Oct/Nov 2006 pdf - Mission Arts Monthly

missionarts.org

Oct/Nov 2006 pdf - Mission Arts Monthly

Mission Arts

Oct/Nov 2006 FREE

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Come meet artists in

their studio’s and get

a great deal on some

real art and have some

fun.

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INSIDE

Leena Prasad p3

Eve Shen p5

Scott Young p5

Open Studios Map p6

Open Studios Artist List p7

Intersection p12

MAPP p13

Women’s Building p14

MCCLA p15

Ursula Huete p16

Meri Page p17

Carla Caletti p18

Rebecca Bazell p19

Miranda p20

Young Frankenstein p21

Richard III p22

Manifestival p23

Lani Asher p24

ATA Film Fest p25

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MISSION ARTS MONTHLY 744 Alabama

Street, San Francisco, CA 94110

www.missionarts.org

Mission Arts Monthly is published by

Mission Arts Foundation which is a

nonprofi t organization dedicated to

helping the artists and art organizations

of the greater Mission District. It is

distributed free of charge during the fi rst

week of the month.The Online version

can be found at: www.MissionArts.org

Mission Arts Monthly encourages writers,

artists, arts organizations, galleries,

theaters, cartoonists and anyone else to

submit articles, photos, letters and press

releases for inclusion in the magazine by

e-mail to: editor@missionarts.org

All submissions for publication must be by

e-mail and may be edited for clarity and

length. For Inside the Studio section

please e-mail an artist statement and

three jpeg images of your work.


Visual Narratives: “Shut Up Honky”

By Leena Prasad

Your Existence Gives Me Hope, a sidewalk stencil proclaimed. I pulled out my tiny digital camera

and snapped a quick shot, happy to add another entry to my growing visual journal of these phrases

stenciled into the sidewalks of The Mission neighborhood. A few weeks later I noticed a similar stamp,

except with a small update. Next to the Your Existence Gives Me Hope was also stamped Your

Existence Gives me Diarrhea. Although I enjoyed the gushy sentimentality of the original graffiti, I was

delighted to see that the original clichéd stencil had been retrofitted into the mission culture.

Several months ago, I had written a column about the Kill Yuppys sidewalk graffiti. Since then, there has

been an exponential increase in these pavement graffiti and an antagonistic conversation seems to have

started between the original ‘artist’ and some of the graffiti audience. A quick search on Google revealed

a wide fascination with these sidewalk stencils: there were photos posed on Flickr.com, Webshots.com,

Tribe.net, and many other websites.

Who is behind these sidewalk musings? I met a documentary filmmaker who wants to find and interview

the ‘artist.’ On the social network tribe.net, some guess that the messages are from a Christian group

spreading its gospels. There is an ongoing debate whether these are art, vandalism, or public service.

I’m not interested in knowing the artist or the culprit or the religious fanatic. The stencils have simply

added a new dimension to my regular walks. Whenever I see the ubiquitous I Want You So Bad or You

Make My Dreams Come True or any of the other original stencils followed by an editorial Shut Up Honky,

I feel an affirmation of the character of The Mission, a place with a personality that I love more than any

other neighborhood in San Francisco. I love finding a stamp that I have not seen before or a response

to existing ones. I especially enjoy the fact that the new stencils are attempting to wrestle back The

Mission voice from the original mushy gushy potentially religious messages that are out of tune with

the ‘rebel with a cause’ Mission culture. It is kin to experiencing an emotional discussion between two

friends.

I’m sure that not everyone is as gushingly supportive of these minor forms of entertainment as I am and

might look upon them as nothing more than vandalism. During a recent walk, I started looking around

the graffiti to see if they were destroying the ambience of their surroundings. The effect was actually

quite the opposite. They detract from some of the old, worn our and sometimes dirty sidewalks. I don’t

see these stencils in my own Noe Valley neighborhood where flowers and plants abound on the sidewalk

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 3


and where these stamps would probably be washed out immediately if they were ever to make an

appearance. I’m not sure that it’s necessarily a good thing to paint over them – they would add a

delightful character to the immaculately clean Noe Valley.

To anyone who dislikes them, I’d say ‘just walk over it.’ The objective of art is to stir emotions, to

force people out of their everyday existence and to think beyond their world. These stenciled stamps

have managed to do that by stirring a dialogue. They’ll dissolve into the landscape in a few months

so we won’t have to use taxpayer funds to wash over them. They also bring attention to sidewalks

in desperate need of maintenance. If the graffiti causes Mayor Gavin Newsom to clean up the

pavements, these stamps would have achieved a much needed neighborhood restoration service.

There is a case to be made for these as a valid genesis of art. The tradition of mural paintings,

which started as unsanctioned painting of public walls, has become a publicly funded San Francisco

tradition. Artists like Keith Herring whose works now hang in major museums, got their start via graffiti

art. If those voices had been turned off, we would have missed the core influences of much of modern

visual art and had been stuck with the tired centuries old art that does not

speak to the new generations or to the people whose ancestry is not rooted in the European

traditions.

I hope these stencils cheer up some people. I’m certainly entertained by the sarcastic responses and

would be happy to support their existence with my tax dollars.

For more photos, go to http://shutuphonky.blogspot.com/

For comments/complaints/kudos/article ideas/etc., please write to Leena Prasad at

art@WeAreNotAmused.com. Please let me know in your letter if it’d be okay to publish it as part of

this column.

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 4


Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 5


SF OPEN STUDIOS 2006 October 14 th & 15 th Map

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 6


NAME MAP# STUDIO NAME ADDRESS

Amanda Knox 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Anne Arrasmith 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Atelier Gargoyle 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Chris Leib 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Cynthia Tom 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Gracewood Design 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Jeremy David Sutton 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Juliette Lemontey 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Kathleen Maley 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Laura Parker 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Lee Cline 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Michael Schoenig 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Peggy Gyulai 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Peter Sorensen 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Randy Titchenal 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Sara Shaughnessy 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Stephanie Choo 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Tessa Merrie 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Trevor Tubelle 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Wendy L. Miller 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

bloum 111 1890 Bryant Street Studios 1890 Bryant Street

Emily Citraro 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Akane Goda 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Andréa D. Guerra 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Catherine Reed 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Barbara Brodsky 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Carla Caletti 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Dmitri Hochstatter 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Dominique Caron 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Emily Hung 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Erika Meriaux 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Francoise Vespa 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Geoffrey Wolfe 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Georgianne Fastaia 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Jerome Doran 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Laura Lengyel 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Linda Adreveno 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Margret Meyer 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Melisa Phillips 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Paul Morin 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Priscilla Otani 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Sri Prabha 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Thomas Albany 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Rebecca Bazell 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Victoria Highland Scott 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Wendi Spiers 109 Art Explosion Studios - 17th St. 2425 17th Street

Mac McNamara 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Rebecca Bennett 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Azin Moali 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Don Ross 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

GB Sunny Fisher 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

George Webber Design 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Godfrey Lim 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Chloe Kang 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Ian Hart 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Jennifer Wasson 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Kelly Spokus 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Kristin Abkemeier 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Kristine Mays 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Marta Fuentealba 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Mona Cereghino 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Samanta Tello 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Seamus Kiel 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Sharaine Bell 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Terri Wolfe 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Thomas Duane 106 Art Explosion Studios- Alabama Street 744 Alabama St. @ 19th

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 7


David Conrado 114 Artist-Xchange 3169 16th Street

Jacquelyn Paull 114 Artist-Xchange 3169 16th Street

Kent Wisner 114 Artist-Xchange 3169 16th Street

Roger Licot 114 Artist-Xchange 3169 16th Street

Ron M. Saunders 114 Artist-Xchange 3169 16th Street

Suzane Beaubrun 114 Artist-Xchange 3169 16th Street

Andrew Conway 107 BASE Studio 720 York Street

Brian Kaas 107 BASE Studio 720 York Street

Hannah Stouffer 107 BASE Studio 720 York Street

Lark Pien 107 BASE Studio 720 York Street

Scott Barry 107 BASE Studio 720 York Street

LESTER MARKS 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Bret Hansen 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Carlo Abruzzese 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Charles H. Stinson 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Hadley Northrop 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

JoAnn Johnson-Deal 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Julie B Montgomery 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Marcia Teusink 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Paul Ferney 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Sean Poreda 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Tracy Taylor Grubbs 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

William Salit 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Andrea FONO 120 Belcher Artists 69 Belcher Street

Alice Roche 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Anita Green 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Camilla Newhagen 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Christina Mazza 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

DENISE LAWS 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Elisa Harms 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Emily Keyishian 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Marie Bourget 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Matthew Frederick 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Paule Dubois Dupuis 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Rachel Beth Egenhoefer 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Randall Heath 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Robert Donald 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Sidnea D’Amico 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Stephen Stout 101 Blue Studio 2111 Mission Street

Erik Otto Blue Studios 2111 Mission Street

BRAD POLT-JONES 265 Calumet Gallery 2001 Bryant St

DOUG THACKER 265 Calumet Gallery 2001 Bryant St

GENE LEE 265 Calumet Gallery 2001 Bryant St

REBECCA CHANG 265 Calumet Gallery 2001 Bryant St.

Gage Opdenbrouw 86 Compound 21 2498-A Harrison

Hedda Hope Compound 21 2498 Harrison St

Laurel Roth 86 Compound 21 2498-A Harrison

Mati McDonough 86 Compound 21 2498 A Harrison Street

Sabrina Harrison 86 Compound 21 2498-A Harrison

Susannah Bettag 86 Compound 21 2498-A Harrison

Dustin Rankin 289 G spot Studio 731 Florida st # 103

Joshua Martens 266 Nicholas DiBlasio 1475 Noe Street

Anna Efanova 266 Noe Street Artists 1475 Noe Street

Jane Rades 266 Noe Street Artists 1475 Noe Street

Eli Yasek 113 Nomad 1855 Folsom Street

Eric Fidjeland 113 Nomad 1855 Folsom Street

Gail Siegel 113 Nomad 1855 Folsom Street

Kurt Glowienke 113 Nomad 1855 Folsom Street

Terry Ow-Wing 113 Nomad 1855 Folsom Street

AnneKarin Glass 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

Carol Rienecker 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

Christine Zohar Olson 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

Dorothy Connelly 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

DOROTHY CONNELLY Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Ave

Eve Newell 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

Jeanne Carson 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

John Melvin 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

Katia Claude 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 8


Larry Robinson 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

Lorraine Vendrely 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

Priya 58 Oakdale Painting Studio 2014 Oakdale Avenue

Adrian Nieuwenhuyzen 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

AndrzejMichaelKarwacki 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

April Hankins 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Ari Salomon 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Catherine Small 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Cheryl Finfrock 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Claudine Capdeville 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Danielle Loisel 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Diane Rollins Feissel 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Ellen Rosenthal 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Gina Jacupke 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Isabelle Gaudin 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

J. FauchereFruchere 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Jacques Pibot 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Jean Chazy 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Jean Franco 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Jean-Jacques Lapoirie 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Jonah Burlingame 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Liiane Maurin 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Ludovic DeVita 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Marcel Roger 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Michele King 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Mitchell Durkee 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Patric Lipski 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Polska 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Rena Tzolakis 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Sonia Burel 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Veronic Roux Voloir 115 Paris - San Francisco Artist Exchange 312 Valencia Street

Bernard Rauch 110 Project Artaud 499 Alabama Street #129

Cassia Appel 110 Project Artaud 499 Alabama Street #129

Cynthia Point 110 Project Artaud 499 Alabama Street #129

E. Dale Erickson 110 Project Artaud 499 Alabama Street #129

Jan Simon 110 Project Artaud 499 Alabama Street #129

Jane Grossenbacher 110 Project Artaud 499 Alabama Street #129

Jeffrey Blankfort 110 Project Artaud 499 Alabama Street #129

Kenneth Cooper 110 Project Artaud 499 Alabama Street #129

Pepe Ozán 110 Project Artaud 499 Alabama Street #129

Andrew DeWitt 135 Ruby’s Clay Studio 552 A Noe Street

Ann Bontatibus 135 Ruby’s Clay Studio 552 A Noe Street

Denise Stukas 135 Ruby’s Clay Studio 552 A Noe Street

Kent Tool 135 Ruby’s Clay Studio 552 A Noe Street

Marsha Irwin 135 Ruby’s Clay Studio 552 A Noe Street

alexander abajian 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Arnold Wong 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

M Walker Hall 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

miles epstein 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Dixie Shovar 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Ann Simms 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Ann T. Elliott 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Charli Ornett 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Delfina Piretti 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Elana Kundell 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Joan Casserly 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Kathryn Shantz 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Leslie Andelin 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Lily Martine 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Lisa Costiloe 105 Workspace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Maxine Solomon 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Michele DeSha 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Mr Rogers 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Natasha Dikareva 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Robert Reed 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Tana Powell 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Lisa Knoop 105 WorkSpace, Ltd. 2150 Folsom Street

Alexandra Blum 132 661 Castro Street

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 9


Allan Wray 134 4069 19th Street

Andrew McPherson 92 960 valencia

Antjuan Oden 87 3031 - 20th Street

Antonio Tovar 274 973 Valencia Street

Artina Morton 52 129 Randall St

Ben Pax 70 272 Jersey Street

Beryl Landau 60 3290 Harrison St.

Bob Gerbracht 130 3822 19th Street

Calixto Robles 112 151 Potrero Avenue

Carmelo Iaria 88 2407 Harrison #11

Carmen Wolf 269 345 Bocana Street

Caro Pemberton 127 19 Sharon Street

Carol Koffel 281 788 Elizabeth Street

Carole Moore 272 2545 Bryant Street

Catherine Butler 123 811 14th St. Apt. #8

Chairs for Charity 123 811 14th Street Garage

Chris Grassano 97 3765 20th Street

Chris Mende 67 1255 Sanchez

Chris O’Dea 276 1102 Church Street

Chris O’Dea 1102 Church St.

Christin Rice 85 1170 A Hampshire Street

Curt Holzinger 125 215 1/2 Henry Street

Dan Girellini 85 1170A Hampshire St.

Dan McHale 277 220 Vicksburg Street

d’Arci Bruno 53 100 Newman st.

DeAnna Gibbons 81 1362 Florida Street

Debra Koval 290 727 Florida St. #104

dk haas 90 3128 21st Street

Edward Enriquez 79 203 Bartlett Street

Ellen Brook 283 659 Castro Street

Ellen Into 73 4207 24th St.

Ellen Into 73 4189 24th Street

Eric Kinsman 131 672 Noe St

Fire Goat Gallery 275 3492 22nd St.

Frisco Native 291 55 Sanchez Street

Garrison Broekema 279 250 Jersey Street

Gilles Combet 102 262 Shotwell Street

Gregory Bartning 119 143 Fillmore St.

Happy / L.A. Hyder 140 386 Noe Street

Hava Liberman 271 3106 25th St.

Hava Liberman 271 3106 25th St.

Hilary Williams 2568 Folsom St

Ida Walker 61 195 Peralta

Ilara Altman 72 548 Elizabeth Street

Irving Lind 118 73 Waller St.

JACK PITTS 57 206 Putnam St.

James Gleeson 63 148 Precita Ave.

Jan Heyneker 82 2700 Bryant Street

Jane Wason 108 2050 Bryant Street

Janice Rumba 72 548 Elizabeth Street

Jason Winshell 129 76 Hancock Street

Jean-Luc Thébaud 119 143 Fillmore Street

Jeanne Clark 292 107 Steiner St.

Jeanne Hauser 126 2191 Market Street, Suite E

Jenna Dibble 54 406 Anderson Street

Jester Swink 52 129 Randall St.

Jhina Alvarado 98 3587 19th street

Jim Leff 117 170 Duboce Avenue, #8

Jim Myrick 69 3961 24th St.

Joan Miró 59 206 Virginia Avenue

Josh Zubkoff 136 4617 18th Street, Apt. B

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 10


Joshua Coffy 268 130 Hazelwood Ave.

Josie Iselin 74 601 Diamond Street

Kenneth Leaf 127 19 Sharon Street

Kimberley Jones 71 4236 25th Street, #10

Kitty Wehrmeister 51 150 Hearst Avenue

Larry DeDionisio 93 925 Guerrero Street

Les Phillips 96 229 market

Lilly Brady 51 150 Hearst Ave

Malinda Walker 61 195 Peralta Ave

Maria Conlon 121 810 14th Street

Marie Kelzer 65 238A 28th Street

Mary Isham 270 144 Andover St.

Mary T. Faria 64 220 Duncan Street

Matthew Purdon 278 130 Jersey Ave

Michael Davidson 282 525 Grandview Ave #1

Michael Krouse 103 3175 17th Street

Michael Markowitz 77 3747 23rd Street

Michelle Peckham 99 57 Lapidge St.

Mike Shriver 96 229 market

Molly S. McCracken 133 4052-R 19th Sttreet

Monique Passicot 137 4406 17th St.

Nancy Otto 76 863A Elizabeth Street

Natasha Dikareva 286 a. Muse art gallery

Nicholas DiBlasio 266 1475 Noe St.

Paul Alley 124 112 Noe St.

Paul Madonna 116 290 Guerrero street

Pauline Crowther Scott 56 401 Prentiss Street

Rafael Landea 53 100 Newman St.

Randy Antin 55 3900 Folsom Street

Rebecca Reilly 267 350 Athens St.

Rebecca West 82 2700 Bryant St.

Renato Martinez 75 4244 23rd Street

Richard Freeman 133 4052-R 19th Street

Richard Tauber 280 4221 24th Street

Risa Teitelbaum 91 10 Hill St.

Sara Bright 101 2111 Mission St

Sarah Beth Goncarova 95 3531 21st St.

Scott Blum 82 2700 Bryant Street

Sean Connor 80 1026 Shotwell st apt. C

Seth Matarese 94 1 Fair Oaks Street #6

Siena Sanderson 128 44 Abbey St.

Silvia Poloto 104 442 Shotwell Street

Soad Kader 78 3560 24th St. #5

Stephanie Spanjian 138 1222 Clayton St. #31

Stevan Shapona 50 831 Avalon Avenue

Studio E 288 660 York Street

Susan Cervantes 62 398 Precita Ave.

Susan Petterson 289 731 Florida St #202

Suzanne F. Miazga 82 2700 Bryant

Suzanne Jamieson 103 3175 17th St.

T.R. Ocheltree 89 711 Shotwell Street

Takashi Ishii 122 31 Landers Street, #2

Terry Burkes 112 1340 Bryant St.

Tiffany Claflin 66 3976 26th Street

Tito Vandermeyden 4069 19th Street

Tom Fanning 54 406 Anderson Street

Trevor von Stein 293 324 Hermann St.

Trish Tunney 90 3128 21st Street

Txu Txo Perez 285 2183 Mission St.

Vince Meyer 1101 Lake Street

Janie 266 1475 Noe St.

Winston J. Dong, Jr. 100 103 Lexington Street

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 11


Terror?

@ Intersection for the Arts 446 Valencia Street

September 11 - November 11, 2006, FREE

Gallery Hours: Tues by appointment, Wed - Sat, 12-5pm

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Terror? is an international interdisciplinary project investigating how each one of us experiences fear and how it affects

our lives.

Opening on the 5th Anniversary of 9/11, this ambitious exhibition will include hundreds of works on paper from around

the world - creating a cacophony of personal and collective response to some of the most immediate questions and

issues of our times. What is terror? Who perpetrates it? How does fear control us, and the world around us? Who

are we taught to be afraid of, why? What does fear cost? Where does personal fear intersect with larger societal and

political messages of terror? It is our hope and intention to engage with and share voices and perspectives from a

diversity of cultures, political situations, and artistic practices, and to counter the continuing trend towards defining and

understanding notions of terror and fear as a monolithic paradigm framed by the ongoing “war on terror.” In addition to

an exhibition in our gallery, Terror? includes a film screening, readings, public discussions and performance.

TERROR? ATTENDANT EVENTS

Mondays - September 18, 25 & October 2, 9 - 7-9pm

Photography Salon Workshop with Chloe Atkins

Saturday October 14, 6 - 7pm, FREE

Litquake 2006 - The Anxiety Chronicles: How Fear Shapes Politics, Sex and Language

A panel discussion with Susie Bright, Mark Hertsgaard & Geoffrey Nunberg, moderated by Jack Boulware

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 12


The MAPP

MISSION ARTS & PERFORMANCE PROJECT

Saturday, October 14th, 2006

The Mission Arts & Performance Project is a bi-monthly collaboration between visual artists, musicians, poets

and performers. The MAPP puts art and performance on the street level by using alternative spaces such as

private garages, basements, and studios. It’s a block party of the arts for inspiring in ourselves, and others, the

desire for a creative existence, an ever widening experience of life.

By transforming garages and backyards into

mini-galleries MAPP shows how ordinary

spaces can be made extra-ordinary to

bring people together to share in a diverse

experience of fine art and performance. The

garages, as they are unpretentious and open

to the street, pose the possibility of exposing

the arts to a lot of folks who might not ever

enter a gallery or theater. This process

helps take the art from the margins of our

communities to where it may come to be

more widely see and understood as a vibrant

and vital force necessary to the health of our

society. It is our hope that local residents and

others attending the MAPP will be inspired

to seek expression of their own experiences

and feelings through creative means and join

in sharing what they have discovered in the

MAPP events to come.

1PM-4PM

The FAMILY MAPP

- Red Poppy Art House -

The MAPP now offers a full afternoon of

activities for youth. Mural & sidewalk art, face

painting, tie dye, drum circle, dance, and

healthy snacks.

7PM-11PM

The MAPP

Art Exhibits, Music, Poetry, Dance, & Film in 13 Locations!

The MAPP features performances and art exhibits simultaneously and for one night only at locations listed

below. There’s no way to see everything, but this is part of the fun. It happens all at once, like a creative bomb

going off in the neighborhood. The following is a list of spaces with some of the acts and exhibiting artists.

Check back for more info as we get closer to the date.

MAPP TOUR 7PM

Begins at the Art House and tours all MAPP locations. Recommended for MAPP newcomers.

Programs/Maps will be available at MAPP locations.

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 13


Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 14

28th Annual The Women’s Building

Celebration of Craftwomen

November 25-26 & December 2-3, 2006

Herbst Pavilion at Fort Mason Center,

San Francisco

Now in it’s 28th year, The Women’s Building Celebration of

Craftswomen offers a unique opportunity to fi nd gorgeous, oneof-a-kind

holiday gifts, fi ne crafts, and contemporary art all by

women. The show features the work of 300 female artists - 150

different artists each weekend.

The Celebration of Craftswomen will be held from 10-5 on two

weekends: Nov. 25-26 & Dec. 2-3, 2006. Admission is $8 for

adults, $6 for seniors and students, and free for children under

12. A two-day pass that can be used any two of the four days is

$14.

The Fort Mason Herbst Pavilion is located at Buchanan Street and

Marina Blvd. Parking with shuttle service is available at Marina

Middle School, on Bay Street between Buchanan Street and

Webster Street.

This event benefi ts The Women’s Building, a multi-cultural

community center where women and girls achieve selfsuffi

ciency and pursue their dreams. Monies raised though the

raffl e, admission fees, and booth fees go to the organization.

Programs offered by The Women’s Building include a free

bilingual Spanish/English information and referral service,

educational support for low-income adults, fi nancial counseling,

and community events that promote arts, culture, and

discussion. The fi rst women-owned community center in the

U.S., the Women’s Building houses ten diverse community

groups and has helped launch more than 160 women’s programs

and initiatives in San Francisco.

For additional information about the Fair, visit The Women’s

Building Celebration of Craftswomen web site: http://www.

womensbuilding.org or call the information line


CALL FOR ARTISTS & COMMUNITY

Dia De Los Muertos 2006

La Fiesta de los Huesos

A party for the dead... and the living

Curator: Patricia Rodriguez

Exhibition Dates: OCT 27 - NOV17.

AWARDS!

$500 for the best “Contemporary Altar”

$500 for the best “Traditional Altar”

Deadline for Entries: September 8thEntries

must be postmarked by September 8, 2006. No

Exceptions.

.

ENTRIES: Please include a $15 check payable:

Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts (MCCLA),

an entry form a statement of intent, a drawing of

your proposed altar or installation, along with any

one of the following: 3 slides in a 2 x 2” plastic

mount, labeled with your name, title, dimensions

and year or photographs to:

Mission Cultural Center

for Latino Arts

Attn: Patricia Rodriguez, Curator

2868 Mission Street

San Francisco, CA 94110

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 15


Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 16

America:

photographs by

Ursula G. Huete @

ATA

America is a photographic

project about the artist’s time

in the United States. There

are two collections of pictures:

the San Francisco project and

the California project. The San

Francisco project is a collection of

pictures taken in the streets of the

city. The California project is about

the feeling of being outdoors.

Ursula Huete is originally from

Barcelona, Spain.


IN THE STUDIO...

Meri Page Design Fresh organic art glass, inspired by nature.

Rarely starting from a pattern, these stained glass pieces evolve

spontaneously - each one unique. An exploration of organic shapes,

abstraction, negative space, color, light, form and surface. My work

incorporates a variety of materials: glass, rocks, shells, gemstones,

and other found objects. The results are often unexpected and always

interesting.

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 17


Carla

Caletti

In my paintings, I explore the

female form and the evolution of

women expressing themselves

in the world. Inspired by

folk art, my figurative style

is representational with an

emphasis on bold color. My work

is taking on more narrative in

terms of juxtaposing the women

figures with other elements

that begin to tell a story. I like

playing with scale and letting

what is real on the canvas be an

experiment.

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 18


Rebecca Bazell

I was born in Brighton, England, where I lived for

6 months before moving to the US, eventually

living in seven cities before the age of ten. These

moves, though not necessarily in my conscious

memory, are made vivid by my parent’s

descriptions, photos, and historical descriptions

of the early 1970s. The paintings I’m working on

attempt to connect my memories of those times

with what I’ve been able to find out since.

I started these paintings in July, when I returned

to San Francisco after living in NYC for the

past 12 years. I was surprised to discover that

while I was painting these memories, I was also

responding to being back in California, and it

made me question my own memories of place.

Are memories just responses to the present?

Rebecca Bazell holds a BA in Art from Hamilton

College, studied art history in Florence, Italy

and holds a degree in Painting from the New

York Studio School. She teaches painting and

drawing, and recently moved her studio from New

York City to San Francisco’s Potrero Hill.

She has shown in New York, Maine and Los

Angeles, and has received numerous awards

including: The Gamblin Paint Prize, Absolut

Grant, NYSS Merit Award and a Milton Avery

Fellowship.

Attached Art

Brighton, 2006, oil on canvas, 36 x 24

Boreum Hill (Brooklyn), 2006, oil on canvas, 36 x 24

West Village Tub, 2006, oil on canvas, 36 x 24

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 19







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Impossible Productions presents

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN

THE PLAY

SAN FRANCISCO, CA — It’s a comedy about making friends! This Halloween, crack the secrets of life everlasting with

the greatest mad scientist story ever created! YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN: the Play is Impossible Production’s larger than

life tribute to Gene Wilder and Mel Brook’s zany and shocking masterpiece that will leave you in stitches. It’s all-live!

Promising young neurosurgeon Fredrick Frankenstein (grandson to the notorious Doctor) inherits the ominous family

castle. Scoffing its infamous past, he visits the estate and Fate delivers him into the hands of Inga his beautiful new

assistant, Igor the outlandish hunchback, and Frau Blücher the enigmatic heinermacherfrau—all keys to his mysterious

legacy.

With the discovery of the castle’s secret lab and library, temptation proves too much and Freddy becomes obsessed with

continuing his Grandfather’s work—to reanimate a human cadaver—and turn a grave mistake into the acme of scientific

achievement!

But a corpse is a corpse, of course, of course, and the local burgomaster, history fresh in his mind, rallies the villagers into

a riotous mob hell-bent on hunting down Frankenstein’s Monster. And to complicate the grey matter the Creature kidnaps

Elizabeth, Freddy’s estranged fiancé. It comes down to his daring genius to save his creation at the risk of his own life—

will the Monster escape? Or will he meet his maker?

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN: the Play runs Fridays and Saturdays @ 8pm and Sundays @ 3pm, October 6-29, 2006.

The Dark Room is at 2263 Mission Street, SF, between 18th and 19th. You can pick our brains at 415.401.7987, www.

darkroomsf.com/youngfrankenstein or wsup@darkroomsf.com.

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 21


Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 22


Manifesti-val

Dance Brigade’s Festival of

Dance and Social Change

Three Weekends from

November 2-20

WHERE: Dance Mission Theater

3316 24th Street, San Francisco CA 94110

Across from 24th Street Station BART

FOR RESERVATIONS: Call 415-273-4633

Weekend One: November 2, 8 pm

Subduing the Demons with Splendor

EPI Alumni Showcase

Don’t miss this special evening of 10 works by graduates

of the Experimental Performance Institute, San Francisco’s

next generation of social-change oriented artists and

activists.

Weekend Two: November 9-12, 8 pm

HOW TO DIE

Keith Hennessy with Jules Beckman (Marseilles) and

Seth Eisen

HOW TO DIE offers two metaphoric performance portraits

of all-American despair: Homeless USA is a poignant

performance poem about homeless suicide and American

Tweaker is a colorful spectacle about the spectacle

of crystal meth, barebacking, and AIDS. Performance

Art. Extreme bodies. Innovative interdisciplinary

collaborations. Nudity, Drag, and Digital sound. Political

content remixed with unreal images. Ritual reconfigured

in contemplative interventions on static citizenry.

Thu: pay what you can Fri-Sun: $15

Weekend Three: November 18-19, 8 pm

and Nov. 20, 2 and 6 pm

The Outsider Chronicles

Sean Dorsey / Fresh Meat Productions

The Outsider Chronicles

a dance theater journey into the world of the gender

outsider

Fresh Meat Productions presents a special return

engagement of Sean Dorsey’s acclaimed evening-length

dance theater cycle The Outsider Chronicles. These fullbodied,

compelling dances dive headfirst into the world

of the ‘gender outsider’ - revealing aspects of coming out

and living as transgender.

With his signature fusion of modern dance, theater and

storytelling, Dorsey puts a genderbent twist on foiled

first love, lovers’ spats, coming out (or not) to family,

road trips, “til death do us part” and the joys of therapy.

Performed by Sean Dorsey (winner of a 2006 Isadora

Duncan Dance Award), Courtney Moreno and Sonia

Reiter.

TICKETS: $15

Reservations are encouraged: these special return

engagement shows will sell out quickly.

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 23


Orbit

(notes from the

edge of forever)

July 13-August 5 2006

Review by: Lani Asher

Orbit (notes from the edge of forever)

is the latest production from the Erika

Shuch Project (ESP), currently artistsin-residence

at Intersection for the

Arts. She combines dance, theater,

and performance and takes you from

the personal to the planetary. The

director wonders about our place

in the universe and asks if there is

anybody else out there.

The stage is set with moveable stacks

of televisions, books, and lamps on

poles that can slide back and forth

across the stage. As the performance

begins the television sets are tuned

to scenes from old sci-fi films such as

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind,

Alien, and Contact. The performers—

three protagonists, a Puck-like

trickster, and a pair of lovers—move

engagingly about on the stage, which

is painted with planetary orbit lines. In

addition, there is a chorus of dancers

who wear gloves on their hands and

dance barefoot; their costumes are

reminiscent of uniforms. In some ways

they function like the invisible actors in Japanese Noh or Bunraku performances that move props or puppets.

The music for Orbit is a mélange of original music, popular songs, live Cabaret music, and the classic song “Blue Moon”, written by

Richard Rogers and Lorenzo Hart in 1934. The lyrics presumably refer to an English idiomatic expression: if something happens

“once in a blue moon” it almost never happens. The lyrics of the song relate a stroke of luck so unlikely that it must have taken place

under a blue moon. The image of a “blue moon” –as it is used in Orbit-- conjures romance, mystery, and the unknown.

The lovers in Orbit seem attracted and repulsed by planetary forces, their own emotions,

and dreams. In one sequence one of the lovers dreams that he is a small puppet lost in a shipwreck, tossed by waves Finally, the

dreamer is rescued by his lover who is costumed as a giant lighthouse. He survives. At the end of the sequence, the lovers converse

about the seduction and abduction of memories that adversely affects our relationships. Old memories become a visible hole in the

story of the two lovers, demonstrated by the filmed drilling of a hole in a book by mysterious gloved hands. In another scene, one of

the lovers reaches disembodied hands behind the other. We see into a chest cavity on a video monitor and observe the molecular

makeup of the heart.

In the program notes Erika Shuch gives us three clues about ”the search”. The first clue is that when she was a girl her father looked

for alien life forms and sent signals out to various parts of the universe. In particular, he sent signals to exo-planets (any planet orbiting

a star that is outside our solar system). In her dad’s words, an old military man, trying to see a planet orbiting a star is a little like trying

to see a firefly perched on the rim of a search light. The second clue is that once we send a signal into space we cannot take it back.

It keeps going until it finds something to bounce off or be absorbed by. The third clue is that fact that she sent herself a self addressed

postcard attached to a balloon with a request to please return it to her. The postcard never arrived.

The performance is dreamlike, poetic, visual, and auditory, constantly orbiting around itself much like the central image of constantly

orbiting planets. Erika Shuch and the ESP project send out their message and hope the audience will receive it to bounce it back

to them. The nature of art is similar to this search for other life forms, and the search for love and meaning. It’s nice if sometimes it

bounces back.

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 24


ATA Film &

Video Festival

Program

Announced!

San Francisco, CA Artists Television Access announces the

first ATA Film & Video Festival, showcasing 25 short, original,

independent and underground films by local, national and

international film and video artists. The ATA Film & Video Festival

will screen October 19 & 20, 2006 at Artists Television Access,

992 Valencia Street, San Francisco, CA. Doors will open at

7:30pm, screenings start at 8pm. The public is invited to stay for

the opening night party on Thursday night and for the closing

night party on Friday night, after each screening. Tickets are $7-

$10 sliding scale.

The films in the program range from the politically poignant Ha

Ha Ha America by local filmmaker JD Ligon, an Official Selection

at Sundance 2006, to Vanessa Woods experimental animation

The Touch, a visual interpretation of Anne Sextons poem of

the same name. The program is arranged into four different

themes which were decided from the final selections: War, Truce,

Quixotic Quips, and GNP.

In addition to the screenings, the work of seven other filmmakers

will be displayed in ATAs Installation Window during the month of October.

Artists’ Television Access is a nonprofit, all-volunteer, artist-run, experimental media arts gallery that has been in operation since

1984. ATA hosts a series of film and video screenings, exhibitions and performances by emerging and established artists and a

weekly cable access television program.

ATA Film & Video Festival Program:

Thursday, October 19, 2006:

War The Wizard of Oz, part II (Paz Tornero); La guerra (War) (Luiso Berdejo & Jorge C. Dorado); El Soldado Trifaldon (Brigadier

Trifaldon) (Alejandra Egana & Paz Puga); Selective Service System Story (Bill Daniel); Animal, Animal (Tommy Becker).

Truce Spektro Del Tempo (Ilona Berger); Consenting Adults (Neil Ira Needleman); Myth ..7 (Sahar Mozaffar); The Touch (Vanessa

Woods); Bump Past Cut Up Through Windows (Nasturtium) (Paul Clipson); Pump (Sinisa Kukic); You Can’t Get There From Here

(Liss Platt).

Friday, October 20, 2006:

Quixotic Quips Bars and Tone (Gordon Winiemko); Come Deer Children (Tommy Becker); Pigeons (Tony Benna & David Elliott);

Clean (PJ Raval); Reset (Mack McFarland); G Gordon Liddy (Lucas Ketelle); 3 out of 4 (Stephen Slappe); The Promise of Bio-

Marketing the Human Mind (Carl Diehl); Fulltime (Artur Muradyan); Staring Newscasters (Jesse England).

GNP Suprematist Kapital (Yin-Ju Chen & James T. Hong); The Cost of Free (Astra Price); HA HA HA America (JD Ligon). ATA Film

& Video Festival Installation: October 2006 Sensorial Hack & Petting for pleasure FurReal S(t)imulation (Brenda Jean Grell); Clouds

(Mark OConnell); Interstate (part one) (Cortlund Halperin); Happy Again (Gregg Biermann); (Post-) Cold War Dreamscape (Clark

Buckner); You are not the only one (Dan Gilsdorf); Authority Head Exorcism (Daniel King).

ATA Film & Video Festival Website: http://festival.atasite.org

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 25


Art

Explosion

Studios

& Gallery

Art Studios for

Painting

Clay

Photography

Jewelry and more...

We have a great artist community with over 200 artists

at two locations. The studios have darkrooms, kilns, natural

light, figure drawing and a chance to grow and learn as an

artist. The gallery offers selling exposure and opportunities

to interact with the public.

1-877-ART-EXPL

www.theartexplosion.com

Mission Arts Monthly Oct/Nov 2006 www.missionarts.org page 26

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