEND COLLECTION<br />

AND GARDENS<br />

Ms. Sharon G. Dies<br />

Bayou Bend Committee<br />

Mrs. Carol Jean Moehlman<br />

Bayou Bend Collection<br />

Subcommittee<br />

THE GLASSELL SCHOOL<br />

OF ART<br />

Mr. Brad Bucher<br />

Executive Committee<br />

Mrs. Jereann H. Chaney<br />

Glassell Core Subcommittee<br />

RIENZI<br />

Mrs. Rosslyn F. Crawford<br />

Rienzi Committee<br />

Mr. Richard D. Kinder<br />

Long-Range Planning<br />

Committee<br />

Mr. Richard D. Kinder<br />

Nominating Committee<br />

Dr. Anne S. Chao<br />

Mrs. Nidhika O. Mehta<br />

(Co-Chairs)<br />

Asian Art Subcommittee<br />

Ms. Cecily E. Horton<br />

Decorative Arts Subcommittee<br />

Mr. Jack S. Blanton, Jr.<br />

Prints and Drawings<br />

Subcommittee<br />

Mr. E. J. Hudson<br />

and Ms. Alice C. Simkins<br />

(Co-Chairs)<br />

Conservation Committee<br />

Mrs. Cyvia G. Wolff<br />

Rienzi Collections<br />

Subcommittee<br />

Mrs. Laura Kelsey<br />

Rienzi Garden Subcommittee<br />

Mrs. Anne S. Duncan<br />

Exhibitions Committee<br />

Mrs. Macey Hodges Reasoner<br />

Learning and Interpretation<br />

Committee<br />

Ms. Terry A. Brown<br />

Library Committee<br />

5


REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR<br />

The year that ran from July 2021 through June <strong>2022</strong><br />

demonstrated a decided return to normalcy following<br />

the pandemic. Although patterns of visitation have<br />

changed, a new and youthful audience energized the<br />

Museum, with its memorable exhibitions, distinctive<br />

new acquisitions, and well-attended lectures, concerts,<br />

and films. On Thursday, March 17, <strong>2022</strong>, more than<br />

7,800 visitors came to the Museum, the largest<br />

single-day attendance in the Museum’s history; the<br />

previous record was 6,189. The Nancy and Rich Kinder<br />

Building for modern and contemporary art continued to<br />

attract many first-time visitors to discover the immersive<br />

environments provided by artists El Anatsui, Carlos<br />

Cruz-Diez, Ólafur Elíasson, Gyula Kosice, Yayoi Kusama,<br />

and James Turrell. During this year, the intimate,<br />

walnut-paneled Lynn Wyatt Theater was inaugurated<br />

and the gastronomic restaurant Le Jardinier hit its stride;<br />

both brought new visitors to the Sarofim Campus. For<br />

the staff, our IDEA initiative, led with great sensitivity<br />

by Larry Stokes, Chief Human Resources and Diversity<br />

Officer, brought many insights and greatly enhanced<br />

mutual respect in our workplace culture.<br />

Deborah Roldán, associate director for exhibitions,<br />

skillfully managed the ambitious program of special<br />

exhibitions and installations of the permanent collection,<br />

as seen on pages 96–119. Houston was the exclusive<br />

venue for Virtual Realities: The Art of M.C. Escher from<br />

the Michael S. Sachs Collection, the largest and most<br />

comprehensive exhibition of Escher’s achievement ever<br />

presented. A monumental undertaking, led by Dena<br />

Woodall, curator of prints and drawings, the installation<br />

revealed the fascinating inner workings of the mind of<br />

one of the twentieth century’s most famous, but least<br />

understood, artists through prints, drawings, watercolors,<br />

sculptures, and woodblocks generously lent by Mr. Sachs,<br />

who has devoted much of his career to assembling this<br />

comprehensive collection. We are most grateful to<br />

Mr. Sachs for this unique opportunity.<br />

Among the most ambitious of our programs were<br />

two traveling exhibitions, Afro-Atlantic Histories and<br />

Calder-Picasso. Focusing on the cross-Atlantic trade<br />

of enslaved Africans to the New World, Afro-Atlantic<br />

Histories was conceived by Adriano Pedrosa and the<br />

Museu de Arte de São Paulo and brought to the United<br />

States by our Museum, where curator Kanitra Fletcher<br />

contributed a number of works, many from the <strong>MFAH</strong><br />

collection, that highlight the experiences of the African<br />

diaspora of North America to complement the diasporic<br />

histories of the Caribbean and South America. After<br />

Houston, the exhibition traveled to the National Gallery<br />

of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and,<br />

ultimately, the Dallas Museum of Art. In Houston,<br />

the exhibition was installed by curators Alison de Lima<br />

Greene and Anita Bateman with curatorial assistant<br />

Katie O’Hara in consultation with Ms. Fletcher.<br />

6


Calder-Picasso was conceived by the two grandsons of the<br />

artists, Alexander S. C. Rower and Bernard Ruiz-Picasso,<br />

to examine the fruitful admiration of two artists, one<br />

Spanish, one American, resident in France between the<br />

two world wars. The exhibition, a revelatory exploration<br />

of two very different modernists, was organized by the<br />

Musée National Picasso-Paris in collaboration with the<br />

Calder Foundation and the Fundación Almine y Bernard<br />

Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte. In Houston, curator Ann<br />

Dumas was responsible for the exquisite installation.<br />

Our Museum organized the U.S. tour to the de Young<br />

Museum in San Francisco and the High Museum in<br />

Atlanta. Incomparable Impressionism from the Museum of<br />

Fine Arts, Boston was a last-minute but most welcome<br />

addition to the program. Some one hundred masterworks<br />

from Boston’s exemplary collection of French<br />

Impressionism were lent in an exceptional gesture. I am<br />

personally indebted to Director Matthew Teitelbaum for<br />

making this exhibition available to our appreciative audiences,<br />

and to curator Helga Aurisch for the installation.<br />

We are proud to have shown a number of smaller,<br />

but no less important, exhibitions. Associate curator<br />

Lisa Volpe conceived and realized Georgia O’Keeffe,<br />

Photographer, surprisingly the first exhibition ever<br />

devoted to the impact of O’Keeffe’s photographic<br />

practice on her better-known paintings. This exhibition,<br />

with a prize-winning catalogue, traveled to the Denver<br />

Art Museum, the Cincinnati Art Museum, and the<br />

Addison Gallery of American Art at Andover. We were<br />

fortunate to host Dawoud Bey: An American Project,<br />

a retrospective organized by the San Francisco Museum<br />

of Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American<br />

Art. As an early and consistent collector of Mr. Bey’s<br />

photographs, our museum was a logical host for this<br />

compelling presentation. We were equally proud to<br />

show the unique textile sculptures of Olga de Amaral<br />

in To Weave a Rock, organized by Anna Walker in<br />

collaboration with the Cranbrook Art Museum, as well as<br />

the fascinating multimedia works by the Pakistani-born<br />

artist Shahzia Sikander, a former Glassell School of Art<br />

Core Fellow whom we welcomed back to Houston with<br />

the exhibition Extraordinary Realities, organized by the<br />

RISD Museum and installed by Alison de Lima Greene.<br />

Mari Carmen Ramírez coordinated and installed the<br />

intriguing exhibition devoted to Leandro Erlich’s<br />

legerdemain Seeing Is Believing. We thank the National<br />

Portrait Gallery for sending the portraits of President<br />

Barack Obama and Michelle Obama to Houston as part of<br />

a whistle-stop tour of American museums. Anita Bateman<br />

was responsible for that installation in Cullinan Hall.<br />

Several international collectors have made long-term<br />

loans that enrich our holdings enormously. We remain<br />

indebted to our friends and supporters in Kuwait: the<br />

nearly three hundred masterpieces of Islamic art on<br />

loan from the al-Sabah Collection of Kuwait, graciously<br />

extended by Sheikha Hussa Sabah al-Salem al-Sabah, are<br />

widely consulted by students and appreciated by visitors.<br />

And for much of this past year we have been preparing<br />

galleries in the Caroline Wiess Law Building to house<br />

the Hossein Afshar Galleries for Art of the Islamic<br />

Worlds. Generously endowed by Mr. Afshar of Kuwait,<br />

the galleries will feature loans from his unparalleled<br />

collection of Iranian art, from pre-Islamic to Qajar Iran.<br />

The galleries will open in early 2023, doubling the space<br />

available to Islamic art. We are grateful to the Thoma<br />

family for extending their loan, Spanish Colonial<br />

Paintings from the Thoma Collection. This important group<br />

of paintings prompted the purchase of a magnificent set of<br />

7


REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR<br />

eighteenth-century lacquer screens, made by Indigenous<br />

artists in Mexico, that depict Mexico City and its citizens,<br />

a landmark in our ongoing priority to display the art of<br />

the Americas south of the border. Equally important are<br />

the loans from the Xuzhou Collection of Buddhist Art,<br />

displayed in the galleries of Asian art. With one stroke,<br />

these objects greatly amplify the representation of<br />

Buddhist visual culture at the Museum. We are most<br />

appreciative of the collectors, who wish to remain anonymous,<br />

and to their adviser, curator Hao Sheng.<br />

The Museum’s collections grew substantially. Donors<br />

gave six hundred works of art, valued at $10,008,696,<br />

and the Museum purchased 266 works of art, spending<br />

$15,542,400. They are listed on pages 76–95, and I regret<br />

that there is insufficient space here to mention more<br />

than a few. Among the many distinguished acquisitions<br />

this year, two rise above the rest, both made in Mexico:<br />

the biombos mentioned above and a masterpiece by Diego<br />

Rivera, a newly rediscovered canvas painted in Mexico<br />

City two hundred years later. Saddened by the loss of our<br />

great benefactor Meredith Long in 2020, we welcomed<br />

the beautiful painting by Lee Krasner given by his widow,<br />

Cornelia Cullen Long, in his memory. The addition of a<br />

group of works by Giuseppe Penone and several Latin<br />

American artists from the estate of our dear friend Gary<br />

Mercer is another bittersweet acquisition. Jereann and<br />

Holland Chaney and John MacMahon continue to enrich<br />

our holdings of contemporary art and photography with<br />

great gifts. Francita Stuart Koelsch Ulmer has found<br />

several more exquisite British watercolors to add to her<br />

burgeoning collection at the Museum. And Frank Carroll<br />

once again bestowed fine examples of African art.<br />

which stood sentinel at the American Pavilion of the<br />

Venice Biennale. Lenore Tawney’s Dove, Minol Araki’s<br />

Lotus Pond, Marilyn Minter’s Smash, Pipilotti Rist’s<br />

Peeping Freedom Shutters for Olga Shapir, Adriana<br />

Corral and Vincent Valdez’s Requiem, and Ron Mueck’s<br />

Woman with Shopping testify to the global range of<br />

modern and contemporary acquisitions. We purchased<br />

several additional examples of midcentury Italian design<br />

from Dennis Freedman, creating the most important<br />

corpus of such work in North America. The photography<br />

department added a number of key works from<br />

the nineteenth century, most notably Édouard Baldus’s<br />

album Chemin de fer du Nord. A magnificent silver<br />

Torah crown, made in eighteenth-century Venice, was<br />

the debut purchase for the much-anticipated Albert and<br />

Ethel Herzstein Gallery for Judaica, which should open<br />

in late 2023. When that gallery is completed, it will be the<br />

only one in a major U.S. encyclopedic museum dedicated<br />

to art created for Jewish homes and synagogues.<br />

The department of learning and interpretation, headed<br />

by Caroline Goeser, revived in-person programming<br />

at the Museum. Dr. Goeser outlines their achievements<br />

in her report, but here I wish to congratulate the department<br />

for its extensive reach throughout the community.<br />

The department collaborated with more than a hundred<br />

community partners to offer performances and activities<br />

on and off campus; these collaborations, maintained by<br />

Lourdes Remond, manager of community engagement,<br />

are essential to our success. We are grateful to our partners<br />

at Houston Community College, Rice University,<br />

University of St. Thomas, Texas Southern University,<br />

and the University of Houston.<br />

Among the purchases, works by African American<br />

artists take pride of place: Jack Whitten’s Natural<br />

Selection and Simone Leigh’s monumental Satellite,<br />

The free admission that was extended to nearly<br />

one-third of the 794,411 visits across our facilities was<br />

supported by $20.9 million in grants and donations for<br />

8


operations, a fund-raising program brilliantly overseen<br />

by Chief Development Officer Amy Purvis and her staff.<br />

The federal COVID relief grant of $6.14 million through<br />

the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant greatly lifted<br />

our revenues this year, thanks to this unique federal<br />

program. We are especially grateful for this muchneeded<br />

support to stabilize our operations following<br />

the pandemic.<br />

The <strong>MFAH</strong> house museums, Rienzi and Bayou Bend<br />

Collection and Gardens, flourished in the postpandemic<br />

environment, although Christmas Village<br />

was suspended for the second time in December 2021;<br />

we look forward to resuming this tradition in <strong>2022</strong>.<br />

The staff and volunteers of both house museums<br />

created a number of online programs for our public,<br />

and many continued even after we instituted in-person<br />

tours and activities. Attendance is growing, and the<br />

gardens at both houses are resplendent after the shock<br />

of the February 2021 freeze. I am especially grateful to<br />

the docents at Rienzi and Bayou Bend for resuming<br />

their essential roles as interpreters for the general public.<br />

The crucial $6 million restoration of the Buffalo Bayou<br />

stream bank at Bayou Bend was largely completed by<br />

summer <strong>2022</strong>, on time and according to budget, thanks<br />

to the conscientious oversight of Chief Operating Officer<br />

Christian Schörnich.<br />

The Glassell School of Art continued its post-pandemic<br />

rebound, with enrollment at the Junior School especially<br />

robust. At the close of the year, Joseph Havel retired after<br />

thirty years at the helm. He had made the school into<br />

Houston’s essential laboratory for creativity, seeding<br />

the city with generations of artists who now illuminate<br />

the region. A colleague of consummate professionalism<br />

and an artist remarkable for a practice composed of<br />

unforgettable sculptures and images both delicate and<br />

ambitious, Mr. Havel is returning full time to his studio.<br />

We are happy to welcome his distinguished successor,<br />

Paul Coffey, vice provost of the School of the Art<br />

Institute of Chicago. In addition, we welcomed curators<br />

Anita Bateman and Elizabeth Essner, Todd Lacy, head of<br />

security and safety, and Toni Wood, head of marketing<br />

and sales.<br />

During fiscal year 2021–<strong>2022</strong>, the staff of 601<br />

professionals was enhanced and supported by 1,976<br />

docents and volunteers. Our operations required an<br />

expenditure of $68.8 million, of which $42.9 million<br />

(55 percent of the $78.1 million revenue total) was<br />

provided by the Museum’s endowment, and $20.9<br />

million (27 percent of revenue) by fund-raising and<br />

gifts, and $14.3 million (18 percent of revenue) was<br />

earned income. The City of Houston allocated $716,731<br />

(less than 1 percent of revenue) in Hotel Occupancy<br />

Tax funds to the Museum. As always, our financial<br />

operations are guaranteed by our extraordinary Chief<br />

Financial Officer Eric Anyah, who also oversees all the<br />

revenue-producing departments.<br />

In June <strong>2022</strong>, we lost Fayez S. Sarofim, a giant in our<br />

community. For almost fifty years, his firm Fayez Sarofim<br />

& Co. had managed a significant share of the Museum’s<br />

endowment, attaining an impressive annualized return<br />

just shy of 12 percent over those five decades, while<br />

overseeing the growth of the endowment into the third<br />

largest held by a U.S. museum. Over that same period, he<br />

assembled the greatest private collection of American<br />

art in Houston, and one of the most extensive in the<br />

country, all the while generously supporting the Museum<br />

with gifts of art and donations throughout the years; his<br />

was the largest single gift to the Museum’s recent capital<br />

campaign. Mr. Sarofim was an important adviser to my<br />

predecessor, Peter C. Marzio, and to myself. His impact<br />

9


REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR<br />

on the city of Houston and on charitable institutions such<br />

as the Brown Foundation, Inc., the Houston Endowment,<br />

M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the Menil Collection,<br />

and Rice University cannot be overstated, nor can our<br />

gratitude. We extend our profound condolences to his<br />

widow and his family.<br />

This year also marked the final term of Rich Kinder’s<br />

chairmanship of the Board of Trustees. For nine years,<br />

he has steadfastly led the institution through the most<br />

important transformation in its history—four new<br />

buildings were erected during his tenure, increasing the<br />

galleries by 50 percent, and some ten thousand works<br />

of art valued at more than $270 million were acquired—<br />

insuring all the while that the Museum ran on a balanced<br />

budget, ultimately accumulating a rainy-day fund of<br />

surpluses amounting to nearly $19 million, while the<br />

endowment grew from $1.1 billion to more than $1.6<br />

billion. The generosity of Nancy and Rich Kinder and<br />

the Kinder Foundation is now legendary in their adopted<br />

city of Houston, which they have transformed with an<br />

extensive network of parks and green spaces. Our recent<br />

campus expansion was funded through a $476 million<br />

capital campaign, of which $75 million was donated by<br />

the Kinder Foundation. Less well known is Rich Kinder’s<br />

extraordinary generosity with his time and expertise. The<br />

Museum could not have accomplished what it did without<br />

him. Personally, I am immensely grateful to him for his<br />

guidance and leadership as Chairman, and, on behalf of<br />

the entire institution, I am honored to express our most<br />

profound thanks for his selfless service.<br />

As always, my final appreciation goes to the Trustees,<br />

staff, volunteers, and visitors who make the Museum of<br />

Fine Arts, Houston, such an exciting place for all people.<br />

Thank you.<br />

—Gary Tinterow<br />

Director<br />

The Margaret Alkek Williams Chair<br />

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston<br />

10


RESOLUTIONS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES<br />

WHEREAS,<br />

WHEREAS,<br />

WHEREAS,<br />

WHEREAS,<br />

WHEREAS,<br />

WHEREAS,<br />

WHEREAS,<br />

WHEREAS,<br />

RICHARD D. KINDER has been a member of the Board of Trustees of the<br />

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, since 1989, serving honorably as a Life Trustee<br />

from 2006, and with great distinction as Chairman from 2013 until <strong>2022</strong>; and<br />

Richard D. Kinder has served on the Finance Committee from 1997 to present;<br />

the Long-Range Planning Committee, from 1998 to the present; the Nominating<br />

Committee, from 2005 to the present; and has chaired the Executive Committee<br />

since 2013; and<br />

as Chairman, Richard D. Kinder has provided immense strength to the Board<br />

and Staff, setting a superb example of leadership and providing invaluable<br />

counsel in countless matters, great and small; and<br />

as Chairman, Richard D. Kinder presided over the most extensive expansion in<br />

the Museum’s history, for which nearly $500 million was donated to fund the<br />

largest cultural construction project in North America; and<br />

as Chairman, Richard D. Kinder presided over an unparalleled growth in the<br />

Museum’s endowment, from $1.1 billion to more than $1.6 billion, and an<br />

equivalent growth of the permanent collection, adding nearly 10,000 works<br />

of art; and<br />

Richard D. Kinder and his wife, Nancy Kinder, provided the lead gift that<br />

initiated the Capital Campaign and enabled the construction of the Nancy and<br />

Rich Kinder Building for modern and contemporary art; and<br />

Richard D. Kinder and Nancy Kinder provided the Kinder Challenge Grant,<br />

which guaranteed the fulfillment of the Capital Campaign; and<br />

Richard D. Kinder and Nancy Kinder have demonstrated remarkable dedication<br />

through their transformative support of nearly every Museum fundraising<br />

initiative, including capital projects, traveling exhibitions, educational<br />

programming, and fundraising events;<br />

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED:<br />

THAT, We, the Trustees and Staff of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, recognize Richard D.<br />

Kinder’s extraordinary achievements and hereby express our immense gratitude for his<br />

service to the Museum and to the citizens of Houston; and<br />

THAT, accordingly, RICHARD D. KINDER is hereby appointed CHAIRMAN EMERITUS of the<br />

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and it is our fervent wish that in this appointed capacity<br />

he will continue to support the Museum with his wise counsel.<br />

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and the seal of this Corporation<br />

this 21 day of June, <strong>2022</strong>.<br />

Anne S. Duncan<br />

Secretary to the Board of Trustees<br />

11


REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR<br />

OPENING OF THE LYNN WYATT THEATER<br />

Lynn Wyatt<br />

The debut of the Lynn Wyatt Theater inside the<br />

Museum’s new Nancy and Rich Kinder Building<br />

was as grand as the Houston icon herself. After a<br />

greeting of champagne and popcorn—Mrs. Wyatt’s<br />

favorite movie snack—Rich Kinder, chairman of<br />

the Board of Trustees, welcomed a hundred guests<br />

inside the refined new space. Three short films were<br />

presented, including an interview with Mrs. Wyatt,<br />

a lifelong cinema lover, discussing the Museum’s film<br />

program; a short directed by the acclaimed filmmaker<br />

Lisa Immordino Vreeland featuring Lynn Wyatt; and<br />

a special film created by the Museum featuring images<br />

and footage of Wyatt throughout the years alongside<br />

appearances from Museum Director Gary Tinterow,<br />

Mayor Sylvester Turner, filmmaker Richard Linklater,<br />

Patrick Summers, artistic and music director of<br />

Houston Grand Opera, Stanton Welch, artistic director<br />

of the Houston Ballet, and Todd Waite, resident acting<br />

company member of the Alley Theatre. Following<br />

the screenings, Tinterow thanked Mrs. Wyatt for<br />

her decades of tireless leadership and invited her<br />

to take the dais to officially open the new theater.<br />

12


Rich Kinder; Lynn Wyatt; Nancy Kinder<br />

Mayor Sylvester Turner; Lynn Wyatt<br />

Lynn Wyatt; Gary Tinterow<br />

13


ACCESSIONS<br />

GUERCINO (GIOVANNI FRANCESCO<br />

BARBIERI), Italian, 1591–1666<br />

Mars Brandishing a Sword, c. 1640<br />

Pen and brown iron gall ink on laid paper<br />

Sheet: 10 x 7 3/4 in. (25.4 x 19.7 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Director’s Accessions Endowment<br />

and the Buddy Taub Foundation,<br />

Dennis A. Roach and Jill Roach,<br />

Directors<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.10<br />

Giovanni Francesco Barbieri was called<br />

Guercino because of his pronounced<br />

squint. He was largely self-taught but was<br />

influenced by the Carracci family in Bologna,<br />

who promoted naturalism and stressed<br />

the importance of drawing. Guercino made<br />

this animated study of Mars, the god of<br />

war, using a goose-feather pen dunked<br />

in ink, his favorite medium. Through the<br />

vigorous use of the pen, the artist rapidly<br />

rendered Mars’s sense of movement and<br />

gave expression to the god’s rage. The<br />

masterful swirling strokes that describe<br />

Mars’s cloak and the denser concentrations<br />

of ink reveal the energy and speed<br />

with which Guercino executed this drawing.<br />

DMW<br />

14


15


SIMON VOUET, French, 1688–1754<br />

Portrait of a Woman Wearing Pearls<br />

and a Crown of Flowers, c. 1632–35<br />

Pastel on beige laid paper<br />

Sheet: 10 13/16 x 8 5/16 in.<br />

(27.4 x 21.1 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Alice Pratt Brown Endowment<br />

2021.726<br />

The French artist Simon Vouet rose to<br />

prominence in Italy before serving in 1627<br />

as premier painter to King Louis XIII in<br />

France. Known for introducing the Italian<br />

Baroque painting style to France, Vouet was<br />

also one of the leading seventeenth-century<br />

draftsmen. Rendered from life, this pastel<br />

portrait is of an aristocratic woman, possibly<br />

one of the ladies-in-waiting to Anne of<br />

Austria, Queen of France, and a member<br />

of King Louis XIII’s court. It was part of<br />

an acclaimed group of portrait drawings,<br />

rediscovered in the late twentieth century,<br />

made for the king’s amusement and to<br />

teach him how to draw.<br />

DMW<br />

16


Robe à la française (dress and petticoat)<br />

France, 1765–80<br />

Silk brocade with silver floss and fluting<br />

65 3/4 x 118 7/8 in. (167 x 302 cm)<br />

Gift of Cecily E. Horton<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.115<br />

The robe à la française, a style of formal<br />

court dress in eighteenth-century Europe,<br />

was the product of an age that wanted, at<br />

any cost, to convey grace and aesthetic<br />

perfection. The style incorporated large<br />

pleats from the back of the neckline,<br />

which allowed for expansive amounts of<br />

textiles. In this example, the expense of<br />

the silver-flossed silk and the generous<br />

amount of fabric used to create the flowing<br />

back signal that this dress was intended<br />

for an event of some distinction. Period<br />

candlelight would have sparkled across<br />

its silvered surface, adding to the wearer’s<br />

sumptuous display.<br />

CG<br />

17


ALBRECHT DÜRER, German, 1471–1528<br />

Martyrdom of the Ten Thousand,<br />

c. 1496–97<br />

Woodcut on laid paper<br />

15 3/8 x 11 1/4 in. (39 x 28.5 cm)<br />

Gift of Laurie Taylor Mitchell<br />

in honor of Diane Wolfthal<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.80<br />

Brutal methods of torture and execution<br />

are on full display in this early woodcut by<br />

Albrecht Dürer. The scene derives from<br />

a popular medieval legend in Jacobus<br />

de Voragine’s Legenda Aurea, in which<br />

ten thousand Roman soldiers, who had<br />

converted to Christianity and refused to<br />

sacrifi ce to the Roman gods after battle,<br />

were sent to their death by the king of<br />

Persia on the orders of the emperor. Saint<br />

Acacius, who had encouraged the soldiers,<br />

has a drill bored into one eye socket. Dürer<br />

later made a painting after the print for<br />

Frederick the Wise, who owned relics from<br />

the massacre.<br />

DMW<br />

18


ADRIAEN VAN OSTADE,<br />

Dutch, 1610–1685<br />

The Family, 1647<br />

Etching on laid paper, state II/VII<br />

Sheet: 7 5/16 x 6 7/16 in. (18.5 x 16.3 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Art + Paper, Dr. and Mrs. Craig S.<br />

Calvert, Linda and David Dillahunty<br />

at Art + Paper <strong>2022</strong>, and the Alvin S.<br />

Romansky Prints and Drawings<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.91<br />

Adriaen van Ostade became the Netherlands’<br />

foremost painter of peasant and “low” life<br />

genre paintings, and was second only<br />

to Rembrandt van Rijn as the leading<br />

seventeenth-century Dutch printmaker.<br />

This superb impression demonstrates Van<br />

Ostade’s consummate technical skill. He<br />

used meticulous hatching and crosshatching<br />

to create a sense of depth and atmosphere,<br />

casting the recesses of the room into shadow<br />

and drawing the viewer’s attention to the<br />

brightly lit fi gures of the mother, father,<br />

and three children in the foreground.<br />

Rembrandt’s influence can be seen in the<br />

intimacy of the figures amid their cluttered<br />

surroundings, echoing his Holy Family<br />

imagery.<br />

DMW<br />

19


Design by WILLIAM KENT,<br />

English, 1685–1748<br />

Hall Chair, c. 1730–40<br />

Mahogany<br />

35 1/16 x 22 7/16 x 20 1/2 in.<br />

(89 x 57 x 52 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Rienzi Accessions Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.180<br />

This mahogany chair is one of sixteen<br />

designed for Chiswick House, a neo-<br />

Palladian villa near London, which was<br />

the creation of Richard Boyle, the 3rd Earl<br />

of Burlington. Lord Burlington was an<br />

accomplished architect and, with renowned<br />

designer William Kent, endeavored to<br />

express his personal vision of antiquity at<br />

Chiswick. Sized to complement the house’s<br />

small scale, the chair’s design echoes the<br />

classical pediments over the principal interior<br />

doors as well as the massive outdoor portico<br />

of the front elevation. Although classical in<br />

inspiration, the design is idiosyncratic, individual,<br />

and unexpectedly animate. It is unique<br />

among eighteenth-century chair designs.<br />

CG<br />

JOHANN CHRISTOPH HEYNE,<br />

American, born Germany, 1715–1781<br />

Flagon, c. 1754–80<br />

Pewter<br />

11 3/16 x 7 1/2 x 6 3/16 in.<br />

(28.4 x 19.1 x 15.7 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Susan Neptune<br />

B.<strong>2022</strong>.7<br />

The pewterer Johann Christoph Heyne<br />

was born in Saxony in 1715 and served<br />

his apprenticeship there. He worked as a<br />

journeyman in Sweden before settling in<br />

the Moravian community of Bethlehem,<br />

Pennsylvania. He later moved to Lancaster,<br />

where he remained until his death in<br />

1781. His work was unknown until 1928.<br />

Heyne’s flagon, with its elegant, tapering<br />

form, represents a combination of German<br />

and Scandinavian elements, along with<br />

components that had become common on<br />

Anglo-American pewter, closely reflecting<br />

both his heritage and the trajectory of his<br />

career and travels.<br />

BCB<br />

20


Torah Crown<br />

Venice, mid-18th century<br />

Silver and silver-gilt<br />

8 7/8 x 10 1/4 in. (22.5 x 27 x 28.5 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Brown Foundation Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.228<br />

Jewish ceremonial art, or Judaica, carries<br />

the stories of Jewish culture across its<br />

millennia of existence. Among these works<br />

of art are items made to adorn the Torah<br />

scroll, protecting and glorifying the sacred<br />

text. Exuberant, highly decorated Torah<br />

crowns are among the trademarks of<br />

Venetian synagogue Judaica. The small,<br />

gilt, cast motifs on this crown include<br />

ritual references such as a handwashing<br />

laver, a menorah, and the Temple in<br />

Jerusalem. The rich decoration is indicative<br />

of the wealth and influential status of the<br />

Jewish congregation in the Venetian citystate<br />

in the eighteenth century.<br />

CG<br />

21


Manufactured by WORCESTER<br />

PORCELAIN MANUFACTORY<br />

(Flight, Barr & Barr Period),<br />

English, active 1813–1840<br />

Painted by THOMAS BAXTER,<br />

English, 1782–1821<br />

Cabinet Cup and Stand, c. 1814–16<br />

Porcelain and gilding<br />

Cup: 3 1/4 x 3 7/8 x 3 5/16 in.<br />

(8.3 x 9.9 x 8.4 cm)<br />

Stand: 1 1/8 x 5 5/16 in. (2.8 x 13.5 cm)<br />

The Rienzi Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by the Rienzi<br />

Accessions Endowment, and<br />

Gary and Marion Glober<br />

2021.386<br />

The portrait on this cup is of Mirza Abul<br />

Hassan Khan (1776–1845), a diplomat who<br />

was sent to England in 1809 to negotiate a<br />

treaty between Great Britain and Persia on<br />

behalf of Fath-Ali Shah Qajar, the second<br />

Shah of Qajar Iran. Abul Hassan became<br />

a fi gure of much fascination and was the<br />

popular subject of English portraits, prints,<br />

poetry, and even painted ceramics. This<br />

cup was painted by Thomas Baxter, the<br />

head of the painting workshop at Worcester<br />

from 1814 to 1816 and one of the most<br />

highly regarded porcelain painters of the<br />

nineteenth century.<br />

MF<br />

22


Banner<br />

Ottoman Turkey, late 17th century<br />

or later<br />

Silk; woven with metallic thread<br />

115 7/8 x 91 3/4 in. (294.3 x 233 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by Rania<br />

and Jamal H. Daniel; Lily and Hamid<br />

Kooros; Dr. Aziz Shaibani; and the<br />

Director’s Accessions Endowment<br />

2021.317<br />

This shield-shaped banner, or sançak in<br />

Turkish, follows the characteristic format<br />

for these Ottoman banners. The prominent,<br />

centrally located bifurcated sword<br />

with a dragon-headed hilt is known as<br />

Dhu’l Fiqar. This sword represents military<br />

victory and is thought to have belonged<br />

to Ali, the cousin and son-in-law of the<br />

Prophet Muhammad. The surrounding<br />

roundels are inscribed with the names of<br />

Allah and the Prophet, as well as Abu Bakr,<br />

Umar, Uthman, and Ali, the first four leaders<br />

of the Muslim community. Banners such as<br />

this one may have been carried on military<br />

campaigns and on pilgrimages to Mecca.<br />

AF<br />

Musket<br />

‘Alawid Morocco, 18th century<br />

Silver and brass with niello<br />

and glass jewels<br />

8 3/4 x 3 1/4 x 61 3/8 in.<br />

(22.2 x 8.3 x 155.9 cm)<br />

Gift of the Honorable and<br />

Mrs. Edward P. Djerejian<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.114<br />

This armament belongs to a category of<br />

musket once referred to as a moukahla or<br />

Kabyle musket, named after the Kabyle<br />

Berbers indigenous to Kabylia in northern<br />

Algeria. Its engravings and inlays form<br />

swirling vegetal, floral, and geometric<br />

patterns, all of which are typical of Islamic<br />

design. Firearms reached Islamic lands in<br />

the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries<br />

due to trade and conflict with Europe.<br />

AF<br />

23


24


-<br />

Biombo with Views of Mexico City<br />

Viceregal Mexico, 18th century<br />

Twelve-panel folding screen; oil on red<br />

maki-e lacquer on panel, with gilt wood<br />

mounts and linen backing<br />

Open: 67 x 150 3/4 x 1 1/8 in.<br />

(170.2 x 382.9 x 2.9 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Agnes Cullen Arnold<br />

Endowment Fund<br />

2021.537<br />

Japanese folding screens were fi rst<br />

introduced to Viceregal Mexico as exports<br />

by way of the Manila galleon trade and by<br />

Japanese embassies that brought them<br />

to Mexico as gifts in the early decades<br />

of the seventeenth century. The Spanish<br />

word biombo is a transliteration of the<br />

Japanese word for folding screen, byobu.<br />

The Mexican art form was inspired by its<br />

Japanese prototype. This biombo, created<br />

in Mexico City by Mexican artists, presents<br />

views of eighteenth-century Mexico City,<br />

including architectural monuments, natural<br />

landmarks, and its diverse population.<br />

JA<br />

25


Page from a Botanical Album:<br />

Garcenia gutta<br />

Calcutta, India, c. 1812–14<br />

Commissioned by William Roxburgh<br />

Graphite, ink, and watercolor<br />

on wove paper<br />

Sheet: 9 1/4 x 6 11/16 in. (23.5 x 17 cm)<br />

Gift of Edward and Kendall Ondarza<br />

2021.534<br />

Garcenia gutta is the botanical name<br />

for the Malabar tamarind plant native to<br />

Tamil Nadu in South India. An unnamed<br />

Indian artist has produced this idiosyncratic<br />

image, unique to Indian botanical studies,<br />

providing a super-realistic image shown<br />

from multiple vantage points and at the<br />

same time including small sketches of the<br />

typical pumpkin-like fruit and its flower.<br />

This work is part of a group of fi fteen<br />

botanical studies commissioned by the<br />

Scottish researcher William Roxburgh.<br />

AGP<br />

26


Pair of Beaded and Quilled Moccasins<br />

with Horse-Track Design<br />

Lakota people, c. 1870–1900<br />

Hide, softened and dyed porcupine<br />

quills, beads, cotton cloth, thread,<br />

and tin cones<br />

Shoes (each): 11 in. (28 cm) length<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Alfred C. Glassell, Jr.<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.54<br />

Quilled moccasins are traditionally made<br />

by women, bringing honor to their families<br />

and lending them prestige for their skill.<br />

Quill work is considered connected to<br />

the supernatural. The artist is believed<br />

to commune with higher powers during<br />

its creation. The designs and colors are<br />

a visual language conveying signifi cant,<br />

multifaceted meanings. Yellow, white,<br />

black, and red are traditional colors,<br />

although Europeans introduced new<br />

colors and materials, like the blue beads<br />

seen here. The differently colored U shapes<br />

on the heels represent horse tracks and<br />

can be read many ways—as symbols of<br />

success, speed, or strength.<br />

CD<br />

27


AMMI PHILLIPS, American, 1788–1865<br />

Man with Ruffled Jabot, c. 1825<br />

Woman with Lace Collar, c. 1825<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

Each: 32 1/16 x 25 1/2 in. (81.5 x 64.8 cm)<br />

Museum purchases funded by<br />

Friends of American Arts<br />

2021.535, 2021.536<br />

Born in Connecticut in 1788, Ammi Phillips<br />

was a prolific portrait painter whose career<br />

spanned more than fi fty years. Very little<br />

is known about his artistic training, yet<br />

through his paintings of wealthy sitters<br />

throughout Connecticut, upstate New York,<br />

and Massachusetts, historians have been<br />

able to trace his career and maturing style.<br />

Phillips’s fi nest works are characterized<br />

by their radical simplicity and saturated<br />

colors, and by the individualized, though<br />

formulaic, features of the sitters. In this<br />

pair of portraits, the sitters’ penetrating<br />

gazes and taut linear silhouettes exemplify<br />

Phillips’s signature style.<br />

KHW<br />

28


FPO<br />

29


JOHN CONSTABLE, British, 1776–1837<br />

Illustration to Stanza III of Grey’s Elegy,<br />

“Save that, from yonder ivy-mantled<br />

tower / The moping owl doth to the<br />

moon complain,” 1833–35<br />

Watercolor on wove paper<br />

Sheet (approx.): 4 7/8 x 7 1/2 in.<br />

(12.4 x 19 cm)<br />

The Stuart Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by Francita Stuart<br />

Koelsch Ulmer in honor of The<br />

Honorable Anne and Terence Mallinson<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.81<br />

JOHN CONSTABLE, British, 1776–1837<br />

Illustration to Stanza V of Grey’s Elegy,<br />

“The breezy call of incense-breathing<br />

Morn / The swallow twitt’ring from<br />

the straw-built shed,” 1833–35<br />

Watercolor on wove paper<br />

Sheet (approx.): 5 3/8 x 7 in.<br />

(13.6 x 17.8 cm)<br />

The Stuart Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by Francita Stuart<br />

Koelsch Ulmer in memory of Pauline<br />

Ella Smith and in honor of Mollie<br />

Harlow Zumwalt<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.82<br />

30


JOHN CONSTABLE, British, 1776–1837<br />

Illustration to Stanza XI of Grey’s<br />

Elegy, “Can storied urn or animated<br />

bust / Back to its mansion call the<br />

fleeting breath?” 1883–85<br />

Watercolor on wove paper<br />

Sheet (approx.): 4 3/4 x 6 9/16 in.<br />

(12 x 16.6 cm)<br />

The Stuart Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by Francita Stuart<br />

Koelsch Ulmer in honor of Halbert<br />

Stuart Koelsch<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.83<br />

JOHN CONSTABLE, British, 1776–1837<br />

A letter addressed to John Martin,<br />

dated 9th July 1835, containing<br />

a drawing of Stoke Poges church, 1835<br />

Ink on wove paper<br />

Sheet (approx.): 8 7/8 x 7 5/16 in.<br />

(22.5 x 18.5 cm)<br />

The Stuart Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by Francita Stuart<br />

Koelsch Ulmer in honor of Jon Evans<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.84<br />

John Constable is one of Britain’s most<br />

signifi cant landscape painters and a key<br />

fi gure in British Romantic art of the early<br />

nineteenth century. These three watercolors<br />

and a related letter were preserved in an<br />

album completed by 1835. The artist made<br />

them for his friend and collaborator John<br />

Martin, who encouraged Constable to<br />

produce images to accompany thirty-three<br />

stanzas of Thomas Grey’s Elegy Written in a<br />

Country Church-Yard, an inspiration for many<br />

landscape painters of the day. The letter<br />

reveals Constable’s eagerness to participate<br />

in the project and includes a pen-and-ink<br />

sketch of Stoke Poges church, where Grey<br />

was entombed.<br />

DMW<br />

31


HENRY P. MOORE,<br />

American, 1835–1911<br />

Slaves of Rebel Gen. T. F. Drayton,<br />

Hilton Head, S.C., 1861–62<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

5 1/8 x 8 1/4 in. (13 x 21 cm)<br />

Museum purchase, funded by<br />

the Buddy Taub Foundation,<br />

Dennis A. Roach and Jill Roach,<br />

Directors<br />

2021.314<br />

When Union troops landed on Hilton<br />

Head Island, South Carolina, in late 1861,<br />

they found that Confederate General<br />

Thomas Fenwick Drayton—like all the<br />

island’s White inhabitants—had fled,<br />

leaving behind his 700-acre plantation and<br />

the 102 men, women, and children whom<br />

he had enslaved there. This photograph<br />

by the New Hampshire photographer<br />

Henry P. Moore depicts people not yet<br />

free, who continued to work the fields now<br />

held by Union soldiers. The Emancipation<br />

Proclamation was still a year away.<br />

MD<br />

32


JOHN BEVAN HAZARD,<br />

English, 1831–1892<br />

[Work Horse and Hay Cart, Bristol,<br />

England], 1850s<br />

Salted paper print from glass negative<br />

5 1/16 x 7 5/16 in. (12.8 x 18.5 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Carl Niendorff, Jean L. Karotkin,<br />

Joan Morgenstern, James Edward<br />

Maloney, and Leslie Blanton<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.41<br />

Although little is known about John Bevan<br />

Hazard, this photograph speaks lovingly<br />

of disappearing traditions in the 1850s, as<br />

rural life in England was transformed by<br />

the railroads, steam power, and mechanical<br />

agricultural equipment. Adjusting his lens<br />

to position the sturdy workhorse and heavily<br />

burdened wagon against a softly blurred<br />

background, Hazard granted them a starring<br />

role, while two dogs alongside might easily<br />

be missed by all but the most careful<br />

observer. Beyond this print’s physical<br />

beauty, the photograph is an expression of<br />

moral worth in tradition, nature, and rural<br />

life and labor—considered a vanishing<br />

set of values.<br />

MD<br />

33


Oshele (Currency Blade)<br />

Nkutshu or Ndengese people,<br />

Congo Free State, c. 1875–1925<br />

Iron<br />

23 3/4 x 20 1/2 x 3/8 in.<br />

(60.3 x 52 x 1 cm)<br />

Gift of Frank Carroll<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.13<br />

Modeled on a multibladed throwing knife,<br />

this oshele, or currency blade, functions<br />

as a prestigious currency for important<br />

exchanges and the purchase of luxury<br />

items. It takes an incredible amount of<br />

skill to create the thin, elongated forms<br />

on this oshele, requiring a combination<br />

of great force and meticulous hammering.<br />

Iron as a medium holds high cultural value<br />

throughout Africa due to its abundance,<br />

versatility, and the ritualistic symbolism<br />

associated with it. Blacksmiths are held<br />

in high esteem for their specialized knowledge<br />

and close relationship with iron.<br />

Their ability to forge ironworks is likened<br />

to giving birth and creating life.<br />

CD<br />

34


Mvwala (Staff) Finial<br />

Kongo Yombe people,<br />

Kingdom of Kongo, 19th century<br />

Wood<br />

8 7/8 x 1 3/4 x 1 1/2 in.<br />

(22.6 x 4.4 x 3.8 cm)<br />

Gift of Frank Carroll<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.15<br />

This finial comes from a mvwala, a scepter<br />

that was a symbol of rank carried by Kongo<br />

chiefs and kings. The ornament highlights<br />

the masterful carving of the Kongo peoples,<br />

reflecting the great care dedicated to detail.<br />

Staffs were associated with the Kongo<br />

foundation myth and were believed to be<br />

bridges between chiefs and their ancestors.<br />

The female fi gure refers to the role of<br />

women in the support and continuation<br />

of the community. The pair below consists<br />

of a herald, announcing an important<br />

event, and a prisoner, whose arms and legs<br />

are bound.<br />

CD<br />

Chief’s Stool<br />

Babanki people, German Kamerun or<br />

British Cameroon, early 20th century<br />

Wood, beads, and string<br />

16 3/8 x 15 1/4 in. diam.<br />

(41.6 x 38.7 cm)<br />

Gift of Frank Carroll<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.109<br />

This chief’s stool belonged to Chief<br />

Vugha II of Babanki Kijem, Bamenda<br />

Province, in the Cameroon Grassfi elds.<br />

These stools are carved with symbols<br />

reserved for noble offi ce and equate<br />

roughly to thrones in European traditions.<br />

The carved standing fi gures supporting<br />

this stool’s seat may represent the chief’s<br />

subjects or ancestors and thus literally<br />

support the chief seated upon them,<br />

integrating form and function. Kings,<br />

chiefs, and nobles have a stool carved at<br />

the beginning of their reign with symbols<br />

important to their family lineage, but<br />

they typically have multiple stools in their<br />

possession for different purposes.<br />

CD<br />

35


MARCEL BREUER, American,<br />

born Hungary, 1902–1981<br />

Manufactured by Isokon Furniture<br />

Company, British, active 1932–1939<br />

Short Chair, designed 1937,<br />

made 1937–39<br />

Birch and plywood<br />

30 13/16 x 23 5/8 x 37 13/16 in.<br />

(78.2 x 60 x 96 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Design Council, <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.65<br />

Although closely associated with the<br />

Bauhaus, Marcel Breuer had a long career<br />

afterward as a visionary architect and<br />

furniture designer in the 20th century. In<br />

1935 Breuer immigrated to England, where<br />

he was asked by his Bauhaus associate<br />

Walter Gropius to design plywood furniture<br />

for the British firm Isokon. For the next year,<br />

Breuer worked on a bent plywood version of<br />

his well-known aluminum Short Chair. He<br />

found that he needed to alter the shape and<br />

curves of the plywood seat and back as well<br />

as add supports for strength. Short Chair<br />

was in production for two years, making this<br />

example quite rare.<br />

CS<br />

36


CASSIO M’BOY (DA ROCHA MATOS),<br />

Brazilian, 1896–1986<br />

Tapestry, c. 1935<br />

Wool<br />

27 3/16 x 54 7/8 x 9/16 in.<br />

(69 x 139.4 x 1.5 cm)<br />

Gift of Adolpho Leirner in<br />

honor of Richard Wortham III<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.117<br />

CASSIO M’BOY (DA ROCHA MATOS),<br />

Brazilian, 1896–1986<br />

Chair, c. 1933<br />

Madeira wood and upholstery<br />

39 x 17 5/8 x 20 1/2 in.<br />

(99 x 44.7 x 52.1 cm)<br />

Gift of Adolpho Leirner<br />

in honor of Sam Gorman<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.116<br />

Cassio M’Boy’s Tapestry follows the tenets<br />

of French and English Art Deco carpet design<br />

in its bold use of color, radiating and overlapping<br />

geometric shapes, and clear linear<br />

composition. In addition, the thick pile of<br />

the wool, determined for comfort, signals its<br />

use as a functional, rather than ornamental,<br />

work. Aesthetically, this design is closer in<br />

comparison to Art Deco textile and carpet<br />

designs by the French artist Sonia Delaunay<br />

and the American Edward McKnight-Kauffer<br />

than to examples by his Brazilian compatriots<br />

of the period.<br />

CS<br />

In the mid-1920s, Brazilian artists like<br />

Cassio M’Boy learned about the Art Deco<br />

style through personal connections with<br />

Paris. In response, he began to design<br />

Art Deco–influenced furniture, decorative<br />

objects, and fabrics in the 1930s. This<br />

chair, one of an original set of four by<br />

M’Boy, demonstrates a preference for<br />

geometric abstraction. With its geometric<br />

inlay providing a strong graphic image,<br />

its decoration is more solid, elemental,<br />

and constructivist than European<br />

examples. Although Art Deco was an<br />

international style in the truest sense,<br />

Latin American versions, as seen in this<br />

chair by M’Boy, are mostly unknown outside<br />

of the region.<br />

CS<br />

37


FRANCISCO MATTO, Uruguayan,<br />

1911–1995<br />

Pintura constructiva (bodegón)<br />

(Constructive Painting [Still Life]),<br />

c. 1946<br />

Oil on board<br />

31 1/2 x 40 in. (80 x 101.6 cm)<br />

Gift of Billie W. Mercer<br />

in memory of Gary Mercer<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.147<br />

Depicting everyday items (like a teakettle,<br />

knife, and bottle) as flat objects in a limited<br />

palette of black, white, and the primary<br />

colors, Francisco Matto offers an example<br />

of the basic lessons that Joaquín Torres-García<br />

used to teach his students the principles<br />

of constructive art. Returning to representational<br />

painting by reducing objects<br />

to their essential qualities while avoiding<br />

naturalistic imitation was one such principle.<br />

Currently displayed alongside the<br />

decorative arts within the Latin American<br />

art galleries, this still life also traces the<br />

Taller Torres-García’s interest in daily life.<br />

VSG<br />

38


SANDÚ DARIÉ, Romanian,<br />

active Cuba, 1906–1991<br />

Sin título (Untitled), 1950s<br />

Mixed media on wood<br />

46 1/2 x 46 x 2 in. (118.1 x 116.8 x 5.1 cm)<br />

Gift of Billie W. Mercer<br />

in memory of Gary Mercer<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.148<br />

Originally from Romania, Sandú Darié<br />

moved to Havana in 1941 and is credited<br />

with having introduced geometric<br />

abstraction in Cuba. In his innovative<br />

wood constructions, which he developed<br />

in dialogue with the Argentinean Madí<br />

group, Darié challenged the rigidity of the<br />

grid by extending form and color beyond the<br />

frame. The artist used syncopated rhythms<br />

of squares and lines to suggest movement<br />

across the work’s surface. He also included<br />

physically protruding wooden planes while<br />

superimposing circles and triangles onto<br />

the orthogonal structure. These strategies<br />

create virtual depth and push the composition<br />

further into the viewer’s space.<br />

VSG<br />

AUGUSTO TORRES, Uruguayan,<br />

1913–1992<br />

Estructura en blanco<br />

(Structure in White), c. 1965<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

37 3/4 x 27 1/8 in. (95.9 x 68.9 cm)<br />

Gift of Billie W. Mercer<br />

in memory of Gary Mercer<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.174<br />

Estructura en blanco belongs to Augusto<br />

Torres’s most mature period and exquisitely<br />

demonstrates the young painter’s<br />

assimilation and transformation of Joaquín<br />

Torres-García’s system of Universalismo<br />

Constructivo (Constructive Universalism)<br />

into his own artistic concerns. In this<br />

work, Torres emphasized the structural<br />

organization and the positioning of<br />

signs and objects within the gridlike<br />

compartments. This painting relates to<br />

Constructivo (1963), a wood construction<br />

by Augusto Torres in the Museum’s<br />

collection, as well as many of the other<br />

works of School of the South artists.<br />

VSG<br />

39


BETTY PARSONS, American,<br />

1900–1982<br />

Maine 2, 1957<br />

Acrylic on canvas<br />

66 x 148 x 68 in.<br />

(167.6 x 375.9 x 172.7 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

contemporary@mfah, <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.106<br />

From 1946 to 1982, Betty Parsons was<br />

among New York’s most acclaimed art<br />

dealers. She championed numerous<br />

painters, including Jackson Pollock, Mark<br />

Rothko, Forrest Bess, and Agnes Martin.<br />

However, her fi rst and most enduring<br />

commitment was to her own artistic<br />

practice. Her lyrical abstractions reflect<br />

both her surroundings and her deeply<br />

held mystical beliefs, and Maine 2 typifies<br />

her mature style. The organic palette and<br />

staccato brushwork evoke Maine’s coastal<br />

landscape, where Parsons had spent many<br />

summers. “The abstract world was considered<br />

cold,” she stated. “But it had fire,<br />

energy, nature, light, space—it concentrated<br />

on all those values.”<br />

ALG<br />

40


LEE KRASNER, American, 1908–1984<br />

Bird’s Parasol, 1964<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

61 1/8 x 46 in. (155.3 x 116.8 cm)<br />

Gift of Cornelia Cullen Long<br />

in memory of Meredith<br />

2021.755<br />

A pioneer among the Abstract Expressionists,<br />

Lee Krasner tackled Cubism’s structured<br />

spaces with a gestural freedom, developing<br />

an autographic painterliness that earned her<br />

a place at the forefront of her generation.<br />

Bird’s Parasol is among her signature works,<br />

typifying the exuberance of her mid-1960s<br />

paintings. The overall composition thrusts<br />

upward like a bird in flight, and Krasner<br />

commented, “For me, it is a matter of<br />

whether the canvas allows me to breathe<br />

or not—if the canvas soars into space or if<br />

it is earthbound . . . I would like to soar in<br />

a canvas.”<br />

ALG<br />

41


JAY DEFEO, American, 1929–1989<br />

Untitled [E2728], from the series Still Life<br />

(Delaware Street, Berkeley), 1953<br />

Ink on wove paper<br />

Sheet: 36 x 27 in. (91.4 x 68.6 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded<br />

by the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

2021.724<br />

Jay DeFeo was celebrated in the 1950s<br />

as part of the energetic San Francisco<br />

community of Beat artists, musicians,<br />

and poets. This drawing was made after<br />

her return to San Francisco from her<br />

fellowship-funded travels through Europe<br />

and North Africa, in 1951–52, and before<br />

she produced her iconic one-ton, elevenfoot-tall<br />

monumental painting The Rose<br />

(1958–66, Whitney Museum of American<br />

Art). Untitled, from her Still Life series,<br />

features a still life atop a three-legged<br />

table. This delicate pen-and-ink drawing<br />

on a large sheet of paper, like others in the<br />

series, was made in tandem with smallscale<br />

sculptures.<br />

DMW<br />

JAY DEFEO, American, 1929–1989<br />

Untitled [E1029], from the series<br />

Tripod, 1976<br />

Acrylic and graphite with collage on<br />

wove paper<br />

Sheet: 28 x 23 1/4 in. (71.1 x 59.1 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded<br />

by the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

2021.725<br />

Jay DeFeo was among the emerging artists<br />

whose work was included in the landmark<br />

1959 exhibition Sixteen Americans at the<br />

Museum of Modern Art in New York that<br />

showcased eclecticism and experimentation<br />

from several geographical regions.<br />

Sixteen years later, DeFeo produced a series<br />

of drawings that gave life to inanimate<br />

objects in her studio, such as this drawing<br />

resembling a tripod. She treated the threelegged<br />

mechanical object as a dressed<br />

human model. The artist gave the drawing<br />

textured nuances, making additions and<br />

erasures as she built up the surface with<br />

various materials.<br />

DMW<br />

42


EDWARD KIENHOLZ, American,<br />

1927–1994<br />

The Mort Soul Searcher, 1960<br />

Mixed media, power drill,<br />

and electric lights<br />

27 1/2 x 52 1/2 x 18 in.<br />

(69.9 x 133.4 x 45.7 cm)<br />

Gift of Ruth and Ted Baum<br />

2021.310<br />

The Mort Soul Searcher is a rare, early<br />

example of Edward Kienholz’s junk-aesthetic<br />

approach to assemblage and his wry political<br />

humor. Like a mad dog wandering down<br />

a quiet street, the sculpture disrupts the<br />

hushed precincts of an art gallery with its<br />

glowing eyes, hunched pose, and the hum<br />

of a drill bit embedded in the front limb. The<br />

title pays homage to the antiestablishment<br />

comedian Mort Sahl, whose features are<br />

eerily echoed in the Union Shield mask, as<br />

this unruly creature searches for the soul of<br />

America at a time when the battle for civil<br />

rights divided the nation.<br />

ALG<br />

43


GIUSEPPE PENONE, Italian, born 1947<br />

Il peso del soffio, il peso del corpo<br />

(The Weight of Breath, the Weight<br />

of the Body), 1979<br />

Ink and watercolor on wove paper<br />

Sheet: 22 x 29 1/2 in. (55.9 x 74.9 cm)<br />

Gift of Billie W. Mercer<br />

in memory of Gary Mercer<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.152<br />

The Italian artist Giuseppe Penone has<br />

worked tirelessly over the past five decades<br />

with conceptual and performative works<br />

as well as with monumental sculpture and<br />

works on paper, connecting nature with<br />

culture as symbiotic, reciprocally defi ned<br />

entities. In 1979 Penone produced Soffio<br />

di foglio (Breath of Leaves), using his body<br />

and breath to blow and impress his form<br />

into a massive pile of dried myrtle leaves.<br />

This ink drawing from the same year<br />

captures the experience; swaths of dark<br />

brown ink delineate the artist’s body amid<br />

the leaf pile, suggested by wide, curvilinear<br />

brushstrokes.<br />

DMW<br />

GIUSEPPE PENONE, Italian, born 1947<br />

Senza titolo (Untitled), 1977<br />

Watercolor and ink on wove paper<br />

Sheet: 12 3/4 x 9 3/8 in. (32.4 x 23.8 cm)<br />

Gift of Billie W. Mercer<br />

in memory of Gary Mercer<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.153<br />

As an important leader of the Italian Arte<br />

Povera movement that emerged about<br />

1967–71, Giuseppe Penone explored the<br />

interplay among humankind, nature, and<br />

art. Inspired by the mountains and forests<br />

of northern Italy, the artist scrutinized<br />

nature’s cycles. This 1977 drawing is consistent<br />

with Penone’s early work, which<br />

explores the processes of respiration,<br />

growth, and aging that are common to<br />

both humans and trees. It relates to Soffio<br />

(Breath), a 1978 bronze that shows a new<br />

twig growing from a sapling, suggesting<br />

the delicate balance between humans and<br />

trees, carbon dioxide and oxygen.<br />

DMW<br />

44


GIUSEPPE PENONE, Italian, born 1947<br />

Spoglia d’oro (Stripped of Gold), 2001<br />

Gold and plaster<br />

Base: 5 1/4 x 9 5/8 x 9 1/4 in.<br />

(13.3 x 24.4 x 23.5 cm)<br />

Object: 5 1/2 x 5 1/8 x 3 1/2 in.<br />

(14 x 13 x 8.9 cm)<br />

Gift of Billie W. Mercer<br />

in memory of Gary Mercer<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.154<br />

Giuseppe Penone makes works of art from<br />

ephemeral acts—such as his silhouette<br />

in a pile of leaves—in order to record his<br />

presence in the world at large. Spoglia<br />

d’oro enshrines the imprint of the artist’s<br />

palm, pressed into a sheet of gold, which<br />

he then shaped into a loose cone balanced<br />

on a plaster base. The contrast between<br />

the warm reflections of the gold and the<br />

matte surface of the plaster, as well as<br />

the contrast between the precious and<br />

the mundane, can be understood as a<br />

celebration of the animating spirit of life<br />

and creation.<br />

ALG<br />

45


NACHO CARBONELL, Spanish,<br />

born 1980<br />

One Man Chair, from the Evolution<br />

series, designed 2008,<br />

made 2009<br />

Recycled paper, iron, and chicken wire<br />

45 1/4 x 33 7/16 x 60 1/4 in.<br />

(115 x 85 x 153 cm)<br />

The Dennis Freedman Collection,<br />

museum purchase funded by the<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.74<br />

In 2008 the gallerist Rossana Orlandi<br />

commissioned the designer Nacho<br />

Carbonell to create a series of furniture.<br />

Carbonell decided to make communicative<br />

forms using experimental technology and<br />

materials to address issues related to the<br />

human condition and the environment.<br />

The resulting three forms, called the Evolution<br />

Collection, utilized recycled paper and chicken<br />

wire as their primary materials. For Carbonell,<br />

paper is a source of information, and chicken<br />

wire conveys being “cooped up.” One Man<br />

Chair provides a personal space for refuge<br />

and thinking, whereas the other two designs<br />

in the collection engage the public more<br />

directly through the user’s seated positions.<br />

CS<br />

46


PAOLO SANTINI, Italian, 1929–2020<br />

Chair, 1967<br />

Steel<br />

29 1/2 x 32 3/4 x 28 1/8 in.<br />

(74.9 x 83.2 x 71.4 cm)<br />

The Dennis Freedman Collection,<br />

museum purchase funded by the<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.75<br />

Paolo Santini had a diverse artistic career<br />

as a sculptor, furniture and jewelry<br />

designer, interior architect and draftsman,<br />

and painter. In the early to mid-1960s, he<br />

learned to cast aluminum, which became<br />

a signature material for him. By the end<br />

of the decade, Santini was designing<br />

aluminum and steel furniture forms<br />

made in small editions, including this<br />

chair. With its suspended, ribbed, and<br />

curved seat and architectonic base, the<br />

design, while functional, has a distinctive<br />

sculptural presence. Santini made it by<br />

hand, drawing on his material knowledge.<br />

He ultimately made four of these chairs in<br />

three different patinas.<br />

CS<br />

JURGEN BEY, Dutch, born 1965<br />

JAN KONINGS, Dutch, born 1966<br />

STUDIO KONINGS & BEY, Dutch,<br />

active 1991–2001<br />

For DROOG DESIGN, Dutch,<br />

established 1993<br />

Kokon Table-Chair, 1997/1999<br />

PVC and wood (or plastic)<br />

31 5/16 x 30 5/16 x 44 1/8 in.<br />

(79.5 x 77 x 112 cm)<br />

The Dennis Freedman Collection,<br />

museum purchase funded by the<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.72<br />

The Dutch designers Jurgen Bey and<br />

Jan Konings first received international<br />

attention in 1997 when they were<br />

invited to take part in a Droog Design<br />

project called Dry Tech II. The curatorial<br />

premise of the show espoused using<br />

low-tech materials in minimal but<br />

functional designs. Bey and Konings<br />

submitted a series of furniture called<br />

Kokon, including this Table-Chair, that<br />

consisted of familiar forms grafted<br />

together and wrapped in an elastic<br />

skin. The result is a new hybrid form<br />

that challenges preconceived notions<br />

of function and is both approachable<br />

and off-putting in its mutation.<br />

CS<br />

47


SHEILA PINKEL, American, born 1941<br />

Folded Paper, 1974–82<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

51 7/8 x 108 1/2 in. (131.8 x 275.6 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the S. I. and Suzie Morris<br />

Photography Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.195<br />

To make Folded Paper, Sheila Pinkel<br />

exposed a folded sheet of photographic<br />

paper to a brief flash of light. She then<br />

unfolded and processed the paper in the<br />

darkroom, revealing the dramatic shading<br />

and sense of volume this simple method<br />

produced. By distilling her process to<br />

the very essentials of photography—light<br />

and paper—Pinkel teased out one of the<br />

medium’s great contradictions: its endless<br />

ability to reproduce the world and its<br />

endless capacity to defamiliarize it.<br />

LV<br />

48


OMAR RAYO, Colombian, 1928–2010<br />

TiiiT, 1974<br />

Acrylic on canvas<br />

17 x 17 in. (43.2 x 43.2 cm)<br />

Fundación Privada Allegro Collection,<br />

gift of Fundación Privada Allegro<br />

2021.565<br />

TiiiT is an exceptional painting by the<br />

renowned Colombian artist Omar Rayo.<br />

An important fi gure in the development<br />

of geometric abstraction, Rayo is known<br />

for distorting and overlapping black and<br />

white ribbons associated with Indigenous<br />

cultures to create a sense of optical movement<br />

and volumetric shape. Featuring<br />

a crisp pattern of a thick blue line on a<br />

red background, TiiiT creates an optical<br />

illusion of three-dimensional movement<br />

in which the canvas appears to fold onto<br />

itself and overlap in the middle.<br />

VSG<br />

49


ZILIA SÁNCHEZ, Cuban, born 1926<br />

Lunar con tatuaje (Moon with Tattoo),<br />

c. 1968–69<br />

Acrylic and ink on canvas<br />

71 5/8 x 72 1/16 x 11 5/8 in.<br />

(182 x 183 x 29.5 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

<strong>2022</strong> Latin American Experience<br />

Gala and Auction<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.183<br />

Lunar con tatuaje is one of Zilia Sánchez’s<br />

largest and most complex works from her<br />

innovative series of tattooed, shaped canvases.<br />

The painting combines her gestural<br />

topological drawings with astronomical<br />

references to create a larger unit with cosmic<br />

symbolism. Sánchez began exploring<br />

the shaped canvas during the late 1950s<br />

while living in Cuba. By stretching painted<br />

canvases over hand-molded wooden<br />

armatures, she produced three-dimensional,<br />

undulating silhouettes imbued with sensuous<br />

undertones. The curved protrusions<br />

from the canvas resemble breasts and<br />

female genitalia, as well as mountains,<br />

rivers, and valleys.<br />

RM<br />

50


CÉSAR PATERNOSTO, Argentinean,<br />

born 1931<br />

I Wonder Why, 1971<br />

Acrylic on canvas<br />

48 1/4 x 48 1/16 x 3 1/16 in.<br />

(122.5 x 122 x 7.7 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Latin Maecenas<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.108<br />

I Wonder Why is an early painting by César<br />

Paternosto that he described as “lateral or<br />

oblique.” The front of the canvas is painted<br />

white, and the vertical sides serve as the<br />

site for experimentation. Here, the artist<br />

relies on a limited color palette of orange,<br />

purple, and pink to create horizontal bands<br />

that accentuate the thickness of the canvas.<br />

By shifting the attention to the sides of the<br />

canvas, Paternosto innovatively questioned<br />

the traditional frontal format of paintings,<br />

highlighting the three-dimensionality of<br />

the support and turning his paintings<br />

into objects.<br />

VSG<br />

51


CÉSAR PATERNOSTO, Argentinean,<br />

born 1931<br />

Adobe Gate II, 1992<br />

Mixed media on canvas<br />

72 1/16 x 58 1/8 x 2 5/16 in.<br />

(183.1 x 147.6 x 5.9 cm)<br />

Gift of Fundación Privada Allegro<br />

2021.564<br />

Adobe Gate II, by the Argentinean artist<br />

César Paternosto, exemplifi es his interest<br />

in Inca artifacts and architecture. Here, the<br />

artist manipulated the canvas to resemble<br />

a facade. Painted in a matte, monochromatic<br />

bronze, this work draws on Andean<br />

and Greek architecture. Specifi cally, the<br />

opening in the middle refers to the “sun<br />

gate,” a monolithic carved arch or gateway.<br />

An avid traveler and archaeology enthusiast,<br />

Paternosto visited numerous porticos<br />

and sun gates throughout Europe and<br />

South America in the 1980s and 1990s.<br />

VSG<br />

52


LIKA MUTAL, Peruvian,<br />

born the Netherlands, 1939–2016<br />

Sanctuary of Opposites: I Am One Stone,<br />

1992<br />

Travertine<br />

38 x 29 x 23 in. (96.5 x 73.7 x 58.4 cm)<br />

Gift of the Nohra Haime Gallery<br />

2021.569<br />

In this sculpture, Lika Mutal presents<br />

two rough, organic, mountainous shapes<br />

made of travertine, connected by a pair of<br />

smooth, interlocking rings carved from<br />

the same stone. The artist’s intervention<br />

into the stone and its natural state coexist<br />

in a respectful and powerful harmony.<br />

Sanctuary of Opposites is one of a kind,<br />

yet it exemplifi es Mutal’s overall practice,<br />

characterized by a repetition of motifs and<br />

shared attributes. The subtle differences<br />

in each work emphasize Mutal’s intimate<br />

relationship with stone and her interest<br />

in using a single block to create a work<br />

that highlights the specific qualities of<br />

the medium.<br />

VSG<br />

53


LENORE TAWNEY, American,<br />

1907–2007<br />

Médecins Anciens, 1966<br />

Paper, newsprint, glass, spices, cork,<br />

and ink<br />

2 1/2 x 8 1/2 x 5 1/4 in.<br />

(6.4 x 21.6 x 13.3 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.182<br />

Lenore Tawney’s assemblage sculptures<br />

often feature mixed media culled from her<br />

studio archive of diverse found and saved<br />

materials. Indebted to and often compared<br />

with Surrealist examples and specifi cally<br />

Joseph Cornell’s boxes, Tawney’s assemblages<br />

are less about creating a world and<br />

more about engaging cherished materials<br />

in multiple ways. Médecins Anciens was<br />

inspired by Tawney’s visit to a homeopathic<br />

doctor during the 1960s. The cork vials filled<br />

with potions in his offi ce caught her eye<br />

and sparked her imagination. Here, Tawney<br />

incorporated similar vials filled with spices<br />

and set them into a collaged box, conjuring<br />

a connection to the past.<br />

CS<br />

54


LENORE TAWNEY, American,<br />

1907–2007<br />

Dove, 1974<br />

Linen<br />

118 x 108 in. (299.7 x 274.3 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded<br />

by the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.181<br />

Lenore Tawney was a dominant fi gure in<br />

American fi ber art from the 1950s to mid-<br />

1980s. Dove is part of a series of large-scale<br />

woven forms that Tawney made in 1974<br />

in response to issues of form, light, and<br />

structure. It featured a new technique—the<br />

slit weave—that allowed light to penetrate<br />

the form. For Dove, Tawney distilled her<br />

aesthetic vocabulary to a cross, which for her<br />

represented transcendence and the eternal.<br />

The title, inspired by Carl Jung, is a nod to<br />

Tawney’s spiritual and meditation practice,<br />

promoting peace and harmony within one’s<br />

personal being and environment.<br />

CS<br />

LENORE TAWNEY, American,<br />

1907–2007<br />

Distilla, 1967<br />

Paper and watercolor<br />

Sheet: 10 1/4 x 8 1/4 in. (26 x 21 cm)<br />

Gift of the Lenore G. Tawney Foundation<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.123<br />

The collages that Lenore Tawney began<br />

making in the 1960s grew out of her<br />

practice of making small-scale mail art<br />

with painted and collaged elements drawn<br />

from her studio archive. Tawney’s collages<br />

owe a debt to Dada and Surrealism.<br />

Distilla, French for distilled, alludes to the<br />

filtering of matter from a liquid base. Here,<br />

Tawney is using it possibly as a metaphor<br />

for language and nature (the collaged text)<br />

emerging from the earth’s atmosphere<br />

(the painted sky). Distilla represents the<br />

best of Tawney’s collage—bold and intimate,<br />

abstract but pictorial, vibrant with<br />

movement, and distinctive in its image<br />

and personality.<br />

CS<br />

55


ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG, American,<br />

2025–2008<br />

Printed by Bill Goldston<br />

Published by Universal Limited Art<br />

Editions, Ltd., Bayshore, New York<br />

Kitty Hawk, 1974<br />

Lithograph on Kraft brown wrapping<br />

paper, edition 26/28<br />

Sheet: 79 x 40 in. (200.7 x 101.6 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Art + Paper <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.90<br />

Throughout his six-decade career, Robert<br />

Rauschenberg embraced technical<br />

experimentation and material eclecticism.<br />

This lithograph is impressive for its size<br />

and use of a photomechanical camera. It<br />

was printed on a single sheet of brown,<br />

asphalted paper, a commercial, waterproof<br />

paper typically used for wrapping shipments<br />

by United Limited Art Editions (ULAE), in<br />

keeping with Rauschenberg’s utilization of<br />

everyday materials. The print incorporates<br />

images of a scarf belonging to ULAE’s<br />

founder, Tatyana Grosman, and a bicycle,<br />

referencing the Wright brothers, who had<br />

owned a bicycle shop and conducted their<br />

initial flight experiments in Kitty Hawk,<br />

North Carolina.<br />

DMW<br />

56


BRUCE CONNER, American,<br />

1933–2008<br />

PRINTS, 1974<br />

Steel lockbox, paper envelopes with<br />

typewritten text, photocopies on paper,<br />

gelatin silver prints with typewritten<br />

text, metal keys, plastic bags, clear<br />

plastic folders with plastic binding clips,<br />

paper folders, fingerprint form, and ink<br />

fingerprints<br />

2 5/16 x 15 1/4 x 10 7/16 in.<br />

(5.8 x 38.8 x 26.5 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Morris Weiner<br />

2021.757<br />

As an incoming lecturer at San José State<br />

University, Bruce Conner was fingerprinted<br />

as part of the school’s policy. Conner<br />

requested the return of his fi ngerprints<br />

after processing, arguing that they were a<br />

work of art, as he had previously sold work<br />

bearing only his fi ngerprint. The school<br />

objected. Conner fought for twelve years—<br />

documenting the conflict through letters,<br />

transcripts, photocopies, fingerprints, and<br />

photographs—until the return of his fingerprints.<br />

PRINTS combines conceptual art,<br />

performance, and humor while provoking<br />

questions about the very idea of personal<br />

identity and what kind of value can and<br />

cannot be placed upon it.<br />

LV<br />

PHILIP-LORCA DICORCIA,<br />

American, born 1953<br />

Eddie Anderson, 21 years old,<br />

Houston, Texas, $20, from the series<br />

Hustlers, 1991<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

26 1/4 x 38 1/4 in. (66.7 x 97.2 cm)<br />

Gift of John A. MacMahon<br />

in memory of Clinton T. Willour<br />

2021.628<br />

Having received a National Endowment<br />

for the Arts fellowship that required a<br />

pledge not to make “obscene” work,<br />

Philip-Lorca diCorcia set out to reveal the<br />

bleak underside of Hollywood and respond<br />

to the self-righteous, anti-gay bigotry of<br />

certain politicians. Only after scouting<br />

locations and planning each photograph<br />

with meticulous detail did he search for<br />

models among the hustlers, drug addicts,<br />

and drifters of Santa Monica. Almost as<br />

a defi ant poke in the government’s eye,<br />

diCorcia paid his subjects (with NEA funds)<br />

the amount each would have charged for<br />

sex—$20 in this case of this young man<br />

from Houston.<br />

MD<br />

57


MARTA MINUJÍN, Argentinean,<br />

born 1943<br />

Payment of the Argentine Foreign Debt<br />

to Andy Warhol with Corn, the Latin<br />

American Gold, 1985, printed 2010<br />

Series of digital C-prints, edition of 3/3<br />

Each: 53 1/8 x 49 5/8 in. (135 x 126 cm)<br />

Gift of the Institute for Studies<br />

on Latin American Art (ISLAA)<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.192.1–.3<br />

These photographs capture the moment<br />

when Marta Minujín handed Andy Warhol<br />

bushels of corn as symbolic payment for<br />

Argentina’s foreign debt. Corn is central<br />

to Indigenous cultures and has been<br />

associated with the natural wealth of the<br />

Americas since colonial times. Here,<br />

it subtly links Argentina’s fi nancial<br />

difficulties of the 1980s to a long history<br />

of colonization in which it, like other Latin<br />

American countries, fi gured as a mere<br />

source of raw materials to be harnessed<br />

by foreign powers. Within an Argentinean<br />

context, the corn stands in for fi nancial<br />

loans that threatened to destabilize<br />

the country’s precarious economy in<br />

the 1980s.<br />

VSG<br />

58


MINOL ARAKI, Japanese, born China,<br />

1928–2010<br />

Lotus Pond, 1987<br />

Set of 12 continuous panels;<br />

ink and color on Japanese paper,<br />

mounted on Dibond panel<br />

34 3/4 x 834 x 1 1/4 in.<br />

(88.3 x 2118.4 x 3.2 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by Anne<br />

and Albert Chao, Chitra Kumar and<br />

Kumar Bashyam, and Friends of Asian<br />

Art; and made possible by a gift of<br />

David Frank and Sugiyama Kazukuni<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.184<br />

Minol Araki’s Lotus Pond stretches across<br />

twelve panels that allow for modular<br />

display, reflecting Araki’s previous work as<br />

an industrial designer in Japan. Lotus Pond<br />

is one of five monumental artworks painted<br />

by Araki during the 1980s in memoriam<br />

to his teacher and friend, Zhang Daqian<br />

(1898–1983), the famed Chinese ink painter.<br />

The lotus is a ubiquitous form in Asian art<br />

and especially in the Buddhist practice as a<br />

metaphor for enlightenment, as the radiant<br />

blossom grows from murky waters. Shown<br />

in various stages of its life cycle, the lotus<br />

also represents the ephemeral transience<br />

of human existence.<br />

BB<br />

59


JACK WHITTEN, American,<br />

1939–2018<br />

Natural Selection, 1995<br />

Acrylic and sumi ink on<br />

unstretched canvas<br />

96 x 83 3/4 x 1/4 in.<br />

(243.8 x 212.7 x 0.6 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded<br />

by the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

2021.544<br />

Jack Whitten was among the vanguard of<br />

New York artists whose innovative approach<br />

to painting in the 1970s and 1980s emphasized<br />

the physicality of their canvases<br />

and materials. Whitten’s work stands out<br />

among his contemporaries, however, as<br />

he reconciled his formal explorations with<br />

nuanced meditations on history, science,<br />

and the nature of Black identity. Natural<br />

Selection features his autographic mosaic<br />

technique, with handmade blocks of acrylic<br />

paint creating a shimmering grid. At the<br />

same time, the shadowy fi gure gives the<br />

composition an emotive anchor, further<br />

buttressed by the title’s reference to the<br />

Darwinian struggle for existence.<br />

ALG<br />

60


CALLUM INNES, Scottish, born 1962<br />

Exposed Painting Charcoal Black<br />

on Black, 2004<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

68 3/4 x 64 x 1 1/2 in.<br />

(174.6 x 162.6 x 3.8 cm)<br />

Gift of Peter and Linda Zweig<br />

2021.318<br />

Exposed Painting Charcoal Black on Black<br />

demonstrates the conceptual rigor and a<br />

delicacy of touch that Callum Innes brings<br />

to his process-based abstractions. Innes<br />

began this canvas by laying down a white<br />

primer and then bisecting the canvas with<br />

a single, broad, black band of paint. He<br />

then “unpainted” the left half of the black<br />

band, brushing on a layer of turpentine<br />

that dissolved the top coat of pigment,<br />

which then flowed down. As a result, Innes<br />

reveals the warmer charcoal-toned hues<br />

buried within the seemingly monochromatic<br />

palette, imbuing the overall composition<br />

with an inner light.<br />

ALG<br />

61


THOMAS HOUSEAGO, British,<br />

born 1972<br />

Reclining Figure (For Rome), 2013<br />

Bronze, edition 2/3<br />

66 x 148 x 68 in.<br />

(167.6 x 375.9 x 172.7 cm)<br />

Gift of the Abush Family<br />

2021.558<br />

Thomas Houseago modeled Reclining<br />

Figure (For Rome) on Dying Gaul, one<br />

of classical antiquity’s most famous<br />

sculptures. Houseago evokes mortality<br />

in a visceral manner, flaying flesh from<br />

bone, revealing a hollowed-out body<br />

and the supports that hold the patently<br />

artificial construction together. He stated,<br />

“I am fascinated by the act . . . of making<br />

art. And in a broad sense, by how an artist<br />

responds to the world and the action that<br />

occurs from that interaction . . . I wanted<br />

to get rid of the readymade and figure out<br />

what I looked like and how I reacted to<br />

the world.”<br />

KAO<br />

62


RON MUECK, Australian, born 1958<br />

Woman with Shopping, 2014<br />

Mixed media<br />

44 1/2 x 18 1/8 x 11 13/16 in.<br />

(113 x 46 x 30 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded<br />

by the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

2021.596<br />

Ron Mueck draws upon memories,<br />

reveries, and everyday experience as he<br />

approaches his subjects with extraordinary<br />

empathy. Typically spending more than a<br />

year conceiving and making each fi gure,<br />

Mueck captures every physical detail with<br />

an astonishing degree of verisimilitude.<br />

This naturalism, however, is undercut by<br />

his calculated play with scale. Woman with<br />

Shopping, which stands only forty-four<br />

inches high, was inspired by a woman<br />

and child Mueck spotted on a London<br />

street; he meticulously translated this<br />

fleeting encounter into a compassionate<br />

testament to motherhood, and the loving<br />

and exhausting care it demands.<br />

ALG<br />

63


MARILYN MINTER, American,<br />

born 1948<br />

Smash, 2014<br />

Single-channel video, sound<br />

7 minutes, 18 seconds<br />

Museum purchase funded<br />

by the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.30<br />

For more than four decades, Marilyn<br />

Minter has explored the intersection of the<br />

glamorous and the grotesque through a<br />

feminist lens in photography, painting, and<br />

video. Her embrace of the visual language<br />

of both the fashion and porn industries and<br />

her unabashed depiction of the female body<br />

were controversial in the 1980s and remain<br />

intentionally unsettling—simultaneously<br />

seductive and repulsive. In her mesmerizing<br />

slow-motion video Smash, a dancer<br />

in jeweled anklets and silver stilettos, seen<br />

only from her calves down, sloshes through<br />

puddles of silver liquid and kicks through<br />

a pane of glass, sending liquid and glass<br />

shards toward the camera.<br />

MD<br />

64


ZANA BRISKI, American and British,<br />

born 1966<br />

Bearogram #2, August 1, 2019<br />

Gelatin silver print, photogram<br />

52 1/2 x 84 3/8 in. (133.3 x 214.3 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Director’s Accessions Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.1<br />

On moonless nights in the woods of<br />

upstate New York, Zana Briski often hiked<br />

to a place she knew nocturnal creatures<br />

might pass. There, she would unroll an<br />

enormous sheet of photographic paper,<br />

stretch it between supports alongside the<br />

trail, and wait in the darkness. Often she<br />

waited in vain, but sometimes luck blessed<br />

her endeavor: a black bear strolled along<br />

the trail, and as it walked between Briski<br />

and her photographic paper, she fired an<br />

electronic flash—so instantaneous that the<br />

bear hardly noticed, but powerful enough to<br />

record its shadow as a one-of-a-kind, lifesized<br />

photogram.<br />

MD<br />

65


RAVEN HALFMOON, Caddo Nation,<br />

born 1991<br />

Nut’tehtsi (Red River Girl), 2021<br />

Stoneware<br />

53 1/2 x 34 x 48 in.<br />

(134.6 x 86.4 x 121.9 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.60<br />

Building on her study of ancient Caddo<br />

vessels, Raven Halfmoon pinched,<br />

pressed, and sculpted thick coils of clay<br />

into two commanding female fi gures<br />

that melt into one. Bah’hatteno Nut’tehtsi<br />

(Red River Girl in Caddo) refers to the<br />

Red River, a center of the artist’s Caddo<br />

heritage that winds between East Texas,<br />

Arkansas, Louisiana, and southeastern<br />

Oklahoma. The red glaze that encircles<br />

each figure’s cheeks refers to both modern<br />

cosmetics and traditional Caddo tattoos.<br />

By entwining ancestral influences with<br />

contemporary touchpoints, the sculpture<br />

counters notions of Indigenous artistry as<br />

something that lives only in the past.<br />

EE<br />

66


SONIA GOMES, Brazilian, born 1948<br />

Untitled, from the series Raíz<br />

(Root), 2018<br />

Fabric, thread, and wood<br />

20 9/16 x 12 3/4 x 6 3/16 in.<br />

(52.3 x 32.4 x 15.7 cm)<br />

Gift of Billie W. Mercer<br />

in memory of Gary Mercer<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.167<br />

The contemporary artist Sonia Gomes<br />

began her art career in her forties, developing<br />

a practice that combines found and<br />

gifted materials and objects to create winding,<br />

entangled forms that evoke sacred<br />

artifacts. The hybrid, mysterious character<br />

of her works recalls Afro-Brazilian religious<br />

rituals, such as those Gomes witnessed<br />

when she was a child. Gomes incorporates<br />

tree trunks and branches into these pieces,<br />

binding patchworks of fabric to the wood,<br />

as seen in Untitled, a compact work with<br />

an alchemical presence.<br />

VSG<br />

67


PAULO NAZARETH, Brazilian,<br />

born 1977<br />

Untitled, from the series Objetos para<br />

tampar o sol de seus olhos (Objects to<br />

Keep the Sun Out of Your Eyes), 2010<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

Sheet (approx.): 23 1/2 x 35 1/4 in.<br />

(59.7 x 89.5 cm)<br />

Gift of Billie W. Mercer in memory<br />

of Gary Mercer<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.171<br />

Paulo Nazareth’s work often relies on precise<br />

and simple gestures to raise awareness<br />

of pressing issues such as immigration,<br />

globalization, and colonization. This work<br />

pertains to a series of self-portraits in which<br />

the artist wears various hats made out of<br />

woven palm leaves. The title Objects to Keep<br />

the Sun Out of Your Eyes suggests the protective<br />

measures taken by enslaved Africans<br />

forced to labor in Brazil’s sugar fields and<br />

also underscores Nazareth’s vulnerability<br />

as he undertook extended journeys on foot<br />

across Brazil. Through this work, Nazareth<br />

explores the exoticization and commercialization<br />

of his own Afro-Brazilian and<br />

Indigenous identity.<br />

VSG<br />

68


VINCENT VALDEZ, American,<br />

born 1977<br />

ADRIANA CORRAL, American,<br />

born 1983<br />

Requiem, 2019<br />

Eagle: clay, cast bronze, and ash<br />

32 x 72 x 58 in. (81.3 x 182.9 x 147.3 cm)<br />

Wall: dates hand-carved into drywall<br />

216 x 420 in. (548.6 x 1066.8 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.51<br />

The first large-scale collaboration between<br />

Vincent Valdez and Adriana Corral,<br />

Requiem presents a larger-than-life fallen<br />

eagle, made by Valdez from clay and cast<br />

in bronze. Behind the sculpture, Corral<br />

laboriously carved 243 dates into individual<br />

drywall squares, representing the number<br />

of years the American Republic has been<br />

in existence. Each date was chosen by a<br />

different, anonymous person from across<br />

the country; participants were asked to<br />

collaborate and contribute a written text<br />

about their date’s signifi cance. Corral<br />

ritualistically burned these papers in an<br />

act of mourning, and Valdez then used the<br />

ashes to create a patina for the bronze bird.<br />

RM<br />

69


DAVID HOCKNEY, British, born 1937<br />

Ink Test, 19th to 21st March, 2019<br />

Inkjet print on wove paper,<br />

edition 26/35<br />

Sheet: 33 7/8 x 43 in. (86 x 109.2 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund<br />

2021.435<br />

Throughout his more than sixty-year<br />

career, the British artist David Hockney<br />

has been a restless draftsman, embracing<br />

mark making while also utilizing technologies<br />

such as Polaroid photographs, fax<br />

machines, and digital tools. Made at his<br />

home in the countryside of Normandy,<br />

in northern France, this print portrays<br />

an intimate view of objects and collected<br />

specimens inside and outside his studio.<br />

Here, Hockney tests out the capabilities<br />

of various ink colors, inscribed with notations<br />

and numbers. A contour drawing<br />

of a dog is visible on the back wall.<br />

DMW<br />

ELLEN LESPERANCE, American,<br />

born 1971<br />

Printed by Valpuri Remling and<br />

Alyssa Ebinger<br />

Published by Tamarind Institute,<br />

Albuquerque, New Mexico<br />

The Final Path of Feminye, 2020<br />

Lithograph in 9 colors, printed chine<br />

collé, on wove paper, edition 4/20<br />

42 x 29 13/16 in. (106.7 x 75.7 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Alvin<br />

S. Romansky Prints and Drawings<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

2021.541<br />

The Portland-based artist Ellen Lesperance<br />

addresses the aesthetics of protest, making<br />

visible feminist narratives across generations,<br />

causes, and cultures. In 2020 she<br />

created three prints at Tamarind Institute<br />

about twentieth-century female activists<br />

through their garments. This lithograph<br />

simulates and translates the gridded yarn<br />

pattern of a variegated-color sweater. The<br />

pattern of the labrys (double-sided ax) symbolizes<br />

the women’s liberation movement<br />

and feminism. The image is based on a<br />

monochromatic photograph of a woman<br />

wearing a striped sweater from the 1980s<br />

Greenham Common Women’s Peace<br />

Camp, a protest against nuclear weapons.<br />

DMW<br />

70


PIPILOTTI RIST, Swiss, born 1962<br />

Peeping Freedom Shutters for<br />

Olga Shapir, 2020<br />

Silent single-channel video installation<br />

with vertical flatscreen, in wooden<br />

painted window frame with shutters,<br />

integrated video player; unique<br />

Overall (open shutters):<br />

77 x 85 7/16 x 7 7/8 in.<br />

(195.6 x 217 x 20 cm)<br />

23 minutes, 11 seconds<br />

Museum purchase funded<br />

by the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.189<br />

Pipilotti Rist’s Peeping Freedom Shutters for<br />

Olga Shapir frames the infinite and ecstatic<br />

world we inhabit within the confi nes of<br />

domestic architecture. The title cites an<br />

overlooked feminist author—Olga Shapir,<br />

who championed women’s rights in Tsarist<br />

Russia—and the embedded video tracks<br />

how the body and nature are united in a<br />

seamless flow. In contrast, the shutters<br />

provide a rigid and ambiguous portal. Rist<br />

has commented, “There is this saying that<br />

our eyes are the windows to our soul. I<br />

love this about windows and eyes: they<br />

let us look outside while allowing a view<br />

inside too.”<br />

ALG<br />

71


BILLIE ZANGEWA, Malawian,<br />

born 1973<br />

The Pleasure of a Child, 2021<br />

Hand-stitched silk collage<br />

45 1/8 x 61 7/8 in. (114.6 x 157.2 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.32<br />

Attuned to depicting mundane visual<br />

anecdotes in her domestic life, Billie<br />

Zangewa stitches together silk collages<br />

to flesh out narratives of what she calls<br />

“daily feminism.” The Pleasure of a Child<br />

distills with extraordinary tenderness a<br />

rare moment of connection during the first<br />

year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Zangewa<br />

recounted, “Although we didn’t feel like<br />

celebrating Christmas 2020, we did it<br />

anyway in a very small way to bring pleasure<br />

to my son. . . . The act also brought reprieve<br />

to us the adults, as we could just bask in the<br />

pure joy of a child.”<br />

AB<br />

LORETTA PETTWAY, American,<br />

born 1942<br />

Printed by Alexander Groshong<br />

Published by Paulson Fontaine Press,<br />

Berkeley, California<br />

Remember Me, 2006<br />

Softground in colors and hardground<br />

etching with aquatint and spitbite<br />

aquatint on Somerset white textured<br />

wove paper, edition 28/50<br />

Plate: 28 9/16 x 28 5/8 in. (72.5 x 72.7 cm)<br />

Sheet: 39 1/2 x 38 3/4 in. (100.3 x 98.4 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Ann S. Jackson and Virginia R.<br />

Jackson at Art + Paper <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.89<br />

Begun in the nineteenth century by enslaved<br />

people on what was then the cotton plantation<br />

of Joseph Gee, the unique patchwork quilting<br />

tradition of Gee’s Bend, Alabama, has been<br />

carried forward by multiple generations of<br />

Black women from this rural community.<br />

master printer Pam Paulson of Paulson<br />

Fontaine Press realized the graphic potential<br />

of Gee’s Bend quilts and collaborated with<br />

five artists to translate their three-dimensional<br />

textiles into two dimensions. Loretta Pettway’s<br />

Remember Me, with its lively asymmetrical<br />

design and equally bold palette, demonstrates<br />

the formal qualities that have garnered Gee’s<br />

Bend quilts comparisons to Modernist painting<br />

and improvisational jazz.<br />

DMW<br />

72


DEBORAH ROBERTS, American,<br />

born 1962<br />

The Inconvenient citizen, 2021<br />

Collage of acrylic, graphite, pastel,<br />

and inkjet prints<br />

52 x 38 in. (132.1 x 96.5 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded<br />

by the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

2021.395<br />

In this collaged and painted work, a preteen<br />

boy lays his head in his right hand as if<br />

at rest; yet, his left hand and wandering<br />

eyes convey a tension or danger. “At the<br />

base of everything that I’m trying to say<br />

is that we’re starting off with an innocent<br />

kid,” Deborah Roberts explains, “and I’m<br />

dealing with what society has drawn on.”<br />

This work’s title, The Inconvenient citizen,<br />

references the complex politics that Black<br />

children are forced to navigate. Though<br />

Roberts’s collages are meant to reflect<br />

present inequalities, they also celebrate<br />

Blackness, beauty, and innocence.<br />

LV<br />

73


QUALEASHA WOOD, American,<br />

born 1996<br />

Foreva by Cardi B, 2021<br />

Cotton jacquard weave and glass beads<br />

Overall (with fringe):<br />

87 13/16 x 62 3/8 in. (223 x 158.5 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Bryn Larsen, Jean L. Karotkin,<br />

Nena Marsh, Jeffrey A. Magid,<br />

Emily Todd, Lester Marks, the African<br />

American Art Advisory Association,<br />

and Cyvia Wolff<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.47<br />

“[I played] the Sims when I was younger,<br />

and assuming this God-like position of,<br />

‘I control these people. I’ve built these<br />

universes’ . . . that’s what inspired me to<br />

start thinking differently,” notes Qualeasha<br />

Wood. Through gestures, languages, and<br />

iconography, Wood exposes the parallels<br />

between the religion and technology fi rst<br />

revealed to her through online gaming.<br />

In this dual realm, she positions herself<br />

as both creator and created, heckler and<br />

martyr, stereotype and icon—a realm of<br />

existence Wood describes as free of any<br />

“notions and stereotypes of what Blackness<br />

is supposed to look like and be.”<br />

LV<br />

74


DEREK FORDJOUR, American,<br />

born 1974<br />

Cotillion, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Acrylic, charcoal, cardboard, oil pastel,<br />

foil on newspaper, and canvas<br />

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Robert H. N. Ho Family<br />

Foundation Global<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.190<br />

Derek Fordjour’s Cotillion represents a<br />

formative cultural event in Black debutante<br />

culture. Using his signature collage technique,<br />

Fordjour imbued the canvas with<br />

references to the first Black cotillion in Los<br />

Angeles, held on October 20, 1952, as the<br />

African American community turned out<br />

to celebrate the presentation of eighteen<br />

eligible ladies of marrying age to society.<br />

Fordjour depicts a progression of eighteen<br />

sumptuously dressed couples across the<br />

ballroom floor. In the foreground, the table<br />

numbers “19” and “52” refer to the year of<br />

the original ball. This phenomenon became<br />

synonymous with racial uplift among the<br />

Black upper class.<br />

AB<br />

75


ACCESSIONS | African Art | American Art | Art of the Indigenous Americas | Art of the Islamic Worlds | Asian Art<br />

Whenever possible, the nationality<br />

and lifespan dates of the artist or<br />

maker are provided.<br />

AFRICAN ART<br />

GIFTS<br />

Gifts of Frank Carroll:<br />

Oshele (Currency Blade)<br />

Nkutshu or Ndengese people,<br />

Congo Free State, c. 1875–1925<br />

Iron<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.13<br />

Sogoni Koun (Headdress)<br />

Bamana people, French Sudan,<br />

20th century<br />

Wood and fiber with waterbuck hair<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.14<br />

Mvwala (Staff) Finial<br />

Kongo Yombe people,<br />

Kingdom of Kongo, 19th century<br />

Wood<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.15<br />

Chief’s Stool<br />

Babanki people, German Kamerun or<br />

British Cameroon, early 20th century<br />

Wood, beads, and string<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.109<br />

AMERICAN ART<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Ammi Phillips, American, 1788–1865<br />

Man with Ruffled Jabot, c. 1825<br />

Woman with Lace Collar, c. 1825<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

Museum purchases funded by<br />

Friends of American Arts<br />

2021.535, 2021.536<br />

ART OF THE<br />

INDIGENOUS<br />

AMERICAS<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Rhonda Holy Bear, Cheyenne River Sioux,<br />

born 1959<br />

Pair of Blackfoot Warriors, 1997<br />

Mixed media<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Kay and Doug Wilson<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.42<br />

Purchases funded by the<br />

Alfred C. Glassell, Jr. Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund:<br />

Pair of Beaded and Quilled Moccasins with<br />

Horse-Track Design<br />

Lakota people, c. 1870–1900<br />

ART OF THE<br />

ISLAMIC WORLDS<br />

GIFTS<br />

Musket<br />

‘Alawid Morocco, 18th century<br />

Silver and brass with niello<br />

and glass jewels<br />

Gift of the Honorable and<br />

Mrs. Edward P. Djerejian<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.114<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Banner<br />

Ottoman Turkey, late 17th century or later<br />

Silk; woven with metallic thread<br />

Museum purchase funded by Rania and<br />

Jamal H. Daniel; Lily and Hamid Kooros;<br />

Dr. Aziz Shaibani; and the Director’s<br />

Accessions Endowment<br />

2021.317<br />

ASIAN ART<br />

GIFTS<br />

Seated Entertainer<br />

China, Han dynasty, 206 BC–AD 220<br />

Earthenware<br />

Gift of Jane and Leopold Swergold<br />

2021.429<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Hayashi Kodenji, Japanese, 1831–1915<br />

Hydrangea Vase, c. 1900<br />

Wired and wireless (musen) cloisonné<br />

enamels on dark blue ground<br />

Museum purchase funded by Nanako and<br />

Dale Tingleaf; Friends of Asian Art; and<br />

gift of the Orientation Gallery<br />

2021.323<br />

Kobayashi Kiyochika, Japanese, 1847–1915<br />

Published by Matsuki Heikichi, Japanese,<br />

1836–1891<br />

Hunter Spying a Hawk, c. 1880<br />

Woodblock printed diptych; ink and color<br />

on kozo paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by Peter and<br />

Erika Aron and the Japanese Business<br />

Association<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.28<br />

Pair of Lions<br />

Rajasthan, probably Udaipur, c. 1880<br />

Silver over wood<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Manmeet and Paul Likhari<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.29<br />

Toyohara Chikanobu, Japanese, 1838–1912<br />

A Collection of Pictures of Chignon Wigs<br />

to Put On, 1887<br />

Woodblock prints on paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by Usha and<br />

Kalyeem (Beaded Headdress)<br />

Kuba Bushoong people,<br />

Congo Free State, c. 1900<br />

Raffia, cotton cloth, cowry shells,<br />

and glass beads<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.110<br />

Hide, softened and dyed porcupine quills,<br />

beads, cotton cloth, thread, and tin cones<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.54<br />

Pair of Beaded Possible Bags<br />

Lakota people, c. 1875–1900<br />

Hide, beads, tin cones, dyed horsehair,<br />

Gifts of Edward and Kendall Ondarza:<br />

Pages from an Album<br />

Tamil Nadu, India, c. 1815–28<br />

Graphite and watercolor on laid paper<br />

2021.503–2021.519<br />

Kumara Peddamathan, Leslie and Brad<br />

Bucher, Diane and H. John Riley Jr. in<br />

honor of Anne and Albert Chao, Raymond<br />

D. Brochstein, and Lenora Montgomery<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.35<br />

Minol Araki, Japanese, born China,<br />

pigment, thread, and sinew<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.55<br />

Spontoon-Type Pipe Tomahawk<br />

Western Plains Tribe, c. 1790–1880<br />

Wood, iron, and brass tacks<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.56<br />

Pages from an Album<br />

Calcutta, India, c. 1812–14<br />

Commissioned by William Roxburgh<br />

Graphite, ink, and watercolor<br />

on wove paper<br />

2021.520–2021.534<br />

1928–2010<br />

Lotus Pond, 1987<br />

Set of 12 continuous panels; ink and<br />

color on Japanese paper, mounted<br />

on Dibond panel<br />

Museum purchase funded by Anne and<br />

Albert Chao, Chitra Kumar and Kumar<br />

Bashyam, and Friends of Asian Art;<br />

and partial gift of David Frank and<br />

Sugiyama Kazukuni<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.184<br />

76


Asian Art | The Bayou Bend Collection | Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design<br />

Purchases funded by<br />

Friends of Asian Art, and Usha<br />

and Kumara Peddamatham:<br />

Betel Box with Scenes from<br />

the Sama Jataka<br />

Burma (present-day Myanmar), 1909<br />

Silver<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.186<br />

Storage Box with Scenes from<br />

the Sama Jataka and the Ramayana<br />

Burma (present-day Myanmar), 1925<br />

Silver<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.187<br />

Maung Kywet Ni, Burmese,<br />

dates unknown<br />

Cup with Scenes of Mahajanaka Jataka,<br />

c. 1880<br />

Silver<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.188<br />

• • •<br />

Sanju Saku, Japanese, active 1880–1920<br />

The “Brown Sherman” Tea and Coffee Service,<br />

c. 1900–1902<br />

Jungin silver and cloisonné enamel<br />

with ivory<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence C. Burns<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.193<br />

–<br />

Takahiro Kondo, Japanese, born 1958<br />

Nami (Wave), 2021<br />

Marbleized porcelain, “silver mist” overglaze,<br />

cast glass, removable stainless base<br />

Museum purchase funded by Ms. Miwa S.<br />

Sakashita and Dr. John R. Stroehlein, and<br />

Nanako and Dale Tingleaf<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.213<br />

Chintz Textile<br />

Coromandel, East Deccan<br />

(present-day India), c. 1800<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Director’s Accessions Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.218<br />

Unknown Company School artist, Bengali<br />

View of Pudu Mandapa opposite the<br />

Meenakshi Temple at Madurai, c. 1854<br />

Pencil and watercolor on paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Elizabeth S. and Marjorie G. Horning<br />

Asian Art Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.220<br />

THE BAYOU BEND<br />

COLLECTION<br />

GIFTS<br />

Child’s Mug<br />

England, probably Staffordshire, c. 1820<br />

Earthenware (pearlware) with transfer print<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, gift of<br />

Carol Jean and Michael Moehlman<br />

B.2021.7<br />

Tucker China Factory, American,<br />

1826–1838<br />

Teacup and Saucer, c. 1837<br />

Philadelphia<br />

Hard-paste porcelain with enamel<br />

and gilding<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, gift of<br />

Jesse Goldberg, Artemis Gallery<br />

B.2021.8<br />

Attributed to Moses Williams,<br />

American, 1777–c. 1825<br />

Revealed Silhouette of George Washington,<br />

after 1803<br />

Philadelphia<br />

Wove paper and black textile<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection,<br />

gift of Pam Diehl<br />

B.2021.9<br />

Retailed by J. G. & D. Bell, American,<br />

1851–1860<br />

Dinner Fork, c. 1851–60<br />

Retailed in San Antonio, Texas<br />

Silver<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, gift of<br />

Lynn Hamilton, Carol A. Crawford,<br />

Sally Luna, Jeannie Osborne, and<br />

Patsy Holmes, the first five presidents<br />

of the Silver Study Society<br />

B.<strong>2022</strong>.5<br />

PURCHASES<br />

David Elers, English, 1656–1742<br />

John Philip Elers, English, 1664–1738<br />

Teapot, c. 1690–98<br />

Burslem, Staffordshire, England<br />

Red stoneware and silver<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by Patti Mullendore,<br />

and Carol Jean and Michael Moehlman<br />

B.2021.6<br />

Thomas Fletcher, American, 1787–1866<br />

Sauceboat, c. 1830<br />

Philadelphia<br />

Silver<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by the Bayou Bend<br />

Provisional Class of 2012 in honor of<br />

Tricia Rosencranz and Jennifer Hammond<br />

B.2021.10<br />

Purchases funded by Susan Neptune:<br />

Unknown artist, English<br />

Tit for Tat or Wm. Hogarth Esqr. Principal<br />

Pannel Painter to His Majesty, 1763<br />

Etching with engraving on laid paper<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection<br />

B.<strong>2022</strong>.1<br />

Johann Christoph Heyne, American,<br />

born Germany, 1715–1781<br />

Flagon, c. 1754–80<br />

Lancaster, Pennsylvania<br />

Pewter<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection<br />

B.<strong>2022</strong>.7<br />

• • •<br />

Henry Dawkins, American, born England,<br />

active 1753–c. 1786<br />

After William Williams, American,<br />

born England, 1727–1791<br />

Benjamin Lay, c. 1760<br />

Etching with engraving on laid paper<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by the Theta Charity<br />

Antiques Show<br />

B.<strong>2022</strong>.2<br />

Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, English,<br />

founded 1759<br />

Modeled by William Hackwood,<br />

English, c. 1753–1836<br />

Abolitionist Medallion, c. 1787<br />

Etruria, Staffordshire, England<br />

Stoneware (jasperware)<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by the Toni and<br />

Ralph Wallingford Endowment Fund<br />

B.<strong>2022</strong>.3<br />

Eliza Carolina Dagen, American, 1807–1875<br />

Painted elements attributed to Peter Lehn<br />

Grosh, American, 1758–1859<br />

Made at the Lititz Moravian Girls’ School<br />

(now Linden Hall School for Girls),<br />

American, established 1746<br />

Memorial Embroidered Picture, c. 1822<br />

Lititz, Pennsylvania<br />

Silk thread, silk chenille, metallic threads,<br />

metallic spangles, ink, and watercolor<br />

on twill woven silk ground fabric<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by the Houston Junior<br />

Woman’s Club Charitable Fund<br />

B.<strong>2022</strong>.4<br />

Andrew Ellicott Warner, American,<br />

1786–1870<br />

Pair of Candlesticks, 1815<br />

Baltimore<br />

Silver<br />

The Bayou Bend Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by the Michael K. Brown<br />

Metals Endowment Fund<br />

B.<strong>2022</strong>.6<br />

DECORATIVE ARTS,<br />

CRAFT, AND DESIGN<br />

GIFTS<br />

Reinhold Reiling, German, 1922–1984<br />

Brooch, 1970<br />

Silver and gold<br />

Helen Williams Drutt Collection,<br />

gift of the Helen Williams Drutt<br />

Family Collection<br />

2021.388<br />

Garth Clark and Mark Del Vecchio<br />

Collection, gifts of Garth Clark and<br />

Mark Del Vecchio:<br />

Del Harrow, American, born 1977<br />

breath, 2013–16<br />

Ceramic with lit wood display case<br />

breath, 2013–16<br />

Graphite on paper, edition 2/5<br />

breath, 2013<br />

Single-channel video<br />

2021.425.1–.3<br />

• • •<br />

77


ACCESSIONS | Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design<br />

Nancy Worden, American, 1954–2021<br />

Conjugal Bushwhacking Necklace, 2000<br />

Copper, silver, glass taxidermy eyes,<br />

lava, and mother-of-pearl<br />

Overprotective Impulse Brooch, 1993<br />

Silver, brass, glass, onyx, and paper<br />

Gifts of the estate of Nancy Worden<br />

2021.426, 2021.427<br />

Manufactured by Tiffany & Co.,<br />

New York, established 1837<br />

Creamer and Sugar Bowl, c. 1873–74<br />

Sterling silver and gilt<br />

Gift of Martin K. Webb and Charles L.<br />

Venable in honor of Steven and<br />

Karen Chambless<br />

2021.568<br />

Gifts of Anne Wilkes Tucker:<br />

Suzan Rezac, Swiss,<br />

born Czechoslovakia, 1958<br />

Necklace, 1981<br />

Brass, soapstone, and silver<br />

2021.570<br />

Sandra Zilker, American, born 1950<br />

Necklace and Ring<br />

Silver and shell<br />

2021.571<br />

Alice H. Klein, American, born 1956<br />

Pair of Earrings, 1982<br />

Acrylic, gold, and pearls<br />

2021.572<br />

• • •<br />

Eva Zeisel, American, born Hungary,<br />

1906–2011<br />

Manufactured by Shenango Pottery<br />

Company, American, active 1901–1991<br />

For Castleton China Company, American,<br />

active 1940–c. 1970s<br />

Place Setting from the “Museum” pattern,<br />

designed c. 1942–43, made 1949–c. 1972<br />

Porcelain<br />

Gift of David Jameson<br />

2021.573.1–.8<br />

John Millward Banks, English, 1845–1911<br />

Anointing Spoon, 1901<br />

Silver<br />

Gift of Jane Gillies<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.26<br />

78<br />

Attributed to Marius Hammer,<br />

Norwegian, 1847–1927<br />

Dragon Spoon, c. 1900<br />

Silver-gilt and plique-à-jour enamel<br />

Gift of Franci Neely<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.44<br />

Althea McNish, Trinidadian,<br />

active England, 1924–2020<br />

Manufactured by Hull Traders, Ltd.,<br />

British, active 1958–1971<br />

Golden Harvest furnishing fabric, designed<br />

c. 1958, made 1959–c. 1970s<br />

Screen-printed cotton<br />

Gift of Cindi Strauss and Chris Ballou<br />

in honor of Sarah Horne<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.112<br />

Gifts of Adolpho Leirner:<br />

Cassio M’Boy (da Rocha Matos),<br />

Brazilian, 1896–1986<br />

Chair, c. 1933<br />

Madeira wood and upholstery<br />

In honor of Sam Gorman<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.116<br />

Cassio M’Boy (da Rocha Matos),<br />

Brazilian, 1896–1986<br />

Tapestry, c. 1935<br />

Wool<br />

In honor of Richard Wortham III<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.117<br />

• • •<br />

Barbara Nanning, Dutch, born 1957<br />

Nautilus, 2008<br />

Glass<br />

Gift of Dominique Lévy<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.118<br />

Gifts of Cecily E. Horton:<br />

Robe à la française (dress and petticoat)<br />

France, 1765–80<br />

Silk brocade with silver floss and fluting<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.115<br />

Pocketbook<br />

Great Britain or France, c. 1790<br />

Silk satin with needlework, metal purl,<br />

steel beads, and flannel<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.119<br />

Panel (dress fabric)<br />

France, 1770s<br />

Silk brocade<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.120<br />

Panels (furnishing fabric)<br />

Italy, 1600–1650<br />

Silk satin damask<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.121<br />

Panel (furnishing fabric),<br />

France or Italy, 1600–1650<br />

Silk satin damask<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.122<br />

• • •<br />

Lenore Tawney, American, 1907–2007<br />

Distilla, 1967<br />

Paper and watercolor<br />

Gift of the Lenore G. Tawney Foundation<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.123<br />

The Dennis Freedman Collection,<br />

gifts of Dennis Freedman:<br />

Giorgio Ceretti, Italian, born 1932<br />

Pietro Derossi, Italian, born 1933<br />

Riccardo Rosso, Italian, born 1941<br />

Manufactured by Gufram, Italian,<br />

established 1966<br />

Puffo Stool, designed 1968, made c. 1970–78<br />

Polyurethane foam and Guflac ®<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.175<br />

Gaetano Pesce, Italian, born 1939<br />

Manufactured by Bernini, Italian,<br />

established 1904<br />

Model 901 Shelves, from the series<br />

Luigi or Mi amate voi, 1982<br />

Wood and paint<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.176<br />

Marco Zanuso, Italian, 1916–2001<br />

Richard Sapper, German, 1932–2015<br />

Manufactured by Brionvega S.p.A.,<br />

Italian, established 1945<br />

Black 201 Television Set, designed 1969,<br />

made 1969–74<br />

Acrylic, metal, and electronic parts<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.177<br />

Arne Jacobsen, Danish, 1902–1971<br />

Manufactured by Louis Poulsen & Co.,<br />

Danish, established 1874<br />

Ceiling or Wall Lamp, designed 1955<br />

Brass, Plexiglas, paint, and bulb<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.178<br />

Marcel Breuer, American, born Hungary,<br />

1902–1981<br />

Manufactured by Gebrüder Thonet,<br />

Austrian, established 1853<br />

Side Chair, Model B33, designed 1927–28<br />

Chrome-plated tubular steel and cloth<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.179<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Purchases funded by the<br />

John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation:<br />

Superstudio, Italian, active 1966–78<br />

Manufactured by Poltronova, Italian,<br />

established 1957<br />

For Design Centre, Italian, active possibly<br />

1967–79<br />

O-Look Hanging Lamp, designed 1968,<br />

made 1968–75<br />

Chrome-plated metal, glass, lacquered<br />

aluminum, plastic, and 60-watt<br />

incandescent candle bulb<br />

2021.424<br />

Samuel Ross, British, born 1991<br />

Trauma Chair Prototype, 2020<br />

Fired OSB, burnished steel, and<br />

molasses lacquer<br />

2021.548<br />

Norman Teague, American, born 1968<br />

Made by Norman Teague Studios,<br />

American<br />

Leather made by Yohance Lacour,<br />

American, born 1973<br />

Sinmi Stool, designed 2015, made <strong>2022</strong><br />

Walnut and leather<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.69<br />

• • •<br />

Joe Colombo, Italian, 1930–1971<br />

Manufactured by OLuce, Milan,<br />

established 1945<br />

Spider Table Lamp, designed 1965,<br />

made 1969<br />

Metal, chrome-plated metal, enamel,<br />

melamine, and 75-watt Cornalux<br />

incandescent bulb<br />

Museum purchase funded by Joan<br />

Morgenstern in honor of Anna Walker<br />

2021.428<br />

Sonya Clark, American, born 1967<br />

Noorotco (Reverse Octoroon), 2021<br />

Canvas and thread<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Caroline<br />

Wiess Law Accessions Endowment Fund,<br />

the African American Art Advisory<br />

Association, and Judy and Scott Nyquist<br />

2021.547


Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design<br />

Patti Warashina, American, born 1940<br />

Metamorphosis of a Car Kiln, 1971<br />

Earthenware and acrylic<br />

Museum purchase funded by Sara and<br />

Bill Morgan in memory of Clint Willour<br />

and in honor of Cindi Strauss; the GRITS<br />

Foundation; Nina Zilkha; the Decorative<br />

Arts Endowment Fund; Cecily Horton;<br />

and Joan Morgenstern<br />

2021.549<br />

Purchases funded by the<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund:<br />

Giampaolo Bertozzi, Italian, born 1957<br />

Stefano Dal Monte Casoni, Italian,<br />

born 1961<br />

Bertozzi & Casoni S.r.l., Italian,<br />

established 1980<br />

Mercurio, 2019<br />

Ceramic<br />

2021.550<br />

Raven Halfmoon, Caddo Nation, born 1991<br />

Bah’hatteno Nut’tehtsi (Red River Girl), 2021<br />

Stoneware<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.60<br />

Lenore Tawney, American, 1907–2007<br />

Dove, 1974<br />

Linen<br />

Médecins Anciens, 1966<br />

Paper, newsprint, glass, spices, cork, and ink<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.181, <strong>2022</strong>.182<br />

• • •<br />

Gio Ponti, Italian, 1891–1979<br />

Manufactured by Manifattura Jsa,<br />

Italian, active 1949–1979<br />

Legge Mediterranea (Mediterranean Law),<br />

1954<br />

Screen-printed cotton sateen<br />

Museum purchase funded by Joan<br />

Morgenstern in honor of Nancy Daily<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.50<br />

Richard Riemerschmid,<br />

German, 1868–1957<br />

Manufactured by Vereinigte Werkstätten<br />

für Kunst im Handwerk, German,<br />

established 1897<br />

Chair, Model 4059, 1898–99<br />

Walnut, leather, and metal<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Design<br />

Council, <strong>2022</strong>, the American Institute<br />

of Architects Design Collection, Cecily E.<br />

Horton, and Leo and Karin Shipman<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.61<br />

Jutta Sika, Austrian, 1877–1964<br />

Manufactured by Wiener<br />

Porzellanmanufaktur Josef Böck,<br />

Austrian, active 1898–1960<br />

Mocha Pot and Cup and Saucer, 1901<br />

Porcelain<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Mary<br />

Kathryn Lynch Kurtz Charitable Lead<br />

Trust Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.62<br />

Purchases funded by Michael W. Dale:<br />

Peter Behrens, German, 1868–1940<br />

Made by Simon Peter Gerz, G.m.b.H.,<br />

German, active 1857–1999<br />

Wine Jug, Model 1146, 1903<br />

Salt-glazed stoneware and pewter<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.63<br />

Gretl Wollner, Austrian, 1920–2006<br />

Leo Wollner, Austrian, 1926–1995<br />

For Knoll, Inc., American,<br />

established 1938<br />

Manufactured by Pausa AG,<br />

German, active 1919–2003<br />

Roads, designed 1971, made 1972–78<br />

Screen-printed cotton viscose sateen<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.68<br />

• • •<br />

Maria Likarz, Austrian, 1893–1971<br />

Manufactured by Flammersheim &<br />

Steinmann, German, active c. 1919–1960<br />

Tapeten der Wiener Werkstätte (Wallpaper<br />

of the Wiener Werkstätte), 1925<br />

Paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Mary<br />

Kathryn Lynch Kurtz Charitable Lead<br />

Trust Fund and Joan Morgenstern<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.64<br />

Marcel Breuer, American,<br />

born Hungary, 1902–1981<br />

Manufactured by Isokon Furniture<br />

Company, British, active 1932–1939<br />

Short Chair, designed 1937, made 1937–39<br />

Birch and plywood<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Design Council, <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.65<br />

Maija Grotell, American,<br />

born Finland, 1899–1973<br />

Vase, 1940–49<br />

Stoneware<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Art<br />

Colony Association, Inc., the Marjorie and<br />

Evan Horning Endowment for Decorative<br />

Arts, and Sara Sant’Ambrogio<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.66<br />

Toini Muona, Finnish, 1904–1987<br />

Made at Arabia Porcelain Company,<br />

Finnish, established 1874<br />

Bowl, c. 1940–49<br />

Stoneware<br />

Museum purchase funded by Judy and<br />

Henry Sauer in honor of Cindi Strauss<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.67<br />

The Dennis Freedman Collection,<br />

museum purchases funded by the<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund:<br />

Archizoom Associati, Italian,<br />

active 1966–1974<br />

Panel, c. 1969<br />

Paint on panel<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.70<br />

Humberto Campana, Brazilian, born 1953<br />

Fernando Campana, Brazilian, born 1961<br />

Bubble Wrap Chair, designed 1995,<br />

made 1998<br />

Bubble wrap and chromed iron<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.71<br />

Jurgen Bey, Dutch, born 1965<br />

Jan Konings, Dutch, born 1966<br />

Studio Konings & Bey, Dutch,<br />

active 1991–2001<br />

For Droog Design, Dutch,<br />

established 1993<br />

Kokon Table-Chair, 1997/99<br />

Kokon Chair, 1997/99<br />

PVC and wood (or plastic)<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.72, <strong>2022</strong>.107<br />

Patrick Jouin, French, born 1967<br />

Manufactured by Materialise, Belgian,<br />

established 1990<br />

C1 Chair, from the series SOLID,<br />

designed 2004, made 2006<br />

Resin<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.73<br />

Nacho Carbonell, Spanish, born 1980<br />

One Man Chair, from the Evolution series,<br />

designed 2008, made 2009<br />

Recycled paper, iron, and chicken wire<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.74<br />

Paolo Santini, Italian, 1929–2020<br />

Chair, 1967<br />

Steel<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.75<br />

• • •<br />

Coffee Pot with Cover<br />

Japan, 1650–75<br />

Porcelain with underglaze blue<br />

(Arita ware); mounted with metal<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Director’s Accessions Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.111<br />

Museum purchases funded by<br />

the Brown Foundation Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund:<br />

Charles Hougham, English, 1748–1793<br />

Pair of Torah Finials, 1790<br />

Sterling silver and silver-gilt<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.227<br />

Torah Crown<br />

Venice, mid-18th century<br />

Silver and silver-gilt<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.228<br />

Torah Mantle Panel<br />

Germany, 1797<br />

Velvet with metallic thread<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.229<br />

79


ACCESSIONS | European Art | Hirsch Library | Latin American Art<br />

EUROPEAN ART<br />

GIFTS<br />

Unknown artist, French<br />

Crucifixion, c. 1890<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

Gift of Will L. McLendon in memory of<br />

Norbert Choucroun<br />

2021.560<br />

Isaack Luttichuijs, Dutch, 1616–1673<br />

Jan Hendrik Lestevenon, c. 1653<br />

Esther de Bary, c. 1653<br />

Oil on wood<br />

Gifts of Linda and Ronny Finger<br />

2021.721, 2021.722<br />

Francesco Guarino da Solofra,<br />

Italian, 1611–1654<br />

Saint Barbara, c. 1635<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

Gift of Anne Morey<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.225<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Thomas Gainsborough, British,<br />

1727–1788<br />

Landscape with Trees and a Field,<br />

a Church Tower in the Distance, 1746–47<br />

Oil on canvas, laid on panel<br />

The Stuart Collection, museum purchase<br />

funded by Francita Stuart Koelsch Ulmer,<br />

in honor of Sybilla Eliza Juliet Yarker<br />

2021.390<br />

Biombo with Views of Mexico City<br />

Viceregal Mexico, 18th century<br />

Twelve-panel folding screen; oil on red<br />

maki-e lacquer on panel, with gilt wood<br />

mounts and linen backing<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Agnes Cullen Arnold Endowment Fund<br />

2021.537<br />

HIRSCH LIBRARY<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Alejandro Cartagena, Mexican,<br />

born Dominican Republic, 1977<br />

Group of Maquettes, 2011–21<br />

87 maquettes and 8 posters from<br />

25 book projects<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Caroline<br />

Wiess Law Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

LIB.692<br />

Anton Koberger, German, 1445–1513<br />

Liber Chronicarum, 1493<br />

1st edition; 327 leaves<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Director’s Accessions Endowment<br />

LIB.711<br />

LATIN AMERICAN ART<br />

GIFTS<br />

Margarita Paksa, Argentinean, 1933–2020<br />

Toma del Batallón 601 (Taking of the<br />

Batallion 601), 1975<br />

Tucumán Vietnam Argentino, 1975<br />

Ink on Arches paper<br />

Gifts of the Institute for Studies on<br />

Latin American Art (ISLAA)<br />

2021.431, 2021.432<br />

Gifts of Fundación Privada Allegro:<br />

Omar Rayo, Colombian, 1928–2010<br />

TiiiT, 1974<br />

Acrylic on canvas<br />

2021.565<br />

César Paternosto, Argentinian, born 1931<br />

Adobe Gate II, 1992<br />

Mixed media on canvas<br />

2021.564<br />

• • •<br />

Ana Mendieta, American,<br />

born Cuba, 1948–1985<br />

Untitled: Silueta (Silhouette) Series, 1979<br />

Single-channel video, color, silent,<br />

1/8 + 3 AP<br />

Gift of the estate of Ana Mendieta<br />

2021.566<br />

Gifts of Martin and Rebecca Eisenberg:<br />

Ernesto Neto, Brazilian, born 1964<br />

Cópula (Copulation), 1989/1995<br />

Nylon stocking and lead beads<br />

2021.567<br />

Ernesto Neto, Brazilian, born 1964<br />

Ring, 2001<br />

Stocking, Styrofoam, and lavender,<br />

edition 3 of 5<br />

2021.574<br />

• • •<br />

Lika Mutal, Peruvian,<br />

born the Netherlands, 1939–2016<br />

Sanctuary of Opposites: I Am One Stone,<br />

1992<br />

Travertine<br />

Gift of the Nohra Haime Gallery<br />

2021.569<br />

Jaime Davidovich, American,<br />

born Argentina, 1936–2016<br />

Cola del Kerosén (Kerosene Line), 1954<br />

Watercolor on paper<br />

Gift of the Jaime Davidovich Foundation<br />

2021.575<br />

Julián Álvarez Márquez, Uruguayan<br />

Formas (Forms), 1935<br />

Oil on Masonite<br />

Gift of Martin Cerruti<br />

2021.659<br />

Fabian Marcaccio, Argentinean, born 1963<br />

Private Contractor, 2006<br />

Pigmented based inks, oil, acrylic,<br />

silicone, and canvas on pliable mesh<br />

Gift of Jereann and Holland Chaney<br />

2021.709<br />

Gego (Gertrud Goldschmidt), Venezuelan,<br />

born Germany, 1912–1994<br />

Untitled, 1955<br />

Ink and caseina on matboard<br />

Gift of the Fundación Gego<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.113<br />

Thomas Glassford, American, born 1963<br />

Locus Classicus, 2018<br />

Stone and gold leaf<br />

Gift of Leslie and Brad Bucher<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.124<br />

Gifts of Billie W. Mercer in memory<br />

of Gary Mercer:<br />

Francisco Matto, Uruguayan, 1911–1995<br />

Pintura constructiva (bodegón)<br />

(Constructive Painting [Still Life]), c. 1946<br />

Oil on board<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.147<br />

Sandú Darié, Romanian, active Cuba,<br />

1906–1991<br />

Sin título (Untitled), 1950s<br />

Mixed media on wood<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.148<br />

Feliza Burzstyn, Colombian, 1933–1982<br />

Cachumbos, 1969<br />

Metal<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.149<br />

Narciso Debourg, Venezuelan, 1925–<strong>2022</strong><br />

Lumière à 4 faces (4-Sided Light), 1968<br />

Mirrored Mylar sheet inside painted<br />

plastic tubes, with a wood backing<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.150<br />

Eduardo Ramírez Villamizar,<br />

Colombian, 1923–2004<br />

Composición con grises<br />

(Composition in Grey), 1956<br />

Oil on paper mounted on board<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.151<br />

Rogelio Polesello,<br />

Argentinean, 1939–2014<br />

Untitled, 1964<br />

Acrylic<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.158<br />

Omar Rayo, Colombian, 1928–2010<br />

Asmodius, 1968<br />

Acrylic and wood on canvas<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.159<br />

Carlos Rojas, Colombian, 1933–1997<br />

Untitled, from the series America, 1976<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.160<br />

David Zink Yi, Peruvian, born 1973<br />

Untitled, 2015<br />

Stainless steel, edition 3/5 + 2 APs<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.161<br />

Augusto Torres, Uruguayan, 1913–1992<br />

Formas con fondo blanco<br />

(Forms with White Background), 1936<br />

Oil on paperboard<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.163<br />

Luis Caballero, Colombian, 1943–1995<br />

Untitled, 1984<br />

Charcoal and ink on paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.164<br />

Gabriel de la Mora, Mexican, born 1968<br />

A.N., 2007<br />

Human hair on paper<br />

Radio, 2011<br />

3,348 Post-it Notes on paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.165, <strong>2022</strong>.166<br />

Sonia Gomes, Brazilian, born 1948<br />

Untitled, from the series Raíz (Root), 2018<br />

Fabric, thread, and wood<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.167<br />

80


Latin American Art | Modern and Contemporary Art<br />

Alfredo Hlito, Argentinean, 1923–1993<br />

Sin título (Untitled), 1953–54<br />

Gouache and ink on paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.168<br />

Gerd Leufert, Venezuelan,<br />

born Prussia, 1914–1998<br />

Amor (Love), 1964<br />

Ink on paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.169<br />

Paulo Nazareth, Brazilian, born 1977<br />

Untitled, from the series Noticias de<br />

America (News from the Americas), 2012<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

Untitled, from the series Objetos para tampar<br />

o sol de seus olhos (Objects to Keep the Sun<br />

Out of Your Eyes), 2010<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

CA—produtos de genocídio—Lajita y Azteca<br />

(CA—Genocide Products—Lajita and<br />

Azteca), 2017<br />

Found materials cast in resin with artist’s<br />

wooden and metal stand<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.170–<strong>2022</strong>.172<br />

Adriano Costa, Brazilian, born 1975<br />

BigBangPsychedelicCheese, 2016<br />

Powder-coated steel<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.173<br />

Augusto Torres, Uruguayan, 1913–1992<br />

Estructura en blanco (Structure in White),<br />

c. 1965<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.174<br />

• • •<br />

Marta Minujín, Argentinean, born 1943<br />

Payment of the Argentine Foreign Debt<br />

to Andy Warhol with Corn, the Latin<br />

American Gold, 1985, printed 2010<br />

Series of three digital C-prints, edition 3/3<br />

Gift of the Institute for Studies on Latin<br />

American Art (ISLAA)<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.192<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Museum purchases funded by<br />

Latin Maecenas:<br />

César Paternosto, Argentinean, born 1931<br />

I Wonder Why, 1971<br />

Acrylic on canvas<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.108<br />

• • •<br />

Manuel Pailós, Spanish, 1918–2005<br />

Cara (Face), 1959<br />

Oil on wood<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Myron B.<br />

and Linnet F. Deily Endowment for Latin<br />

American Art and the 2019 Latin American<br />

Experience Gala and Auction<br />

2021.419<br />

Museum purchases funded by the<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund:<br />

Diego Rivera, Mexican, 1886–1957<br />

La bordadora (The Embroiderer), 1928<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.45<br />

Vincent Valdez, American, born 1977<br />

Adriana Corral, American, born 1983<br />

Requiem, 2019<br />

Clay, cast bronze, and ash; dates<br />

hand-carved into drywall<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.51<br />

• • •<br />

Zilia Sánchez, Cuban, born 1926<br />

Lunar con tatuaje (Moon with Tattoo),<br />

c. 1968–69<br />

Acrylic and ink on canvas<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

<strong>2022</strong> Latin American Experience Gala<br />

and Auction<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.183<br />

Daniel González, Venezuelan, born 1934<br />

Muerte en el asfalto, una lectura de la calle<br />

(Death on the Asphalt, a Street Reading),<br />

1979/2012<br />

Sixteen Cibachrome prints<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Caribbean Art Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.236.1–.16<br />

MODERN AND<br />

CONTEMPORARY ART<br />

GIFTS<br />

Edward Kienholz, American, 1927–1994<br />

The Mort Soul Searcher, 1960<br />

Mixed media, power drill, and<br />

electric lights<br />

Gift of Ruth and Ted Baum<br />

2021.310<br />

Callum Innes, Scottish, born 1962<br />

Exposed Painting Charcoal Black on Black,<br />

2004<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

Gift of Peter and Linda Zweig<br />

2021.318<br />

Christian Eckart, Canadian, born 1959<br />

Sacra Conversazione Painting –<br />

Versione Follia, 2014<br />

Acrylic urethane on aluminum<br />

Gift of Franci Neely<br />

2021.389<br />

Daniel Gorski, American, 1939–2017<br />

Fourth Down, 1966<br />

Painted plywood, Masonite, and chipboard<br />

Gift of Bebe Woolley<br />

2021.557<br />

Thomas Houseago, British, born 1972<br />

Reclining Figure (For Rome), 2013<br />

Bronze, edition 2/3<br />

Gift of the Abush Family<br />

2021.558<br />

Gifts of Claire Creatore:<br />

Vicky Colombet, American,<br />

born France, 1953<br />

River Series #1216-06, 2006<br />

Pigment, oil, alkyd, and wax on canvas<br />

From the Floating World Series #1431, 2020<br />

Pigment, oil, and alkyd on canvas<br />

2021.576, 2021.577<br />

Philip Smith, American, born 1952<br />

Untitled (Night Sky No. 2), <strong>2022</strong><br />

Oil pastel on canvas<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.128<br />

Lucas Johnson, American, 1940–2002<br />

Los Desamparados (The Helpless), 1966<br />

Oil on panel<br />

Gift of Jeffrey Wahba Family<br />

2021.578<br />

Charles J. Umlauf, American, 1910–1994<br />

Reclining Nude, 1958<br />

Bronze<br />

Gift of Brenda Duncan<br />

2021.579<br />

Kate Shepherd, American, born 1961<br />

Bazooka Joe Red Yellow Blue,<br />

Frayed Carpet, 2004<br />

Enamel on wood, in two parts<br />

Gift of John A. MacMahon<br />

2021.634<br />

Lee Krasner, American, 1908–1984<br />

Bird’s Parasol, 1964<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

Gift of Cornelia Cullen Long in memory<br />

of Meredith<br />

2021.755<br />

Jimmy Lee Sudduth, American,<br />

1910–2007<br />

Crucifixion, c. 1989<br />

Oil on panel<br />

Gibson House, 1989<br />

Mud and paint on plywood<br />

Jim at Age 9 Playing a Harp, c. 1989<br />

Mud and paint on plywood<br />

US Capitol Building, c. 1989<br />

Mud and paint on plywood<br />

The Gitter-Yelen Collection, gifts of<br />

Dr. Kurt Gitter and Alice Yelen Gitter<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.16–<strong>2022</strong>.19<br />

Cleve Gray, American, 1918–2004<br />

Hera, No. 2, 1968<br />

Roman Walls, 1980<br />

Untitled, 1997<br />

Acrylic on canvas<br />

Gifts of the Cleve Gray Foundation<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.125–<strong>2022</strong>.127<br />

Juan Francisco Elso Padilla,<br />

Cuban, 1956–1988<br />

Corazon de America (America’s Heart), 1987<br />

Mixed media<br />

2021.379<br />

• • •<br />

81


ACCESSIONS | Modern and Contemporary Art | Photography<br />

Gifts of Billie W. Mercer in memory<br />

of Gary Mercer:<br />

Giuseppe Penone, Italian, born 1947<br />

Spoglia d’oro (Stripped of Gold), 2001<br />

Gold and plaster<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.154<br />

Henry Taylor, American, born 1958<br />

I had to get rid of two, 2017<br />

Acrylic on cereal box<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.162<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Rachel Jones, British, born 1991<br />

lick your teeth, they so clutch, 2021<br />

Oil pastel and oil stick on canvas<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Green Family Art Foundation,<br />

courtesy Adam Green<br />

2021.433<br />

Museum purchases funded by<br />

the Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund:<br />

Jack Whitten, American, 1939–2018<br />

Natural Selection, 1995<br />

Acrylic and sumi ink on<br />

unstretched canvas<br />

2021.544<br />

Ron Mueck, Australian, born 1958<br />

Woman with Shopping, 2014<br />

Mixed media<br />

2021.596<br />

Nicolas Abdallah Moufarrege,<br />

Lebanese, 1947–1985<br />

Mission Impossible, 1983<br />

Thread, pigment, glitter, and brooches<br />

on needlepoint on canvas<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.2<br />

Pipilotti Rist, Swiss, born 1962<br />

Peeping Freedom Shutters for Olga Shapir,<br />

2020<br />

Silent single-channel video installation<br />

with vertical flatscreen, in wooden painted<br />

window frame with shutters, integrated<br />

video player; unique<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.189<br />

Simone Leigh, American, born 1968<br />

Satellite, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Bronze, edition 2<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.191<br />

• • •<br />

Carl Palazzolo, American, born 1945<br />

Erasing Days #17, 2021<br />

Acrylic, gesso, graphite, drawing inks,<br />

crayon, and oil on panel<br />

Museum purchase funded by Franci Neely<br />

2021.597<br />

Charisse Pearlina Weston, American,<br />

born 1988<br />

I am moored along the soft, shored unity<br />

of impatient ruin, 2021<br />

Enfolded glass etched with text<br />

Museum purchase funded anonymously<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.34<br />

Genevieve Gaignard, American, born 1981<br />

Family Tree, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Mixed media, vintage wallpaper<br />

Museum funded by the Director’s<br />

Accessions Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.95<br />

Betty Parsons, American, 1900–1982<br />

Maine 2, 1957<br />

Acrylic on linen<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

contemporary@mfah, <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.106<br />

PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

GIFTS<br />

André Ramos-Woodard, American,<br />

born 1994<br />

melodrama, 2020<br />

Mixed media with artist’s frame<br />

Gift of the artist<br />

2021.161<br />

George Platt Lynes, American, 1907–1955<br />

Tanaquil Le Clercq and Jerome Robbins in<br />

“Bourée Fantastique,” 1949<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

Gift of Kay Bearman<br />

2021.202<br />

Noelle Mason, American, born 1977<br />

Backscatter Blueprint (Los Bananos), 2020<br />

Cyanotype<br />

Gift of the artist<br />

2021.387<br />

Gifts of Charles Dee Mitchell:<br />

Dominic Bracco II, American, born 1986<br />

Manny and Alejandro jump across the newly<br />

lit section of Camino, 2012<br />

The remains of a car where three undercover<br />

federal police officers were executed. Two died<br />

inside a car and the other fled but was unable<br />

to escape gunmen and died nearby, 2010<br />

The scene of a murdered couple. The woman<br />

was far into her pregnancy. The couple’s<br />

heads touched in a last embrace. A single<br />

bullet entered the man’s skull and took all<br />

three lives, 2010<br />

A guard dog stretches the length of his chain<br />

in front of a family of factory worker’s home<br />

in Juarez, Mexico, 2010<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.393, 2021.439–2021.441<br />

Debi Cornwall, American, born 1973<br />

Fidel Bobblehead ($20), Guantanamo Bay,<br />

Cuba, 2015<br />

Prayer Rug with Arrow to Mecca, Camp<br />

Echo, U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay,<br />

Cuba, 2015<br />

Compliant Detainee Media Room, Camp 5,<br />

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 2014<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.442–2021.444<br />

Scott Dalton, American, born 1968<br />

Funeral Procession, Ciudad Juárez,<br />

Mexico, 2010<br />

Halloween, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, 2012<br />

Friend’s Wake, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, 2012<br />

Federal Police in Pursuit, Ciudad Juárez,<br />

Mexico, 2012<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.445–2021.448<br />

Yuri Kozyrev, Russian, born 1963<br />

Libyan rebels celebrate on top of a Gaddafi<br />

loyalist tank outside of Ajdabiyah,<br />

March 26, 2011<br />

Opposition troops shoot at a portrait of<br />

Colonel Gaddafi as they celebrated taking<br />

Ben Jawad, Libya, March 3, 2011<br />

Ras Lanuf, Libya, March 11, 2011<br />

A Libyan man inside of his ruined apartment<br />

as the result of heavy shelling, 2012<br />

Volunteers sprinkle chemical powder on two<br />

corpses in the al-Intisar neighborhood of<br />

Tripoli, August 27, 2011<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.449–2021.453<br />

Paolo Pellegrin, Italian, born 1964<br />

Looking west from the Paso del Norte bridge,<br />

with the Rio Grande trickling between Juárez<br />

on the left and El Paso on the right, 2011<br />

Border, 2011<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.456, 2021.457<br />

Ibrahim Mahama, Ghanaian, born 1987<br />

MTN MTN RA, 2017<br />

Tarpaulin cloths, metal tags, and charcoal<br />

on jute sacking<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.31<br />

Billie Zangewa, Malawian, born 1973<br />

The Pleasure of a Child, 2021<br />

Hand-stitched silk collage<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.32<br />

Derek Fordjour, American, born 1974<br />

Cotillion, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Acrylic, charcoal, cardboard, oil pastel, and<br />

foil on newspaper mounted on canvas<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Robert<br />

H. N. Ho Family Foundation Global<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.190<br />

Anthony Suau, American, born 1956<br />

US/Mexican border, Naco, Arizona,<br />

May 4, 2008<br />

US/Mexican border, San Luis, Arizona,<br />

May 1, 2008<br />

California-Mexican Border, San Diego,<br />

California, May 15, 2008<br />

Gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.394, 2021.458, 2021.459<br />

Teun Voeten, Dutch, born 1961<br />

Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, June 2009<br />

Culiacán, Mexico, June 2009<br />

Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, June 2009<br />

Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, October 2009<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.460–2021.463<br />

82


Photography<br />

Gifts of Diane and<br />

Norman Blumenthal:<br />

John Goodman, American, born 1947<br />

The Other Side / Bay Village, 1978<br />

No Minors / Washington Street, 1975<br />

Jim Goldberg / Tuscany, August 1999<br />

Henry Finder + Anthony Appiah/Boston,<br />

1998<br />

Dominos / Havana, 2000<br />

Davana Olympia / Las Vegas, 2006<br />

Gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.437, 2021.438, 2021.561, 2021.562,<br />

2021.580, 2021.581<br />

John Goodman, American, born 1947<br />

Tim Conroy / Nantucket, June 1993<br />

Inkjet print<br />

2021.563<br />

• • •<br />

Auguste Salzmann, French, 1824–1872<br />

Jérusalem, Saint Sépulcre (Church of the<br />

Holy Sepulcher, Jerusalem), 1854<br />

Salted paper print from paper negative<br />

Gift of Michael S. Sachs<br />

2021.454<br />

Richard Misrach, American, born 1949<br />

Sally’s Camera, 1998, printed 2021<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Gift of the artist<br />

2021.455<br />

Gifts of Betty Moody:<br />

Keith Carter, American, born 1948<br />

White Dove, 2004<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

In memory of Clinton T. Willour<br />

and in honor of Reid Mitchell<br />

2021.464<br />

Al Souza, American, born 1944<br />

Joseph Beuys, 1973<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

In honor of Al Souza<br />

2021.465<br />

Bill Owens, American, born 1938<br />

The Soroptimists started fifty-four years ago in<br />

Oakland, California. We are now a worldwide<br />

organization interested in worldwide service<br />

and citizenship. Our yearly luncheon is<br />

our biggest fundraiser. The money goes to<br />

preschool programs, Senior Citizens and<br />

scholarships for high school students, c. 1972<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

In honor of Al Souza<br />

2021.466<br />

• • •<br />

Unknown artist, American<br />

[Clinton T. Willour at Event], 1981<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

Gift of Reid Mitchell in honor of<br />

Betty Moody<br />

2021.467<br />

Gifts of Clinton T. Willour and<br />

Reid Mitchell:<br />

Matsue Taiji, Japanese, born 1963<br />

Wyoming, 2000<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

2021.468<br />

Paul Vincent Kuntz, American, 1961–2021<br />

Poolside, Hampton Inn, Harlingen, TX, 2016<br />

Inkjet print<br />

2021.469<br />

Pelle Cass, American, born 1954<br />

Everything in Nature, 2004<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

2021.470<br />

´<br />

Rachel Papo, Israeli/American, born 1970<br />

Waiting for Hand Grenade Practice,<br />

Southern Israel, 2005<br />

Nastya before Class, St. Petersburg,<br />

Russia, 2007<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.471, 2021.472<br />

Robert Bruce Langham III,<br />

American, born 1952<br />

Fallen Stacked Dogwoods, 2019<br />

Dicenado, 2018<br />

Cyanotypes<br />

2021.473, 2021.474<br />

John Chervinsky, American, 1961–2015<br />

Untitled, c. 2006<br />

Inkjet print<br />

2021.475<br />

Iain Stewart, Scottish, born 1967<br />

Bereft, 2006<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

2021.760<br />

• • •<br />

Fazal Sheikh, American, born 1965<br />

Traditional birthing attendant, Nyirabahire<br />

Esteri, holding newborns Nsabimana (“I beg<br />

something from God”) and Mukanzabonimpa<br />

(“God will grant me, but I don’t know when”),<br />

flanked by mothers Kanyange, Mukabatazi,<br />

and Mukabatazi’s mother, Rwandan refugee<br />

camp, Lumasi, Tanzania, 1994<br />

Abdul Rahman, Afghan refugee village,<br />

Khairabad, North Pakistan, 1997<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

Gifts of Jane P. Watkins<br />

2021.476, 2021.477<br />

Gifts of Richard and Ronay Menschel:<br />

Aaron Siskind, American, 1903–1991<br />

Rome: The Arch of Constantine 10, 1963<br />

Cusco 11, 1975<br />

Jalapa 35 (Homage to Franz Kline), 1973<br />

Martha’s Vineyard, 1954<br />

New York 2, 1951<br />

Olive Tree, Corfu 127, 1970<br />

Vera Cruz 288, 1973<br />

Gelatin silver prints, printed 1977–87<br />

2021.480–2021.486<br />

Harry Callahan, American, 1912–1999<br />

Untitled, mid-1970s<br />

Detroit, 1943<br />

Eleanor and Barbara, Chicago, 1953<br />

Detroit, 1941<br />

Siena, 1968<br />

Cuzco 528, 1974<br />

Cuzco, Peru, 1974<br />

Eleanor and Barbara, Chicago, 1954<br />

Cape Cod, 1972<br />

Gelatin silver prints, printed 1977–87<br />

2021.487–2021.495<br />

• • •<br />

Dennis Farber, American, 1946–2017<br />

Nurturing Doubt, 1989<br />

Untitled, c. 1992<br />

Untitled, 1988–92<br />

Dye diffusion transfer prints<br />

Gifts of the Dennis Farber Trust<br />

2021.496–2021.498<br />

Chris Iduma, Nigerian, born 1993<br />

Love and Hate, 2018<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Gift of the artist<br />

2021.553<br />

Keystone View Company, American,<br />

active 1892–1949<br />

Underwood & Underwood, American,<br />

active 1882–1940s<br />

Changing Fixation from 7 to 4 requires 11 1/2<br />

prism diopters of Positive Convergence. The<br />

Keystone Eye Comfort and Depth-Perception<br />

Series, about 1930<br />

Gelatin silver print, stereograph<br />

Gift of Malcolm Daniel and<br />

Darryl Morrison<br />

2021.555<br />

Joyce Tenneson, American, born 1945<br />

Luminous Being (Larissa in Gold), 1990s,<br />

printed 2021<br />

Dye sublimation print<br />

Gift of Michelle and Frank J. Hevrdejs,<br />

and Joe and Tina Pyne<br />

2021.559<br />

Jan Henle, American, born 1948<br />

La Jíbarita II, 1991–92<br />

Silver dye bleach print<br />

Gift of Pierre Apraxine<br />

2021.582<br />

83


ACCESSIONS | Photography<br />

Gifts of Joan Morgenstern:<br />

Anderson & Low, British, active since 1990<br />

Jonathan Anderson, British, born 1961<br />

Edwin Hock Low, British, born 1957<br />

Untitled, from the series Sacred Earth, 2018<br />

Untitled, from the series Sacred Earth, 2018<br />

Untitled, from the series Voyages, 2016<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.583–2021.585<br />

Adrián Fernández, Cuban, born 1984<br />

Untitled No. 7, 2017<br />

Untitled No. 12, 2017<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.660, 2021.661<br />

Lee Friedlander, American, born 1934<br />

Untitled, c. 1967<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

2021.662<br />

Ray K. Metzker, American, 1931–2014<br />

Gumball, 1966, printed 1990<br />

Pictus Interruptus: Philadelphia, 1977<br />

Gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.663, 2021.664<br />

• • •<br />

Anderson & Low, British, active since 1990<br />

Jonathan Anderson, British, born 1961<br />

Edwin Hock Low, British, born 1957<br />

Metamorphoses, 2019–2020<br />

12 salted paper prints<br />

Gift of Anderson & Low in honor of<br />

Joan Morgenstern<br />

2021.586<br />

Gifts of Peter J. Cohen:<br />

Unknown artist, American<br />

[Family and Friends, Chautauqua,<br />

New York], 1911–14<br />

Album of gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.587<br />

Unknown artists<br />

[Vernacular Photographs], 20th century<br />

110 gelatin silver prints, chromogenic prints,<br />

cyanotypes, internal dye diffusion transfer<br />

prints, and halftone prints<br />

2021.588<br />

• • •<br />

Jan Henle, American, born 1948<br />

Con el Mismo Amor IV, 1999–2007<br />

Gelatin silver print, toned<br />

Gift of Dee Vitale Henle<br />

2021.589<br />

Marsha Burns, American, born 1945<br />

Tyson, Warm Springs, 1991<br />

Photogravure<br />

Gift of Gail Gibson and Claudia Vernia<br />

in honor of Clinton T. Willour<br />

2021.598<br />

Earlie Hudnall, Jr., American, born 1946<br />

My Thinking Time, 1980<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

Gift of Margaret Culbertson<br />

2021.599<br />

Gifts of John A. MacMahon:<br />

Philip-Lorca diCorcia, American,<br />

born 1953<br />

Eddie Anderson, 21 years old,<br />

Houston, Texas, $20, from the series<br />

Hustlers, 1991<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

In memory of Clinton T. Willour<br />

2021.628<br />

Elad Lassry, Israeli, born 1977<br />

Angela Ledgerwood, 2009<br />

Michael, 2008<br />

Chromogenic prints<br />

2021.629, 2021.630<br />

Sara VanDerBeek, American, born 1976<br />

The Principle of Superimposition 3, 2008<br />

Chromogenic prints<br />

2021.631<br />

James Welling, American, born 1951<br />

D-40, 1980s<br />

Cascade, 1980<br />

Bushing, 1980<br />

Gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.632, 2021.633, 2021.644<br />

Sandy Skoglund, American,<br />

born 1946<br />

Coat Hangers, 1979<br />

A Breeze at Work, 1987<br />

Gathering Paradise, 1991<br />

Silver dye bleach prints<br />

2021.635–2021.637<br />

Roe Ethridge, American, born 1969<br />

Ford Model Kathryn Neale, 1999<br />

Thanksgiving 1984 (Table), 2009<br />

Chromogenic prints<br />

2021.638, 2021.639<br />

Gabriel Orozco, Mexican, born 1962<br />

Castillo en el aire o el leon de la plusvalia<br />

(Castle in the Air or the Lion of Surplus<br />

Value), 1998<br />

Tree through Leaves, 2001<br />

Building and Birds, 1998<br />

Lluvia en Tokio (Rain in Tokyo), 2001<br />

Silver dye bleach prints<br />

2021.640–2021.643<br />

Ed Ruscha, American, born 1937<br />

Standard, Figueroa, 1962, printed 2012<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

2021.645<br />

David Levinthal, American, born 1949<br />

Untitled, from the series Blackface,<br />

1995–98<br />

Dye diffusion transfer print<br />

2021.646<br />

Vanessa Beecroft, Italian, born 1969<br />

Untitled (Performance Detail, 1999,<br />

The New York Times Shoot), 1999<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

2021.647<br />

Uta Barth, American,<br />

born Germany, 1958<br />

nowhere near (Untitled 99.14), 1999<br />

Chromogenic prints<br />

2021.648<br />

Adam Fuss, British, born 1961<br />

Wish, 1992<br />

Silver dye bleach print, photogram<br />

Untitled (Smoke), 2005<br />

Gelatin silver print, photogram<br />

2021.649, 2021.650<br />

Gifts of Ralph Gibson:<br />

Ray Mortenson, American, born 1944<br />

South Kearny Terminal, Kearny, 1980<br />

Aim Industries, Jersey City, 1982<br />

Marshes Dock, Linden, 1979<br />

Conrail Spur, Harrison, 1980<br />

Morses Creek, Linden, 1979<br />

Untitled, 1979<br />

Untitled, 1979<br />

Untitled, 1979<br />

Untitled, 1979<br />

Untitled, 1979<br />

From the series Meadowland<br />

Gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.665–2021.674<br />

Gifts of Mike and Mickey Marvins:<br />

Unknown artists<br />

[Photographic Jewelry], 1840s–1910s<br />

14 gelatin silver prints, ambrotype,<br />

tintype, and daguerreotype jewelry<br />

2021.679<br />

Unknown artists<br />

[Portraits], 1860s–1870s<br />

3 albums of tintypes<br />

2021.680<br />

Unknown artist, German<br />

[Girl with Two Dolls], 1920s<br />

[Boy with Spinning Wheel], 1920s<br />

[Man with Telephone], 1920s<br />

3 lenticular prints<br />

2021.681<br />

Unknown artists<br />

[Portraits], 19th century<br />

8 tintypes<br />

2021.682<br />

Unknown artists<br />

[Portraits], 19th century<br />

2 tintypes<br />

2021.683<br />

Moses S. Quivey, American, 1830–1900<br />

[Portraits], c. 1865<br />

2 albumen silver prints from glass negatives<br />

2021.684<br />

84


Photography<br />

Unknown artist, American<br />

[Virginia Washington Monument], c. 1870<br />

[People and Horse in Front of Building],<br />

c. 1870<br />

[Boy Seated in a Chair with Fringe],<br />

c. 1865<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

2021.685–2021.687<br />

A. W. Harwood, American<br />

[Photographer Seated with Camera<br />

Surrounded by Images], c. 1865<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

2021.688<br />

Brady’s National Portrait Gallery,<br />

American, 1823–1896<br />

Andrew Johnson, c. 1865<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

2021.689<br />

Unknown artist<br />

Playing Tourist, early 20th century<br />

Halftone print<br />

2021.690<br />

Osborne Marley, British<br />

[Four Boys with Guns], early 20th century<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

2021.691<br />

G. H. Bronner, American,<br />

active Alvin, Texas<br />

[Man Holding Hat with Hand on Tree<br />

Stump], after 1895<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

2021.692<br />

William Henry Jackson, American,<br />

1843–1942<br />

Siamese Twins, c. 1895<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

2021.693<br />

Detroit Publishing Company, American<br />

Developing and Printing, 1904<br />

Halftone print<br />

2021.694<br />

Arthur Rothstein, American, 1915–1985<br />

[Parallax Panoramagram by LOOK<br />

magazine], February 25, 1964<br />

Lenticular print<br />

2021.695<br />

Mathew B. Brady, American, 1823–1896<br />

General Robert E. Lee and Staff,<br />

April 16, 1865<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

2021.696<br />

Unknown artist, American<br />

[World War I Military Portraits from<br />

the United States Army, 105th Infantry,<br />

Machine Gun Company], 1914–18<br />

4 gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.697<br />

Unknown artist, American<br />

[Man with Dog], 1860s–70s<br />

Ambrotype<br />

2021.698<br />

Unknown artist, American<br />

[Woman with Patterned Dress], c. 1855<br />

Daguerreotype<br />

2021.700<br />

Hugo Brehme, Mexican,<br />

born Germany, 1882–1954<br />

Taxco Gilo, 1920s<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

2021.701<br />

Unknown artist<br />

[Sunlight through Trees],<br />

early 20th century<br />

Orotone<br />

2021.702<br />

Robo Kocan, Slovak, born 1968<br />

Middle of the Europe, 1995<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

2021.703<br />

Pavel Pecha, Slovak, born 1962<br />

Untitled, from the series<br />

My Intuitive Theatre, 1990<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

2021.704<br />

• • •<br />

Julius Kricheldorff, German, 1830–1910<br />

3rd Squadron, 3rd Guards Uhlans<br />

Regiment, 1899<br />

Albumen silver print, photomontage<br />

Gift of Jacques Preis<br />

2021.706<br />

Gifts of Renée and Stanford Wallace:<br />

MANUAL, American, active since 1974<br />

Suzanne Bloom, American, born 1943<br />

Ed Hill, American, born 1935<br />

Hokusai: Two Beautiful Women, 2010<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Broken Frame, 1996<br />

Chromogenic print face-mounted on<br />

acrylic with constructed wood<br />

2021.713, 2021.714<br />

Duane Michals, American, born 1932<br />

Oviri, 1991<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

2021.715<br />

Laurent Millet, French, born 1968<br />

Petite Machine Littorale, 1997<br />

Gelatin silver print with toning<br />

2021.716<br />

Luis González Palma, Guatemalan,<br />

born 1957<br />

Destinos, 2001<br />

Ambrotype in black case<br />

2021.717<br />

George Rousse, French, born 1947<br />

Mezy, 2001<br />

Silver dye bleach print on aluminum<br />

2021.718<br />

Zofia Rydet, Polish, 1911–1997<br />

Annihilation II, c. 1970<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

2021.719<br />

Marcia Xavier, Brazilian, born 1967<br />

Rotatoria, 2006<br />

Transparency, light box<br />

2021.720<br />

Gifts of Phaedra Harbaugh and<br />

Boris Sepesi:<br />

ˆ<br />

Patrick Nagatani, American, 1945–2017<br />

Lorentz Transformations, 2007<br />

Mr. Yoshitomi and Toki, 1978, printed 2004<br />

Bald Eagle—National Wildlife Research<br />

Center, Fort Collins, Colorado, 2004<br />

Transmogrification—Biology Animal<br />

Research Facility (BARF), 2004<br />

Esoteric Science—Sandoa National<br />

Laboratory, New Mexico, 2004<br />

Claire—Crown Chakra Decompression—<br />

Spectro Chrome Institute Research<br />

Labarato, 1978<br />

Chromascape—Desert Hot Springs,<br />

California, 1980, printed 2004<br />

Harmonizing Marcus, 1978–2004<br />

Tap Water, Distilled H20, Vodka—Absorbing<br />

Chroma Rays, 2004<br />

Emergent Behavior Modification—Simulated<br />

Natural Environment Laboratory, 2005<br />

Ramon—Unintended Consequences,<br />

1979–2004<br />

Transmission, 1980, printed 2004<br />

El Nadador/Nacimiento, 1993<br />

Los Besos/Como Mantenar Amor, 1994<br />

Trinity Site, Jornada Del Muerto,<br />

New Mexico, 1989<br />

Ground Zero, “Operation Gnome”<br />

(Dec 10, 1961), New Mexico, 1990<br />

“Lysistratus,” National Atomic Museum,<br />

Albuquerque, New Mexico, 1989–93<br />

Rocket Lounge, Alamogordo,<br />

New Mexico, 1989<br />

Chromogenic prints<br />

2021.727–2021.738, 2021.747, 2021.748,<br />

2021.751–2021.754<br />

Patrick Nagatani, American, 1945–2017<br />

Andrée Tracey, American, born 1948<br />

Unlikely Earthquake (Right Panel of<br />

Diptych), 1984<br />

Old Black Magic 1984, 1984<br />

34th & Chambers (Detail Right Panel)<br />

(Patrick Nagatani), 1985<br />

Dye diffusion transfer prints<br />

2021.739–2021.741<br />

Patrick Nagatani, American, 1945–2017<br />

Andrée Tracey, American, born 1948<br />

Alamogordo Blues Variant, 1986<br />

Silver dye bleach print<br />

2021.742<br />

85


ACCESSIONS | Photography<br />

Patrick Nagatani, American, 1945–2017<br />

Andrée Tracey, American, born 1948<br />

Amarillo Angst, c. 1987<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

2021.743<br />

Patrick Nagatani, American, 1945–2017<br />

Casey Crime Photographer (Unfinished<br />

Novella), 1994<br />

Boy Scout Camera Club, Confessions of a<br />

Photograph (Unfinished Novella), 1994<br />

Captain Kodak, A Camera Story<br />

(Unfinished Novella), 1994<br />

Amazing Image, 1994<br />

Dye diffusion transfer prints<br />

2021.744–2021.746, 2021.749<br />

Patrick Nagatani, American, 1945–2017<br />

Kairos, 1992<br />

Waterless lithograph<br />

2021.750<br />

Gifts of an anonymous donor:<br />

Joel Meyerowitz, American, born 1938<br />

Dallas, Texas, 1969<br />

New York, 1968–72<br />

California, 1968–72<br />

New Mexico, 1970–74<br />

Jeffersonville, New York, 1970–74<br />

Jeffersonville, New York, 1970–74<br />

Texas, 1970–74<br />

Texas, 1970–74<br />

Schwangau, Germany, 1967<br />

Turkey, 1967<br />

Crossing the Atlantic Ocean, 1967<br />

New York City, 1963<br />

The Catskills, New York, 1963<br />

New York City, 1964<br />

John McClash, New York City, 1964–66<br />

Smithtown, Long Island, New York, 1964<br />

New York City, 1965–66<br />

New York City, 1968<br />

New Mexico, 1970–74<br />

New York City (Kiss Me, Stupid), 1965<br />

World’s Fair, New York City, 1964<br />

Spain, 1967<br />

Ireland, 1967<br />

Malaga, Spain, 1966<br />

Morocco, 1967<br />

France, 1967<br />

Paris, France, 1967<br />

Gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.761–2021.777, 2021.785–2021.794<br />

Joel Meyerowitz, American, born 1938<br />

Esquire—Donald Barthelme, 1986<br />

Esquire—Donald Barthelme, 1986<br />

Esquire—Donald Barthelme, 1986<br />

Italy—Switzerland, 1988–1989<br />

Italy—Switzerland, 1988–1989<br />

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 1986<br />

Mount Fuji, Japan, 1991<br />

World Trade Center, New York City, 1988<br />

St. Petersburg, Russia, June 29, 1988<br />

Young Trees in Winter, Tuscany, Italy, 2002<br />

Vineyard, Passing Storm,<br />

Tuscany, Italy, 2002<br />

Bright Green Landscape, Tuscany, Italy,<br />

September 27, 2002<br />

Tree and Building, Tuscany, Italy, 2002<br />

The Linden Tree, Tuscany, Italy, 2002<br />

Cape Cod, Massachusetts, July 18, 1984<br />

Cape Cod, Massachusetts, August 30, 1984<br />

Cape Cod, Massachusetts,<br />

September 1, 1985<br />

Atlanta, Georgia, October 28, 1988<br />

Cape Cod, Massachusetts, October 10, 1989<br />

Atlanta, Georgia, December 12, 1988<br />

Atlanta, Georgia, April 7, 1989<br />

Atlanta, Georgia, April 7, 1989<br />

Atlanta, Georgia, April 9, 1989<br />

Atlanta, Georgia, April 11, 1989<br />

Atlanta, Georgia, April 11, 1989<br />

Cape Cod, Massachusetts, July 4, 1983<br />

Cape Cod, Massachusetts, July 4, 1983<br />

Chromogenic prints<br />

2021.778–2021.784, 2021.795–2021.814<br />

Joel Meyerowitz, American, born 1938<br />

Paris, France, 1967<br />

France, 1967<br />

Paris, France, 1967<br />

Orleans, France, 1967<br />

Paris, France, 1967<br />

France, 1967<br />

Paris, France, 1967<br />

Jeu de Paume, Paris, 1967<br />

Paris, France, 1967<br />

Chenonceau, France, 1967<br />

Paris, France, 1967<br />

Paris, France, 1967<br />

Dye imbibition prints, printed later<br />

2021.815–2021.826<br />

Joel Meyerowitz, American, born 1938<br />

Provincetown, Massachusetts, July 13, 1983<br />

Fruit, Provincetown, Massachusetts,<br />

August 27, 1983<br />

Cape Cod, Massachusetts, August 28, 1985<br />

Bay/Sky, Provincetown, Massachusetts,<br />

September 22, 1986<br />

Bay/Sky, Cape Cod, Massachusetts,<br />

October 10, 1989<br />

Atlanta, Georgia, October 29, 1988<br />

New York City, January 1st, 1983<br />

Hartwig House, Truro, Massachusetts,<br />

July 2, 1976<br />

Chromogenic prints, printed later<br />

2021.827–2021.834<br />

Gifts of John S. and Nancy<br />

Nolan Parsley:<br />

Dawoud Bey, American, born 1953<br />

Marcia & Waynette, 1996<br />

Dye diffusion transfer prints<br />

In honor of Skyler Rae Bryan<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.11<br />

Dawoud Bey, American, born 1953<br />

Sol and Carol Lewitt, 1997<br />

Dye diffusion transfer prints<br />

In memory of Frederick C. Baldwin<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.12<br />

• • •<br />

Alfredo Sarabia, Cuban, born 1986<br />

Untitled, from the series I know it but I<br />

can’t say it, I can say it but I don’t know how,<br />

2006, printed <strong>2022</strong><br />

Inkjet print<br />

Gift of the artist in honor of Madeleine<br />

Plonsker and Malcolm Daniel<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.130<br />

Christian K. Lee, American, born 1991<br />

Alisa Coleman, 25, background, embraces<br />

Sharise Campbell, 26, after their date at a<br />

local gun range, 2021<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Gift of Scott and Judy Nyquist<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.131<br />

Christian K. Lee, American, born 1991<br />

Aaron Banks Jr and Sr,<br />

Cedar Park, TX, 2021<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Gift of the artist<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.132<br />

Gifts of Lewis Koch:<br />

Lewis Koch, American, born 1949<br />

Along Old US Highway 51, Tomahawk,<br />

Wisconsin, USA, 1990<br />

Café window, Ladysmith,<br />

Wisconsin, USA, 1989<br />

Canning factory, Juneau,<br />

Wisconsin, USA, 1989<br />

Young monks math practice, Upper<br />

Dharamsala, Himachal Pradesh, India, 1995<br />

Soda advertisement, Udaipur,<br />

Rajasthan, India, 1996<br />

Madison, Wisconsin, USA, 1986<br />

Roadside tea stall, Ken River Gorge,<br />

Madhya Pradesh, India, 1996<br />

Minocqua Lake, Minocqua,<br />

Wisconsin, USA, 1999<br />

Floating Elvis, Nashville, Tennessee,<br />

USA, 1994<br />

Near Baijnath, Himachal Pradesh,<br />

India, 1996<br />

Gelatin silver prints<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.133–2021.139, 2021.141–2021.143<br />

Lewis Koch, American, born 1949<br />

Storefront window, Marfa, Texas, USA, 1992<br />

Rear view of a RV, Yellowstone National<br />

Park, Wyoming, USA, 2012<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.140, 2021.144<br />

Lewis Koch, American, born 1949<br />

8 Wisconsin Images, a postcard portfolio, 1977<br />

Duotone prints<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.145<br />

• • •<br />

Caleb Cole, American, born 1981<br />

Trace (gray backdrop), 2016, printed <strong>2022</strong><br />

Inkjet print<br />

Gift of the artist<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.146<br />

86


Photography<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Alfredo Sarabia, Cuban, born 1986<br />

Untitled, 2017<br />

Untitled, 2017<br />

Untitled, 2018<br />

Untitled, 2017<br />

Untitled, 2019<br />

Untitled, 2020<br />

From the series The Round House<br />

Inkjet prints, printed <strong>2022</strong><br />

Museum purchases funded by<br />

Madeleine Plonsker<br />

2021.4–2021.9<br />

Purchases funded by the<br />

Photography Subcommittee 2021:<br />

Shaw, American<br />

Pima Baskets and Artifacts, 1887<br />

Platinum print<br />

2021.313<br />

Bob Gomel, American, born 1933<br />

Boxing champion Muhammad Ali posing in<br />

front of the Alvin Theater during production<br />

of play “The Great White Hope,” NY, 1968,<br />

printed 2021<br />

American tennis player Arthur Ashe<br />

(1943–1993) (right) is interviewed by reporters<br />

at the US National Championships, Forest<br />

Hills, Queens, New York, September 1965,<br />

printed 2021<br />

The Beatles, Miami, 1964, printed 2021<br />

Mysterious object tracked in sky,<br />

September 1, 1960, printed 2021<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.319–2021.322<br />

Russell Lee, American, 1903–1986<br />

Light Gallery<br />

Jim Norris and Wife, Homesteaders,<br />

Pie Town, New Mexico, 1940, printed later<br />

Dye imbibition print<br />

2021.326<br />

Unknown artist, American<br />

[War Widow], c. 1890<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

2021.392<br />

Richard Dykes Alexander, English,<br />

1788–1865<br />

John B. and Anna Alexander<br />

and Their Ten Children, c. 1854<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.22<br />

Unknown artist, American<br />

[Blind Man], 1850s<br />

Daguerreotype<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.24<br />

Purchases funded by the Buddy Taub<br />

Foundation, Dennis A. Roach and<br />

Jill Roach, Directors:<br />

Henry P. Moore, American, 1835–1911<br />

Slaves of Rebel Gen. T. F. Drayton, Hilton<br />

Head, S.C., 1861–62<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

2021.314<br />

Samuel Montague Fassett, American,<br />

born Canada, 1825–1910<br />

Frederick Douglass, February 1864<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.37<br />

Pierre Ambroise Richebourg,<br />

French, 1810–1875<br />

Jacques Mandé Daguerre, c. 1844,<br />

printed c. 1860<br />

Albumen silver print copy of<br />

a daguerreotype<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.215<br />

Édouard Hermagis, French, 1822–1868<br />

Inauguration du boulevard Prince-Eugène,<br />

place de la Nation à Paris. Fête du 7<br />

décembre 1862, December 7, 1862<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative,<br />

collodion emulsion transferred from glass<br />

to paper, modern salted paper print<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.216<br />

Purchases funded by Carl Niendorff:<br />

John Vachon, American, 1914–1975<br />

Rehabilitation client with canned goods,<br />

Chippewa County, Wisconsin,<br />

September 1939<br />

Bunkhouse of migrant fruit pickers,<br />

Berrien County, Michigan, July 1940<br />

House of a pneumonia patient in west<br />

Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, January 1941<br />

Couple from Arkansas picking cherries in<br />

Berrien County, Michigan, July 1940<br />

Doctor visits a sick child at home, Scott<br />

County, Missouri, February 1942<br />

Gelatin silver prints, printed 1970s<br />

2021.327–2021.331<br />

André Ramos Woodard, American,<br />

born 1994<br />

buds, 2020<br />

Mixed media with artist’s frame<br />

2021.384<br />

Go Nakamura, American,<br />

born Japan, 1977<br />

Minneapolis, May/June 2020,<br />

May 30, 2020<br />

Minneapolis, May/June 2020,<br />

May 30, 2020<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

2021.710, 2021.711<br />

Rashod Taylor, American, born 1985<br />

Cowboys, 2021<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.209<br />

Will Michels, American, born 1968<br />

Leandro Erlich in His Pool, 1999<br />

Chromogenic print<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.219<br />

Purchases funded by the Director’s<br />

Accessions Endowment:<br />

Georgia O’Keeffe, American, 1887–1986<br />

[Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium)],<br />

July 1959<br />

[Ladder against Adobe Wall], July 1955<br />

[Cathedral in the Desert, Glen Canyon],<br />

September 1964<br />

[Landscape], July 1956<br />

[Bo II (Bo-Bo)], 1961<br />

[Chama River], July 1959<br />

[Fence and Clouds], 1963<br />

[Todd Webb in the Salita Door], 1956<br />

Inkjet prints, printed 2020–21<br />

2021.333–2021.340<br />

Todd Webb, American, 1905–2000<br />

[Georgia O’Keeffe in Doorway], 1956,<br />

printed 2020<br />

Inkjet print<br />

2021.341<br />

Todd Webb, American, 1905–2000<br />

Georgia O’Keeffe with Camera, 1959<br />

O’Keeffe at Ghost Ranch, 1959<br />

Gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.342, 2021.343<br />

Unknown artist, British<br />

Julia Margaret Cameron and<br />

Her Daughter Julia, 1858<br />

Salted paper print from glass negative<br />

2021.657<br />

Zana Briski, American and British,<br />

born 1966<br />

Bearogram #2, August 1, 2019<br />

Gelatin silver print, photogram<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.1<br />

• • •<br />

Laura Aguilar, American, 1959–2018<br />

In Sandy’s Room, 1990, printed 2017<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Joan Morgenstern, Mary O’Hearn,<br />

and Kerry Inman and Denby Auble<br />

2021.344<br />

Aida Silvestri, British, born Eritrea, 1978<br />

Aman (Eritrea to London on foot, by lorry,<br />

boat and train), 2013<br />

Inkjet print with handstitched thread<br />

Museum purchase funded by Photo<br />

Forum 2021, and Sharon and Del Zogg<br />

2021.376<br />

Dawit L. Petros, Eritrean, born 1972<br />

Untitled (Prologue), Yamoussoukro,<br />

Côte d’Ivoire, 2016<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Purchase funded by Photo Forum 2021<br />

2021.377<br />

Purchases funded by the S. I. and<br />

Susie Morris Photography Endowment:<br />

Martin d’Orgeval, French, born 1973<br />

Témoin (Matilde #1), 2021<br />

Daguerreotype<br />

2021.378<br />

Sheila Pinkel, American, born 1941<br />

Folded Paper, 1974–82<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.195<br />

87


ACCESSIONS | Photography<br />

Purchases funded by the Anne Tucker<br />

and Clint Willour Young Photographers<br />

Endowment:<br />

André Ramos-Woodard, American,<br />

born 1994<br />

BL!NG, 2020<br />

Mixed media with artist’s frame<br />

2021.385<br />

David Alekhuogie, American, born 1986<br />

Inglewood, CA 33.9582° N, 118.3419° W,<br />

2018<br />

Inkjet print on canvas with artist’s frame<br />

2021.396<br />

Purchases funded by the Caroline<br />

Wiess Law Accessions Endowment<br />

Fund:<br />

Deborah Roberts, American, born 1962<br />

The Inconvenient citizen, 2021<br />

Collage of acrylic, graphite, pastel, and<br />

inkjet prints<br />

2021.395<br />

Bruce Conner, American, 1933–2008<br />

THE LATE NIGHT MOVIE ON TV: JUNE<br />

10, 1978 @ 1:20 TO 1:27 AM: STERNS<br />

MOTEL IN VENICE, CA, 1978, printed<br />

1986<br />

5 gelatin silver prints<br />

2021.758<br />

Marilyn Minter, American, born 1948<br />

Smash, 2014<br />

Single-channel video<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.30<br />

Purchases funded by<br />

James Edward Maloney:<br />

Pelle Cass, American, born 1954<br />

Harvard Pole Vault, 2019<br />

Inkjet print<br />

2021.478<br />

Charles Marville, French, 1813–1879<br />

Porte Dauphine, Château de Fontainebleau,<br />

1854<br />

Salted paper print from paper negative<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.23<br />

Purchases funded by<br />

Joan Morgenstern:<br />

Pelle Cass, American, born 1954<br />

Basketball at Boston College<br />

(Uncrowded Fields), 2020<br />

Inkjet print<br />

In honor of James Edward Maloney<br />

2021.479<br />

Gary Burnley, American, born 1950<br />

Self-Portrait, 2016<br />

Inkjet print and mixed-media collage<br />

In honor of Sara Terry<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.57<br />

Geoffroy de Ruillé, Belgian, 1842–1922<br />

[Man Posing as if on Horseback in the<br />

Studio of the Sculptor Geoffroy de Ruillé],<br />

1865<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.203<br />

Rashod Taylor, American, born 1985<br />

Hold On, 2020<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.208<br />

• • •<br />

Chris Iduma, Nigerian, born 1993<br />

Untitled (Sister of Charity), 2020<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Jean Karotkin in honor of Edna Robins<br />

2021.552<br />

Purchases funded by Dan and<br />

Mary Solomon:<br />

Unknown artists, British<br />

[MacCorquodale Family Album],<br />

1860s–1870s<br />

Album of albumen silver prints from<br />

glass negatives, with applied color<br />

2021.658<br />

Unknown artists, American<br />

[African American Soldiers, Sweethearts,<br />

and Family, World War II], 1940s–1950s<br />

Album of gelatin silver prints and 13<br />

gelatin silver prints in paper mats<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.38<br />

Unknown artist<br />

[Young Girl Seated with Hand on Table],<br />

c. 1860<br />

Ambrotype<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Judy Nyquist<br />

2021.712<br />

Édouard Baldus, French, born Prussia,<br />

1813–1889<br />

Auguste-Hippolyte Collard, French,<br />

1812–c. 1897<br />

Furne Fils & H. Tournier, French,<br />

active, 1858–1863<br />

Unknown artist, French<br />

Chemin de fer du Nord – Ligne de Paris à<br />

Boulogne – Vues photographiques, 1855–59,<br />

assembled c. 1860<br />

Album of 50 albumen silver prints<br />

Museum purchase<br />

2021.723.1–.50<br />

Purchases funded by Morris Weiner:<br />

Bruce Conner, American, 1933–2008<br />

PRINTS, 1974<br />

Steel lockbox, paper envelopes with typewritten<br />

text, photocopies on paper, gelatin<br />

silver prints with typewritten text, metal<br />

keys, plastic bags, clear plastic folders<br />

with plastic binding clips, paper folders,<br />

fingerprint form, and ink fingerprints<br />

2021.757<br />

Chris Iduma, Nigerian, born 1993<br />

Untitled (Woman with Painted Face),<br />

from the series Self-Portraits, 2021<br />

Inkjet print<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.46<br />

• • •<br />

Vernon Heath, British, 1819–1895<br />

The Vale of Festiniog, 1870s<br />

Marscow, Isle of Skye, 1870s<br />

Carbon prints<br />

Museum purchases funded by<br />

W. Burt Nelson in memory of<br />

Phyllis Ann Chancellor Nelson<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.5, <strong>2022</strong>.6<br />

Daniel Gonçalves, American, born Canada<br />

Letters to Elvis, 2017–18<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

Museum purchase funded by Joan<br />

Morgenstern, Bryn K. Larsen, Geoffrey<br />

and Barbara Koslov, Anne Wilkes Tucker,<br />

Edward Osowski, H. Rashed Haq, and<br />

Photo Forum <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.8.1–.10<br />

Go Nakamura, American, born Japan, 1977<br />

Minneapolis, May/June 2020, June 2, 2020<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Museum purchase funded by H. Rashed<br />

Haq in honor of Mohammad Ekramul<br />

Haque and Farida Begum<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.9<br />

Star Montana, Mexican American,<br />

born 1987<br />

Sarah, 2016, printed 2021<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Joan Morgenstern, and Kerry Inman and<br />

Denby Auble<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.20<br />

Star Montana, Mexican American,<br />

born 1987<br />

Felipe, 2013, printed 2021<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Mundy<br />

Photography Accessions Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.21<br />

Rabéa Ballin, American,<br />

born Germany, 1973<br />

F Is For FRESH, 2009<br />

5 dye sublimation prints on aluminum<br />

Museum purchase funded by Nena Marsh<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.25<br />

David Alekhuogie, American, born 1986<br />

washington and oak 34.0368° N, 118.2774° W,<br />

2018<br />

Inkjet print on canvas with artist’s frame<br />

Museum purchase funded by Joan<br />

Morgenstern, and by James Edward<br />

Maloney in honor of Joan Morgenstern<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.33<br />

Unknown artists, American<br />

[Family Album], 1935–1954<br />

Album of gelatin silver prints<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.52<br />

• • •<br />

88


Photography | Prints and Drawings<br />

Inbal Abergil, Israeli, born 1976<br />

N.O.K.—Next of Kin, 2017<br />

18 chromogenic prints and<br />

accompanying text<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Nena Marsh, W. Temple Webber III,<br />

and Morris Weiner<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.39<br />

Nicholas Nixon, American, born 1947<br />

The Brown Sisters, Jamaica Plain,<br />

Massachusetts, 2021<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Nina and Michael Zilkha<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.40<br />

John Bevan Hazard, British, 1831–1892<br />

[Work Horse and Hay Cart, Bristol,<br />

England], 1850s<br />

Salted paper print from glass negative<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Carl Niendorff, Jean L. Karotkin,<br />

Joan Morgenstern, James Edward Maloney,<br />

and Leslie Blanton<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.41<br />

Janice Guy, British, born 1953<br />

Untitled, 1977<br />

6 gelatin silver prints<br />

Museum purchase funded by S. I. and<br />

Susie Morris Photography Endowment,<br />

Jereann Chaney, Sharon Lederer, John A.<br />

MacMahon, and Joan Morgenstern<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.43<br />

Qualeasha Wood, American, born 1996<br />

Foreva by Cardi B, 2021<br />

Cotton jacquard weave and glass beads<br />

Museum purchase funded by Bryn<br />

Larsen, Jean L. Karotkin, Nena Marsh,<br />

Jeffrey A. Magid, Emily Todd, Lester<br />

Marks, the African American Art<br />

Advisory Association, and Cyvia Wolff<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.47<br />

Probably Charles Delahaye, French,<br />

1837–1878<br />

[Charles Delahaye, Seated], c. 1860<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Michael S. Sachs<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.48<br />

Lissa Rivera, American, born 1984<br />

Shelburne, Nova Scotia, from the series<br />

Absence Portraits, 2011, printed <strong>2022</strong><br />

Inkjet print<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Photo Forum <strong>2022</strong> and Marian Blake<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.194<br />

Jason Andrew, American, born 1976<br />

Defaced Bust of Zachary Taylor,<br />

January 7, 2021<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Julie Brook Alexander<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.196<br />

Kennedi Carter, American, born 1998<br />

When Hands Touch, from the series<br />

East Durham Love, 2018<br />

Inkjet print<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Mary O’Hearn, Jereann Chaney, Shelley<br />

Anne Calton and Stuart Chancellor<br />

Nelson, Peter Morris, Aimee McCrory,<br />

and H. Rashed Haq<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.197<br />

Purchases funded by Lynn and Marcel<br />

Mason Photography Endowment:<br />

Kennedi Carter, American, born 1998<br />

Silas, from the series<br />

Ridin Sucka Free, 2020<br />

Inkjet print<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.198<br />

Nancy Newberry, American, born 1968<br />

Night Fall, 2013<br />

Inkjet print<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.223<br />

• • •<br />

John K. Rose, American, born Canada,<br />

1849–1932<br />

Benjamin S. Hopkins, American,<br />

born Canada, 1859–1915<br />

Tachiar and Ce-Gee-Che, Ute Squaws, 1899<br />

Heebe-Tee-Tse, Shoshone, 1899<br />

Platinum prints<br />

Museum purchase funded by Photo<br />

Forum <strong>2022</strong>, and Barbara and<br />

James Hemphill<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.199, <strong>2022</strong>.200<br />

Purchases funded by<br />

Photo Forum <strong>2022</strong>:<br />

William Notman, Canadian, 1826–1891<br />

Niagara Falls, with Remnants of the<br />

Lewiston Suspension Bridge, 1868<br />

Albumen print from glass negative<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.201<br />

Larry Clark, American, born 1943<br />

Billy Mann, Tulsa, 1968, printed 2010<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.204<br />

Nancy Newberry, American, born 1968<br />

Open Carry, 2020<br />

Untitled Scene 06, 2018<br />

Inkjet prints<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.221, <strong>2022</strong>.222<br />

• • •<br />

Unknown artist, British<br />

[Two British Children with an Indian Man],<br />

c. 1860<br />

Albumen silver print from glass negative<br />

Museum purchase funded by Photo<br />

Forum <strong>2022</strong> and T. Fuller Pentecost<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.202<br />

Rashod Taylor, American, born 1985<br />

Easter Sunday, 2021<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Sharon and Del Zogg<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.207<br />

Grant Mudford, Australian, born 1944<br />

El Paso, 1976<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

Museum purchase funded by Photo Forum<br />

<strong>2022</strong> and John and Nancy Parsley<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.212<br />

Dionne Lee, American, born 1988<br />

Lapse, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Gelatin silver print, collage<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Francis L. Lederer Foundation,<br />

courtesy of Sharon Lederer<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.217<br />

Enrique Metinides, Mexican, 1934–<strong>2022</strong><br />

Car Crash, Mexico City,<br />

late 1960s–early 1970s<br />

Gelatin silver print<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

W. Temple Webber III<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.224<br />

Unknown artist, American<br />

[Father and Two Daughters in<br />

Front of a 42-Star American Flag], 1890<br />

Tintype<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

the Photography Subcommittee <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.237<br />

PRINTS AND<br />

DRAWINGS<br />

GIFTS<br />

Gifts of Kay Bearman:<br />

Frank Stella, American, born 1936<br />

The Green Hornet Goes to L.A., 1962<br />

Colored pencil and graphite on wove<br />

paper in painted artist’s frame<br />

In memory of Henry Geldzahler<br />

2021.186<br />

Frank Stella, American, born 1936<br />

Sketch for unpublished print [Over the<br />

Wave], 1966<br />

Black fiber-tipped pen with graphite on<br />

wove graph paper<br />

2021.187<br />

Frank Stella, American, born 1936<br />

Printed by Kenneth Tyler, Octavio Pereira,<br />

Robert de la Rocha, and James Webb<br />

Published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles<br />

Star of Persia II, from the series Star of<br />

Persia, 1967<br />

Lithograph in colors on wove paper,<br />

from the edition of 92<br />

2021.188<br />

Frank Stella, American, born 1936<br />

Sketch for Abra, 1967<br />

Colored fiber-tipped pen with graphite on<br />

wove graph paper<br />

2021.189<br />

89


ACCESSIONS | Prints and Drawings<br />

Frank Stella, American, born 1936<br />

Sketch for Odelsk, c. 1970<br />

Cut-and-pasted color wove paper, oil<br />

pastel, fiber-tipped pen, and graphite on<br />

color wove paper<br />

2021.190<br />

Frank Stella, American, born 1936<br />

Printed by Valerie Pedlar and Bill Law<br />

Published by Propyläen-Verlag, Berlin,<br />

and Pantheon Presse, S.A., Agno,<br />

Switzerland<br />

Sidi Ifni, 1973<br />

Offset lithograph in colors on wove paper,<br />

artist’s proof 3/15<br />

2021.191<br />

Frank Stella, American, born 1936<br />

Union, from the series<br />

Eccentric Polygons, 1973<br />

Lithograph in colors and screenprint<br />

in colors on wove paper, trial proof<br />

2021.192<br />

Frank Stella, American, born 1936<br />

Published by Tyler Graphics Ltd.,<br />

Bedford Village, NY<br />

Lunna Wola (V), 1975<br />

Cotton-pulp relief with dyes and dry<br />

pigments, from the edition of 26<br />

2021.193<br />

Jasper Johns, American, born 1930<br />

Published by Universal Limited Art<br />

Editions, Bay Shore, New York<br />

Target, 1967<br />

Lithograph in colors on wove paper,<br />

artist’s proof 5/5<br />

2021.194<br />

Jasper Johns, American, born 1930<br />

Published by Tanglewood Press, Inc.,<br />

New York<br />

The Critic Sees, from the series Ten from<br />

Leo Castelli, 1967<br />

Collage of screenprint on acetate, textile,<br />

and cut-and-pasted embossment on wove<br />

paper, artist’s proof, aside from the edition<br />

of 200<br />

2021.195<br />

Jasper Johns, American, born 1930<br />

Printed by Jasper Johns for the benefit of<br />

Merce Cunningham Dance Company and<br />

Aetna Silkscreen, Inc.<br />

Target with Four Faces, 1968<br />

Screenprint in seven colors on wove<br />

paper, artist’s proof 10/10<br />

2021.196<br />

Jasper Johns, American, born 1930<br />

Published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles<br />

Number 7, 1968<br />

Lithograph in colors on wove paper,<br />

edition 66/70<br />

2021.197<br />

Jasper Johns, American, born 1930<br />

Published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles<br />

0 through 9, 1970<br />

Embossed lead relief with polystyrene<br />

and wood backing in aluminum frame,<br />

edition 20/60<br />

2021.198<br />

Jasper Johns, American, born 1930<br />

Published by Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles<br />

Target, 1971<br />

Lithograph and rubber stamp with paintbrush<br />

and three watercolor pads on wove<br />

paper in a wooden box with brass hinges<br />

and clasp, artist’s proof III/VI, aside from<br />

the offset lithograph edition of 22,500<br />

2021.199<br />

Jasper Johns, American, born 1930<br />

Printed by John Lund<br />

Published by Low Road Studio,<br />

Sharon, CT<br />

Flag on Orange, 1998<br />

Etching and aquatint in colors on wove<br />

paper, artist’s proof 11/11<br />

2021.200<br />

Jasper Johns, American, born 1930<br />

Published by Universal Limited Art<br />

Editions, Bay Shore, New York<br />

Number 9, 2012<br />

Lithograph on wove paper, edition 34/40<br />

2021.201<br />

Frank Stella, American, born 1936<br />

Corona Collage 44, 2020<br />

Collage of photo-offset lithograph,<br />

letterpress, halftone print, color paper,<br />

ink stamp, and black ink on wove paper<br />

and paper board, encapsulated in thermal<br />

laminating films<br />

2021.203<br />

Bruce Conner, American, 1933–2008<br />

Untitled, 1970<br />

4 offset lithographs on wove paper,<br />

edition of 90<br />

Gifts of Fredericka Hunter and<br />

Ian Glennie<br />

2021.278–2021.281<br />

James Rizzi, American, 1950–2011<br />

[Title unknown], c. 1970<br />

Etching on wove paper, edition 2/72<br />

Gift of Eileen B. Glaser<br />

2021.398<br />

Francisco Toledo, Mexican, 1940–2019<br />

Printed by Mario Reyes and Litoarte,<br />

Mexico City<br />

Published by Avril Gráfica, Mexico City<br />

Sahagun, 1974<br />

Eight-print portfolio with etching, aquatint,<br />

drypoint, and mezzotint in colors on wove<br />

paper, edition 53/100<br />

Gift of Patricia Covo Johnson and the<br />

estate of Lucas Johnson<br />

2021.399<br />

Carroll Dunham, American, born 1949<br />

Printed and published by Universal Limited<br />

Art Editions, Bay Shore, New York<br />

Untitled, 2006<br />

14 lithographs on wove paper, printer’s<br />

proof, 4/4, aside from the edition of 5<br />

Gift of Hiram Butler, Andrew Spindler,<br />

Josh Pazda and Chris Goins in honor of<br />

Theodore J. Lee and Marc A. Sekula<br />

2021.400<br />

Curtis Gannon, American, born 1974<br />

The Trouble Next Door, 2019<br />

Acrylic on wove paper<br />

Gift of the artist in memory of<br />

Clinton T. Willour<br />

2021.401<br />

Winsor & Newton, founded London, 1832<br />

Watercolor Box, c. 1841–55<br />

Watercolor pigments, wood, and<br />

ceramic components<br />

The Stuart Collection, gift of Lowell Libson<br />

and Jonny Yarker in honor of Francita<br />

Stuart Koelsch Ulmer on the occasion of<br />

her 90th birthday<br />

2021.402<br />

Christiane Baumgartner, German,<br />

born 1967<br />

Think positive Stay negative!, 2020<br />

Woodcut on wove paper, edition 98/100<br />

Gift of the artist<br />

2021.403<br />

Gift of Grace Phillips and<br />

Eugene Nosal:<br />

Fereydoun Ave, Iranian, born 1945<br />

Lal Dahlias I, from the series<br />

Lal Dahlias, 2010<br />

Screenprint on wove paper, edition 60/125<br />

Untitled, from the series Lal Dahlias, 2016<br />

Screenprint on wove paper, edition 20/20<br />

2021.404, 2021.405<br />

Gifts of Michael S. Sachs:<br />

Maurits Cornelis Escher, Dutch, 1898–1972<br />

Printed and published by C.A.J.<br />

van Dishoeck, Bussum, Belgium<br />

Handwijzer (Signpost), from<br />

XXIV Emblemata, 1931, published 1932<br />

Bijenkorf (Beehive), from<br />

XXIV Emblemata, 1931, published 1932<br />

Dobbelsteenen (Dice), from<br />

XXIV Emblemata, 1931, published 1932<br />

Schuilnest (Retreat), from<br />

XXIV Emblemata, 1931, published 1932<br />

Woodcut on wove paper, from the edition<br />

of 300<br />

2021.406–2021.409<br />

Erik Desmazières, French,<br />

born Morocco, 1948<br />

La Tentation de Saint Antoine<br />

(The Temptation of Saint Anthony), 1993<br />

Etching, aquatint, and roulette on wove<br />

paper, state I/II, edition 2/75<br />

2021.556<br />

Gifts of Michael W. Dale:<br />

Alexander Calder, American, 1898–1976<br />

Petit Stabile, c. 1962–63<br />

Lithograph in colors on wove paper,<br />

edition 13/90<br />

2021.410<br />

Anna Elizabeth Keener, American,<br />

1895–1982<br />

Untitled (Madonna and Child),<br />

early to mid-20th century<br />

Watercolor and graphite on wove paper<br />

2021.411<br />

• • •<br />

90


Prints and Drawings<br />

Rockwell Kent, American, 1882–1971<br />

Girl on Cliff (The Abyss), 1930<br />

Wood engraving on wove paper, from the<br />

edition of 1700, plus 50 for the artist<br />

In honor of Dr. Dena M. Woodall<br />

2021.412<br />

Gene Kloss, American, 1903–1996<br />

Desert Drama, 1977<br />

Drypoint and aquatint on wove paper,<br />

edition 34/35<br />

2021.413<br />

Navarre Scott Momaday, American,<br />

Kiowa, born 1934<br />

Published by the Rydal Press, Santa Fe<br />

In the Presence of the Sun: A Gathering<br />

of Shields, 1992<br />

Artist’s book with letterpress and hand<br />

coloring, deluxe edition 0/26<br />

2021.414<br />

Earl Stroh, American, 1924–2005<br />

Possibly printed with Johnny Friedlaender<br />

at Atelier Friedlaender, Paris<br />

St. Martin de la Place, c. 1959<br />

Etching and drypoint on wove paper,<br />

edition 19/75<br />

2021.415<br />

Robin Utterback, American, 1949–2007<br />

Unnamed, 1978<br />

Acrylic and charcoal on wove paper<br />

In honor and memory of<br />

Clinton T. Willour<br />

2021.416<br />

Emmi Whitehorse, American, Diné<br />

(Navajo), born 1957<br />

Kin Nah Zin II, 1982<br />

Oil and pastel with collage on wove paper<br />

In honor of Dr. Dena M. Woodall<br />

2021.422<br />

• • •<br />

Linda Ridgway, American, born 1947<br />

Thank You Alison, 2006<br />

Photogravure on wove paper<br />

Gift of the artist in honor of<br />

Alison de Lima Greene<br />

2021.417<br />

Félicien Rops, Belgian, 1833–1898<br />

La Presse (The Press), c. 1870<br />

Etching and drypoint on tan wove paper<br />

Gift of Malcolm Daniel in honor of Jay<br />

McKean Fisher<br />

2021.418<br />

Stanton Macdonald Wright, American,<br />

1890–1973<br />

Printed by Clifton Karhu, American,<br />

active Japan, 1927–2007<br />

Haiga Portfolio, 1966–67<br />

Portfolio of 20 woodcuts in colors on<br />

Japanese paper, edition 44/50<br />

Bequest of the estate of Stanton and<br />

Jean Macdonald Wright<br />

2021.420<br />

Robert Nava, American, born 1985<br />

Sun Walk, 2019<br />

Crayon, grease pencil, and graphite on<br />

wove paper<br />

Gift of Dr. Joseph Nguyen and Tamie Tong<br />

2021.421<br />

Toni LaSelle, American, 1901–2002<br />

Sketchbook (Provincetown), c. 1948<br />

Ink and graphite on 12 sheets of wove paper<br />

in a spiral-bound sketchbook<br />

Gift of the Dorothy Antoinette<br />

LaSelle Foundation<br />

2021.600<br />

Rufino Tamayo, Mexican, 1899–1991<br />

Printed and published by Taller de Gráfica<br />

Mexicana, Mexico City<br />

El Nino Bailando, 1974<br />

Mixografia © in colors on wove paper,<br />

hors commerce/17, besides the edition<br />

of 100<br />

Gift of Maria Merrill and<br />

Dr. Joseph M. Merrill<br />

2021.601<br />

Mary Cassatt, American, 1844–1926,<br />

active France<br />

Afternoon Promenade, 1881<br />

Soft ground etching with aquatint on laid<br />

paper, state II/II<br />

Standing Woman, Study for the Etching<br />

Afternoon Promenade, 1881<br />

Graphite on wove paper<br />

Gifts of Dr. and Mrs. Craig Calvert<br />

2021.602, 2021.835<br />

Gifts of Jeffrey Wahba Family:<br />

Lucas Johnson, American, 1940–2002<br />

Carnival, c. 1960s<br />

Ink on wove paper<br />

Los espectadores (The Spectators), 1968<br />

Lithograph on wove paper<br />

Retrato de Don Quixote y Sancho Panza #2,<br />

1969<br />

Offset lithograph on paper<br />

La Gorda (The Fat Girl), 1968<br />

Graphite with pen and ink on wove paper<br />

2021.603–2021.606<br />

José Luis Cuevas, Mexican, 1934–2017<br />

Manifestantes (Protestors), May 17, 1968<br />

Pen and ink on wove paper<br />

2021.607<br />

• • •<br />

Elizabeth McBride, American, 1943–2009<br />

Untitled, 2001<br />

Ink on plastic film<br />

Gift of Clinton T. Willour and Reid<br />

Mitchell<br />

2021.608<br />

Eric Avery, American, born 1948<br />

Malinda Beeman, American, born 1949<br />

James Bettison, American, 1957–1997<br />

Derek Boshier, English, born 1937<br />

Karin Broker, American, born 1950<br />

Chuck Dugan, American, 1947–2007<br />

Gail Siptak, American, born 1944<br />

Gael Stack, American, born 1941<br />

William Steen, American, 1949–2008<br />

Michael Tracy, American, born 1949<br />

Printed by Penny Cerling<br />

Published by Little Egypt<br />

Enterprises, Houston<br />

Art Against AIDS, 1988<br />

10-print portfolio of woodcuts, etchings,<br />

and lithographs on wove paper,<br />

edition 47/50<br />

Gift of Gail Siptak<br />

2021.609<br />

Gifts of Penny Cerling:<br />

Luis Jiménez, American, 1940–2006<br />

Printed at Tembo/Cerling Print Studio,<br />

Houston, TX<br />

Portrait of Artist’s Mother, 2002–4<br />

Etching, drypoint, and aquatint on wove<br />

paper, state II/II, proof<br />

In honor of Laura Jane Cerling<br />

2021.610<br />

Beth Secor, American, born 1956<br />

Printed by Penny Cerling and<br />

Marco Villegas<br />

Metaphors of Adolescence: 9:15, 1993<br />

Metaphors of Adolescence: 4:11, 1993<br />

Metaphors of Adolescence: 6:45, 1993<br />

Etching and aquatint on wove paper,<br />

bon à tirer<br />

In memory of Clinton T. Willour<br />

2021.611–2021.613<br />

Eleanore Mikus, American, 1927–2017<br />

Printed by David Folkman<br />

Published by Tamarind Lithography<br />

Workshop, Inc., Los Angeles<br />

Tablet 3, 1968<br />

Lithograph on wove paper, bon à tirer,<br />

aside from the edition of 10<br />

In memory of Eileen Montgomery in<br />

recognition of her collaborative work at<br />

Little Egypt Enterprises<br />

2021.653<br />

Hedda Sterne, American, born Romania,<br />

1910–2011<br />

Printed by Clifford Smith with<br />

David Folkman<br />

Published by Tamarind Lithography<br />

Workshop, Inc., Los Angeles<br />

Untitled, from the series The Vertical<br />

Horizontals, 1967<br />

Lithograph on wove paper, bon à tirer,<br />

aside from the edition of 20<br />

In memory of Eileen Montgomery in<br />

recognition of her collaborative work at<br />

Little Egypt Enterprises<br />

2021.654<br />

• • •<br />

Do Ho Suh, Korean, born 1962<br />

Who Am We?, 2006<br />

Offset Iris print in four colors on<br />

coated paper<br />

Gift of Jereann and Holland Chaney<br />

2021.614<br />

Ruth Pastine, American, born 1964<br />

Blue 12, 2020<br />

Oil on wove paper<br />

Gift of the artist, courtesy of<br />

Gallery Sonja Roesch<br />

2021.615<br />

91


ACCESSIONS | Prints and Drawings<br />

James Abbott McNeill Whistler,<br />

American, 1834–1903<br />

Longshore Men, 1859<br />

Etching with drypoint on wove paper,<br />

state III/IV<br />

La vieille aux loques (The old woman<br />

with rags), 1858<br />

Etching with drypoint on laid paper,<br />

state IV/IV<br />

The Rag Gatherers (Rag Pickers, Quartier<br />

Mouffetard, Paris), 1858<br />

Etching with drypoint on laid paper,<br />

state V/V<br />

Gifts of Frank J. Hevrdejs<br />

2021.616–2021.618<br />

Gifts of Will L. McLendon:<br />

Jacques Villon, French, 1875–1963<br />

Standing Nude Woman, in Profile,<br />

early 20th century<br />

Graphite on wove paper<br />

In memory of Arthur Tafolla<br />

2021.619<br />

Jacques Villon, French, 1875–1963<br />

Published by Editions Sagot, Paris<br />

Minne étendue dans un rocking-chair<br />

(Le Repos) (Minne Reclining in a Rocking<br />

Chair [The Repose]), from the portfolio<br />

Le Bain de Minne (Minne’s Bath), 1907<br />

Etching, aquatint, and drypoint on laid<br />

Japan paper, edition 32/50<br />

In memory of Norbert Choucroun<br />

2021.620<br />

• • •<br />

Robin Utterback, American, 1949–2007<br />

Untitled, STR #67, 2004<br />

Collage and acrylic on butcher paper<br />

Untitled, STR #18, 2004<br />

Collage and acrylic on silk<br />

Untitled, STR #20, 2004<br />

Paint on cardboard<br />

Untitled, STR #34, 2004<br />

Acrylic on cardboard<br />

Untitled, Strasbourg #12, 2004<br />

Acrylic on cut cardboard<br />

Untitled, #1109 a, 2005<br />

Paint on newsprint, burlap, and fabric<br />

Untitled, #1109 b, 2005<br />

White paint on red burlap, with collage<br />

Gifts of the Robin Utterback Trust<br />

2021.621–2021.627<br />

Henry Wolf, American, 1852–1916<br />

After Sarah Choate Sears, American,<br />

1858–1935<br />

Romola, 1896<br />

Wood engraving on wove paper,<br />

artist’s proof<br />

Gift of Devin Borden in memory of<br />

Joan Clark Borden<br />

2021.651<br />

Julião Sarmento, Portuguese, born 1948<br />

Curiosity’s Eye Portfolio, 2013<br />

6-print portfolio of Mixografia ©<br />

prints in colors on handmade paper<br />

Gift of McClain Gallery in honor of<br />

Dr. Dena M. Woodall<br />

2021.652<br />

Lucinda Cobley, British, born 1963<br />

Intervals 12, from the series Intervals, 2018<br />

Monoprint of Charbonnel ink on cut and<br />

torn Dura-Lar polyester film<br />

Gift of Wade H. Wilson in honor of<br />

Dr. Malcolm and Jackie Wolens Mazow<br />

2021.655<br />

Jake Berthot, American, 1939–2014<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 23/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching and aquatint on Somerset Satin<br />

paper, edition 15/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 9/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 11/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 10/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 13/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 16/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 14/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 7/35<br />

Untitled, 1998<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 12/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 4/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 10/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching on Arches Hot Press watercolor<br />

paper, edition 8/35<br />

Untitled, 1989<br />

Etching and aquatint on Arches Hot Press<br />

watercolor paper, edition 16/35<br />

Untitled, 1990<br />

Etching and aquatint on Arches Hot Press<br />

watercolor paper, edition 11/35<br />

Untitled, 1991<br />

Etching and aquatint on Arches Hot Press<br />

watercolor paper, edition 11/20<br />

Untitled, 1991<br />

Etching and aquatint on Arches Hot Press<br />

watercolor paper, edition 8/25<br />

Untitled, 1991<br />

Etching and aquatint on Somerset Satin<br />

wove paper, edition 10/20<br />

Untitled, 1992<br />

Etching and aquatint on Somerset Satin<br />

paper, edition 9/25<br />

Untitled, 1992<br />

Etching and aquatint on Somerset Satin<br />

paper, edition 11/20<br />

Untitled, 2002<br />

Etching and drypoint on Somerset Satin<br />

paper, edition 12/20<br />

Untitled, 2002<br />

Etching and aquatint on Arches Hot Press<br />

watercolor paper, edition 6/25<br />

Untitled, 2002<br />

Etching and drypoint on Somerset Satin<br />

paper, edition 9/20<br />

Untitled, 2002<br />

Etching, aquatint, and drypoint on Somerset<br />

Satin paper, edition 10/20<br />

Gifts of Betty Cuningham Gallery<br />

2021.656, 2021.836–2021.858<br />

Joseph Havel, American, born 1954<br />

Rope Drawing, 1992<br />

Charcoal on wove paper<br />

Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Clive Fields<br />

2021.705<br />

Various artists<br />

Published by Verlag Pan, Berlin<br />

Pan, vol. 1, no. 3, 1895<br />

Book with letterpress text and<br />

lithograph, etching, collotype, and<br />

heliogravure illustrations<br />

Gift of Eileen B. Glaser and<br />

Jay R. Schachner<br />

2021.707<br />

Domenico Maria Canuti, Italian, 1625–1684<br />

Lot and His Daughters, 17th century<br />

Red chalk on laid paper<br />

Gift of William Elliott Doyle<br />

2021.708<br />

Eric Avery, American, born 1948<br />

Malinda Beeman, American, born 1949<br />

James Bettison, American, 1957–1997<br />

Derek Boshier, English, born 1937<br />

Karin Broker, American, born 1950<br />

Gail Siptak, American, born 1944<br />

Gael Stack, American, born 1941<br />

William Steen, American, 1949–2008<br />

Michael Tracy, American, born 1949<br />

Published by Little Egypt<br />

Enterprises, Houston<br />

Art Against AIDS Portfolio, 1988<br />

10-print portfolio of woodcut, etching,<br />

and lithographs on wove paper<br />

Gift of Robert Rosenberg in honor of<br />

Penny Cerling<br />

2021.759<br />

Gifts of Julie Peak:<br />

Sir Francis Seymour Haden, British,<br />

1818–1910<br />

After Joseph Mallord William Turner,<br />

British, 1775–1851<br />

Calais Pier, after Turner, 1874<br />

Etching and drypoint on J. Whatman 1864<br />

paper, state V/XII<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.77<br />

Alfredo Müller, French,<br />

born Italy, 1869–1939<br />

Le Massage (After the Bath), 1908<br />

Aquatint in colors on laid paper,<br />

from the edition of approx. 50<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.78<br />

92


Prints and Drawings<br />

Alfredo Müller, French,<br />

born Italy, 1869–1939<br />

Flotille de Bateaux de Pecheurs<br />

(Flotilla of Fishing Boats), 1902<br />

Aquatint in color on Arches wove paper,<br />

edition 47/50<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.79<br />

• • •<br />

Albrecht Dürer, German, 1471–1528<br />

Martyrdom of the Ten Thousand,<br />

c. 1496–97<br />

Woodcut on laid paper<br />

Gift of Laurie Taylor Mitchell<br />

in honor of Diane Wolfthal<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.80<br />

George Grosz, German, 1893–1959<br />

Menschen in der Strasse (People in the<br />

Street), from the portfolio Im Schatten<br />

(In the Shadows), 1920–21<br />

Lithograph on handmade paper<br />

Gift of Dr. Bruce Patsner<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.85<br />

Jay DeFeo, American, 1929–1989<br />

Untitled [E1891], from the series<br />

Compass, 1979<br />

Charcoal and acrylic on wove paper<br />

Gift of the Jay DeFeo Foundation<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.87<br />

Gifts of the estate of<br />

Mary Susan Lewis:<br />

Terry Allen, American, born 1943<br />

Printed by Jack Lemon, American,<br />

born 1936<br />

Published by Landfall Press, Chicago<br />

Yellow Man’s Revenge, from the<br />

Juarez Series, 1971<br />

Lithograph, printed chine collé,<br />

on wove paper with punch holes<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.92<br />

Terry Allen, American, born 1943<br />

[PS to a personal letter],<br />

mid- to late 20th century<br />

Fiber-tipped pen on wove paper<br />

Study for Route (Study for Writing on Rocks<br />

Across the USA), from the Juarez Series,<br />

c. 1965–72<br />

Gouache, color pencil, and ink with<br />

collage of papers on paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.93, <strong>2022</strong>.94<br />

Horst Antes, German, born 1936<br />

Jorge Castillo, Spanish, born 1933<br />

Renato Guttuso, Italian, 1912–1987<br />

David Hockney, British, born 1937<br />

Jean Ipoustéguy, French, 1920–2006<br />

Marino Marini, Italian, 1901–1980<br />

André Masson, French, 1896–1987<br />

Henry Moore, British, 1898–1986<br />

Sir Eduardo Paolozzi, British, 1924–2005<br />

Fritz Wotruba, Austrian, 1907–1975<br />

Paul Wunderlich, German, 1927–2010<br />

Emilio Greco, Italian, 1913–1995<br />

Giacomo Manzù, Italian, 1908–1991<br />

Printed by Aldo Crommelynck, Paris<br />

Omaggio a Michelangelo (Homage to<br />

Michelangelo), 1975<br />

11 prints (lithograph in colors; etching;<br />

etching and aquatint) on wove paper from<br />

a portfolio of 13, edition 182/200<br />

Gift of Sue and Rusty Burnett<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.129<br />

Gifts of Billie W. Mercer<br />

in memory of Gary Mercer:<br />

Giuseppe Penone, Italian, born 1947<br />

Il peso del soffio, il peso del corpo (The Weight<br />

of the Breath, the Weight of the Body), 1979<br />

Ink and watercolor on wove paper<br />

Senza titolo (Untitled), 1977<br />

Watercolor and ink on wove paper<br />

Suture (Sutures), 1989<br />

Wine vinegar, Chinese ink on wove paper<br />

Una pelle di spine d’acacia (The Skin of<br />

Acacia Thorns), 2001<br />

Chinese ink, charcoal, crayon, and tape<br />

Senza titolo [Terra verticale] (Untitled<br />

[Vertical Earth]), 1984<br />

Ink on wove paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.152–<strong>2022</strong>.157<br />

Gifts of Carroll Dunham:<br />

Carroll Dunham, American, born 1949<br />

Published by Universal Limited Art<br />

Editions, Bay Shore, New York<br />

Full Spectrum, 1985–87<br />

Lithograph in 14 colors on J.B. Green<br />

wove paper, edition 10/68<br />

Analysis, 1991<br />

Wood engraving in 4 colors on<br />

Saunders wove paper, edition 29/38<br />

Cold and Dark, 1992–93<br />

Intaglio in one color with drypoint on<br />

handmade Richard de Bas black wove<br />

paper, edition 15/17<br />

Untitled, 1996<br />

Lithograph in 15 colors on Arches Cover<br />

buff wove paper, edition 27/29<br />

The Sun, 2000–2001<br />

Pigmented inkjet with intaglio on<br />

Concorde Rag paper, edition 21/23<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.230–<strong>2022</strong>.234<br />

Carroll Dunham, American, born 1949<br />

Published by Pace Editions, Inc.<br />

Interior A, B, C, 2006<br />

Suite of 3 screenprints in color,<br />

on laminated archival book board paper,<br />

edition 20/35<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.235<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Vilhelm Hammershøi, Danish,<br />

1864–1916<br />

Composition de formes géométriques<br />

(Composition of Geometric Forms), 1879<br />

Graphite and charcoal, heightened with<br />

white chalk on laid paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Buddy<br />

Taub Foundation, Dennis A. Roach and<br />

Jill Roach, Directors<br />

2021.381<br />

Morimura Ray, Japanese, born 1948<br />

Portland Japanese Garden—Spring, 2014<br />

Woodblock print in colors on Kozo paper,<br />

edition 36/100<br />

Museum purchase funded by Michael W.<br />

Dale in memory of Janice K. McCollough<br />

2021.382<br />

Museum purchases funded by<br />

the Alvin S. Romansky Prints<br />

and Drawings Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund:<br />

Albert Eugene Gallatin,<br />

American, 1881–1952<br />

Collage No. 15, 1940<br />

Collage, oil, and graphite on card stock<br />

2021.383<br />

Ursula von Rydingsvard, American,<br />

born Germany, 1942<br />

Published by Dieu Donné, New York<br />

Kasia, 2016<br />

Silk, pigment, linen, and handmade paper,<br />

edition 2/20<br />

2021.397<br />

June Wayne, American, 1918–2011<br />

Printed by Sarah Amos<br />

Published by Tamarind Institute,<br />

Albuquerque, New Mexico<br />

Ostend/Hollywood, 1992<br />

Lithograph in colors on wove paper,<br />

short edition II/V, aside from edition of 15<br />

2021.500<br />

June Wayne, American, 1918–2011<br />

Printed by Edward Hamilton<br />

Published by Tamarind Institute,<br />

Albuquerque, New Mexico<br />

Visa/Sunday, 1976<br />

Lithograph in colors on wove paper, short<br />

edition V/VII, aside from edition of 20<br />

2021.501<br />

Jim Hodges, American, born 1957<br />

Printed by Cole Rogers at Highpoint Center<br />

for Printmaking, Minneapolis<br />

Published by Highpoint Editions and<br />

Walker Art Center, Minneapolis<br />

Winter Speaks, 2015<br />

Etching, aquatint, sugar lift, spit bite,<br />

and drypoint in colors with scraping and<br />

burnishing on wove paper and brown<br />

Gampi paper; screenprint in white ink on<br />

white Gampi paper, and hand-cut Beva film,<br />

printer’s proof 1/4<br />

2021.502<br />

• • •<br />

93


ACCESSIONS | Prints and Drawings<br />

Masami Teraoka, Japanese, born 1936<br />

Printed by Tadakatsu Takamizawa, Hanpei<br />

Okura, and Kanjiro Sato, Ukiyo e Research<br />

Center, Tokyo<br />

Published by Space Gallery, Los Angeles<br />

31 Flavors Invades Japan / Today’s Special,<br />

1982<br />

Woodcut in colors with watercolor on Kozo<br />

paper, edition 308/500<br />

2021.538<br />

Masami Teraoka, Japanese, born 1936<br />

Printed by Satoshi Hishimura, Tokyo,<br />

and Keizo Sato, assisted by<br />

Makoto Nakayama, Kyoto<br />

McDonald’s Hamburgers Invading Japan /<br />

Tattooed Woman and Geisha III, 2018<br />

Woodcut in colors on Kozo paper,<br />

edition 22/85<br />

2021.539<br />

Ellen Lesperance, American, born 1971<br />

Printed by Valpuri Remling and<br />

Alyssa Ebinger<br />

Published by Tamarind Institute,<br />

Albuquerque, New Mexico<br />

The Final Path of Feminye, 2020<br />

Lithograph in colors printed chine<br />

collé on wove paper, edition 4/20<br />

LIFE, 2020<br />

Lithograph in 9 colors, printed chine collé<br />

on wove paper with Kozo paper and silver<br />

leaf with ribbons, edition 4/15<br />

Who Killed Karen Silkwood?, 2020<br />

Lithograph in colors, printed chine collé<br />

and hand-knitted element with silk wool<br />

and silver leaf safety pin on wove paper,<br />

edition 4/15<br />

2021.541–2021.543<br />

Terran Last Gun, American, Piikani<br />

(Blackfoot), born 1989<br />

Constructing Earthbeams for the Sun, 2021<br />

Ink and colored pencil on antique ledger<br />

paper (dated 1927)<br />

Observing the Calendar Rings, 2021<br />

Ink and colored pencil on antique ledger<br />

paper (dated 1926)<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.3, <strong>2022</strong>.4<br />

• • •<br />

Sam Messenger, British, born 1980<br />

HR.25.17, from the series Houston, 2017<br />

Ink and watercolor on wove paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Alvin S.<br />

Romansky Prints and Drawings Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund and Kelly R. and<br />

Nicholas A. Silvers<br />

2021.391<br />

Museum purchases funded by the<br />

Caroline Wiess Law Accessions<br />

Endowment Fund:<br />

David Hockney, British, born 1937<br />

Autour de la Maison, Hiver, 2019<br />

Inkjet print on wove paper, edition 15/15<br />

Ink Test, 19th to 21st March, 2019<br />

Inkjet print on wove paper, edition 26/35<br />

A Bigger Fire, 2020<br />

Inkjet print [from iPad drawing] printed<br />

on wove paper, edition 26/35<br />

2021.434–2021.436<br />

Jay DeFeo, American, 1929–1989<br />

Untitled [E2728], from the series Still Life<br />

(Delaware Street, Berkeley), 1953<br />

Ink on wove paper<br />

Untitled [E1029], from the series Tripod,<br />

1976<br />

Acrylic and graphite with collage<br />

on wove paper<br />

2021.724, 2021.725<br />

• • •<br />

Sasha Gordon, American, born 1998<br />

Mirror, 2021<br />

Colored pencil on wove paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Dr. Joseph Nguyen and Tamie Tong<br />

2021.499<br />

Anna Park, American, born Korea, 1996<br />

First Wedding, 2021<br />

Charcoal on wove paper on panel<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Jeffrey A. Magid<br />

2021.540<br />

The Stuart Collection, museum<br />

purchases funded by Francita Stuart<br />

Koelsch Ulmer:<br />

Edward Dayes, British, 1763–1804<br />

A Waterfall at Cynwyd, near Corwen,<br />

North Wales, c. mid-1790s<br />

Blue and gray wash over graphite<br />

on wove paper<br />

In honor of Jack Mallinson Smith<br />

2021.551<br />

David Cox, English, 1783—1859<br />

The River Llugwy from Pont-y-Kyfyn,<br />

near Capel Curig, mid-1840s<br />

Watercolor over colored pencil heightened<br />

with gouache on oatmeal paper<br />

In honor of Philip and Melissa Koelsch<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.58<br />

John Constable, British, 1776–1837<br />

The Tomb of James Gubbins,<br />

Epsom Churchyard, 1816<br />

Graphite on wove paper<br />

In memory of Margaret Cooke Skidmore<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.59<br />

John Constable, British, 1776–1837<br />

Illustration to Stanza III of Grey’s Elegy,<br />

“Save that, from yonder ivy-mantled tower /<br />

The moping owl doth to the moon complain,”<br />

1833–35<br />

Watercolor on wove paper<br />

In honor of The Honorable Anne and<br />

Terence Mallinson<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.81<br />

John Constable, British, 1776–1837<br />

Illustration to Stanza V of Grey’s Elegy,<br />

“The breezy call of incense-breathing Morn /<br />

The swallow twitt’ring from the strawbuilt<br />

shed,” 1833–35<br />

Watercolor on wove paper<br />

In memory of Pauline Ella Smith, and<br />

in honor of Mollie Harlow Zumwalt<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.82<br />

John Constable, British, 1776–1837<br />

Illustration to Stanza XI of Grey’s Elegy,<br />

“Can storied urn or animated bust / Back to<br />

its mansion call the fleeting breath?,” 1883–85<br />

Watercolor on wove paper<br />

In honor of Halbert Stuart Koelsch<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.83<br />

John Constable, British, 1776–1837<br />

A letter addressed to John Martin, dated 9th<br />

July 1835, containing a drawing of Stoke Poges<br />

church, 1835<br />

Ink on wove paper<br />

In honor of Jon Evans<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.84<br />

• • •<br />

Simon Vouet, French, 1590–1649<br />

Portrait of a Woman Wearing Pearls<br />

and a Crown of Flowers, c. 1632–35<br />

Pastel on beige laid paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Alice Pratt Brown Museum Endowment<br />

2021.726<br />

Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri),<br />

Italian (Bolognese), 1591–1666<br />

Mars Brandishing a Sword, c. 1640<br />

Pen and brown iron gall ink on laid paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by the<br />

Director’s Accessions Endowment and the<br />

Buddy Taub Foundation, Dennis A. Roach<br />

and Jill Roach, Directors<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.10<br />

Liz Ward, American, born 1959<br />

Large Cascade, 2002<br />

Silverpoint and tinted gesso on wove paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by Leslie and<br />

Jack S. Blanton, Jr., Wynne H. Phelan,<br />

Betty Moody, the Francis L. Lederer<br />

Foundation, courtesy of Sharon Lederer,<br />

Dr. and Mrs. Craig S. Calvert, Eleanor D.<br />

McMurtrey, Linda and David Dillahunty,<br />

Martha and Richard Finger, Bari and<br />

David Fishel, Flo Crady, Sharon and<br />

Del Zogg, and Guy and Darla Comeaux,<br />

in memory of Clinton T. Willour<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.49<br />

Alice Leora Briggs, American, born 1953<br />

Printed by Tracy Mayrello with Cordelia<br />

Blanchard and Brittney Madalore at<br />

Flatbed Press, Austin, Texas<br />

Published by Alice Leora Briggs and<br />

Flatbed Press, Austin, Texas<br />

La Ventana, 2013<br />

Woodcut, printed chine collé on Kitkata<br />

on wove paper, edition 7/10<br />

Museum purchase funded by Carol Lynne<br />

Werner in honor of Karen Ann Hughes<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.76<br />

Brittney Leeanne Williams,<br />

American, born 1990<br />

Reach 1, 2021<br />

Pastel, acrylic, gouache, and watercolor<br />

on paper<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Carol Lynne Werner at Art + Paper <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.86<br />

94


Prints and Drawings | Rienzi<br />

Essie Bendolph Pettway, American,<br />

born 1956<br />

Printed by Alexander Groshong<br />

Published by Paulson Fontaine Press,<br />

Berkeley, California<br />

Equal Justice, 2020<br />

Soft ground etching in colors with<br />

aquatint on Rives BFK White wove paper,<br />

edition 16/50<br />

Museum purchase funded by Christy and<br />

Mark K. Craig in honor of their daughters<br />

Katie and Claire Craig at Art + Paper <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.88<br />

Loretta Pettway, American, born 1942<br />

Printed by Alexander Groshong<br />

Published by Paulson Fontaine Press,<br />

Berkeley, California<br />

Remember Me, 2006<br />

Softground etching in colors and<br />

hardground etching with aquatint and<br />

spitbite aquatint on Somerset white<br />

textured wove paper, edition 28/50<br />

Museum purchase funded by Ann S.<br />

Jackson and Virginia R. Jackson at<br />

Art + Paper <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.89<br />

Robert Rauschenberg, American,<br />

1925–2008<br />

Printed by Bill Goldston<br />

Published by Universal Limited Art<br />

Editions, Ltd., Bay Shore, New York<br />

Kitty Hawk, 1974<br />

Lithograph on Kraft brown wrapping<br />

paper, edition 26/28<br />

Museum purchase funded by<br />

Art + Paper <strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>2022</strong>.90<br />

Adriaen van Ostade, Dutch, 1610–1685<br />

The Family, 1647<br />

Etching on laid paper, state II/VIII<br />

Museum purchase funded by Art + Paper,<br />

Dr. and Mrs. Craig S. Calvert, Linda and<br />

David Dillahunty at Art + Paper <strong>2022</strong>,<br />

and the Alvin S. Romansky Prints and<br />

Drawings Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.91<br />

Museum purchases funded by the<br />

Marjorie G. and Evan C. Horning<br />

Print Endowment:<br />

Johan Adolph Kittendorff, 1820–1902<br />

After Wilhelm Ferdinand Bendz, Danish,<br />

1804–1832<br />

Konstnere Forsamlede om Aftenen I<br />

Fincks Kaffehuus I München (An Evening<br />

Gathering of Artists at the Coffee House<br />

Finck, Munich), after 1850<br />

Lithotint printed in two shades of brown<br />

ink on wove paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.27<br />

French<br />

[Biblia Latina], fragment from The Saint<br />

Albans Bible (for English use), c. 1330<br />

Illuminated manuscript on parchment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.96<br />

Robert Nanteuil, French, 1623–1678<br />

François Mallier du Houssay,<br />

Bishop of Troyes, c. 1656<br />

Engraving on laid paper, state II/III<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.97<br />

Robert Nanteuil, French, 1623–1678<br />

After Philippe de Champaigne,<br />

French, 1602–1674<br />

Michel IV Le Tellier, 1653<br />

Engraving on laid paper, state II/III<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.98<br />

Thomas de Leu, French, 1555–1612<br />

Gabrielle d’Estrées, Marquise de<br />

Monceaux, c. 1596<br />

Engraving on laid paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.100<br />

Thomas de Leu, French, 1555–1612<br />

After François Quesnel, French,<br />

1543–1619<br />

Jeanne-Françoise de Coësme,<br />

Princess of Conti, 1572–1601<br />

Engraving on laid paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.101<br />

Michel Dorigny, French, 1617–1665<br />

Bacchanal (Plate 5), from<br />

Autres bacchanals, 1650s<br />

Etching with engraving on laid paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.102<br />

Joseph François Parrocel, French,<br />

1704–1781<br />

Le Bivouac (The Encampment), 1675<br />

Etching on laid paper, state I/II<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.105<br />

Purchases funded by Leslie and<br />

Jack Blanton, Jr., in honor of<br />

Dr. Dena M. Woodall:<br />

Jacques Callot, French, 1592–1635<br />

L’hôpital (The Hospital) (plate 15), from<br />

Les grandes misères et malheurs de la guerre<br />

(The Grand Miseries of War), 1633<br />

Etching on laid paper, state II/III<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.99<br />

Claude Mellan, French, 1598–1688<br />

François-Théodore de Nesmond, c. 1661<br />

Engraving on laid paper, state II/III<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.103<br />

Ludolph Büsing,<br />

German, 1599/1602–1669<br />

After Georges Lallemand, French,<br />

c. 1575/1598–1636/1640<br />

Aeneas Saving His Father Anchises from<br />

Troy, c. 1628–30<br />

Chiaroscuro woodcut from one line block<br />

printed in black ink and one tone block<br />

printed in brown ink on laid paper<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.104<br />

• • •<br />

Written by Sebastian Münster,<br />

German, 1489—1552<br />

Published by Johann Froben,<br />

Swiss, born Germany, 1460—1527<br />

Hokhmat ha-Mazzalot (Kalendarium<br />

Hebraicum), 1527<br />

Book with woodcuts and text<br />

Museum purchase funded by the Brown<br />

Foundation Accessions Endowment Fund<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.226<br />

THE RIENZI<br />

COLLECTION<br />

GIFTS<br />

Gillows, Lancaster, English,<br />

active c. 1727–74<br />

Writing Table, c. 1810<br />

Mahogany, brass, and leather<br />

Gift of Samuel Lehrman<br />

2021.380<br />

Gifts of Mr. and Mrs. Harris<br />

Masterson III:<br />

Unknown artist, French<br />

Breviary Pages of the Gospel of Matthew,<br />

c. 1350<br />

Tempera and ink on parchment<br />

2021.545<br />

Ladle<br />

South America, possibly Ecuador,<br />

late 19th–early 20th century<br />

Silver, wood, and tagua nut<br />

2021.546<br />

PURCHASES<br />

Manufactured by Worcester Porcelain<br />

Manufactory (Flight, Barr & Barr Period),<br />

English, active 1813–40<br />

Painted by Thomas Baxter,<br />

English, 1782–1821<br />

Cabinet Cup and Stand, c. 1814–16<br />

Porcelain and gilding<br />

The Rienzi Collection, museum purchase<br />

funded by the Rienzi Accessions<br />

Endowment, and Gary and Marion Glober<br />

2021.386<br />

William Kent, English, 1685–1748<br />

Hall Chair, 1730–40<br />

Mahogany<br />

The Rienzi Collection, museum<br />

purchase funded by the Rienzi<br />

Accessions Endowment<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.180<br />

95


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

Except where noted, all exhibitions noted on pp. 96–115 were<br />

organized exclusively by the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.<br />

The al-Sabah Collection at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston<br />

Gallery 102M<br />

The Caroline Wiess Law Building<br />

In 2012 the Museum signed a landmark partnership<br />

with the al-Sabah Collection of Kuwait, one of the greatest<br />

privately held collections of Islamic art in the world, assembled<br />

by the late Sheikh Nasser Sabah al-Ahmad al-Sabah<br />

and Sheikha Hussa Sabah al-Salem al-Sabah. Two exclusive<br />

galleries in the Museum’s Caroline Wiess Law Building<br />

showcased more than two hundred works of art from this<br />

collection, ranging from carpets and architectural fragments<br />

to exquisite ceramics, intricate metalwork, precious jeweled<br />

objects, scientific instruments, and illustrated manuscripts<br />

from the eighth century to the eighteenth century and from<br />

across all Islamic lands. This dedicated space, along with the<br />

permanent collection galleries of Islamic art, comprised one<br />

of the largest displays of art from Islamic lands on view in<br />

the southeastern United States.<br />

96


The Hossein Afshar Collection at<br />

the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston<br />

Galleries 111A and 111B<br />

The Caroline Wiess Law Building<br />

In 2017 the Museum began to showcase objects on long-term loan<br />

from one of the greatest collections of the arts of Iran in private<br />

hands, built over the last fifty years by Mr. Hossein Afshar. More<br />

than seven hundred works of art from his extraordinary collection<br />

are now in the Museum’s care. These works span the sixth to the<br />

nineteenth century and diverse media, including exquisite paintings,<br />

rare Qur’an pages, precious inlaid metalwork, an impressive<br />

range of ceramics, sumptuous velvet embroideries, and monumental<br />

silk carpets. Many of these outstanding works will be on<br />

view in early 2023 in the new Hossein Afshar Galleries for Art<br />

of the Islamic Worlds.<br />

97


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

Spanish Viceregal Paintings from the Thoma Collection<br />

Reopened June 8, <strong>2022</strong>–October 15, 2023<br />

Gallery 212<br />

The Audrey Jones Beck Building<br />

Since 2017 the Museum has presented a selection of Spanish<br />

Viceregal paintings from the celebrated collection of Carl and<br />

Marilynn Thoma. The Spanish colonization of Latin America<br />

began with the creation in 1535 of the Viceroyalty of New Spain,<br />

which comprised present-day Mexico, Central America, and<br />

parts of the southern United States. The Viceroyalty of Peru—<br />

made up of present-day South America, except for Brazil and<br />

the far south—followed in 1542. Peru would later be subdivided<br />

by the formation of the viceroyalties of New Granada and the Rio<br />

de la Plata. In the sixteenth century, European artists traveled to<br />

Latin America to meet the huge demand for artistic creations in<br />

newly established religious institutions. Sometimes, family workshops<br />

were founded that lasted generations. By the seventeenth<br />

century, artists born in Latin America began to dominate, and<br />

new styles and idioms emerged that had less and less to do with<br />

European origins. The eighteenth century saw the full flowering<br />

of Spanish colonial art, as regional schools and academies developed<br />

and influential patrons demanded both religious and secular<br />

paintings of the highest quality.<br />

98


Olga de Amaral: To Weave a Rock<br />

July 25–September 19, 2021<br />

Brown Foundation, Inc., Galleries<br />

The Audrey Jones Beck Building<br />

This exhibition was organized by the Museum of Fine Arts,<br />

Houston, and the Cranbrook Art Museum.<br />

Major support was provided by: Sara and Bill Morgan, in<br />

honor of Anna Walker<br />

Additional generous funding was provided by:<br />

Anne Lamkin Kinder<br />

Lenore G. Tawney Foundation<br />

Michael W. Dale<br />

Leatrice and Melvin Eagle<br />

Joan Morgenstern<br />

Olga de Amaral has pioneered her own visual language within the<br />

fiber arts movement. Her radical experimentation with color, form,<br />

material, composition, and space transforms weaving from a flat<br />

design element into an architectural component that defies the<br />

confines of any genre or medium. The Museum of Fine Arts,<br />

Houston, was the debut venue for Olga de Amaral: To Weave a Rock.<br />

This major touring retrospective spotlighted the Colombian artist<br />

(born 1932) and her prolific, six-decade career through some fifty<br />

works that trace Amaral’s architectural investigations of the woven<br />

form. Four thematic sections told the story of Amaral’s creative<br />

spirit: “Radical Materialism,” “The Rebel Warp,” “Alchemy,” and “The<br />

Line.” Also included were two galleries devoted to her immersive<br />

Brumas (Mists) and Estelas (Stelae) series.<br />

99


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

New Light on Old Masters:<br />

European Art from Houston Collections, 1300–1700<br />

October 2, 2021–February 6, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Millennium Gallery<br />

The Audrey Jones Beck Building<br />

The term “Old Masters” denotes the artists working in Europe<br />

from the thirteenth through eighteenth century. The works<br />

of art they produced, including paintings, sculpture, textiles,<br />

metalwork, stained glass, and works on paper, express the broad<br />

range of artistic treasures desired by wealthy patrons, royal<br />

courts, and the Roman Catholic Church. In the Medieval period,<br />

gold-ground paintings, stained glass, and illuminated manuscripts<br />

gave material form to the transcendent hope of salvation.<br />

The Renaissance bore witness to an emergent sense of individualism<br />

expressed by the advent of portraiture and to increasingly<br />

naturalistic depictions of the divine and earthly realms. The<br />

Baroque period was characterized by an increased drama in<br />

painting and sculpture as well as illuminated manuscripts and<br />

exuberant creations in silverwork. The works in this exhibition<br />

were drawn from the Museum’s collections and from generous<br />

loans by private collectors in Houston. These masterpieces<br />

presented a diversity of objects, encompassing the richness<br />

of European art and shedding new light on Old Masters.<br />

100


Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer<br />

October 17, 2021–January 17, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Upper Brown Pavilion East<br />

The Caroline Wiess Law Building<br />

This exhibition was organized by the Museum of Fine Arts,<br />

Houston, with the collaboration of the Georgia O’Keeffe<br />

Museum, Santa Fe.<br />

Generous support was provided by:<br />

PHILLIPS<br />

Rand Group<br />

Fannie and Peter Morris<br />

Alice C. Simkins<br />

Celia and Jay Munisteri<br />

Official promotional partner: Houston Public Media<br />

Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986) forged a career as one of the most<br />

significant artists of the twentieth century. Captured on film<br />

throughout her life—in early family photos, travel snapshots,<br />

and portraits by a cavalcade of photographic artists, including her<br />

husband, Alfred Stieglitz (1864–1946)—O’Keeffe was no stranger<br />

to the medium. She expressed her unique perspective through<br />

all aspects of her life, and by the time she began her photographic<br />

practice in the mid-1950s, her singular identity and artistry were<br />

well established. She became famous for her paintings of flowers,<br />

skyscrapers, and landscapes, yet her lifelong connection to photography<br />

had not been explored previously in depth. Premiering at the<br />

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer was<br />

the first exhibition devoted to O’Keeffe’s work as a photographer.<br />

Nearly a hundred photographs from a newly examined archive<br />

revealed the American icon’s Modernist approach to the medium.<br />

The exhibition was organized around key tenets of O’Keeffe’s<br />

photographic approach: reframing, the rendering of light, and<br />

seasonal change. Complementing the photographs were paintings<br />

and drawings to represent the full scope of her career.<br />

101


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

Afro-Atlantic Histories<br />

October 24, 2021–January 17, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Upper Brown Pavilion West<br />

The Caroline Wiess Law Building<br />

This exhibition was co-organized by the Museum of Fine Arts,<br />

Houston, and the Museu de Arte de São Paulo in collaboration<br />

with the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.<br />

Major support was provided by: Ford Foundation and<br />

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.<br />

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, presented the U.S. tour of<br />

Afro-Atlantic Histories, an unprecedented exhibition that explored<br />

the history and legacy of the transatlantic slave trade. The exhibition<br />

comprised more than 130 works of art and documents made<br />

in Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, and Europe across five<br />

hundred years, from the seventeenth century to the twenty-first<br />

century. It dynamically juxtaposed works by artists from twenty-four<br />

countries, representing evolving perspectives across time and<br />

geography through major paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures,<br />

photographs, time-based media art, and ephemera. The range<br />

extended from historical paintings by Jean-Baptiste Debret,<br />

Frans Post, and Dirk Valkenburg to contemporary art by Melvin<br />

Edwards, Ibrahim Mahama, and Kara Walker. The exhibition<br />

premiered at the Museu de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) in Brazil,<br />

and the U.S. tour built on the presentation through the overarching<br />

theme of histórias—a Portuguese term that can encompass<br />

both fictional and nonfictional narratives of cultural, economic,<br />

personal, or political character. The term is plural, diverse, and<br />

inclusive, offering viewpoints that have been marginalized or<br />

forgotten. Afro-Atlantic Histories unfolded through six thematic<br />

sections that explore the varied histories of the diaspora.<br />

102


103


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

Calder-Picasso<br />

October 31, 2021–January 30, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Brown Foundation, Inc., Galleries<br />

The Audrey Jones Beck Building<br />

This exhibition was organized by the Museum of Fine Arts,<br />

Houston, in partnership with the Calder Foundation, New York;<br />

Musée National Picasso-Paris (MNPP); and the Fundación Almine<br />

y Bernard Ruiz-Picasso para el Arte (FABA).<br />

This exhibition was supported by an indemnity from<br />

the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.<br />

This exhibition was made possible in part by a grant from:<br />

Texas Commission on the Arts<br />

Major support was provided by:<br />

Bobbie Nau<br />

Additional generous support was provided by:<br />

M. D. Anderson Foundation<br />

PHILLIPS<br />

Giorgio Armani Corporation<br />

Sara Dodd-Denton and William S. Denton, III<br />

Virginia and Lee Lahourcade<br />

John and Kathy Orton<br />

Minnette Robinson<br />

Works by Alexander Calder and Pablo Picasso—two of the foremost<br />

figures in twentieth-century art—came together for a fascinating<br />

encounter in this presentation. The internationally traveling<br />

exhibition featured paintings, sculptures, mobiles, and works on<br />

paper spanning the artists’ careers. Calder-Picasso explored their<br />

prolific affinities as it revealed the radical innovation and enduring<br />

influence of their art. Conceived by the artists’ grandsons, the exhibition<br />

focused on Calder’s and Picasso’s exploration of the void,<br />

or absence of space. Calder explored the absence of mass in his<br />

sculptures, and Picasso expressed contortions of time in his figurative<br />

work. The American artist Calder (1898–1976) and Spanish<br />

artist Picasso (1881–1973) both headed to Paris as young artists:<br />

Picasso in 1900 and Calder in 1926. Though their lives and work<br />

shared many parallels, the two men were not close and were known<br />

to have met on only four occasions. Calder and Picasso were both<br />

engaged by the relationship of volume to space, and they pursued<br />

simplification to arrive at the essence of a subject.<br />

104


105


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

Incomparable Impressionism<br />

from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston<br />

November 14, 2021–March 27, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Galleries 201–207<br />

The Audrey Jones Beck Building<br />

This exhibition was organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.<br />

Lead foundation underwriting was provided by: Kinder Foundation<br />

Lead Corporate Sponsor: PNC<br />

Major support was provided by: Anne and Charles Duncan<br />

Additional generous support was provided by:<br />

1661 Tanglewood<br />

Melza and Ted Barr<br />

Polly and Murry Bowden<br />

Linnet F. Deily<br />

Samuel F. Gorman<br />

Cecily E. Horton<br />

Ann G. Trammell<br />

Jeanie Kilroy Wilson<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Rodney H. Margolis<br />

The Cyvia and Melvyn Wolff Endowment for Exhibitions<br />

Jonathan Blackwood and Dean Maddalena<br />

Bettie Cartwright<br />

Rosanette S. Cullen<br />

Joyce Z. Greenberg<br />

Francita Stuart Koelsch Ulmer in memory of Frances Wells Stuart<br />

For the first time, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, lent about<br />

a hundred of the most significant paintings and works on paper<br />

from its renowned Impressionist collection for an exhibition<br />

that opened at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, its only U.S.<br />

venue. Incomparable Impressionism from the Museum of Fine Arts,<br />

Boston was curated exclusively for the Houston presentation.<br />

The extraordinary collection of French Impressionist and Post-<br />

Impressionist work traced the evolution of the radical movement,<br />

from its roots in the novel, naturalistic landscapes of Jean-<br />

Baptiste-Camille Corot, Charles François Daubigny, and other<br />

painters of the Barbizon School; to the early “optical color”<br />

experimentations in plein-air landscape painting by Claude<br />

Monet, Camille Pissarro, and Alfred Sisley; to the frank depictions<br />

of modern urban life by Mary Cassatt, Edgar Degas, Edouard<br />

Manet, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. The exhibition brought<br />

together paintings from the nineteenth and early twentieth<br />

centuries, assembled in nine thematic groupings. Among the<br />

highlights was a breathtaking display of sixteen canvases by<br />

Monet, including his luminous Grainstack (Snow Effect);<br />

Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s life-size Dance at Bougival; and Degas’s<br />

double portrait of his sister, Thérèse, and her husband, Edmondo<br />

Morbilli. In addition, a fascinating selection of works on paper<br />

showcased the artists’ working methods.<br />

106


107


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

Virtual Realities: The Art of M.C. Escher<br />

from the Michael S. Sachs Collection<br />

March 13–September 5, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Upper Brown Pavilion<br />

The Caroline Wiess Law Building<br />

Generous support was provided by:<br />

Luther King Capital Management<br />

Vivian L. Smith Foundation<br />

Marty and Kathy Goossen<br />

Martha and Richard Finger<br />

Marc Grossberg<br />

The Francis L. Lederer Foundation,<br />

courtesy of Sharon Lederer and Ellis Mills IV<br />

Elizabeth and George Passela<br />

Grace Phillips and Eugene Nosal<br />

The Scurlock Foundation<br />

This program was supported as part of the Dutch Culture<br />

USA program by the Consulate General of the Netherlands<br />

in New York.<br />

The Museum hosted the largest and most comprehensive exhibition<br />

of works by M.C. Escher ever presented. Virtual Realities featured<br />

more than four hundred prints, drawings, watercolors, printed<br />

fabrics, constructed objects, wood and linoleum blocks, lithographic<br />

stones, sketchbooks, and the artist’s working tools. Maurits<br />

Cornelis Escher (1898–1972), popularly referred to as M.C. Escher,<br />

was born in the Netherlands and is known internationally for his<br />

self-described “mental images,” which connect to mathematics and<br />

various branches of science. Considered a “one-man art movement,”<br />

he remained outside of the art establishment. Escher was heralded<br />

in the psychedelic era of the 1960s and 1970s and is treasured today<br />

for his mind-bending works. Spanning Escher’s entire career, Virtual<br />

Realities was drawn from the most extensive Escher collection in<br />

the world, held by Michael S. Sachs, who acquired 90 percent of the<br />

Escher estate in 1980. The artist’s singular, sometimes unsettling<br />

works, with their orchestration of multidimensional alternate realities,<br />

have become icons of the twentieth century. Escher’s imagery<br />

evolved from realistic observations of the world to inventions from<br />

his imagination that explore the relationships between art and<br />

science, order and disorder, and logic and irrationality. Interactive<br />

auxiliary rooms, where visitors could play with optical illusions,<br />

accompanied the exhibition.<br />

108


109


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

Dawoud Bey: An American Project<br />

March 6–May 30, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Brown Foundation, Inc., Galleries<br />

The Audrey Jones Beck Building<br />

This exhibition was co-organized by the San Francisco Museum of<br />

Modern Art and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.<br />

Generous support provided by:<br />

The African American Art Advisory Association (5A) at the <strong>MFAH</strong><br />

Krista and Michael Dumas<br />

Merinda Watkins-Martin and Reginald Martin<br />

Nancy Powell Moore<br />

Joan Morgenstern<br />

The photographer Dawoud Bey portrays communities and<br />

histories that have been underrepresented or even unseen. From<br />

portraits in Harlem to nocturnal landscapes, classic street photography<br />

to large-scale studio portraits, his images combine an ethical<br />

imperative with an unparalleled mastery of his medium. Dawoud<br />

Bey: An American Project spanned the breadth of Bey’s career<br />

through nearly ninety works, from the 1970s to the present. Photographs<br />

in this retrospective ranged from his earliest street portraits<br />

in Harlem (1975–78) to his most recent historical explorations: the<br />

Underground Railroad (2017) and Louisiana plantations (2020).<br />

Born in New York City in 1953, Bey received his first camera as a<br />

gift when he was fifteen. The following year, he saw the landmark,<br />

highly divisive exhibition Harlem on My Mind at the Metropolitan<br />

Museum of Art in New York. Widely criticized for its failure to<br />

include significant numbers of artworks by African Americans, the<br />

exhibition nonetheless made an impression on Bey and inspired<br />

him to take up his own documentary project about Harlem in 1975.<br />

Since then, Bey has worked primarily in portraiture, making<br />

tender, psychologically rich and direct portrayals of Black subjects<br />

and rendering African American history in a form that is poetic,<br />

poignant, and immediate. Dawoud Bey: An American Project<br />

introduced Bey’s deeply humanistic photographs into a longrunning<br />

conversation about what it means to represent America<br />

with a camera.<br />

110


Shahzia Sikander: Extraordinary Realities<br />

March 20–June 5, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Millennium Gallery<br />

The Audrey Jones Beck Building<br />

This exhibition was organized by the RISD Museum and<br />

presented in collaboration with the Museum of Fine Arts,<br />

Houston. This exhibition originated at the RISD Museum<br />

thanks to generous federal, private, and endowment support.<br />

Major support was provided by:<br />

Leslie and Brad Bucher<br />

Additional generous funding was provided by:<br />

E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation<br />

The Margaret Cooke Skidmore Exhibition Endowment<br />

Bettie Cartwright<br />

Jereann and Holland Chaney<br />

Alice Kleberg Reynolds Foundation<br />

Extraordinary Realities examined the career of Shahzia Sikander<br />

during her prolific first fifteen years. Paintings, drawings, and<br />

video animations showed how the Pakistani American artist<br />

explores contemporary issues by transforming and subverting<br />

South and Central Asian illustrated manuscript painting.<br />

Born in Lahore, Pakistan, in 1969, Sikander was an artist in<br />

the Core Residency Program at the Museum’s Glassell School<br />

of Art from 1995 to 1997. She is now internationally celebrated<br />

for bringing manuscript painting traditions into dialogue with<br />

contemporary art practice. Shahzia Sikander: Extraordinary<br />

Realities brought together nearly sixty of Sikander’s works,<br />

from public and private collections. The presentation tracked<br />

her groundbreaking deconstruction of manuscript painting<br />

in Pakistan; development of a new personal vocabulary in<br />

her graduate years at the Rhode Island School of Design;<br />

expanded explorations around identity at the Glassell School;<br />

and global approach during her first years in New York.<br />

Throughout that time, she richly interrogated gender, sexuality,<br />

race, class, and history, creating open-ended narratives that have<br />

sustained her as one of the most significant artists working<br />

today. Sikander’s vibrant synthesis of traditional and contemporary<br />

art has played a critical role in recognizing a wider<br />

range of perspectives, including those of women, people of<br />

color, Muslims, and artists working outside the United States<br />

and Europe.<br />

111


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

The Obama Portraits Tour<br />

April 3–May 30, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Cullinan Hall and North Foyer<br />

The Caroline Wiess Law Building<br />

This tour was organized by the Smithsonian’s National Portrait<br />

Gallery, Washington, D.C. Support for the national tour was<br />

generously provided by Bank of America.<br />

Generous support was provided by:<br />

Susan and Fayez Sarofim<br />

H-E-B<br />

Tony Chase and Dina al Sowayel<br />

Joyce Z. Greenberg<br />

Ellen S. Susman<br />

Jay Jones and Terry Wayne Jones<br />

Merinda Watkins-Martin and Reginald Martin<br />

Reginald and Paula DesRoches; Al and Kim Odom;<br />

and Barron and Lisa Wallace<br />

From the moment of their unveiling at the Smithsonian’s National<br />

Portrait Gallery in February 2018, the official portraits of President<br />

Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama have become iconic.<br />

Kehinde Wiley’s portrait of Barack Obama and Amy Sherald’s portrait<br />

of Michelle Obama have inspired unprecedented responses from the<br />

public. The Obama Portraits Tour came to the Museum of Fine Arts,<br />

Houston, after premiering at the Art Institute of Chicago in June<br />

2021 and traveling to the Brooklyn Museum, the Los Angeles County<br />

Museum of Art (LACMA), and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta.<br />

Following the Houston presentation, the tour continued to the<br />

de Young Museum in San Francisco and the Museum of Fine Arts,<br />

Boston. The two paintings present a striking contrast to the formality<br />

of earlier portraits of presidents and first ladies. Through the<br />

presentation of these now-iconic works by Wiley and Sherald, the<br />

exhibition contemplated how portraiture has given visual form<br />

to ideas of power, identity, status, and legacy throughout history.<br />

The Obama Portraits Tour reached millions of people who might not<br />

otherwise have had an opportunity to view these remarkable paintings.<br />

In addition to the paintings themselves, the exhibition featured<br />

audio-visual elements and educational programs. This special presentation<br />

enhanced conversations surrounding the power of portraiture<br />

and its potential to engage communities.<br />

112


The Xuzhou Collection of Buddhist Art<br />

Reopened May 28, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Gallery 106M<br />

The Caroline Wiess Law Building<br />

In 2021 thirty master works of Buddhist sculpture from an<br />

exceptional private collection were placed on long-term loan at<br />

the Museum. Shown in public for the first time, a selection was<br />

displayed in the Arts of Asia Galleries of the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Building. Among the highlights were a spectacular Tang Chinese<br />

dry-lacquer Buddha head, two infant Buddhas from Korea and<br />

Japan, and an Indonesian seated Buddha cast in pure gold. The<br />

exhibition revealed the great heights of Asian devotional art inspired<br />

by the teaching of Buddhism over a millennium. Representing<br />

major Buddhist cultures across the Asian continent, the loan has<br />

been transformative to the Museum’s capacity to exhibit Asian art<br />

and encourage cross-cultural dialogue. Through the lens of a shared<br />

religious tradition, the exhibition demonstrated the deep interconnectedness<br />

as well as the great diversity and inventiveness of Asian<br />

art and civilizations.<br />

113


MAJOR LOAN AND PERMANENT-COLLECTION EXHIBITIONS<br />

The New Galleries for European Art<br />

Opened June 8, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Galleries 201–208, 210–212<br />

The Audrey Jones Beck Building<br />

The Museum’s major new reinstallation of eleven galleries for<br />

European art spans the Middle Ages through the eighteenth<br />

century, with art from northern and southern Europe as well<br />

as Mexico, Central, and South America. This interdisciplinary<br />

presentation of more than two hundred works features paintings,<br />

tapestries, sculpture, and liturgical objects across<br />

six hundred years of cultural and artistic production. The<br />

galleries’ overarching narrative tells a comprehensive story<br />

of European art, with works of varied media throughout that<br />

illustrate how textiles, sculpture, decorative arts, books, works<br />

on paper, and paintings functioned together within their<br />

original contexts. Several galleries highlight specific areas<br />

of achievement in early modern Europe and the Viceroyalty<br />

of New Spain, including sixteenth-century Netherlands and<br />

Venice, and seventeenth-century Spain and its colonies in<br />

Mexico, Central, and South America. Notably, three galleries<br />

trace the relationship between seventeenth-century Spanish art<br />

and the art of the Viceroyalty of New Spain in the seventeenth<br />

and eighteenth centuries, exploring the relationship between<br />

European art and the art of the Americas. The installation<br />

included several exceptional loans, as well as some major<br />

recent acquisitions, including a recently acquired eighteenthcentury<br />

lacquered folding screen, or biombo, from Mexico;<br />

a singular portrait miniature of Henri III, King of France, by<br />

the renowned sixteenth-century court artist Jean de Court; and<br />

a long-case clock attributed to the seventeenth-century French<br />

cabinet maker to King Louis XIV, André Charles Boulle.<br />

114


Leandro Erlich:<br />

Seeing Is Not Believing<br />

June 29–September 5, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Cullinan Hall and North Foyer<br />

The Caroline Wiess Law Building<br />

This exhibition was organized by<br />

the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston<br />

Major support was provided by:<br />

Leslie and Brad Bucher<br />

Generous support was provided by:<br />

Baker McKenzie<br />

Silvia Salle and Peter T. Wood<br />

The conceptual artist Leandro Erlich creates visual paradoxes<br />

and optical illusions that question viewers’ perception of reality.<br />

He renders everyday situations confounding—a staircase leads<br />

nowhere; an elevator appears partially stuck below ground;<br />

a swimming pool reflects one group of onlookers above the<br />

water’s surface and a different group below. Seeing Is Not<br />

Believing featured two of Erlich’s most iconic installations.<br />

Bâtiment (2004) juxtaposed a reproduction of a building facade<br />

with a monumental mirror; by lying on the floor between the<br />

two, visitors appeared suspended across the facade. In Le cabinet<br />

du psy (The Psychoanalyst’s Office) (2005), viewers entered one<br />

of two rooms separated by a large glass panel through which<br />

they could see their reflections projected within a psychoanalyst’s<br />

office. These immersive, room-size environments and a<br />

selection of additional works span the career of this acclaimed<br />

Argentinean artist, whose psychological subversion of the<br />

everyday seems to defy the laws of physics. Born in 1973, Erlich<br />

lives and works in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Montevideo,<br />

Uruguay. He was a resident in the Glassell School of Art’s Core<br />

Program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, from 1997 to<br />

1999. This exhibition served as both a homecoming for him<br />

and a revelation for Museum visitors.<br />

115


ADDITIONAL DISPLAYS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION<br />

AND GALLERY ROTATIONS<br />

1<br />

Bookbinding Uncovered:<br />

Materials, Techniques,<br />

and Artistic Expression<br />

July 14–October 30, 2021<br />

Hirsch Library<br />

The Caroline Wiess<br />

Law Building<br />

1. The Geometric Landscape:<br />

Selections from the<br />

Museum’s Collection<br />

July 24–August 8, 2021<br />

Millennium Corridor<br />

The Audrey Jones<br />

Beck Building<br />

116


2<br />

2. Mungo Thomson: American<br />

Desert (for Chuck Jones)<br />

October 13–November 21, 2021<br />

Cullinan Hall<br />

The Caroline Wiess<br />

Law Building<br />

Not Playing Around:<br />

The Unconventional Use<br />

of the Card in Modern and<br />

Contemporary Art<br />

November 3, 2021–<br />

March 12, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Hirsch Library<br />

The Caroline Wiess<br />

Law Building<br />

Jennifer Steinkamp:<br />

The Seasons<br />

November 24, 2021–<br />

January 2, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Cullinan Hall<br />

The Caroline Wiess<br />

Law Building<br />

Native American Gallery<br />

Reopened December 16, 2021<br />

Wiess Gallery, East<br />

The Caroline Wiess<br />

Law Building<br />

117


ADDITIONAL DISPLAYS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION<br />

AND GALLERY ROTATIONS<br />

3<br />

4 5<br />

3. William Kentridge: City Deep<br />

January 5–March 18, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Cullinan Hall<br />

The Caroline Wiess<br />

Law Building<br />

Arts of Korea Gallery<br />

Reopened May 26, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Galleries 103M–104M<br />

The Caroline Wiess<br />

Law Building<br />

Arts of India Gallery<br />

Reopened May 28, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Gallery 106M<br />

The Caroline Wiess<br />

Law Building<br />

118


6 7<br />

8<br />

9<br />

RIENZI EXHIBITIONS<br />

4. Hidden Hands: Invisible Workers<br />

in Industrial England<br />

September 1, 2021–January 9, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Isla’s Gallery<br />

5. Materials of Empire:<br />

Colonial Narratives 1700–1860<br />

January 15–July 31, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Isla’s Gallery<br />

THE GLASSELL SCHOOL OF ART EXHIBITIONS<br />

Levant Foundation Gallery:<br />

Student Exhibition<br />

July 9–September 5, 2021<br />

BLOCK XXI<br />

September 17–December 3, 2021<br />

6. Figurative Art in Houston: 2000–2021<br />

The Glassell Connection<br />

December 20, 2021–February 9, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Leslie and Brad Bucher Gallery:<br />

Glassell Figurative Students Past &<br />

Present Artists: 2000–2021<br />

September 17, 2021–February 9, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Certificate of Achievement Recipients Exhibition<br />

May 28–September 5, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Orton Gallery:<br />

Suzanne Manns:<br />

Decades of Wandering and Wondering<br />

September 17–November 7, 2021<br />

Painting 1 & 2<br />

November 15, 2021–January 16, <strong>2022</strong><br />

7. <strong>2022</strong> Core Exhibition<br />

March 10–April 22, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Printmaking Students<br />

May 16–June 17, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Junior School:<br />

Richard Williams: A Retrospect of a Lifetime<br />

Art Teacher<br />

August 27–October 15, 2021<br />

<strong>Annual</strong> Junior School Holiday Exhibition<br />

November 19, 2021–January 3, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Glassell Junior School Faculty Exhibition<br />

January 24–February 18, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Presbyterian School: Community Connections<br />

March 1–March 22, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Advanced Portfolio Preparation Student Exhibition<br />

March 31–April 30, <strong>2022</strong><br />

8. State VASE (Visual Art Scholastic Event)<br />

Gold Seal Exhibition<br />

June 6–August 12, <strong>2022</strong><br />

The following Glassell School of Art exhibitions<br />

were presented in the Kinder Morgan Building<br />

in Houston:<br />

9. Emotions<br />

September 3–November 19, 2021<br />

Urban<br />

November 19, 2021–February 18, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Suburban<br />

February 18–May 13, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Wilderness<br />

May 28–September 3, 2021<br />

119


DEPARTMENTAL HIGHLIGHTS<br />

Conservator Tina Tan helps to install the exhibition<br />

Virtual Realities: The Art of M.C. Escher from the Michael S.<br />

Sachs Collection.<br />

CONSERVATION<br />

This fiscal year was dedicated to catching<br />

up on projects that temporarily had<br />

been placed on hold due to the pandemic.<br />

Large-scale conservation efforts, such as<br />

the conservation of Anish Kapoor’s Cloud<br />

Column, is still ongoing due to scale and<br />

complexity. Exhibition schedules were<br />

also impacted by the worldwide rescheduling<br />

of traveling exhibitions. With the<br />

postponement of the Philip Guston<br />

show, a vacancy in our exhibition<br />

schedule allowed the Museum to mount<br />

a very large exhibition, Virtual Realities:<br />

The Art of M.C. Escher from the Michael S.<br />

Sachs Collection.<br />

team worked to find appropriate frames<br />

for all of the works. The focused dedication<br />

of the conservation, registration, and<br />

installation staff to meet world-class standards<br />

helped bring this exhibition to life.<br />

Scholarship is a cornerstone of the<br />

Conservation Department. The Museum’s<br />

Andrew W. Mellon Research Scientist, Dr.<br />

Corina Rogge, worked toward publishing<br />

her findings in the forthcoming book<br />

Franz Kline: The Artist’s Materials, which<br />

will include contributions by Dr. Zahira<br />

Véliz Bomford. The book, to be published<br />

in August <strong>2022</strong>, is a comprehensive<br />

investigation of the materials and working<br />

methodologies of Franz Kline, an<br />

American Abstract Expressionist who<br />

worked alongside Jackson Pollock and<br />

Willem de Kooning. The information<br />

gathered will be an instrumental tool for<br />

conservators and scholars when examining<br />

and studying works by Franz Kline.<br />

—Per Knutås<br />

HEAD OF CONSERVATION<br />

legendary Italian filmmaker in honor<br />

of the centennial of his birth.<br />

December brought a transformative<br />

moment with the opening of the Lynn<br />

Wyatt Theater in the Kinder Building.<br />

At Mrs. Wyatt’s request, some of her<br />

favorites were shown, including the film<br />

noir Laura and Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear<br />

Window. The Japanese drama Drive My<br />

Car, winner of the 2021 Academy Award<br />

for Best International Feature, drew<br />

capacity crowds to multiple screenings.<br />

The return of popular series, including<br />

Oscar-Nominated Shorts, Festival of Films<br />

from Iran, Latin Wave: New Films from<br />

Latin America, Five Funny French Films,<br />

and Jazz on Film, attracted steadily<br />

increasing attendance throughout<br />

the spring.<br />

—Marian Luntz<br />

CURATOR, FILM<br />

Tina Tan, conservator for works of art<br />

on paper, spent time at Michael Sachs’s<br />

home to prepare the artworks to travel to<br />

Houston. The work associated with large<br />

exhibitions like this one usually require<br />

careful orchestration of multiple departments,<br />

and this process can take years.<br />

The Conservation Department was<br />

deeply involved in incoming assessment<br />

of the collection, and Patrick Turk and<br />

Sara Wright prepared mats for almost<br />

every single artwork on view during a<br />

very compressed timeline. To ensure<br />

a cohesive appearance, the conservation<br />

120<br />

Film still from Federico Fellini’s La Strada<br />

FILM<br />

Following eighteen months of virtual<br />

cinema programming, during which the<br />

Museum’s films were available to watch<br />

from home on streaming platforms,<br />

in-person screenings resumed in Brown<br />

Auditorium Theater in September.<br />

The very first film shown was Federico<br />

Fellini’s iconic La Strada, heralding<br />

a rescheduled retrospective of the<br />

Keliy Anderson-Staley speaking to an audience about<br />

her photographically based books as part of a program<br />

coordinated by the Hirsch Library<br />

LIBRARIES AND ARCHIVES<br />

Planning for the Hirsch Library’s future<br />

reading room was a primary activity<br />

throughout much of the year. This<br />

culminated in the move out of our longtime<br />

facility in the Caroline Wiess Law<br />

Building in April of <strong>2022</strong>. Purpose built<br />

by the legendary architect Mies van der<br />

Rohe in 1973 and then expanded in 2001,<br />

the space served us well for nearly five<br />

decades. We look forward to welcoming


our staff and the public to our expanded<br />

reading room in the Audrey Jones Beck<br />

Building in the fall of <strong>2022</strong>.<br />

In anticipation of this move, we worked<br />

to ensure ongoing access to our resources<br />

for both internal researchers and the<br />

public. Notably, we supported curatorial<br />

initiatives by providing objects from<br />

our rare collections for sixteen different<br />

installations, ranging from the exhibitions<br />

Afro-Atlantic Histories and Rienzi’s<br />

Hidden Hands: Invisible Workers in<br />

Industrial England to rotations in<br />

the photography galleries featuring<br />

Alexander Rodchenko. In terms of collection<br />

building, the Hirsch Library added<br />

two significant acquisitions to its holdings.<br />

The first, the Liber Chronicarum<br />

(1493), better known as the Nuremberg<br />

Chronicle, sought to synthesize the history<br />

of the world through visual and textual<br />

means. Today, it stands as one of the<br />

monuments of early book-making for its<br />

beautiful execution, staggering number<br />

of woodcuts, and ingenious integration<br />

of text and image. The other noteworthy<br />

addition was the complete maquette<br />

holdings of Alejandro Cartagena, a<br />

Mexican photographer and photobook<br />

maker who is widely recognized for<br />

his explorations of social, urban, and<br />

environmental issues. The collection<br />

comprises eighty-seven maquettes and<br />

eight posters produced between 2011<br />

and 2021, providing insights into the<br />

mindset and creative process of the<br />

photographer. On the programming<br />

front, the Hirsch Library hosted a wellattended<br />

public program featuring the<br />

latest body of work by the local photographer<br />

and University of Houston professor<br />

Keliy Anderson-Staley, who addressed<br />

her photographically based books in<br />

the context of photobooks from the<br />

Hirsch Library and the Manfred Heiting<br />

Book Collection.<br />

The Museum Archives returned to its<br />

pre-pandemic service levels and enhanced<br />

its database of photographs in order to<br />

provide better access to this content for<br />

future researchers.<br />

The William J. Hill Texas Artisans<br />

and Artists Archive expanded its freely<br />

accessible database to 133,000 records.<br />

During the year, it was acknowledged<br />

by two different entities as an exemplary<br />

resource: first as a finalist for the 2021<br />

Decorative Arts Trust prize and second<br />

as the recipient of the <strong>2022</strong> Texas<br />

Digital Library Excellence Award, which<br />

recognizes the finest digital initiative in<br />

the state.<br />

—Jon Evans<br />

CHIEF, LIBRARIES AND ARCHIVES<br />

The award-winning exhibition catalogue<br />

Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer<br />

PUBLICATIONS<br />

In fiscal year 2021–<strong>2022</strong>, the Museum<br />

published Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer<br />

to accompany the exhibition of the same<br />

name. The catalogue, copublished with<br />

Yale University Press, included essays by<br />

Lisa Volpe, associate curator of photography,<br />

and Ariel Plotek, curator of fine art at<br />

the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, Santa Fe.<br />

Of the more than five hundred images<br />

included in the book, many had never<br />

been published before, and Volpe’s<br />

revelatory essay sheds light on this<br />

little-known aspect of O’Keeffe’s<br />

creative process. The book was awarded<br />

a Mitchell A. Wilder Publication Design<br />

Award, earning first place in the Books<br />

and Catalogues category, at the annual<br />

conference of the Texas Association<br />

of Museums.<br />

In celebration of the new Nancy and Rich<br />

Kinder Building for modern and contemporary<br />

art, the publications department<br />

produced the booklet The First Century,<br />

which includes an essay by Director Gary<br />

Tinterow that tells the story of the collectors,<br />

directors, patrons, and curators<br />

who have shaped the Museum from<br />

its founding to the present day. Ronnie<br />

Self, professor at the Gerald D. Hines<br />

College of Architecture and Design at<br />

the University of Houston, contributed<br />

an insightful essay on the architecture of<br />

the building as well. The department also<br />

produced The Museum Collectors: Enriching<br />

the Collection over 42 Years to honor the<br />

contributions of that patron group.<br />

The beginning of fiscal year 2021–<strong>2022</strong><br />

saw the launch of the Museum’s first<br />

online scholarly catalogue, The Straus<br />

Collection. This resource, made available<br />

for free on the Museum’s website,<br />

includes an introduction by Helga K.<br />

Aurisch, curator of the arts of Europe<br />

and the Mediterranean, about the history<br />

of this foundational collection as well as<br />

detailed entries on the seventy-four works<br />

in the collection, written by Dr. Aurisch;<br />

Dena M. Woodall, curator of prints and<br />

drawings; Jeremy Warren, honorary<br />

curator of sculpture at the Ashmolean<br />

Museum, Oxford, and sculpture research<br />

curator at the National Trust, UK; and<br />

independent scholar Michelle Packer. The<br />

template upon which the catalogue was<br />

based will provide the technical framework<br />

for future online catalogues.<br />

—Heather Brand<br />

PUBLISHER IN CHIEF<br />

121


LEARNING AND INTERPRETATION<br />

Texas Southern University Marching Band at the Sunday Best opening celebration of The Obama Portraits Tour<br />

During the 2021–<strong>2022</strong> fiscal year, the<br />

Learning and Interpretation Department<br />

continued to offer programs and resources<br />

online. As the year progressed and the<br />

pandemic waned, in-person programs<br />

gradually returned at the Museum of<br />

Fine Arts, Houston, and in the community.<br />

In total, the department served<br />

222,499 visitors, students, teachers, and<br />

community members throughout the year.<br />

Learning and Interpretation staff joyfully<br />

welcomed back 16,914 students, teachers,<br />

and chaperones to the Fayez S. Sarofim<br />

Campus for in-person school tours during<br />

the 2021–<strong>2022</strong> academic year. Students<br />

and chaperones from Galena Park and<br />

Spring Branch Independent School<br />

Districts experienced in-person tours<br />

guided by the Museum’s devoted docent<br />

volunteers, and students and chaperones<br />

from schools across the region came for<br />

in-person self-guided tours. In addition,<br />

1,206 elementary, middle, and high<br />

school students and their teachers from<br />

Houston ISD attended docent- and<br />

staff-led tours of the national exhibition<br />

The Obama Portraits Tour during the<br />

spring. Through a prestigious multiyear<br />

grant from the Institute of Museum and<br />

Library Services, From Classroom to<br />

Home: Promoting Equitable Art Access<br />

at the <strong>MFAH</strong>, object-based-learning staff<br />

collaborated with eighteen paid teacher<br />

fellows to develop culturally responsive<br />

digital resources to integrate art from<br />

the Museum’s collections into school<br />

curriculum at Houston ISD. These new<br />

resources reached 1,203 teachers and<br />

138,851 students in three tranches during<br />

the academic year.<br />

Studio and gallery programs staff were<br />

delighted to discover that families<br />

yearned to return to the Museum for<br />

in-person art making. For spring break,<br />

art-making activities took place outside in<br />

the Cullen Sculpture Garden, serving a<br />

group of 410 over five days in March. In<br />

collaboration with the Houston Islamic<br />

Arts Society, staff teaching artists organized<br />

the Islamic Arts Family Experience<br />

on Sunday, March 13, also in the sculpture<br />

garden, where 150 family members<br />

experimented with paper marbling,<br />

Arabic calligraphy, and much more. For<br />

the first month of summer break in June,<br />

art-making tables were set up in the<br />

lower-level Kinder Building arrivals hall,<br />

serving 1,196 family members over five<br />

Thursdays in June. This was a welcoming<br />

space for families to engage in artist-led<br />

activities, with Visitation, the beautiful<br />

aluminum and copper-wire tapestry by<br />

El Anatsui, providing inspiration on the<br />

surrounding walls. Following the school<br />

year, for one week in June, studio and<br />

gallery programs staff welcomed fifty<br />

students from the City of Houston Parks<br />

and Recreation Department Summer<br />

Camp at Emancipation Park. They experienced<br />

an array of activities, including<br />

gallery tours, studio art making, behindthe-scenes<br />

exploration of the Museum,<br />

and the creation of a final mural celebrating<br />

Juneteenth, which was gifted to<br />

Emancipation Park.<br />

Public programs staff organized a wide<br />

array of lectures, conversations, and events<br />

during the year, beginning with livestream<br />

programs online, gradually shifting to<br />

in-person venues at the Museum. The<br />

distinctive Conversations with Artists,<br />

a continuation of the Ruth K. Shartle<br />

Lecture Series from the previous fiscal<br />

year, celebrated contemporary art on view<br />

in the Kinder Building. Conversations<br />

with artists, including Trenton Doyle<br />

Hancock, Julie Mehretu, Amalia<br />

Mesa-Bains, and David Taylor, were presented<br />

by livestream via Zoom during the<br />

summer and fall, with the final two conversations<br />

between artists César Augusto<br />

Martinez and Vincent Valdez, and Jason<br />

Salavon and Norbert Viviano, staged in<br />

person in the Brown Auditorium Theater<br />

in November and December. During the<br />

spring, the popular exhibition The Obama<br />

Portraits Tour opened on April 3 with the<br />

Sunday Best celebration on The Brown<br />

Foundation, Inc. Plaza and the Cullen<br />

122


HISD students view Kehinde Wiley’s portrait of President Obama.<br />

A free art-making activity during summer break in<br />

the Kinder Building arrivals hall<br />

<strong>MFAH</strong> art-making activity at MECA’s Day of the<br />

Dead Festival, October 2021<br />

Sculpture Garden, conceived by Associate<br />

Curator Anita Bateman and Marketing<br />

Manager Mahogany Johnson, and<br />

sponsored by H-E-B. An estimated 3,500<br />

visitors attended the stellar performances<br />

by Texas Southern University’s Ocean of<br />

Soul Marching Band, New Bethlehem<br />

Missionary Baptist Church of Houston<br />

Choir, and the National Convention of<br />

Gospel Choirs and Choruses; drop-in art<br />

activities with Houston artists Melissa<br />

Aytenfisu, Mark Francis, Bria Lauren,<br />

Marc Furi, and Irene Antonia Diane<br />

Reece; and free general admission to<br />

the Museum, where visitors lingered<br />

in Cullinan Hall to appreciate the portraits<br />

of the Obamas by Kehinde Wiley and<br />

Amy Sherald. Additional programs<br />

during the run of the exhibition included<br />

POETRAITS, a solo performance by<br />

Houston Poet Laureate Outspoken Bean<br />

in response to the Obama portraits, as<br />

well as Houston Public Library’s adult<br />

reading circle and family story time<br />

at the Museum, focusing on Michelle<br />

Obama’s memoir, Becoming, and Jessica<br />

and Parker Curry’s children’s book, Parker<br />

Looks Up, retelling the young author’s<br />

experience viewing the portrait of Michelle<br />

Obama for the first time.<br />

During the 2021–<strong>2022</strong> fiscal year,<br />

interpretation staff created resources<br />

to deepen visitors’ experiences with art on<br />

view at the Museum. The Conversations<br />

with an Artist audio guide investigates<br />

selected objects in the permanent collection,<br />

with artist Dario Robleto asking<br />

curators, conservators, and historians<br />

questions about their relationships with<br />

works of art. As Robleto remarks, “I am a<br />

huge advocate for a curiosity that is broad<br />

and not afraid of asking the wrong or<br />

silly question.” He is the perfect liaison<br />

for visitors who want to take a deep-dive<br />

exploration into unique works from<br />

across the Museum’s collections. For<br />

seven special exhibitions, the interpretation<br />

team created multivoiced audio<br />

guides to enhance visitors’ experiences in<br />

the galleries. For example, the guide for<br />

Afro-Atlantic Histories included commentary<br />

from artists including Jamal Cyrus,<br />

Nona Faustine, and Kehinde Wiley; poet<br />

Joy Priest; and scholars and museum<br />

curators. The audio guides are available<br />

to access through visitors’ own devices<br />

on the Culture Connect platform.<br />

The community engagement team<br />

was very active bringing art-making<br />

opportunities to communities throughout<br />

Houston, as, for example, at the Day<br />

of the Dead celebration at Houston’s<br />

Multicultural Education and Counseling<br />

through the Arts (MECA) in October,<br />

and at the BakerRipley Gulfton<br />

Sharpstown Campus, celebrating<br />

International Women’s Day. The team<br />

also brought community members to<br />

the Museum throughout the year, such<br />

as students and staff from Third Ward’s<br />

SHAPE Community Center to see the<br />

exhibition Dawoud Bey: An American<br />

Project during spring break in March.<br />

They also celebrated Black History Month<br />

with a beautiful video, Quilts, A Mosaic<br />

of Art and Community, commemorating<br />

the work of the Jubilee Quilt Circle at the<br />

Community Artists Collective (CAC), led<br />

by Executive Director Michelle Barnes,<br />

and Lutisha Pettway’s Quilt, Bars, made<br />

in Gee’s Bend, Alabama, now part of<br />

the Museum’s collection. The <strong>MFAH</strong><br />

Speakers Bureau, a dedicated group of<br />

volunteer presenters, reached seniors at<br />

community centers throughout Houston:<br />

750 in person and 474 through online<br />

livestream platforms. With community<br />

engagement a critical focus going<br />

forward, the Learning and Interpretation<br />

Department’s school and community<br />

initiatives are core to the work of the<br />

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.<br />

—Caroline Goeser, PhD<br />

THE W. T. AND LOUISE J. MORAN CHAIR<br />

OF THE DEPARTMENT OF LEARNING<br />

AND INTERPRETATION<br />

123


MEMBERSHIP AND GUEST SERVICES<br />

Members attended a preview of The Obama Portraits Tour.<br />

The Membership and Guest Services<br />

team entered fiscal year 2021–<strong>2022</strong> with<br />

the goals of rebuilding the membership<br />

program after a year of the pandemic,<br />

evolving protocols and staffing considerations<br />

with the expansion of the campus<br />

in mind, and considering innovative ways<br />

to deliver positive guest experiences. Like<br />

many cultural organizations across the<br />

United States, the Museum experienced<br />

a decline in members because of<br />

the pandemic.<br />

The team developed strategies to retain as<br />

many members as possible through visit<br />

satisfaction, frequent Museum updates,<br />

and retention efforts. We employed four<br />

multichannel campaigns to acquire new<br />

members. Letters, emails, and digital<br />

advertising featured the Museum’s newly<br />

expanded campus and touted membersonly<br />

opportunities, such as exclusive<br />

previews to a fantastic slate of exhibitions,<br />

including Three Centuries of American<br />

Art – Antiquities, European and American<br />

Masterpieces from The Fayez S. Sarofim<br />

Collection; Monet to Matisse: Impressionism<br />

to Modernism from the Bemberg Foundation;<br />

Ernesto Neto: SunForceOceanLife;<br />

Afro-Atlantic Histories; Georgia O’Keeffe,<br />

Photographer; Calder-Picasso; Dawoud Bey:<br />

An American Project; Incomparable<br />

Impressionism from the Museum of Fine<br />

Arts, Boston; The Obama Portraits Tour;<br />

124<br />

Shahzia Sikander: Extraordinary Realities;<br />

Virtual Realities: The Art of M.C. Escher<br />

from the Michael S. Sachs Collection; and<br />

Leandro Erlich: Seeing Is Not Believing.<br />

We also hosted a number of intimate,<br />

insider opportunities for top membership<br />

levels, such as behind-the-scenes events<br />

with Joseph Havel, the retiring director<br />

of the Glassell School of Art, and with<br />

Jon Evans, chief of libraries and archives,<br />

who discussed the construction of the<br />

new Hirsch Library. Furthermore, we<br />

continued to engage young members<br />

through Art Crowd events, featuring<br />

evening access to the Museum and lively<br />

music spun by a DJ. We were encouraged<br />

by the overall support of members,<br />

despite the fact that events in fiscal year<br />

2021–<strong>2022</strong> did not yet include food or<br />

beverages because of pandemic safety<br />

protocols. Through these efforts, we<br />

grew the number of general member<br />

households to 26,762. We also realized<br />

an increase in students participating in<br />

the University Partnership Program, from<br />

4,900 Houston-area college students in<br />

fiscal year 2020–2021 to 8,800 in fiscal<br />

year 2021–<strong>2022</strong>. This made for a grand<br />

total of 35,562 member households<br />

(approximately 61,619 individual<br />

members). We exceeded $3 million in<br />

membership revenue, an amount that<br />

is comparable to fiscal years 2016–2017<br />

and 2017–2018.<br />

Additional entrances into the Nancy and<br />

Rich Kinder Building required new<br />

staffing considerations for greeting<br />

guests, providing information and<br />

wayfinding, scanning tickets, and selling<br />

tickets and memberships. The Guest<br />

Services team experimented with different<br />

staffing locations, with ease of entry<br />

and hospitality in mind. We also supported<br />

the return of in-person programs and<br />

films in the auditoriums.<br />

The Guest Services team introduced<br />

contactless ticket scanning with selfscanning<br />

towers at the entries of<br />

Brown Auditorium Theater and Wyatt<br />

Theater. Later in the year, the department<br />

launched a new Guest Experience<br />

Volunteer Program to assist guests as<br />

they navigated through the tunnels of the<br />

expanded campus. You can now find these<br />

volunteers at stationed desks Thursdays<br />

through Sundays. We are grateful for their<br />

friendly assistance with guests.<br />

The Membership and Guest Services<br />

team has continued to build upon the<br />

successful launch in September 2020 of<br />

the Museum’s new customer-relationship<br />

management platform, Tessitura. Behind<br />

the scenes, we are realizing successes,<br />

such as reduced time for members to<br />

receive their membership cards, from<br />

forty to seventeen days, and solutions<br />

to allow for better testing of offers, such<br />

as fourteen months of membership for<br />

the price of twelve—an offer that would<br />

not have been possible to implement last<br />

year because of the complexity of delivering<br />

the extra months of memberships.<br />

We reinstated on-site survey collection<br />

by iPad and by volunteers at the exits<br />

of ticketed exhibitions and are tracking<br />

guest satisfaction to improve the visit<br />

experience. We continue to try new tactics<br />

and consider innovative ways to serve<br />

our constituents. We are energized and<br />

motivated by our community and look<br />

forward to serving guests and members<br />

in the coming year.<br />

—Jennifer Garza<br />

CHIEF ADMINISTRATOR OF MEMBERSHIP<br />

AND GUEST SERVICES


INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR THE ARTS OF THE AMERICAS<br />

The fiscal year 2021–<strong>2022</strong> was one of<br />

continued expansion for the International<br />

Center for the Arts of the Americas<br />

(ICAA). The ICAA completed the<br />

Critical Documents of Chilean Art<br />

project in partnership with Fundación<br />

AMA in Santiago, which resulted in<br />

the online publication of more than five<br />

hundred documents related to contemporary<br />

Chilean art. Through its partnership<br />

with the Cruz-Diez Foundation,<br />

the ICAA team also has been working<br />

to process more than ninety documents<br />

drawn from the artist’s archive in Paris.<br />

By the end of this fiscal year, over 9,200<br />

documents had been made available<br />

online, free of charge, to more than<br />

691,989 users from around the world.<br />

In addition, ICAA staff, fellows, and<br />

researchers have published articles on<br />

the Papelitos blog space. In April <strong>2022</strong>,<br />

the ICAA welcomed Lillian Michel as the<br />

new ICAA digital experience specialist.<br />

The ICAA continued to partner with<br />

the Institute for Latin American Art<br />

(ISLAA), New York. This long-term<br />

collaboration supports research by<br />

postgraduate art history students and<br />

professional researchers while making<br />

primary sources in ISLAA’s archival<br />

collections accessible via the ICAA’s<br />

Documents Project. The first initiative<br />

has entailed the researching and<br />

processing of more than nine hundred<br />

gacetillas, or newsletters, produced by<br />

the Centro de Arte y Comunicación<br />

(CAYC) in Buenos Aires in the late<br />

1960s and 1970s.<br />

In this fiscal year, the ICAA made<br />

meaningful progress toward completing<br />

the initial phase of the Latinx Papers<br />

Project, which aims to identify and<br />

highlight critical primary documents<br />

related to Latinx art for inclusion in<br />

the ICAA Documents Project Digital<br />

Archive. With the support of a planning<br />

Participants from the ICAA/University of Houston NEH Summer Institute in a session devoted to Latin American<br />

and Latinx art on view in the Kinder Building<br />

grant from the Terra Foundation for<br />

American Art, ICAA staff traveled to<br />

several key repositories at the University<br />

of Texas at El Paso, UT San Antonio, UT<br />

Austin, and Stanford University to survey<br />

their holdings and establish contact<br />

with potential stakeholders.<br />

The ICAA’s partnership with the<br />

University of Houston (UH) continued<br />

to grow. In June <strong>2022</strong>, the ICAA and<br />

UH hosted a two-week Summer Institute<br />

funded by the National Endowment for<br />

the Humanities on the topic Engaging<br />

Latinx Art. The institute sponsored<br />

twenty-five college and university<br />

professors from humanities programs<br />

across the United States who traveled<br />

to Houston to study the cultural and<br />

artistic movement known as Latinx<br />

art through readings, documents, lectures,<br />

and objects from the Museum’s<br />

collections. Focused workshops were<br />

led by ICAA staff, UH faculty, and more<br />

than ten leading scholars and experts in<br />

this field. The participants also worked<br />

to develop course curricula centered<br />

on Latinx art to be implemented at<br />

their home institutions. The annual<br />

Object-Based Learning Seminar resumed<br />

in the fall of 2021 with the participation<br />

of thirteen graduate and undergraduate<br />

students in art and art history. Participants<br />

performed in-person analyses<br />

of objects from the Latin American<br />

and Latinx collections on view in the<br />

Kinder Building, including painting,<br />

sculpture, works on paper, archival holdings,<br />

and rare books. Weekly sessions<br />

were facilitated by UH faculty, ICAA<br />

staff, and members of the Museum’s<br />

learning and interpretation and conservation<br />

departments. The course exposed<br />

students to a variety of departmental<br />

practices and the collaboration required<br />

to research, preserve, and exhibit<br />

works of art within a museum context.<br />

Additionally, UH graduate fellows have<br />

been working since August 2021 at the<br />

ICAA on a number of research and<br />

digital initiatives.<br />

—Mari Carmen Ramírez, PhD<br />

WORTHAM CURATOR OF LATIN<br />

AMERICAN ART AND DIRECTOR,<br />

INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR<br />

THE ARTS OF THE AMERICAS<br />

125


SARAH CAMPBELL BLAFFER FOUNDATION<br />

Gainsborough, was featured in the exhibition In<br />

the Light of Cuyp: Aelbert Cuyp & Gainsborough –<br />

Constable – Turner at the Dordrechts Museum<br />

in the Netherlands. Jean-Siméon Chardin’s Still<br />

Life with a Leg of Lamb traveled to the exhibition<br />

Through Vincent’s Eyes: Van Gogh and His Sources<br />

at the Columbus Museum of Art in Ohio and the<br />

Santa Barbara Museum of Art in California. The<br />

Kiss on the Shore and Kneeling Female Nude, by<br />

Edvard Munch, were on display in the exhibition<br />

Munch: In Dialogue at the Albertina Museum in<br />

Vienna, Austria.<br />

CHRISTIAN LUYCKS,<br />

Flemish, 1623–c. 1677<br />

A Vanitas Still Life with Musical<br />

Instruments, Sheet Music, Books,<br />

a Skeleton, Skulls, and Armor, c. 1655<br />

Oil on canvas<br />

29 3/8 x 36 3/4 in. (74.6 x 93.3 cm)<br />

Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation,<br />

Houston<br />

<strong>2022</strong>.3<br />

Sarah Campbell Blaffer<br />

Foundation Board of Trustees<br />

Mr. Charles W. Hall<br />

President<br />

Mr. Edward Joseph Hudson, Jr.<br />

Vice-President and Secretary<br />

Ms. Anne D. Owen<br />

Vice-President and Treasurer<br />

Mr. Robert Lee Hudson<br />

Vice-President<br />

Mr. James Owen Coleman<br />

Vice-President<br />

126<br />

In 1964 Sarah Campbell Blaffer established a<br />

foundation for religious, charitable, and educational<br />

purposes. Since that time, the Sarah<br />

Campbell Blaffer Foundation has supported<br />

a wide variety of institutions through monetary<br />

grants. In 1971 its trustees, including<br />

Mrs. Blaffer, decided to focus more of the<br />

foundation’s resources on acquiring works of<br />

art that would be made available to people in<br />

Texas through a “museum without walls.”<br />

The Sarah Campbell Blaffer Foundation now<br />

maintains, exhibits, and continues to develop<br />

a collection of more than 150 Old Master and<br />

modern paintings, approximately 500 works<br />

on paper, and a small collection of decorative<br />

arts. Prior to 2000, the foundation had never<br />

occupied its own permanent exhibition space.<br />

However, as the result of an agreement with<br />

the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the finest<br />

works in the Blaffer Foundation’s collection<br />

continue to be exhibited in five dedicated<br />

galleries in the Audrey Jones Beck Building.<br />

In the 2021–<strong>2022</strong> fiscal year, the Blaffer<br />

Foundation pursued its ongoing program<br />

of exhibiting works of art at museums in<br />

Texas and outside the state. Coastal Scene<br />

with Shipping and Cattle, by Thomas<br />

In <strong>2022</strong> the foundation acquired A Vanitas Still<br />

Life with Musical Instruments, Sheet Music, Books,<br />

a Skeleton, Skulls, and Armor (c. 1655), by the<br />

Fleming Christian Luycks, who was a successful<br />

and skilled painter of still lifes of various types,<br />

including vanitas and memento mori. This lavish<br />

painting includes quintessential iconography<br />

of both these overlapping types: the vanity of<br />

worldly achievements and pursuits is indicated<br />

by the trappings of royalty, military valor, church<br />

hierarchy, music, gaming, theater, and a book<br />

open to a depiction of the misery of Job, while<br />

the viewer is reminded of inevitable death by<br />

the skulls, an hourglass with its sand run to the<br />

bottom, a timepiece, fading roses, a tomb on and<br />

around which these objects are displayed, a boy in<br />

the background blowing bubbles, and a skeleton<br />

snuffing out a candle with one hand and holding<br />

a sheet inscribed in Latin, “It is established for all<br />

men to die once,” in the other. Numerous other<br />

inscriptions—virtually a catalogue of relevant<br />

texts—support these admonitions. The painting<br />

is on permanent view in the Blaffer Foundation’s<br />

own cabinet of curiosity, installed in gallery 217<br />

at the Museum.<br />

The staff of the Blaffer Foundation is grateful<br />

to the foundation’s Board of Trustees for<br />

its continued guidance. We would also like to<br />

thank Museum staff members who lend their<br />

expertise to the advancement of the foundation’s<br />

art programs.<br />

—James Clifton, PhD<br />

DIRECTOR, SARAH CAMPBELL BLAFFER<br />

FOUNDATION


THE GLASSELL SCHOOL OF ART<br />

Glassell School of Art studio color class, spring <strong>2022</strong><br />

The Glassell School of Art serves as the<br />

teaching wing of the Museum by offering<br />

a variety of classes, workshops, and<br />

educational opportunities for students<br />

diverse in age, interests, experience,<br />

and needs through our Studio School,<br />

Junior School, and the internationally<br />

acclaimed Core Residency Program.<br />

The Glassell Studio School started its<br />

fourth year in the building with a return<br />

to full-capacity classes, predominantly<br />

meeting in person, and a handful of<br />

online classes and hybrid options. The<br />

Studio School began the fiscal year with<br />

the 2020–2021 <strong>Annual</strong> Student Exhibition<br />

and Certificate of Achievement Exhibition<br />

returning to the Levant Foundation<br />

Gallery and the Leslie and Brad Bucher<br />

Gallery. In September, Block XXI, featuring<br />

work from the 2020–2021 Block<br />

program students, was featured in the<br />

Levant Foundation Gallery. The popular<br />

annual Student Art Sale returned in<br />

December, with more than 150 students<br />

participating, selling just over 1,700<br />

works over a four-day period. Student<br />

participants retain 75 percent of the sales<br />

price, and the remaining funds transfer<br />

to a scholarship account, helping to fund<br />

Studio School scholarships for both fall<br />

and spring semesters. The school also<br />

continued its partnership with Kinder<br />

Morgan, hosting a series of exhibitions of<br />

student work in the lobby of the Kinder<br />

Morgan Building downtown. Enrollment<br />

for the year totaled 1,899. The school<br />

ended the fiscal year with the 2021–<strong>2022</strong><br />

<strong>Annual</strong> Student and Certificate of Achievement<br />

Exhibition in the Levant Foundation<br />

Gallery and the Leslie and Brad Bucher<br />

Gallery, highlighting the works of<br />

sixty-eight students and ten Certificate<br />

of Achievement recipients.<br />

The Junior School continued to follow<br />

a more cautious safety approach in the<br />

classrooms for the July through August<br />

summer classes and the fall semester<br />

by continuing to limit classroom enrollment;<br />

it expanded back to full capacities<br />

in spring semester and June summer<br />

classes once COVID-19 vaccinations were<br />

more readily available for children. The<br />

Junior School hosted its annual holiday<br />

exhibition, featuring work from students<br />

in all classes. It also partnered with the<br />

Presbyterian School and hosted a spring<br />

exhibition of artworks by its middle<br />

school students, curated and installed<br />

by its fourth-grade students. The Junior<br />

School continued programming with<br />

several long-standing school partnerships,<br />

including the Presbyterian School and the<br />

Post Oak School, and added programming<br />

with several other local schools,<br />

including River Oaks Baptist School, St.<br />

Mark’s Episcopal School, the Fay School,<br />

and the Joy School. The spring semester<br />

concluded with an exhibition of work<br />

from the Advanced Portfolio Preparation<br />

classes, which featured work from students<br />

completing three years of classes in this<br />

scholarship-funded program. Portfolio<br />

Day and Sketch Day resulted in 71<br />

scholarship awards for the following year,<br />

and enrollment for the year totaled 4,023.<br />

The Core Residency Program is a ninemonth<br />

postgraduate program consisting<br />

of six artists and two critical writers.<br />

Participants are provided studio or office<br />

space at the Glassell School, along with a<br />

stipend and access to the school’s equipment<br />

and facilities. For the 2021–<strong>2022</strong><br />

term, seven of the eight fellows participated<br />

in person, and one continued to<br />

participate remotely. The Core Program<br />

also welcomed Leslie Hewitt, a former<br />

Core Fellow (2005–2007), as a mentor<br />

artist in residence. She conducted studio<br />

visits, led a seminar, and consulted with<br />

the fellows individually throughout<br />

the program year. This year, the Core<br />

Program hosted a distinguished roster<br />

of artists, critics, curators, and scholars<br />

both in-person and virtually. Visitors<br />

for the year included Anahita<br />

Ghazvinizadeh, Meg Onli, Omar<br />

Berrada, Ylinka Barotto, Jamal Cyrus,<br />

Naeem Mohaiemen, and Elizabeth<br />

Povinelli. In March, the annual Core<br />

Exhibition returned to the building, with<br />

works on view in the Levant Foundation<br />

Gallery, the Leslie and Brad Bucher<br />

Gallery, and the Orton Gallery. The<br />

fellows organized a lecture and a<br />

screening during the run of the show.<br />

The Core yearbook was released in conjunction<br />

with the exhibition, featuring<br />

profiles of each artist as well as essays<br />

from the writers in residence. In May,<br />

the fellows closed out the year with an<br />

Open Studios event, giving visitors the<br />

opportunity to meet them, see their work,<br />

and learn more about the program.<br />

After thirty years at Glassell, I am retiring<br />

to focus on my artistic practice full<br />

time. I am grateful for the generous and<br />

enthusiastic support of individuals, foundations,<br />

and corporations to further the<br />

Glassell School of Art’s mission and programming.<br />

I would like to acknowledge<br />

Executive Committee Chair Brad Bucher<br />

and Core Program Subcommittee Chair<br />

Jereann Chaney for their leadership and<br />

efforts on behalf of the School.<br />

—Joseph Havel<br />

DIRECTOR, THE GLASSELL SCHOOL<br />

OF ART<br />

127


BAYOU BEND COLLECTION AND GARDENS<br />

Spring Break Week at Bayou Bend<br />

Bayou Bend enjoyed a successful fiscal<br />

year 2021–<strong>2022</strong> while continuously<br />

adapting to two major challenges: the<br />

pandemic’s evolving effect on programming<br />

and the erosion mitigation project’s<br />

changing impact on overall operations,<br />

including a three-month closure.<br />

Innovative approaches developed during<br />

the height of the pandemic were put to<br />

good use this year. Programs such as<br />

July 4 and the September and October<br />

Family Days had to be conducted virtually<br />

due to protocols or closure, but often<br />

this proved to be the perfect format; the<br />

evening webinar series Fascinating Finds<br />

was able to reach a national audience.<br />

Families welcomed self-guided activities,<br />

including the second annual Holiday<br />

Discovery Days. Many popular on-site<br />

events were able to return: Sip and Stroll,<br />

Jazz and Juleps, the Children’s Texas Art<br />

Festival, and Spring Break Week, which<br />

welcomed more than two thousand people.<br />

Summer History Camp, supported<br />

for seventeen years by Houston Junior<br />

Woman’s Club, began the fiscal year<br />

in July 2021 as a virtual program, and<br />

ended it in June <strong>2022</strong> as an in-person<br />

experience once again. New programs<br />

included a free afternoon of performances<br />

and activities celebrating Juneteenth.<br />

Bayou Bend’s house tour program<br />

features guided tours by members of the<br />

Bayou Bend Docent Organization. This<br />

128<br />

was a challenging year for the docents:<br />

after a twenty-month pause, regular guided<br />

tours resumed in November, but group<br />

tours were not possible until March, with<br />

school tours returning in April. Changing<br />

protocols for masking, vaccinations, and<br />

testing added to the complications. We<br />

thanked our wonderful docents for their<br />

support with a springtime reception at<br />

Bayou Bend. Docents, staff, students, and<br />

the public all benefit from the impressive<br />

resources available at the Kitty King<br />

Powell Library and Study Center. The<br />

library’s online William J. Hill Texas<br />

Artisans and Artists Archive was a<br />

finalist for a national award and was<br />

honored by the Texas Digital Library with<br />

its <strong>2022</strong> Excellence Award. We appreciate<br />

the significant support of Leslie and Brad<br />

Bucher to the archive program this year.<br />

Bayou Bend comprises both a collection<br />

and gardens. The collection is cared for<br />

by our curatorial team, expertly guided<br />

by the collection subcommittee and its<br />

chair, Carol Jean Moehlman. Several<br />

seventeenth-century rarities were among<br />

the objects added to the collection thanks<br />

to generous donors and to accession<br />

endowment proceeds (see page 77 for a<br />

full list of the acquisitions). Protection<br />

of the collection is always a focus; it was<br />

especially so this year because of concerns<br />

that the erosion mitigation work along the<br />

bayou streambank might cause vibrations<br />

to the house foundation. For a period,<br />

fragile objects were removed from walls<br />

and shelving. Fortunately, the structure<br />

was not affected by the work, and nothing<br />

was damaged. The gardens experienced<br />

continuing aftereffects of the historic<br />

freeze of February 2021. Five historic<br />

red oaks died, two that graced the front<br />

entrance of the house for decades. Despite<br />

many weather challenges, the gardens<br />

team, joined by dedicated members of the<br />

River Oaks Garden Club, ensured that<br />

the gardens were beautiful for the 3,200<br />

guests who visited during Azalea Trail.<br />

All year, visitors crossing over Buffalo<br />

Bayou saw the progress being made<br />

on the $6.5 million, Hurricane Harvey–<br />

related erosion repairs. Special thanks<br />

to John L. Nau III for his $500,000<br />

challenge match to help fund the project.<br />

So many people played important roles<br />

in our success this year. Our fiftymember<br />

staff deserves special recognition<br />

for its commitment to overall excellence.<br />

We are fortunate to have many steadfast<br />

donors who once again made generous<br />

contributions, including The Galleria and<br />

1661 Tanglewood, principal underwriters<br />

of the Bayou Bend Fashion Show and<br />

Luncheon and the Bayou Bend Garden<br />

Party, respectively. The Bayou Bend<br />

Committee shared its valuable time and<br />

support, and I am grateful to chairman<br />

Sharon G. Dies for her calming guidance<br />

and wise counsel.<br />

This year marked the tenth anniversary<br />

of our biannual magazine, Inside|Out,<br />

which documents in more detail how we<br />

continue to preserve, enrich, and share<br />

Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens as<br />

a far-reaching cultural resource—and<br />

the legacy of a most singular woman,<br />

Ima Hogg.<br />

—Bonnie A. Campbell<br />

DIRECTOR, BAYOU BEND COLLECTION<br />

AND GARDENS


RIENZI<br />

Amazing Place, and popular recorded<br />

offerings, such as a discussion of<br />

nineteenth-century postcolonial culture<br />

in Mexico in celebration of Latino<br />

Heritage Month.<br />

Rienzi docent Bill Loper with guests, April <strong>2022</strong><br />

The past year found Rienzi navigating the<br />

slow return to normal life after uncertain<br />

times during the pandemic. Docent-led<br />

tours resumed in October 2021 on a<br />

diminished schedule and in alignment<br />

with health protocols. However, these<br />

in-person tours were paused again from<br />

January to April due to concerns over a<br />

surge in COVID-19 cases. Throughout<br />

these starts and stops, Rienzi docents<br />

have stayed committed, returning each<br />

time with enthusiasm and a true desire<br />

to connect with guests over the art and<br />

history found in the collection. Rienzi<br />

continued its strong exhibition program<br />

in the fall with Hidden Hands: Invisible<br />

Workers in Industrial England, which<br />

examined objects that illustrated the<br />

diverse, mostly unseen and nameless,<br />

workforce, including women and children,<br />

behind famous names such as Josiah<br />

Wedgwood and Worcester Porcelain. The<br />

Rienzi Fall Symposium, “Hidden Hands:<br />

Untold Stories of the Object,” held virtually,<br />

hosted papers considering similar contributions<br />

by workers often lost to history.<br />

Response to the call for papers was unexpected,<br />

with submissions from scholars<br />

around the globe. The spring exhibition,<br />

Materials of Empire: Colonial Narratives<br />

1700–1860, explored objects that shed<br />

light on the links between Europe, Africa,<br />

the Americas, and India, placing them<br />

in the context of entangled legacies and<br />

experiences of empire.<br />

The Sterling-Turner Foundation continued<br />

to support Rienzi’s educational<br />

programs and its engagement with<br />

audiences across Houston. Our longlived<br />

partnership with Houston Grand<br />

Opera Studio returned in the fall, again<br />

underwritten by a generous grant from<br />

Margaret Alkek Williams and Randa and<br />

Charles Williams. Although programs<br />

were canceled in January and February<br />

due to health concerns, the spring had a<br />

full roster of events. Main Street Theater<br />

and Ars Lyrica Houston gave performances<br />

at the house in April and June.<br />

The popular Drawing Salon, featuring<br />

live models in Regency dress, also<br />

returned in April. Rienzi Reels, in partnership<br />

with the French Consulate, was<br />

held with a French cinematic offering in<br />

honor of Europe Day in May. The annual<br />

Historic Alcohol Dinner, in collaboration<br />

with Goodnight Hospitality, also<br />

returned in May. The sold-out evening<br />

focused on Italian amari liqueurs and<br />

took inspiration from Italian objects in<br />

Rienzi’s collection. Some programs continued<br />

in a virtual format, including the<br />

History Book Club, collaborations with<br />

For more than twenty years, the care of<br />

Rienzi’s gardens has been a partnership<br />

between the Museum and the Garden<br />

Club of Houston (GCH). In a testament<br />

to the great work being done in our green<br />

spaces, the Rienzi Garden Endowment<br />

Valentine Campaign more than doubled<br />

this year’s fiscal goal. Along with Bart<br />

Brechter, the Museum’s head of gardens<br />

and landscape operations, the GCH<br />

worked hard to get the gardens in excellent<br />

shape for the return of Azalea Trail<br />

this March.<br />

In spite of the uncertain times, Rienzi<br />

still managed to host some marvelous<br />

parties. The Rienzi Society dinner,<br />

originally scheduled for January, was<br />

postponed due to the health concerns<br />

at the time. The joyous dinner, hosted<br />

with real grace by Nancy Guinee, was<br />

instead held on March 31, generously<br />

underwritten by Van Cleef & Arpels.<br />

Members voted to acquire an exquisite<br />

Meissen “Maiblumen” mounted vase<br />

(c. 1755–60), and another generous<br />

member purchased a French Neoclassical<br />

chenet, or andiron (c. 1785), for the collection.<br />

The always glamorous Spring Party<br />

returned on May 5. Several members of<br />

the Masterson family chaired the event<br />

and warmly greeted guests after a twoyear<br />

hiatus. My thanks go to the family<br />

for continuing Rienzi’s wonderful history<br />

of memorable parties. I remain so grateful<br />

to all who have supported Rienzi with<br />

their time, funds, and thoughtful acts<br />

throughout this past year.<br />

—Christine Gervais<br />

THE FREDRICKA CRAIN DIRECTOR,<br />

RIENZI<br />

129


DEVELOPMENT<br />

In the 2021–<strong>2022</strong> fi scal year, the many successes in fund-raising were the result of<br />

commitment and work by members of the Board of Trustees, chaired by Richard D.<br />

Kinder, and the Development Committee, chaired by Mrs. Courtney Lanier Sarofi m.<br />

The generous support of individuals, foundations, corporations, and government<br />

agencies totaled $27.4 million as follows: $20.6 million in contributions in support<br />

of operations and restricted projects; $3.8 million in contributions designated for<br />

the capital campaign and endowment; and $3.0 million in contributions for acquisitions.<br />

On behalf of the Board of Trustees, we honor all those donors who made<br />

this achievement possible.<br />

ANNUAL DRIVES<br />

Funds raised through annual drives are an essential portion of the Museum’s operating<br />

budget. This year, four separate drives raised a total of $3,722,948 for the Museum, Bayou<br />

Bend Collection and Gardens, the Glassell School of Art, and Rienzi. The institution is<br />

indebted to the individuals who give their time and resources to help raise unrestricted<br />

funds for daily operations and critical programs.<br />

BENEFIT EVENTS<br />

Every year, special events at the Museum raise vital funds for operations and the Museum of<br />

fine Arts, Houston, organized six such events for the 2021–<strong>2022</strong> fiscal year. The Grand Gala<br />

Ball raised $1,239,740 for the Museum’s operating budget. The Glassell School of Art Benefit<br />

and Auction raised $470,073. Three benefits at Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens collectively<br />

raised $1,068,239, and the Rienzi Spring Party raised $165,931.<br />

For a list of all <strong>MFAH</strong> annual drives and benefits, please see page 133.<br />

INDIVIDUAL GIFTS<br />

Individuals continue to provide the most significant support for Museum activities, including<br />

exhibitions; learning and interpretation programs; conservation projects; and accessions. For<br />

extraordinarily generous gifts we thank Leslie and Brad Bucher; Anne and Charles Duncan; the<br />

Glassell Family; Michelle and Frank Hevrdejs; Sara and Bill Morgan; Bobbie Nau; Susanne<br />

and Bill Pritchard; Judy and Charles Tate; Francita Stuart Koelsch Ulmer; and Cyvia G. Wolff.<br />

130


FOUNDATION SUPPORT<br />

This fiscal year, more than 50 foundations provided over $8 million in support of operations,<br />

accessions, and capital projects. Houston foundations are exceptional in their giving, and<br />

we extend a special thank-you to Stanford and Joan Alexander Foundation; Albert and<br />

Margaret Alkek Foundation; The Brown Foundation, Inc.; John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation;<br />

the Fondren Foundation; Kinder Foundation; the Robert and Janice McNair Foundation;<br />

Stream of Change Foundation; the Weingarten Schnitzer Foundation, Inc.; and the Windgate<br />

Charitable Foundation.<br />

CORPORATE CONTRIBUTIONS<br />

The Museum is proud of the support received from the corporate community in Houston<br />

and far beyond. This fiscal year, corporate groups provided more than $2.8 million. Special<br />

thanks go to Amerant; Hines Interests; PNC Financial Services; Shell Oil Company; and<br />

the Tanglewood Corporation.<br />

CIVIC AND GOVERNMENT GRANTS<br />

The Museum could not exist without funds provided by various civic and government<br />

organizations. This fiscal year, the Museum received more than $7.5 million in grants from<br />

local, state, and national groups. Our deepest appreciation is extended to the Bayou Bend<br />

Gardens Endowment; City of Houston; the Garden Club of Houston; Institute of Museum<br />

and Library Services; River Oaks Garden Club; Texas Commission on the Arts; Theta Charity<br />

Antiques Club; and the U.S. Small Business Administration.<br />

131


DEVELOPMENT<br />

PLANNED GIVING<br />

The Museum’s Myrtle Wreath and Ima Hogg Societies continue to flourish, with 240 members<br />

to end the fiscal year. These societies allow the Museum to recognize donors who have indicated<br />

that they intend to provide important resources for future generations by including the Museum,<br />

the Glassell School of Art, Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens, or Rienzi in their estate plans.<br />

We extend our deep gratitude to the friends who have enrolled in these societies.<br />

NON-CASH CONTRIBUTIONS<br />

Every year the Museum receives valuable support from donors who provide indispensable<br />

in-kind services to the institution. We especially recognize Vinson & Elkins LLP for donating<br />

consistent and extraordinary legal service and Houston Public Media for generously supporting<br />

Museum exhibitions and programs through advertising.<br />

VOLUNTEERS<br />

Our volunteers are perhaps the most impressive endorsement of the Museum. They give<br />

their time and service to enable the institution to better serve the community. In fiscal year<br />

2021–<strong>2022</strong>, Museum volunteers provided support valued at more than $275,000, according<br />

to guidelines established by the Independent Sector. We wish to pay special tribute to the<br />

Guild, the Museum’s volunteer leadership organization. The Guild was 79 members strong<br />

and provided constant, immeasurable support.<br />

—Amy Purvis<br />

CHIEF DEVELOPMENT OFFICER<br />

132


Funds raised by the annual drives, benefi ts, and support organizations listed in this section are total gross proceeds.<br />

ANNUAL DRIVES<br />

Museum <strong>Annual</strong> Fund Drive<br />

Raised: $2,684,737<br />

Bayou Bend <strong>Annual</strong> Fund Drive<br />

Raised: $605,528<br />

Glassell School <strong>Annual</strong> Fund Drive<br />

Raised: $274,307<br />

Rienzi <strong>Annual</strong> Fund Drive<br />

Raised: $158,376<br />

PLANNED GIFTS<br />

The Myrtle Wreath Society<br />

Members: 245<br />

The Ima Hogg Society<br />

Members: 57<br />

BENEFITS<br />

Grand Gala Ball<br />

November 5, 2021<br />

Hosted by the Life Trustees of the <strong>MFAH</strong><br />

Raised: $1,239,740 for operations<br />

Latin American Experience Gala<br />

March 26, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Celebrating the 20th Anniversary<br />

of the Latin American Art Department<br />

Raised: $1,982,150 for operations<br />

and accessions<br />

Rienzi Society<br />

March 31, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Chair: Nancy P. Guinee<br />

Raised: $225,600 for accessions<br />

Bayou Bend Fashion Show and Luncheon<br />

April 8, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Chairs: Anne Chao and Carolyn Chao Sabat<br />

Raised: $484,950 for operations<br />

Bayou Bend Children’s Party<br />

April 9, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Chairs: Lauren Dies Brollier and<br />

Vivian VandenBout<br />

Raised: $39,300 for operations<br />

Bayou Bend Garden Party<br />

April 10, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Chair: Sharon G. Dies<br />

Raised: $543,988 for operations<br />

Rienzi Spring Party<br />

May 6, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Chairs: Catherine and George Masterson;<br />

Kathy and Harry Masterson; Libbie<br />

Masterson and Mark Sullivan; Tiffany<br />

and Charles Masterson; and Wylie and<br />

Stewart Masterson, Jr.<br />

Raised: $165,931 for operations<br />

Glassell School of Art Benefit<br />

and Auction<br />

May 12, <strong>2022</strong><br />

Chairs: Leigh and Reggie Smith<br />

Raised: $470,073 for operations<br />

133


DEVELOPMENT<br />

1<br />

2<br />

3<br />

4<br />

5<br />

6 7<br />

9<br />

8 10<br />

1 Grand Gala Ball: Janie and Daniel Zilkha<br />

2 Grand Gala Ball: Susan and Fayez Sarofim<br />

3 Grand Gala Ball: Yvonne Cormier and Claire Cormier Thielke<br />

4 Latin American Experience Gala: Adolpho Leirner; Jac Leirner<br />

5 Latin American Experience Gala: Carlos Cruz Puga and<br />

Francisca Novoa<br />

6 Latin American Experience Gala: Judy and Charles Tate<br />

7 Latin American Experience Gala: Marc and Veronika Adler;<br />

Olya and Glen Bucher<br />

8 Rienzi Society: Gary Tinterow; Chair Nancy Guinee<br />

9 Rienzi Society: Carroll Goodman and John Wessels<br />

10 Rienzi Society: Isla and Tommy Reckling; Lauren Reckling<br />

134


11 12<br />

13 14<br />

16<br />

15<br />

17 18<br />

11 Bayou Bend Fashion Show and Luncheon:<br />

Chairs Anne Chao and Carolyn Chao Sabat<br />

12 Bayou Bend Fashion Show and Luncheon:<br />

Hilda Curran; Laurie Morian<br />

13 Bayou Bend Fashion Show and Luncheon:<br />

Polly Bowden; Sharyn Weaver<br />

14 Bayou Bend Children’s Party:<br />

Hallie and JJ McDermott and family<br />

15 Bayou Bend Children’s Party:<br />

Chairs John and Lauren Brollier and family<br />

16 Bayou Bend Children’s Party: Fishel and Dillard families<br />

17 Bayou Bend Garden Party: Chair Sharon Dies<br />

18 Bayou Bend Garden Party: Jim and Amy Miller<br />

135


DEVELOPMENT<br />

19<br />

20 21 22<br />

23 24 25<br />

26<br />

27 28 29 30<br />

19 Bayou Bend Garden Party: Wally Wilson and Jeanie Kilroy Wilson<br />

20 Bayou Bend Garden Party: Jay Jones and Terry Wayne Jones<br />

21 Rienzi Spring Party: Chairs Catherine and George Masterson<br />

22 Rienzi Spring Party: Geer and Libba Blalock<br />

23 Glassell School of Art Benefit and Auction:<br />

Alfred C. Glassell, III, and Marli Andrade<br />

24 Glassell School of Art Benefit and Auction:<br />

Chair Leigh Smith; Joe Havel; Chair Reggie Smith<br />

25 Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer Opening Event: Demi and Ron Rand<br />

26 Afro-Atlantic Histories Opening Event: Ramon and Karen Manning<br />

27 Afro-Atlantic Histories Opening Event: Barron and Lisa Wallace<br />

28 Incomparable Impressionism from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston<br />

Opening Dinner: Bill and Sara Morgan<br />

29 Incomparable Impressionism from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston<br />

Opening Dinner: Margaret Alkek Williams and Jim Daniel<br />

30 Calder-Picasso Opening Dinner: Joan Schnitzer; Phoebe Tudor<br />

136


31 32<br />

33<br />

34 35 36 37<br />

38 39 40<br />

31 Calder-Picasso Opening Dinner: Tina Pyne; Michelle Hevrdejs<br />

32 Dawoud Bey: An American Project Opening Reception: Abbie Brothers;<br />

Merinda Watkins-Martin; Elizabeth Martin; Mei Leebron<br />

33 Dawoud Bey: An American Project Opening Reception:<br />

Sima Ladjevardian; Rania Daniel<br />

34 Virtual Realities: The Art of M.C. Escher from the Michael S. Sachs<br />

Collection Opening Dinner: Kathy and Marty Goossen<br />

35 Virtual Realities: The Art of M.C. Escher from the Michael S. Sachs<br />

Collection Opening Dinner: Richard and Martha Finger<br />

36 Shahzia Sikander: Extraordinary Realities Opening Reception:<br />

Heidi Gerger; Jereann Chaney<br />

37 The Obama Portraits Tour Opening Dinner: Reggie Martin;<br />

Levita and M.D. Marshall<br />

38 The Obama Portraits Tour Opening Dinner:<br />

Simin and Gaurdie Banister<br />

39 Leandro Erlich: Seeing Is Not Believing Opening Dinner:<br />

Leslie Bucher; Leandro Erlich; Brad Bucher<br />

40 Leandro Erlich: Seeing Is Not Believing Opening Dinner:<br />

Cyvia Wolff; Yolanda and Bill Knull<br />

137


DEVELOPMENT<br />

Contributions to the Museum<br />

of Fine Arts, Houston; Bayou Bend<br />

Collection and Gardens; the Glassell<br />

School of Art; and Rienzi<br />

$500,000 or More<br />

Stanford and Joan Alexander Foundation<br />

Albert and Margaret Alkek Foundation<br />

The Brown Foundation, Inc.<br />

Leslie and Brad Bucher<br />

Anne and Charles Duncan<br />

John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation<br />

The Fondren Foundation<br />

The Glassell Family Foundation<br />

Houston Arts Alliance<br />

The Robert and Janice McNair Foundation<br />

PNC Foundation<br />

Francita Stuart Koelsch Ulmer<br />

U.S. Small Business Administration<br />

The Windgate Charitable Foundation<br />

Mrs. Cyvia G. Wolff<br />

$100,000–$499,999<br />

The Adler Foundation<br />

Mrs. Nancy C. Allen<br />

Amerant<br />

The Estate of Kirby Attwell<br />

Mr. and Mrs. J. Murry Bowden<br />

The Buddy Taub Foundation<br />

Sue and Rusty Burnett<br />

Ms. Betsy Burrows<br />

Mrs. Jereann H. Chaney<br />

The Cullen Foundation<br />

Sharon G. Dies<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Gamson<br />

Mr. Samuel F. Gorman<br />

Mrs. Nancy P. Guinee<br />

Albert and Ethel Herzstein<br />

Charitable Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Hevrdejs<br />

Hildebrand Fund<br />

Hines Interests Limited Partnership<br />

The Robert H.N. Ho Family Foundation<br />

The Houston Arts Combined<br />

Endowment Foundation<br />

Houston Public Media<br />

Ms. Victoria Goldstein and<br />

Mr. Randall H. Jamail<br />

Linda and George Kelly<br />

Kinder Foundation<br />

Jan and J.Venn Leeds Foundation<br />

Mrs. Cornelia Long<br />

Sara and Bill Morgan<br />

Morian Foundation<br />

Ms. Bobbie Nau<br />

Ms. Franci Neely<br />

PNC Financial Services<br />

Mr. Dan Pollock<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Ernesto Poma<br />

The Powell Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. William E. Pritchard III<br />

River Oaks Garden Club<br />

Shell Oil Company<br />

Susan Sarofim Revocable Trust<br />

Mr. Fayez Sarofim<br />

Simon Property Group/Galleria Houston<br />

The Skiles Foundation<br />

The Joseph & Sylvia Slifka Foundation<br />

Stream of Change Foundation<br />

Tanglewood Corporation<br />

Judy and Charles Tate<br />

Texas Commission on the Arts<br />

Clark and Charlene Thompson Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John Toussaint<br />

The Weingarten Schnitzer Foundation, Inc.<br />

Mrs. Jeanie Kilroy Wilson<br />

The Wortham Foundation, Inc.<br />

$50,000–$99,999<br />

The Sushila and Durga D. Agrawal<br />

Charitable Trust<br />

The Alkek and Williams Foundation<br />

Laura and John Arnold<br />

Melza and Ted Barr<br />

Bayou Bend Gardens Endowment<br />

Birch Park LP<br />

The Bookout Foundation<br />

Mr. Charles Butt<br />

Bettie Cartwright<br />

CFP Foundation<br />

Anne and Albert Chao<br />

Michael W. Dale<br />

Laura and James DeMare<br />

Mrs. Jerry E. Finger<br />

Heidi and David Gerger<br />

Melbern G. & Susanne M. Glasscock<br />

Foundation<br />

Ms. Marli Andrade and<br />

Mr. Alfred C. Glassell, III<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John Glover<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Green<br />

Houston Endowment Inc.<br />

Mickie and Ron Huebsch<br />

Institute of Museum and Library Services<br />

Mr. Jesse H. Jones II<br />

Elise E. and Russell C. Joseph Family Fund<br />

Ms. Hee Jung<br />

William S. and Lora Jean Kilroy Foundation<br />

Mary and Tom Lile<br />

Michael C. Linn Family Foundation<br />

Luther King Capital Management<br />

M. D. Anderson Foundation<br />

John P. McGovern Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. David A. Modesett<br />

Ms. Joan Morgenstern<br />

Yolanda and William Parish<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Gary R. Petersen<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Reckling III<br />

W. E. Robertson Fund<br />

Rock Ridge Foundation<br />

Saudi Refining, Inc.<br />

Ms. Joanne M. Houck and<br />

Mr. Tim Singletary<br />

Ms. Miwa Sakashita and<br />

Dr. John R. Stroehlein<br />

Ms. Ann G. Trammell<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Sean Patrick Wade<br />

The Morris Weiner Charitable Fund<br />

$25,000–$49,999<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Edward R. Allen III<br />

Baker McKenzie<br />

The Joe Barnhart Foundation<br />

Judith Britton<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Laurence C. Burns, Jr.<br />

The Gordon A. Cain Foundation<br />

Ms. Karol Kreymer and Dr. Robert J. Card<br />

The E. Rhodes & Leona B. Carpenter<br />

Foundation<br />

The P. and C. Carroll Foundation<br />

Christie’s<br />

Citi<br />

The Consulate General of The Netherlands<br />

Mrs. Jerry Ann Woodfin-Costa and<br />

Mr. Victor Costa<br />

Mrs. Rosanette S. Cullen<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Jamal H. Daniel<br />

Mrs. Linnet F. Deily<br />

Mrs. Brenda P. Duncan<br />

The Favrot Fund<br />

The Marvy Finger Family Foundation<br />

H. Fort Flowers Foundation, Inc.<br />

Andrea Frank Foundation<br />

The Garden Club of Houston<br />

Mrs. Clare Attwell Glassell<br />

Goldman Sachs Gives<br />

Ms. Carroll R. Goodman<br />

Mrs. Joyce Z. Greenberg<br />

H-E-B<br />

Maria and Pablo Henning<br />

Ms. Cynthia G. Holliday<br />

Ms. Cecily E. Horton<br />

Houston Junior Woman’s Club<br />

Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo<br />

Lynne and Joe Hudson<br />

Jago & Beal Revocable Trust<br />

The JBD Foundation<br />

The Joan and Marvin Kaplan Foundation<br />

Melissa and Steven Kean<br />

Kirkland & Ellis LLP<br />

Ms. Carla Knobloch<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Kotts<br />

Samuel H. Kress Foundation<br />

Judy and Rodney Margolis<br />

D. Sterling Margolis Family Foundation<br />

The Marks Charitable Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. William N. Mathis<br />

Memorial Hermann Foundation<br />

National Endowment for the Arts<br />

National Endowment for the Humanities<br />

Mr. John L. Nau III<br />

Katharine and John Orton<br />

Ms. Claire Padgett<br />

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Passela<br />

Mrs. Darlene Boytall and Mr. Jorge Pérez<br />

Frank & Carolyn Pichardo Family Fund<br />

Poltex Software, Inc.<br />

Pooja Goradia and Ravi Purohit<br />

The Rand Group, LLC<br />

Mr. and Mrs. H. John Riley, Jr.<br />

Dr. Ellen R. Gritz and<br />

Mr. Milton D. Rosenau, Jr.<br />

Mrs. Carolyn Rosenstock-Ellis<br />

The Sarofim Foundation<br />

Sidley<br />

Dr. Ruth Simmons<br />

The Ray and June Smith Charitable<br />

Foundation<br />

The Vivian L. Smith Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Reginald R. Smith<br />

Ms. Merrianne Timko<br />

The Tingleaf Family Fund<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Ignacio Torras<br />

TXAT LLC<br />

Van Cleef & Arpels<br />

Hallie and Michael Vanderhider<br />

Susan Vaughan Foundation<br />

The Vaughn Foundation<br />

Kay and Doug Wilson<br />

The Winston Charitable Foundation<br />

Nina and Michael Zilkha<br />

$10,000–$24,999<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Mark B. Abendshein<br />

Amegy Bank Foundation<br />

Anchorage Foundation of Texas<br />

Edward H. Andrews Foundation<br />

Automated Security I.S.<br />

Milton and Sally Avery Arts<br />

Foundation, Inc.<br />

Mr. and Mrs. James V. Baird<br />

Bank of America<br />

Dr. Chitra Kumar and<br />

Mr. Kumar Bashyam<br />

Ellen and David Berman<br />

Mrs. Thomas W. Blake<br />

Bloomberg<br />

Mr. Brad Blume<br />

Walt and Nancy Bratic Charitable Fund<br />

Mr. Leon Brener<br />

Dr. and Mrs. Luis T. Campos<br />

Cartier<br />

Chanel, Inc.<br />

Dr. Angela Chen and Mr. Mark Klitzke<br />

Ms. Janet F. Clark<br />

Ms. Sallie C. Morian and<br />

Mr. Michael H. Clark<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Cleary, Jr.<br />

The Cockrell Family Fund<br />

The Coneway Family Foundation<br />

138


James and Molly Crownover<br />

Family Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Greg Curran<br />

Decorative Arts Trust<br />

Mrs. Ellena P. Dickerson and<br />

Mr. Rudy Steary<br />

The Dickson-Allen Foundation<br />

Sara Dodd-Denton and<br />

William S. Denton III<br />

Doggett Family Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen B. Donson<br />

Dumas Family Fund<br />

Mrs. James A. Elkins III<br />

Ms. Emily Ford Embrey<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Dan English III<br />

Clayton and Sheldon Erikson<br />

The Richard B. Finger Charitable Fund<br />

Frost Bank<br />

The Galtney Family Fund<br />

Catherine A. Gassman<br />

Dr. Cullen K. Geiselman<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Robin C. Gibbs<br />

Deborah and Gary Gibson<br />

Giorgio Armani Corporation<br />

The Estate of Nancy Hart Glanville<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Glanville<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Melbern G. Glasscock<br />

Godfrey Management Trust<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Martyn E. Goossen<br />

Mr. Marc Grossberg<br />

Cecilia and Tomás Gunz<br />

Linda and John Hague<br />

George and Mary Josephine<br />

Hamman Foundation<br />

Mrs. Rosemary Harrison<br />

Harry Winston<br />

William E. and Natoma Pyle Harvey<br />

Charitable Trust<br />

Ms. Deborah Brochstein and<br />

Mr. Steven A. Hecht<br />

Celina Hellmund<br />

Carola Herrin<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Marc Herzstein<br />

Mrs. Rosann F. Hooks<br />

Ima Hogg Ceramic Circle, Inc.<br />

The Jacobson Family Foundation<br />

Ms. Carolyn Frost Keenan and<br />

Mr. Charlie R. Gaines, Jr.<br />

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Knull III<br />

The Larsen Family Charitable Fund<br />

The Francis L. Lederer Foundation<br />

Mr. Adolpho Leirner<br />

Anne Levy Charitable Trust<br />

Lindley Family Foundation<br />

Mr. Ronald A. Logan<br />

Ms. Alice C. Simkins<br />

Marilyn G. Lummis<br />

Mr. Dean Maddalena<br />

Mr. and Mrs. James Edward Maloney<br />

Merinda E. Watkins-Martin and<br />

Reginald Martin<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John T. McCauley<br />

Ralph H. and Ruth J. McCullough<br />

Foundation<br />

Dr. Alice R. McPherson<br />

Dr. and Mrs. G. Walter McReynolds<br />

McVey Family Charitable Gift Fund<br />

Mr. Richard J. Meisinger, Jr.<br />

Ms. Natalia Ramirez and<br />

Mr. Alberto Mercado<br />

Donna and Charles Meyer<br />

Steven and Sheila Miller Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mithoff, Jr.<br />

Mitsubishi International Corporation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Michael S. Moehlman<br />

Mrs. Denise D. Monteleone<br />

Ms. Nancy Powell Moore<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Moore<br />

Fannie and Peter Morris<br />

The Claire & Theodore Morse Foundation<br />

Mrs. Claude H. Mullendore<br />

W. B. Nelson<br />

Carol and David Neuberger<br />

Henry Nias Foundation, Inc.<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Nickson<br />

Mr. Carl Niendorff<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Nyquist<br />

Ms. Maria Ojeda<br />

Ott Charitable Foundation<br />

Carl M. Padgett Family<br />

Ms. Sue E. Payne<br />

The Peddamatham Family Fund<br />

Mary Lawrence Porter<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Irving Pozmantier<br />

Prithvipal and Manmeet Likhari<br />

Management Trust<br />

Ms. Amy Purvis<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Julian E. Pylant, Jr.<br />

Pyne Family Foundation<br />

Mrs. Shantha Raghuthaman<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Harry M. Reasoner<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Howard C. Robinson<br />

The Arch and Stella Rowan Foundation, Inc.<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Jason Sabat<br />

Mrs. Melissa Sandefer<br />

Mrs. Louisa Stude Sarofim<br />

Barbara and Paul Schwartz<br />

Scurlock Foundation<br />

Ms. María Inés Sicardi<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Silvers<br />

R. E. Smith Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Smith<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Smith<br />

Stedman West Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart W. Stedman<br />

Susman Family Foundation<br />

Tenaris<br />

Mr. Christopher Gardner and<br />

Mr. Gary Tinterow<br />

Sandra L. Tirey and Jan R. van Lohuizen<br />

Phoebe and Bobby Tudor<br />

Adrienne and Tim Unger<br />

K.C. & Randa Weiner Family Fund<br />

Wells Fargo Foundation<br />

Carol Lynne Werner Charitable Fund<br />

$5,000–$9,999<br />

Dr. and Mrs. George J. Abdo<br />

Accenture LLP<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Louis K. Adler<br />

Ms. Henrietta K. Alexander<br />

Joan Alexander<br />

Julie and Drew Alexander<br />

Lilly and Thurmon Andress<br />

Ms. Priscilla R. Angly and<br />

Mr. Miles Smith<br />

Mr. and Mrs. W. Douglas Ankenman, Jr.<br />

Arensdorf Family Charitable Fund<br />

Dr. and Mrs. Bernardino Arocha<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Gaurdie Banister<br />

Mary and Marcel Barone<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Arturo Barragan<br />

Patricia and José Luis Barragán<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Marcos J. Basso<br />

David J. and Judith Beck Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Beck<br />

Dr. Patricia J. Eifel and Dr. James A. Belli<br />

Ms. Maria Toro and Mr. Luis Benshimol<br />

Ms. Lucia T. Benton<br />

Mrs. W. Tucker Blaine, Jr.<br />

Marian and Hugo Blake<br />

Leslie and Jack Blanton Jr. Fund<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Britt<br />

The Bunchberry Foundation<br />

C2 Art Advisors, LLC<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Campo<br />

Mr. Martin Cerruti<br />

Cristina Chacon and Diego Uribe<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Chang<br />

Mrs. Elizabeth Dabney Charles<br />

The Consulate General of the<br />

Republic of Korea<br />

Cragg Family Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Mark K. Craig<br />

The Crain Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Rogers L. Crain<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Crawford<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Gary T. Crum<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Platt W. Davis III<br />

The James C. and Teresa K. Day Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Ken Delery<br />

Mrs. Carrin F. Patman and<br />

Mr. James V. Derrick, Jr.<br />

The Diehl Family Charitable Fund<br />

Linda and David Dillahunty<br />

Chandos Dodson Epley<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Ted Dohmen<br />

Mr. and Mrs. George Domolky<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Dowdell<br />

Mrs. Mary Cain Driscoll<br />

Mr. and Mrs. S. Stacy Eastland<br />

The Ebel Family Foundation<br />

Mr. Jose Edery<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Tom L. Elsenbrook<br />

ExxonMobil<br />

Susan and Bill Finnegan<br />

Ms. Julia M. Flowers<br />

Aggie L. Foster and Steve Simon<br />

Franco Family Charitable Fund<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin H. Frank III<br />

The Eleanor and Frank Freed Foundation<br />

Dr. Didi Garza and Dr. Peter McLaughlin<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Gautier-Winther<br />

The Gelb Family Foundation<br />

Ms. Eileen B. Glaser and<br />

Dr. Jay R. Schachner<br />

Dr. and Mrs. Gary Glober<br />

Kathy and Marty Goossen Charitable Fund<br />

Aron & Anaruth Gordon Foundation<br />

Ms. Cristina Gracia<br />

Mary A. & Thomas F. Grasselli<br />

Endowment Foundation<br />

The Green Tree Fund<br />

Merrill and Joe Hafner Fund<br />

Dr. Kathryn Hale<br />

The Jim and Pam Harris Charitable Fund<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Hendryx<br />

Mrs. Howard W. Horne<br />

Katherine and George Howe<br />

Humanities Texas<br />

Huneycutt Family Foundation<br />

Kerry F. Inman and William D. Auble<br />

International Investors Group<br />

Istituto Italiano Di Cultura<br />

Ann S. Jackson<br />

Mary B. and James K. Jennings<br />

Charitable Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Joity<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond L. Kalmans<br />

Ms. Anne Lamkin Kinder<br />

David Kita<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey C. Koslov<br />

Ms. Amy Rae Krasner<br />

Lahourcade Family Fund<br />

Lal Family Fund<br />

Helaine and David Lane<br />

Ms. Jennifer Canales and<br />

Mr. Albert G. Laverty<br />

Mr. Marc A. Sekula and Mr. Ted Lee<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Likhari<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Steven J. Lindley<br />

Mr. Erik P. Littlejohn<br />

Luhring Augustine Gallery<br />

Tini Lulu Fund<br />

Candace and John MacMahon<br />

Penelope and Lester Marks<br />

Martin Gourmet, Inc.<br />

Catherine and George Masterson<br />

McClain Gallery<br />

139


DEVELOPMENT<br />

Christiana and Luke McConn Family<br />

Charitable Fund<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh E. McGee III<br />

Mr. Will L. McLendon<br />

Susan and Thomas McMahan<br />

Microsoft Giving Campaign<br />

Arnold and Suzanne Miller<br />

Charitable Fund<br />

Ms. Lainie Gordon and<br />

Mr. David M. Mincberg<br />

Karen J. Minich<br />

Jean and Saul A. Mintz Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Mischer, Jr.<br />

David R. Montague<br />

Elizabeth C. Moody and Lee Steffy<br />

Cristina G. and William R. Moore<br />

The W. T. and Louise J. Moran Foundation<br />

Micheline and German Newall<br />

Ms. Grace Phillips and Mr. Eugene Nosal<br />

Mr. Dee S. Osborne<br />

Alvin and Lucy Owsley Foundation<br />

Ronald C. Pasadyn<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin C. Payne<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Peterkin<br />

Ms. Marti S. Peterson<br />

The Petrello Family Foundation<br />

Mrs. Wynne H. Phelan<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Poster<br />

Francisca Novoa and Carlos Puga<br />

Edlyn and David Pursell<br />

Radoff Family Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. James S. Reckling<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Reckling<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Jordan W. Reese III<br />

Rice University<br />

River Oaks District<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Roach<br />

Barbara and Corbin J. Robertson, Jr.<br />

Leslie and Russ Robinson<br />

Mrs. Minnette Robinson<br />

Mr. Glen Rosenbaum<br />

Tricia and Steve Rosencranz<br />

Dr. Sara Sant’Ambrogio<br />

Dr. Lisa Santos and Mr. William Pugh<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Sarofim<br />

Judy and Henry Sauer<br />

Dr. Fernando Scaglia<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas W. Schnitzer<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Septimus<br />

Mary Eliza and Park Shaper<br />

The Marc and Jeri Shapiro<br />

Family Foundation<br />

Tim Sharma Foundation<br />

The Helmle Shaw Foundation<br />

Sicardi Ayers Bacino Gallery<br />

Simmons Canyon Foundation<br />

Dr. and Mrs. Terry Simon<br />

Michelle and Dmitri Sinenko<br />

Deepa and Preet Singh<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Shawn Skelton<br />

R. J. Stanton Jr.<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce D. Stein<br />

Frances Carter Stephens and<br />

Nicholas C. Stephens<br />

Ms. Johanna Brassert and Mr. Bill Stewart<br />

Mr. and Mrs. William P. Swenson<br />

Jane and Leopold Swergold<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Winston M. Talbert<br />

Mrs. Barbara M. Tartt<br />

Lenore G. Tawney Foundation<br />

Texas Children’s Hospital<br />

Nanako and Dale Tingleaf<br />

Kelley and Harper Trammell Fund<br />

June and Pete Trammell<br />

Ms. Anne W. Tucker and<br />

Mr. Robert Morris<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Brad Tucker<br />

Ms. Laurence Unger<br />

Lynden Unger<br />

University of St. Thomas<br />

Bridget and Patrick Wade<br />

Lisa and Barron Wallace<br />

Ms. Linda R. Walls<br />

The Webber Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. W. Temple Webber III<br />

The Diana and Conrad Weil, Jr.<br />

Family Foundation<br />

Lea Weingarten<br />

Mrs. Raye G. White<br />

Mrs. Sara E. White<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Whitney<br />

Mr. Dave H. Williams<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher D. Winters<br />

Bebe Woolley<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Wulfe<br />

Robert and Edith Zinn Charitable Fund<br />

Erla and Harry Zuber Fund<br />

Erla and Harry Zuber<br />

$2,500–$4,999<br />

3811 Kempner Fund<br />

Nora and Robert Ackerley<br />

Susan and Michael Addy<br />

Neelofur and Sami Ahmad<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Allsford<br />

American International Group, Inc.<br />

Ms. Jane Mooney and<br />

Mr. Francis X. Amsler<br />

Art Colony Association, Inc.<br />

Barbara and Bob Bailey<br />

Bajenski Family Charitable Fund<br />

Carol J. Baker<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Sundaresan Bala<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Saul Balagura<br />

Mr. and Mrs. George Barile<br />

Jacquelyn Barish<br />

Ms. Phoebe Barnard<br />

Mrs. Janice H. Barrow<br />

Garth C. Bates Jr. Memorial Fund<br />

R. Michelle Beale and<br />

Richard H. Anderson Charitable Fund<br />

Ms. Cathleen J. Trechter and<br />

Dr. Ed Biegert<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Myron G. Blalock III<br />

Rita and Jerred Blanchard<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Jorge E. Blanco<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Blanton, Jr.<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Blome<br />

Ms. Dana Robinson and Mr. Mike Bloom<br />

Ms. Meg L. Goodman and<br />

Mr. Michael Bonini<br />

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Bozeman<br />

Kristy and Chris Bradshaw<br />

Lauren and John Brollier<br />

Ms. Barbara A. Brooks<br />

Milton R. Brown Family Foundation<br />

Dr. Laura Sulak and Dr. Richard Brown<br />

Dr. Janet M. Bruner<br />

Gayle and Bruce Buhler<br />

Teresa Bulgheroni<br />

Dr. and Mrs. Craig S. Calvert<br />

Ms. Bonnie Campbell<br />

Mr. Frank N. Carroll<br />

Mrs. Cathryn T. Chapman<br />

Chevron<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Clarke<br />

Ms. Laura DeVries-Conely and<br />

Mr. Mark Conely<br />

The Conlon Family Trust<br />

Consolato Generale D’Italia Houston<br />

Consulate General of Brazil<br />

Council for Canadian American Relations<br />

Carolyn Covault Revocable Trust<br />

Mr. Steven L. Cowart<br />

Mr. and Mrs. David Crabtree<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Arturo Creixell<br />

Mr. Oscar Cuellar and<br />

Mr. William Bickford, Jr.<br />

Robin and Joseph Cunningham<br />

Isabel and Danny David<br />

O. Paul Decker Memorial Fund<br />

Dr. and Mrs. William L. Decker<br />

Denman/Newman Foundation<br />

Ms. Genevieve Déséglise<br />

Paula and Reginald DesRoches<br />

The Carl and Phyllis Detering Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Dilg<br />

Joell and Thomas Doneker<br />

Nancy S. Dunlap<br />

E.M. Bossin & Company, P.C.<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John Eads<br />

Jolene B. Friedman and Harold Eisenman<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Mark S. Elias<br />

Mrs. Martha H. Erwin<br />

Mrs. Nancy M. Fischer<br />

Mr. and Mrs. David D. Fitch<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John Fitzgerald<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Jon Fjeld-Hansen<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John Blake Fosseen<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew M. Fossler<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Michael M. Fowler<br />

Mr. and Mrs. James T. Fox<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Russell Frankel<br />

Dr. and Mrs. H. Jerome Freiberg<br />

Jo Ann and Robert Fry<br />

Ms. Christine A. Galaty<br />

Prince and Princess Piotr Galitzine<br />

Elizabeth and William Galtney<br />

Galveston Arts Center, Inc.<br />

Gatti Family Fund<br />

Ms. Geraldine C. Gill<br />

Gitter-Yelen Foundation<br />

Ms. Donna S. Scott and<br />

Mr. Mitch Glassman<br />

Mrs. Yoshiko Glazzard and<br />

Mr. Charles Azar<br />

Glenwood Cemetery Inc<br />

Colleen and Andrew Gold<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Gorman<br />

Mary and Anthony Gracely<br />

Mr. and Mrs. W. Garney Griggs<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Grobmyer IV<br />

Patricia and Ira Gruber<br />

Eugenia and Eduardo Grüneisen<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Gunst<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Eric Gutierrez<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Mauricio Gutierrrez<br />

Mr. Charles W. Hall<br />

Mr. Rashed Haq<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Kent Harmes<br />

Mary and George Hawkins<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Hay<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Herzog<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Melvyn Hetzel<br />

Hewlett Packard Enterprise Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Holcomb<br />

Mr. Richard W. Holley<br />

Mrs. Patricia Ford Holmes<br />

The Houston Exxonmobil Club<br />

Dr. Georgia R. Hsieh<br />

ILEX Foundation<br />

International Fine Print<br />

Dealers Association<br />

IRO<br />

Mrs. Nancy Fulmer Japhet<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Dunham Jewett<br />

The Chris and Leigh Joseph Family Fund<br />

The Shashank and Medha Karve<br />

Charitable Fund<br />

The Donald W. and<br />

Gayle A. Keller Charitable Fund<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John Wilson Kelsey<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Kelsey<br />

Mr. and Mrs. David J. Kerr<br />

Mrs. Kathryn Ketelsen<br />

Ms. Ann B. Crider and Mr. David King<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas C. Knudson<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Hamid Kooros<br />

Dr. and Mrs. Donald L. Kramer<br />

140


Ms. Emily Kuo and Mr. Michael Chu<br />

The Connie Kwan-Wong Foundation<br />

L’Alliance Française de Houston<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Duncan L. Lamme<br />

Ms. Beverly Buckingham and<br />

Mr. Michael C. Lange<br />

Ms. Aigul Kanatbayeva and<br />

Mr. Mark Langston<br />

Ms. Sally J. Langston<br />

Mrs. Susan Lapin<br />

Mr. and Mrs. C. Berdon Lawrence<br />

Ms. Catherine J. Leachman<br />

Ms. Sharon Lederer and Mr. Ellis Mills IV<br />

Rochelle and Max Levit Family Foundation<br />

Mrs. Carol Androccio LeWitt and<br />

Mr. Bruce Josephy<br />

Victoria H. Lightman<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Stan Lloyd<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Gabriel Lopez-Berestein<br />

Mrs. Sandy Lucas and Mrs. Sarah Eilers<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Lutkus<br />

Jeffrey Magid<br />

Mr. Todd E. Majeski<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Malashock<br />

Manne McGregor Charitable Fund<br />

Ms. Marlene Marker<br />

LeVita and Mannaser Marshall<br />

Kim & Scott Martin Giving Fund<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Marvins<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Marcel Mason<br />

Ms. Libbie J. Masterson<br />

Mrs. Chong-Ok Matthews<br />

Mr. and Mrs. William K. Matthews III<br />

Ms. Leigh A. McBurnett<br />

Peter McDonald, PhD<br />

Mr. and Mrs. William Wells McGee<br />

Mrs. Florence McGee<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John McGowan<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Michael McKeogh<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander K. McLanahan<br />

Ms. Jennifer McLaughlin<br />

Karen B. McRae<br />

Cynthia Rosero and Stephen Mendoza<br />

Mrs. Pati Mengden-Eckhardt and<br />

Mr. Don Eckhardt<br />

Mrs. Suzanne Rainey Montague<br />

Ms. Kristen E. Moore<br />

Morenz Family Foundation<br />

Dr. Susan R. Morrison<br />

Mr. and Mrs. James G. Munisteri<br />

Ms. Judith Munzig<br />

Mr. Robert Muse<br />

Ms. Claudia J. Hackbarth and<br />

Mr. David L. Nelson<br />

Ms. Susan Neptune<br />

Tamie Tong and Joseph Nguyen<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Odom<br />

Ms. Stacey L. Odom<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick O’Donnell<br />

Ms. Mary J. O’Hearn<br />

The Omena Fund<br />

The Edward & Helen Oppenheimer<br />

Foundation<br />

Janice and Dan Palomino<br />

Mr. Daniel Parisian<br />

Ms. Cherrill Farnsworth and<br />

Mr. Peter J. Pavluk<br />

William E. and Susan S. Penland Fund<br />

David and Maria Perez Charitable Fund<br />

Ms. Alyson Poston<br />

Puffer-Sweiven Inc.<br />

Eric J. Pulaski Philanthropic Fund<br />

Racmar Foundation<br />

Rose H. Radoff<br />

The Edward and Ellen Randall Foundation<br />

Mr. and Mrs. Risher Randall<br />

Ms. Rajni Rao<br />

Leonor and Eric Ratliff<br />

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Reed<br />

Russell Reynolds Associates<br />

The Alice Kleberg Reynolds Foundation<br />

Katherine Reynolds and Robert Gay<br />

Vicky and Michael Richker<br />

Ms. Jeannette Burg and<br />

Mr. Anthony J. Riedel<br />

Ms. Nicole Rivera<br />

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Robins<br />

Rosemary Rodd Charitable Gift Fund<br />

Ann Roff<br />