eFreePress 07.21.11.pdf - Blue Rapids Free Press

bluerapidsfreepress.com

eFreePress 07.21.11.pdf - Blue Rapids Free Press

Publishers Free Press

Blue Rapids, Ks

& Manhattan, Ks

Blue Rapids

Free Press

Vol. 4 Number 2 Thursday, July 21, 2011

Fair Week In Blue Rapids

What a week!

The Marshall County Fair

hit Blue Rapids at the same

time as a big Kansas Heat

Wave.

Even with the hot weather

the Fair Grounds have been

full of people every night.

The Parade had many

entries and lots of folks

showed up to watch.

2011 Demolition

Derby Winners

Super Smasher Todd

Oehm

Fullsize

1st Dawson Dittmer

Linn

2nd Kurtis Dittmer

Linn

3rd Denton Dittmer

Linn

4th Ethan Scheele

Linn

5th Dylan Dittmer

Linn

6th Todd Oehm

Marysville

7th Brian Faught

Effingham

8th Trent Schaefer

Clifton

9th Jacob Cohorst

Marysville

Compact

1st Leon Rumsey

Washington

2nd Kenny Jamison

Delphos

3rd Michael Chandler

Washington

4th Bj Wilcox

BR

5th Kurt Hayman

Linn

80’s

1st Ethan Scheele

Linn

2nd Dylan Dittmer

Linn

3rd Denton Dittmer

Linn

2011 Figure 8

Winners

Fullsize

1st Todd Oehm

Marysville

2nd Levi Jenkins

Waterville

3rd Lance Leis

Marysville

4th Tim Fritzson

BR

5th Kristen Bigham

BR

6th Derek Swearingen

BR

7th Dan Smerchek

Waterville

8th Frank Nietfeld

Marysville

Compact

1st Shannon Swearingen

BR

2nd Leon Rumsey

Washington

3rd Jordyn Rumsey

Washington

2011 Ag

Mechanics Results

Small Project

Construction

Ag Mechanics Class

waterer Riley County

74

Ag Mechanics Class

panels Riley County

73

Intermediate Project

Construction

Devon Griffee

tilt trailer Valley Heights

81

Dillon Tittle

bunk feeder Riley County

70

Team Results

Riley County 217

Valley Heights 81

Tricia Schmitz added something to the Marshall County Fair Parade with this colorful outfit.

Faces At The Marshall County Fair

Avery Bishop Dason Hill Lydia Wessel

Jennifer Schneider Hattie Gros Emmett Risdon

Another good

crowd showed up

for the Demolition

Derby on Saturday

night.

Fair Photos by

Deb Barrington

Linda Brake

Jon A. Brake


NEWS EWS Blue Rapids Free Press - Thursday, July 21, 2011

2011 Clounty Wheat Plot Results

The 2011 Marshall County

Wheat Crop is in the bin and so

is the wheat from the Marshall

County Wheat Plots.

This week I am pleased to

announce the results from the

2011 Marshall County Wheat

Plot.

We planted the County

Wheat Plot on cooperator

Richard Holthaus’ field on

October 16, 2010.

We no-till drilled the wheat

into soybean stubble left by last

year’s soybean crop at the rate

of 120#/acre of seed. Part of the

fertilizer was put on as a starter

fertilizer, and the rest was topdressed

in March. We harvested

the plot on July 2, 2011.

Obituaries

David Specht

David L. Specht, age 82, of

Randolph, passed away on

Thursday, July 14, 2011 at the

Clay County Medical Center in

Clay Center.

Dave was born April 19,

1929 at the family farm near

Winkler to Edward H. and

Florence M. (Eversmeyer)

Specht. He graduated from

Randolph High School in 1947

and from Westmar College in

LaMars, Iowa in 1952. Upon

Graduation he joined the US

Air Force and served until

1956. On December 6, 1953 he

married Alyce Jean Reed at

We had stripe rust, tan spot,

leaf rust, and some wheat head

scab in the plot that had affected

most of the wheat varieties

in the plot. Wheat head scab

arrived to affect the wheat plot

the last week of May and into

early June. The plot was hailed

on in early June.

This wheat demonstration

plot had 14 wheat varieties and

blends from K-State and private

seed companies.

The wheat plot averaged

48.1 bushels per acre. Everest,

was the top yielder, followed

by 2137 and AgriPro Post Rock

respectively.

The results of the 2011

Marshall County Wheat Plot

Rigel - Sedivy Reunion

Sunday, July 17, 2011 at

the Blue Rapids Community

Center.

Attending were: Kenneth

Rigel, Las Vegas , Nevada;

Sister Teresa Rigel,

Concordia, Ks. ; Milo and

Elvira Rigel, Green, Ks.;

Carolyn and Chet Meyer,

Manhattan, Ks.; Kay

Nugent and Clarence

Loren

Wilborn

Loren A Wilborn, 50, died

Tuesday, July 12, at Manhattan,

Kansas.

A funeral service was held

3:00 p.m., Friday, July 15, at

the Ward Funeral Home in

Greenleaf. Sister Marilyn Wall

officiated.

Burial was in the Greenleaf

City Cemetery. Pallbearers

were Ed Henry, Deb Hanson,

Clint Jones, Sheila Bolejack,

Carolyn Pinnick and Ronny

Carillo.

Loren was born in Jackson

County, Missouri on November

13, 1960 to Adolphus and

Margaret (Clark) Wilborn. He

Cohorst, Marysville, Ks.;

Frank and Laura Rigel,

Larry and Connie Nugent,

Helen Johnston, Matthew

Nugent all of Blue Rapids.

A special musical performance

was given by Matt

Nugent, Blue Rapids for the

Rigel-Sedivy Reunion.

Family and friends gathered

to escape the heat before the

Clay Center. Dave returned to

the Winker area and farmed

until his retirement.

Dave was a life-long member

of the Fancy Creek Zion

United Methodist Church

where he served in many

capacities including being a

church delegate to the conference.

He had been a member

of the Manhattan Gideon’s

Camp since 1978. He was

active in the Riley County

Farm Bureau, serving two

terms as president and had been

very active promoting 4-H

including being a project

leader.

Survivors include his wife

Alyce Jean, two sons; Ken

resided at KNI until he was 23.

In 1983 he moved to Twin

Valley Development Services

in Greenleaf. Loren worked in

the workshop at Greenleaf, and

at Master Teacher in

Manhattan, collating and packaging

educational materials. He

liked to dance, attend church

services and make friends. He

looked forward to his birthday,

and going to White Memorial

Camp.

Loren enjoyed participating

in the Special Olympics. He

was a cowboy at heart and

loved to listen to Shania Twain.

He is survived by brother,

Marc Wilborn of Kansas; sister,

Sally Wilborn Klang of Texas;

5 nieces and many special

friends.

Home of Elsie Grace’s

Dry Food Mixes and

Homeade Fudge

Gifts for all occassions

Saturday 9-3

ANGELA’S PAINTING

Residential/Commercial

Blue Rapids and Marysville Area

Farm & Ranch

Free Estimates

785-630-0912

Blue Rapids Mercantile

Now Open Monday-Saturday

10 am - 5 pm

Many Vendors - One Store

Free gift wrap & local delivery

Gift certificates available

The best dishcloths - EVER

Jams-n-Jellies, Sugar Shack candles, soaps

& lotions.

Collectable, Retro and Fun Stuff!

401 East 5th Street (US 77) Blue Rapids, Kansas 66411

785-363-7900

A Div. of Blue Valley Insurance Agencies, Inc.

are in the table below.

In analyzing this table, the

columns that will interest most

people will be the test weight

column, moisture percentage

column, and bushels per acre

column.

We must be careful when

comparing yields because the

Marshall County Wheat

Demonstration Plot is not a

replicated plot like at K-State’s

many experiment fields and

stations. However, I think this

information will give producers

an idea of how these varieties

performed in Marshall County,

and which varieties to watch

for in the Wheat Performance

Yield Books, which will be in

parade and enjoy the entertainment.

Matt began performing,

playing guitar, with his

uncle , Kenny Rigel and

cousin, Eddie Rigel, of Las

Vegas, Nevada. They performed

in the band “Trick

Riders: which performed

several years ago in Blue

Rapids before the parade

Specht of Randolph, Ed Specht

and wife Dana of Delphos,

three daughters; Nonie Nicklas

and husband Bradley of

Helmetta, New Jersey, Mary

Desai and husband Gautam of

Tinton Falls, New Jersey and

Joan Tash and husband Andrew

of Goddard. He is also survived

by a sister, Florence

Alwin of Washington, Ks, a

brother, Lowell Specht of Blue

Rapids, by seventeen grandchildren

and one great grandchild.

He was preceded in death by

both parents and by seven

brothers and sisters; Ruth,

Daniel, Rudolph, Gene, Glenn,

Esther and Clement.

A memorial fund has been

established to Twin Valley

Endowment Fund.

Albert Wiechman

Albert H. Wiechman, age 94,

of Linn, passed away Tuesday,

July 19, 2011 at the Linn

Community Nursing Home in

Linn. Albert was born August

11, 1916 the son of John H. and

Emma B. (True) Wiechman at

their rural home north of

Greenleaf. A complete obituary

will follow later.

Funeral services are planned

for 10:00 am Friday, July 22,

2011 at Bethlehem Lutheran

Church, West of Greenleaf.

Kenneth L. Sells, Agent

the Extension Office in August.

I would like to thank everyone

who donated seed: AgriPro

Seed Company, Ruetti Seeds of

Frankfort, Westbred Seed

Company, and especially to

Richard Holthaus for hosting

the wheat plot for the twelfth

year.

For more information, contact

the Marshall County

Extension Office (782) 562-

3531, or to

download a copy of the 2011

Marshall County Wheat Plot

Results go to

www.marshall.ksu.edu.

Next week, I will have the

results of Chris Bargmann’s 4-

H Wheat Plot.

and at the Marshal County

Fair. Matt has performed

solo, for several civic

organizations in the area.

Much of the music Matt

performs was written by

himself. He performs using,

piano, organ and guitar. He

also performs songs by

artists such as the Doors,

Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash

Funeral Services are planned

for 10:00 am, Monday, July 18,

2011 at the Fancy Creek Zion

United Methodist Church

Northwest of Randolph. Burial

will be at the Fancy Creek Zion

Cemetery next to the church.

Viewing will be Sunday from

Noon until 8:00 pm at Terry-

Christie Funeral Home in

Waterville with Dave’s family

receiving guests from 4:00

until 6:00 pm at the funeral

home. Memorials are suggested

to the P.E.T Project and may

be sent in care of the Funeral

Home.

Condolences may be left on

line at www.terrychristiefuneralhome.com

Contributions may be sent in

care of Ward Funeral Home,

Washington.

Burial will be at St. Peter’s

Lutheran Cemetery South of

Barnes. Viewing will be from

noon until 8:00 pm, Thursday,

at Terry-Christie Funeral Home

in Waterville where his family

will receive guests between

6:00 and 8:00 pm. There will

be a Prayer Service following

the visitation at 8:00 pm.

Memorials are suggested to

either the Linn Community

Nursing Home or to the

Bethlehem Lutheran Church

Centennial Celebration.

If you like the Free Press please tell these Advertisers

Mustang Construction

785-629-0050

Kenneth.Sells @fbfs.com

1019 Broadway, P.O. Box 267

Marysville, Ks 66508-0267

Registered Repersentative/Securities & Services offered

through EqullTrust Marketing Services, LLC. 5400

University Ave, West Des Moines, Ia 50266, 877860

Jill L. Gray, D.D.S., P.A.

Family Dentistry

107 South 8th Street

Marysville, Ks 66508

Office: (785 562-5323

Cell: (785 556-1487

BUDGET SHOP

730 Colorado, Manhattan, Ks

Dr. Douglas Stigge

Optometrist

Blue Valley Seamless Gutters

Replace those old gutters and

downspouts with a new seamless

system from Blue Valley Seamless

Gutters.

Thank You

VBS

July 27- 29

5:30—8:00 PM

and Home Improvement

Free Estimates

• Insured

785-363-7414 or 785-268-0236

John & Cheryl Ralph, Owners

2A

Mark-Brenda Rowe would like to thank the following: Line-up

parade helpers: Kurtis Bishop, Ryan Bishop, Jason Hemry,

Phil Osborne. Drivers: Rod Christie, Huston Sweet. Judges:

Jan Studer, Pam Wecker, Dennis Cashier, Sharon Owen,

Lavonne Farrell. Announcers: Richard Spunaugle, Hank

Borgerding

Lilly Pad Daycare

Tracy Lindquist

Waterville, Ks

Opening for Birth to 18 months

Opening for 18 months to Kindergarten

Monday - Friday

7am - 6pm

785-268-0560 or

lillypaddaycare@yahoo.com

Blue Rapids Greenhouse

805 Pomeroy

Blue Rapids, Ks 66411

Greenhouse: 785-363-7300

Cell: 785-562-6124

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

701 Lincoln Blue Rapids, KS

Phone: 363-7547

Bible lessons, Singing, Crafts,

Games, Snacks.

Meal each night at 5:30

Bounce Castle on the 27th

Ages: 4 years—6th grade

Is now open Great bargains in

clothing, collectibles and household

goods.

Retail hours are Tuesday - Friday, 12N to 3PM.

Saturday 10 AM to 1PM. Closed Mondays.

104 E. Commercial Waterville - 785-363-2425

Open 1rst, 2nd , 4th and 5th Monday

and the 3rd Friday of the month by appointment

$90 per

Week

July Special

Stock & Stable 12%

$1.00 off


Free Press

Second Front

News Blue Rapids Free Press - Thursday, July 21, 2011 3A

Community Theatre Opens This Week

The Marysville Area

Community Theatre will present

Joseph and the Amazing

Technicolor Dreamcoat

Thursday, Friday, and Saturday

at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:00

p.m. The performances will be

held in the Marysville High

School auditorium.

“I’m really looking forward

to opening night,” said Wayne

Kruse, the show’s director.

“For some reason I’m really

anxious to see how audiences

will respond to this show. It’s

such a fun show with really

neat music, high energy dance

numbers, and fantastic singers.

This is one of the most talented

groups of people with whom

I’ve had the pleasure of working.

It’s been an amazing summer.”

Written by Tim Rice with

music by Andrew Lloyd

Webber, the musical takes a

humorous look at the Biblical

story of Joseph as found in the

book of Genesis. The show

uses a narrator, played by Pat

Breeding, to tell the tale of

Joseph, portrayed by Tim

Laughlin, and his eleven jealous

brothers. Annie Acosta,

Brian Cook, Hayden Crist,

Nick Fehr, Nick Gordon, Jerry

Horton, Gabe Jespersen, Bryan

Kracht, Alex Laughlin, Matt

Oliver, and Jenny Thayer-

Wood portray the brothers.

As the show opens, Joseph’s

father, Jacob – played by Peter

Muraski – gives his favorite

son a multi-colored coat.

The Cast members of the Community Theatre were in Waterville last week singing for the crowd.

Valley Heights School

Calendar Adjusted

The Board of Education, at

their regular July meeting,

voted to adjust the school calendar

for the 2011-12 school

year. The adjustment is a

result of the negotiations

process between the Board

and the Valley Heights

Education Association. It

also reflects the need to

reduce budget due to the legislature

cutting support for

public schools yet again. The

calendar adjustment removes

9 days from the calendar and

at the same time, lengthens

the school day by 15 minutes

per day. The first day of class

Joseph’s brothers are jealous of

him for his coat, a symbol of

their father’s preference for

him, and sell Joseph as a slave

to some passing Ishmaelites,

portrayed by Megan Oldehoeft

and Kim Rusche, who take him

to Egypt.

In Egypt, Joseph is the slave

of Egyptian millionaire,

Potiphar, played by veteran

community theatre performer,

Vic Blecharczyk. When Mrs.

this year will be August 25th

and the last day will be May 19,

2012. The school day will start

at 8:05 and dismiss at 3:35.

The original calendar had

school starting August 18th and

dismissing May 23rd. Last

year’s school day started at

8:15 and dismissed at 3:30.

The Board anticipates a savings

of over $20,000 with this

adjusted calendar. This agreement

between the Board and

the VHEA is for one year only.

At the conclusion of 2011-12

school year, the agreement

reverts back to the 2010-11

contract agreement.

Potiphar, played by Jess Price,

makes advances, Joseph spurns

her. In the confusion, Potiphar

overhears, barges in, sees the

two together – and jumps to

conclusions. Joseph is thrown

in jail. While there, he helps

two prisoners, portrayed by

Pam White and Carla Wolfe,

interpret their bizarre dreams.

Later, the Pharaoh, played by

Lynn Hartter, is having dreams

that no-one can interpret.

With this calendar adjustment,

enrollment and other

important dates have been

altered. Official enrollment

will be August 15th and 16th

but all buildings will be open

for regular business on

August 1st. Parents can

enroll their child at their convenience

if the scheduled

enrollment dates are not suitable.

Please visit the Valley

Heights website at www.valleyheights.org

for all relevant

information including school

calendar, supply lists and

enrollment information.

The Topeka Capital-Journal,

580 WIBW, and The Big 94.5

Country are running a monthly

“Celebrating all things

Kansas!” poll for the 150th

anniversary of Kansas’ statehood.

They say: “In a state that has

so much to offer, we’re eager to

devote the remainder of this

sesquicentennial year to the

things that make Kansans

proud or full or happy or

healthy....

At the close of each month,

results will be tabulated and the

top vote-getters published each

month on the cover of The

Capital-Journal’s Midway section

- as well as being featured

on AM 580 WIBW, The Big

94.5 Country and here on the

Kansas Best 150 website.

Locals Win June C-J Poll

For June:

Best FFA Chapter

1. Valley Heights

2. Mission Valley

3.Onaga High School

4. Seaman High School

5. Lawrence High

Best Farm Structure

1. Morton Construction Inc.

2. Chris Gross Construction -

Holton

3. K Construction- Alta Vista

4. Orscheln Farm & Home

5. Valley Heights

Best Sale Barn

1. Manhattan Commission

Company

2. Rezac Livestock

Commission

3. Holton Livestock

Exchange

Obama Will Reduce US To European Welfare State

By Betsy McCaughey

Congress’s next fact-finding

mission should be to the

cramped living quarters of

most Europeans, who also cannot

afford modern conveniences.

The lower standard of living

in Europe should serve as a

warning that the United States

must avoid becoming

“Europeanized.” In fact, the

spendaholics in Congress

should take a close look at the

plight of Europeans before raising

the debt ceiling.

America’s rapid increase in

government spending over the

past three years risks pushing it

from a highly productive market

economy to a Europeanlike

welfare state. To see what

that change would mean to the

typical American household,

just look across the Atlantic.

The average American home

is nearly twice as big as the

average Western European

home (1,875 square feet vs.

976 square feet), according to

the Swedish think tank Timbro.

Even taking into account larger

family size, Americans have

nearly twice as much living

space.

Amazingly, even poor

Americans, defined as the bottom

12 percent, have more liv-

ing space than the average

European.

Americans also enjoy more

labor saving devices, according

to the Timbro study’s authors,

economists, Frederik

Bergstrom and Robert

Gidehag. Every American

household (99 percent) owns a

vacuum cleaner, but only half

of Italian households do. In the

U.S., at least 4 out of every 5

households own clothes dryers

and microwaves. In France and

Germany these are rare luxuries,

owned by fewer than 1 out

of every 5 households.

Poor Americans are far more

apt to have microwaves,

clothes dryers, and air conditioners

than the average

European.

Why can’t the French,

Germans, Italians, British,

Dutch, and Spanish have spacious

homes and modern appliances?

There are two reasons.

First, in these countries,

government spending consumes

half, or nearly half of all

the wealth produced.

In France, government

spending consumes 52 percent

of (GDP), in Italy 49 percent, in

the most other European countries

above 45 percent. The

government spending supports

welfare programs, guaranteed

Hearing of Joseph’s dreaminterpreting

abilities, he orders

Joseph to be brought in and the

king tells him of his dream

involving seven fat cows, seven

skinny cows, seven healthy

ears of corn, and seven dead

ears of corn.

Joseph interprets the dream

as seven plentiful years of

crops followed by seven years

of famine. An astonished

Pharaoh puts Joseph in charge

GOVERNMENT CONSUMES 42% OF THE FRUITS OF OUR LABOR

OBAMA’S PRESIDENCY BEGINS

health care, parks, and other

public programs. But it leaves

less for families to spend on

what they choose.

That fact dampens the

incentive to work, Europeans

clock fewer hours, retire in

their 50s, or stay home altogether,

taking advantage of

welfare programs. The result is

dramatically lower productivity

per capita than in the United

States.

The French economy produces

less than three-quarters

the goods and services per

capita that the U.S. economy

produces. Voila! - France’s

lower standard of living.

of carrying out the preparations

needed to endure the impending

famine, and Joseph

becomes the most powerful

man in Egypt, second only to

the Pharaoh.

Back home, the famine has

caught up with Joseph’s brothers,

who express regret at selling

him. They hear Egypt still

has food and decide to go there

to beg for mercy and to be fed.

Joseph gives them handfuls of

That could happen here, if

the government spending binge

of the last three years is not

halted. Throughout all of

American history, government

spending never reached 40 percent

of GDP except once - during

World War II - when the

nation was fighting for its survival.

Nothing today justifies

government consuming 40 percent

of what we all produce

going to work.

Yet in every one of the last

three years, that 40 percent

danger line has been crossed,

largely because of a surge in

federal spending. to a shocking

24 to 25 percent of GDP, up

from the customary 18 to 20

percent. Add in state and local

spending, and government programs

now consume 42 percent

of GDP.

We are on the road to

Europeanization. And this is

before the costly new entitlements

created in the Obama

health law go into effect in

2014.

Many Republicans in

Congress are demanding that

federal spending be capped at

18 percent to 20 percent of

GDP as the quid pro quo for

raising the debt ceiling.

Capping spending is essential

to halt America’s descent.

food and sends them on their

way, but plants a golden cup in

the sack of his brother

Benjamin. When the brothers

try to leave, Joseph stops them,

asking about the “stolen cup.”

The other brothers beg for

mercy for Benjamin, imploring

that Joseph take them prisoner

and set Benjamin free.

Seeing their selflessness and

penitence, Joseph reveals himself

and sends for his father.

The two are reunited for a

happy conclusion.

Others in the production

include Ashley Miller,

Cheyenne Williams, Joy

Kramer, and Mandy Cook

The show also features a

Children’s Chorus made up of

eighteen local youth: Adilee

Gordon, Anna

Cohorst, Bella Lott, Catherine

Kee, Chance Hight, Clara Kee,

Emma Scheiber, Ian Cook,

Jack Lott, Jacy Butler, Joe

Jespersen, Kayenta Fry, Sam

Jespersen, Shea Kramer, Sierra

Linkugel, Sydney Grauer,

Tabitha Wright, and Telesha

Gordon.

The musical is directed by

Wayne Kruse with musical

direction by Tam Gordon. Pat

Breeding, Carol Owen, and

Jess Price choreographed all of

the songs.

Tickets may be purchased at

the Marysville Chamber of

Commerce office or by contacting

Barb Buck at 785-337-

2562. Tickets may also be purchased

at the door.

4. Farmers and Ranchers -

Salina

5. Marysville Livestock

Best Implement Dealer

1. Heritage Tractor

2 KanEquip Inc.

3. Bruna Implement

4. Concordia Tractor

4. Tarwater Farm & Home

Supply - Topeka

Best Feed Elevator

1. Farmers Co-op Manhattan

2. Tarwater Farm & Home

Supply - Topeka

3. Wildcat Feeds

4. Beattie COOP

4. Perry Milling

This is only a part of the poll.

Unfortunately, Republicans

control only one house of

Congress, enough to halt a deal

but not to make a deal.

The president is trying to

scare the nation with untrue

threats that any delay in raising

the debt ceiling will endanger

Grandma’s social security

check.

Worse even, he falsely

claims that his approach to

deficit reduction is “balanced.”

Increasing taxes to support, and

normalize, higher federal

spending is not balanced. It

would be a radical departure

from the fiscal policy that has

boosted America’s living standard

far above Europe’s.

Obama has questioned the

ethos of American exceptionalism.

But he cannot contest

America’s exceptional standard

of living. Americans produce

more and get to keep more of

what they produce. Europe . . .

it’s a nice place to visit. But

Americans don’t want to live

like Europeans.

Betsy McCaughey is a former

lieutenant governor of

New York State and chairman

of DefendYourHealthCare.com


News Blue Rapids Free Press - Thursday, July 21, 2011

News

The Grand Champion...

Maggie Schotte, Marysville, (right) won three Grand Champion ribbons in the swine competition at the Marshall

County Fair Sunday.

KSU Donors Set Fundraising Record

In the midst of a down economy

and challenging fiscal

times, alumni, friends and corporate

partners of Kansas State

University have demonstrated

their commitment and escalated

their philanthropic support

of K-State to new heights, contributing

$107 million to the

university through the KSU

Foundation during the fiscal

year that ended June 30, 2011.

This figure sets a new record

in fundraising activity in the

67-year history of the foundation,

surpassing the previous

record of $99.5 million in fiscal

year 2008.

“K-State’s alumni and

friends are unmatched in their

dedication and generosity,â€

said Lee Harris, Leawood,

chairman of the KSU

Foundation Board of Trustees.

“This achievement is a testament

to the 44,712 alumni and

friends who contributed this

year. Their generosity is deeply

appreciated.”

We’re proud to say the university

has donors from every

county in Kansas, all 50 states

and the District of Columbia,”

said Fred Cholick, president

and CEO of the KSU

Foundation. “We’re also grateful

for our supporters abroad.

K-State received contributions

from people in 16 other countries

— including Canada,

Japan, Turkey, Germany and

the United Kingdom — which

illustrates the impact the university

has across the globe.”

Of the $107 million total,

$67 million was received in

cash, real estate or appreciated

securities, and $40 million was

committed through pledges and

deferred gifts, which will come

to the university at a later date.

These figures represent a total

increase of $17 million from

the previous year. Also of note

are four gifts of $5 million or

more and nine gifts between $1

million and $5 million the university

received in fiscal year

2011.

“This is a new milestone for

Kansas State University, one

that illustrates the outstanding

collaborative efforts of the

donors, university staff and the

foundation staff,” said Kirk

Schulz, K-State president.

“Just one-quarter of the university’s

budget now comes

from the state,” Schulz said.

“The remainder of the budget

comes from three sources:

tuition, grants and contracts,

and private philanthropic support

given through the KSU

Foundation. This new landmark

in fundraising will have a

great impact on students, faculty,

facilities and technology at

K-State, both immediately and

in the future. There is no question

that this level of support by

the K-State family will assist

the university in our quest to be

recognized among the top 50

Kansas Board Requested More School

Funding Than Members Realized

By Gene Meyer

KansasReporter

TOPEKA, Kan. - Kansas

State Board of Education members

this week that a sightunseen

budget request they

voted last week to send to the

governor will cost at least $50

million more than they estimated.

No matter, said board chairman

Dave Dennis of Wichita,

because what board members

believed was a $525 million to

$550 million requested

increase, now grown to $604.5

million, never was realistic.

“We all recognize the legislature

won’t come up with

another $600 million,” Dennis

said. “But state statutes say that

this is what the level should be

and we believe it is our duty to

ask for what the law requires. It

was a symbolic vote.”

Kansas currently is spending

about $3.1 billion, or slightly

more than half its $6 billion

current state general fund

budget to support kindergarten

through 12th grade education

in the state. Actual spending,

including federal and local

government help not counted in

the general fund numbers typically

runs about three times

larger.

The biggest part of the state

general fund expense is providing

$3,780 per pupil in base

state aid. Kansas statutes currently

set that base aid for the

year that began July 1 at

$4,012, but legislators cut $232

per pupil to help balance the

state’s budget.

public research universities.”

Philanthropic contributions

to K-State are coordinated by

the KSU Foundation. The foundation’s

staff works with university

partners to build lifelong

relationships with alumni,

friends, faculty, staff and students

through involvement and

investment in the university.

Total numbers of donors and

dollar amounts by Kansas

county include:

Allen, 74, $249,860;

Anderson, 46, $16,180;

Atchison, 74, $20,373;

Barber, 45, $16,408;

Barton, 329, $846,554;

Bourbon, 54, $7,070;

Brown, 150, $464,807;

Butler, 387, $416,658;

Chase, 42, $19,142;

Chautauqua, 19, $2,555;

Cherokee, 33, $22,933;

Cheyenne, 40, $5,405;

Clark, 29, $219,821;

Clay, 278, $108,976; Cloud,

171, $149,834;

Coffey, 81, $161,799;

Comanche, 23, $9,015;

Cowley, 172, $347,808;

Crawford, 89, $26,300;

Decatur, 31, $10,222;

Dickinson, 360, $220,875;

Doniphan, 69, $34,987;

Douglas, 458, $139,046;

Edwards, 40, $26,640;

Elk, 22, $3,430;

Ellis, 188, $738,425;

Ellsworth, 79, $56,350;

Finney, 301, $535,273;

Ford, 199, $200,344;

Franklin, 168, $32,510;

Geary, 395, $280,851;

Gove, 40, $55,282;

Graham, 21, $12,900;

Grant, 35, $9,160;

Gray, 58, $94,880;

Greeley, 17, $4,564;

Greenwood, 62, $34,585;

Hamilton, 30, $11,695;

Harper, 39, $107,135;

Harvey, 257, $208,572;

Haskell, 48, $37,225;

Hodgeman, 26, $6,080;

Jackson, 138, $105,083;

Jefferson, 116, $43,355;

Jewell, 54, $26,269;

Johnson, 4,884, $5,425,393;

Kearny, 46, $56,115;

Kingman, 64, $122,197;

Kiowa, 24, $5,500;

Labette, 57, $26,746; Lane,

35, $20,338;

Leavenworth, 270, $99,345;

Lincoln, 56, $13,003;

Linn, 29, $2,385;

Amino Brothers Co., Inc.

Heavy & Highway

Construction

Grading contractor seeking roller operator, blade operator, water

truck driver w/CDL, articulated truck drivers, excavator operator

and grade checker for highway project in Blue Rapids, Kansas.

Call for application M-F 8 am to 4 pm (913)334-2330 or email

resume to dvseeman@hotmail.com EOE

Logan, 30, $125,415;

Lyon, 264, $250,650;

Marion, 98, $1,208,270;

Marshall, 241, $329,703;

McPherson, 366, $472,212;

Meade, 35, $7,045;

Miami, 208, $580,818;

Mitchell, 177, $118,667;

Montgomery, 157, $55,214;

Morris, 122, $109,861;

Morton, 3, $40;

Nemaha, 219, $202,320;

Neosho, 102, $68,413;

Ness, 56, $81,817;

Norton, 52, $21,780;

Osage, 159, $30,115;

Osborne, 61, $24,495;

Ottawa, 98, $30,522;

Pawnee, 106, $169,373;

Phillips, 148, $103,727;

Pottawatomie, 779, $716,028;

Pratt, 119, $304,777;

Rawlins, 42, $9,950;

Reno, 512, $343,401;

Republic, 115, $56,395;

Rice, 203, $269,648;

Riley, 8,411, $17,747,945;

Rooks, 59, $25,225;

Rush, 23, $2,980;

Russell, 80, $53,852;

Saline, 907, $3,454,466;

Scott, 94, $164,692;

Sedgwick, 2,439,

$7,613,852;

Seward, 59, $46,980;

Shawnee, 1,914, $2,617,598;

Sheridan, 26, $13,605;

Sherman, 47, $8,430;

Smith, 58, $15,300;

Stafford, 87, $22,805;

Stanton, 17, $3,305;

Stevens, 35, $2,985;

Sumner, 111, $57,967;

Thomas, 107, $57,511;

Trego, 26, $8,387;

Wabaunsee, 189, $49,162;

Wallace, 18, $1,385;

Washington, 117, $66,529;

Wichita, 37, $47,975;

Wilson, 51, $7,400;

Woodson, 27, $7,920; and

Wyandotte, 283, $254,911.

Sidewalk Sale

SPECIALS

Up To

75% OFF



820 Broadway, Marysville

785-562-3341

4A

Accounting Firm Name Change

Sink, Gillmore & Gordon

LLP Public Accountants is officially

changing names to Sink,

Gordon & Associates LLP

Public Accountants. The firm is

currently comprised of six partners

and a staff of 60 employees.

Sink, Gordon & Associates

LLP was originally founded 65

years ago in 1946, with Roger

Sink serving as partner for over

50 years. Today the firm con-

tinues as the area’s largest

accounting firm with offices in

Manhattan, Waterville and

Clay Center, providing individuals

and businesses with

accounting, audit and income

tax services. Audits of business

and municipal entities, business

valuations, trust and estate

services and succession planning

are additional areas of

expertise for the firm.

Chad L. Parker CPA manages

the Waterville office.

Coed Kick Ball

Tournament

July 30th

Blue Rapids Ball Fields

Teams Needed

Entry Fee $10 Per Player

Due by July 23rd

Starts 8am

8-15 Players Per Team

Minimum 5 Girls Per Team

Concession Stand/Beer Garden

Please Call Mandi Hartloff at

816-510-9381 to Register

ANY new Chevrolet at DEALER COST! Call 785-292-4802 or visit us

online at www.LeeChev.com

2011 Camaro Conv. Red jewel/Tan top/Tan int., 2SS/RS, Auto.

M.S.R.P. $43,780.00

Sale price $42,295.00

2011 Silverado, Crew cab, 5.3L V-8, Dual zone climate, Trailer pkg., 3 to

choose from at this price.

M.S.R.P. $37,755.00

Sale price $31,095.00

2011 Equinox, Summit white/Gray leather int., LTZ pkg., All wheel

drive, 29 m.p.g.

M.S.R.P. $31,380.00

Sale price $30,386.00

2011 Impala, Gold mist met./Nuetral cloth, Bench front seat, 3.5L V-6, 30

m.p.g.

M.S.R.P. $26,745.00

Sale price $22,320.00

2007 Tahoe, Maroon/Tan heated leather, LTZ pkg., Fully loaded, Sold

new here.

Sale price $28,750.00

For more information and pictures of these vehicles and our entire inventory

visit us online at www.LeeChev.com


NEWS EWS Blue Rapids Free Press - Thursday, July 21, 2011

By Jagadeesh Gokhale

The Cato Institute

President Obama’s dire

alarms over the approach of the

federal debt ceiling, and subsequent

calls for $4 trillion in

debt reductions over 10 years,

are starkly lacking key ingredients:

substance and coherence

as to what such a fiscal package

should contain.

House Republicans, by contrast,

have a program for longterm

economic stewardship —

Cut, Cap and Balance — that

would deliver much larger savings

than anything the president

has put on the table.

Before appreciating why such a

program would be better, one

must consider why a deal to

achieve $4 trillion in savings

over the next decade — whatever

its contents — would be

insufficient.

Given the weak economy,

budget savings of $4 trillion

will not be implemented immediately,

but will be back-loaded

with a multiple-year lag.

However, estimates made by

the Social Security and

Medicare trustees and actuaries

suggest that those two pro-

If you like the Free Press please tell these Advertisers

See Back Issues Of

The Free Press at

www.BlueRapidsFreePress.com

Blue Rapids Auto & Hardware

DCH Enterprises, Inc. doing business as

Dave’s Body Shop and R&K Service

Windshields

Paintless

dent repair

Spray-in

Bedliner

Kick The Can Or Kick The Habit?

NAPA Auto Parts

Do It Best Hardware

Hunting & Fishing Licenses

Hydraulic Hoses • Saw Chains

Corn Stoves • Ammunition

Infrared Heaters

10 Public Square, Blue Rapids, Kansas 66411

785-363-7384

Contact

Dave or Keith

562-2338 562-3336

Come on out for a free estimate at

742 Pony Express Hwy.

west of Marysville

grams face cumulative, inflation-adjusted,

long-term (75year)

fiscal gaps totaling $39.2

trillion. This implicit debt will

accrue interest and grow larger

over time. The cumulative

interest cost of that shortfall

over 10 years, under a conservative,

inflation-adjusted interest

rate of 2.9 percent per year

(the rate used by the Social

Security actuaries), amounts to

$13 trillion — implying that

not making any fiscal adjustments

for the next 10 years will

increase the budgetary imbalance

to $52.2 trillion. Thus,

scheduling a heavily backloaded

reduction of those costs

by just $4 trillion through 2020

is unlikely to improve the federal

government’s fiscal condition.

The alternative to increasing

the debt limit without sufficiently

large spending reductions

will amount to kicking the

deficit can ahead, to just

beyond the 2012 elections.

These are conservative estimates,

because they include

only shortfalls in entitlement

programs and assume that the

recent health care reform (the

Levels To Continue To Rise

Tuttle Creek Lake water levels

have risen thirteen feet

above normal pool, an elevation

of 1088.0 feet above sea

level. This has resulted in all

boat ramps being inundated.

With care, boaters may still

launch off of the maneuver

areas, but they are cautioned

that maneuver room will be

limited. In addition, underwater

obstructions from courtesy

dock anchor posts and ramp

curbs may not be visible.

Other closures include the

swimming beach and a few

low-lying primitive campsites

in Tuttle Creek Cove Park and

some interior park roads in

Stockdale Park, Spillway State

Park and the Tuttle Creek ORV

Area.

Lake users can anticipate

continued high water for the

foreseeable future, until the

record flooding on the Missouri

River subsides. There will be

other closures as Tuttle Creek

Lake continues to rise. They

may include the access road to

the Blue Valley Yacht Club

(elev. 1089.0), the Mill Creek

crossing on Blue River Hills

Road near Stockdale Park Road

(elev. 1089.5), the boat ramp

parking lot in Tuttle Creek

Cove Park (elev. 1091.5), the

access road to the Riley County

Fish and Game Association’s

Wee Bear Lodge (elev. 1093.0)

and access to the primitive

campground in Tuttle Creek

Cove Park, (elev. 1096.0).

Reflections

Sidewalk Sale

Fri: 8-5:30 July 22

Sat: 9:30-5 July 23

Save up to 75% on baby items, 2010 Christmas

Ornaments, frames, lots of gift items & candles, stationary,

Sports Collectibles and more, single place settings of

Mikosa China & Stone-ware ($10.00 place settings, mix and

match.)

901 Broadway, Marysville

783-562-3919

Owners: David & Christina Hartsook

Brakes

Tue ups

Exhaust

Engine repair

Patient Protection and

Affordable Care Act of 2010)

will appreciably reduce

Medicare’s net unfunded obligations.

But these estimates

exclude the sizable increases in

non-entitlement shortfalls and

increases in future state

Medicaid costs resulting from

health care reform — not to

mention the fact that Congress

is likely to strike the proposed

future reductions in Medicare,

as it has routinely done for

decades.

Thus, for a 10-year, $4 trillion

budget deal to significantly

reduce the nation’s long-term

fiscal imbalance, we will have

to stick to fiscal discipline well

beyond 2020, which means not

enacting new unfunded entitlement

benefits or rapidly

increasing spending. The fate

of the 1990 Budget

Enforcement Act, which was

abandoned as soon as budget

surpluses emerged, does not

bode well for a similar deal

now unless it is accompanied

by constraints against reversals

by future Congresses — constraints

that the Cut, Cap and

Balance program would introduce.

In order to prevent lawmakers

from initiating new entitlement

(or “investment”) programs

with inadequate funding

schemes, those constraints

should be an integral part of the

next budget deal. And such a

budget process constraint

should itself be protected from

repeal except through a large

supermajority in Congress. The

political price of voting for tax

increases to fund new benefits

TIGER’s DEN

Odell, Ne - 402-766-8805

Fri. July 22 Night Buffet:BBQ Meatballs and Chicken Wings

Sun. July 24 Noon Buffet: Grilled Chicken and Meatloaf

Prime Rib available every Friday and Saturday Night!

Tuesday $0.75 Tacos and $0.99 Kids Night

Wednesday $0.50 Wings and $0.99 Pie Night

Thurday $4.99 Pitchers and $6.95 Spaghetti Dinner

Catering & Party Room Available!

Don Musil, DVM

Nicole Porter, DVM

821 Hwy 9

Phone: 785.363.7903 Blue Rapids, Ks 66411

We have Hill’s Prescription and Science Diet Dog & Cat Food

Advertising Gets

Your Attention!

Didn’t We?

Dr. Sara Baskerville-Crome

ALTERNATIVE

HEALTH CARE

CHIROPRACTIC

785-562-1900

would dampen lawmakers’

enthusiasm to expand entitlements

— in contrast to the

adoption of the Medicare prescription

drug benefit in 2003

or last year’s health care

reform, where lawmakers were

shielded from the political

costs of actually paying for the

new programs.

The alternative to increasing

the debt limit without sufficiently

large spending reductions

will amount to kicking the

deficit can ahead, to just

beyond the 2012 elections.

We’ll then tolerate fierce campaigns

soliciting support for

liberal and conservative visions

of a long-term budget fix.

Chances are, however, that a

polarized electorate won’t yield

an unambiguous mandate for

the direction of fiscal adjustments

beyond 2012.

President Obama is exhorting

legislators to swallow bitter

Prairie Valley

Veterinary Clinic

TO BUY OR SELL - CALL PRELL

FARM • RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL

Donald Prell Realty & Auction

1488 Frontier Rd. • Marysville, Ks 66508

785-799-3787 • Cell - 785-562-6787

CHIROPRACTIC

Office Hours: Monday, Tuesday,

Thursday, & Friday

Mondays & 8:30 Thursdays AM - 9 5:30 a.m. PM to 5 p.m.

600 Sharp, Blue Rapids

785-363-7755 Located at - 1124 Answering Pony Express phone Mon.-Sat. Highway

Marysville, Kansas

medicine now because doing so

will only become more difficult

as the 2012 election draws

closer. But had he seized the

pro-budget-reform momentum

generated by his own Simpson-

Bowles deficit reduction commission

last year, things may

have turned out better for him

politically and for the nation

economically. Now we may

remain in the current policy

limbo until after next

November, caught between the

irresistible force of entitlement

spending and the immovable

object of Republican opposition

to tax increases.

Along the way, we’ll

increase the debt limit, one

back-loaded bit at a time, without

much prospect of avoiding

an even larger fiscal calamity

down the road. Maybe it’s time

for the one sure way of curing

this disease: to shred and discard

the federal credit card by

Greenleaf Cafe

$1.00 Draws and Hot Dogs

Every Wednesday

5 pm - Midnight

in the Blue Room

Don’t Forget our $6.00

Steak-Night July 30th

5A

Twin Valley Thrift Stores

UNLOAD YOUR UNWANTED ITEMS,

WE’LL PICK THEM UP!

Drop off your items at any one of these

divisions of Twin Valley Developmental

Services nearest to you

The Wearhouse

107 Commercial

Waterville, KS

(785) 363-2490

Next 2 New

507 Williams

Beattie, KS

(785) 353-2347

enacting Cut, Cap and Balance.

Jagadeesh Gokhale is a senior

fellow at the Cato Institute,

member of the Social Security

Advisory Board, and author of

Social Security: A Fresh Look

at Policy Options University of

Chicago Press (2010).

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News Blue Rapids Free Press - Thursday, July 21, 2011

Faces At The Marshall County Fair

I know how to get into this thing. The eyes have it. Looking for a win.

Yes, I have been having fun, why? Go with the grain, go with the grain. Hot? You think it’s hot?

Beyond Cake And Ice Cream: Myths About Aging

Forget that over-the-hill

party ware. Landmark birthdays

signal a gift of time.

Our population is living

longer. The average life

expectancy at birth for someone

born in the U.S. in 1900

was 47 years, according to

2006 data from the U.S.

Department of Health and

Human Services National

Center for Health Statistics. In

1950, average life expectancy

reached 68 years, and, by 2006,

average life expectancy had

climbed to 78 years, with men

averaging 75 years and women

averaging almost 80 years of

age.

The more than 30 years of

added life expectancy at birth

reflect a mix of biology and

culture, but are not always perceived

positively, said Debra

Sellers, K-State Research and

Extension specialist on aging

and adult development.

Many in our culture associate

aging with losses, rather

than viewing each year as an

opportunity, said Sellers, who

explained the importance of

separating commonly perceived

myths about aging from

reality:

Myth # 1: If you live long

enough, you’ll surely get

Alzheimer’s.

Sellers’ response: Living

longer can increase vulnerability

for Alzheimers disease, but

not every older adult will end

up with this diagnosis. There

are other reasons that may

cause a person to experience

confusion or memory loss, such

as poor nutrition or depression,

and these may be modifiable.

The bottom line? Many people

are able to enjoy their later

years without signs of dementia

or Alzheimerâs disease.

Myth # 2: Older adults are

grouchy.

Sellers’ response: Our personalities

are largely established

by mid-adulthood, and

that means that a grouchy or

otherwise disagreeable young

person will likely retain that

personality trait throughout his

or her lifespan.


$100,000 in Tuttle Creek WRAPS

Cost Share Funds

WHO: Washington & Marshall County Livestock Producers

(All livestock species included)

WHAT: A meeting with featured speakers from K-State

Livestock & Watershed Management, will highlight actual

solutions to common problems faced by livestock producers,

including alternative watering and feeding possibilities that

improve water quality.

WHEN: Tuesday, July 26, 5:30 pm - Supper provided prior

to meeting.

Map shows priority areas and livestock cost share areas in red.

WHERE: St. Monica/St. Elizabeth Catholic Church Hall,

1007 East Avenue, Blue Rapids, KS

WHY: Apply for cost share on site. Experts available to as-


farm site maps & plats.

RSVP by Friday, July 22

Washington, 785-325-2121 or Marysville, 785-562-3531

QUESTIONS: Call Mary Howell at marshallcofair@gmail.

com, 785-562-8726 or Barbara Donovan at donovanmn@

aol.com, 651-247-8292

POSSIBLE PROJECTS:

of feeding areas, access roads, alternative water development,

constructed wind breaks, piped through dams, tanks

below dams and fencing.

The bottom line? Growing

older doesn’t mean that an individual

will turn into a different

person.

Myth # 3: Aging is negative,

and means giving up things that

you enjoy.

Sellers’ response: The effects

of aging can push older adults

to make choices, but making

choices is part of life at any age

and the choices need not be

negative.

While some choices can be

related to losses due to the natural

aging process, such as

6A

1st Quarter 35 + 4 = 39

2nd Quarter 45 + 0 = 45

3rd Quarter 44 + 1 = 45

4th Quarter 48 +1 = 49

S M

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May 2012

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# 5.0

# 4.5

changes in vision, hearing or

memory, many adults report

balancing such losses with

gains and new opportunities

and report a sense of wellbeing

in their mid-70s that is

greater than a sense of wellbeing

felt at a younger age.

In reporting such findings,

Sellers tells the story about

Larry, whom she met a few

years ago, while waiting for her

husband to register at a regional

auto race track in northeast

Kansas.

In striking up a conversation

U.S.D. 498

VALLEY HEIGHTS

2011-12

August

September

5 Labor Day - No School

2 End of 3rd Qu.-Dismiss Noon

5-8 Elementary P/T Conf. Week

17 Last Day - Dismiss Noon

18 Building Level Workday

Prof. Development

Staff Work Day

2:00 PLC Early Dismissal

Noon Dismissal for Students

School not in session

No School for elementary

School in session

with him, she learned that he

also had come to race, and

would be driving a red 2006

Chevrolet Corvette with a sixspeed

manual transmission.

Larry led the field in the first

session, but, when Sellers

asked if he had plans to participate

in any other of the day’s

sessions, he indicated that heâd

head home to Missouri, saying,

“at 90, you can’t quite do

what you’ve always done.

Larry had made a choice,

said Sellers, who noted that he

had established his priorities,

but knew when to set limits.

The bottom line? Aging is a

natural life process, said

Sellers, who emphasized the

need to be proactive and make

choices to take advantage of

the gift of time.

In the U.S., in 1900, only

four percent of the population

reached the age of 65 or older;

in 2000, 12 percent of the population

was age 65 or older,

and, in 2050, 21 percent of the

population is expected to be

age 65 or older.

172+ 6 = 178

June 2012


News Blue Rapids Free Press - Thursday, July 21, 2011

Cars Crash At Fairgrounds Demoliton Derby

This is how you are to back up.

This car is dead in the water.

Now the whole evening is just a blur.

Three car pile up just off US 77.

These drivers are crazy, I’m getting out of here.

Help Celebrate

Kansas-150 Years

at the Historic Waterville

Opera House

Country Music

Sunday, July 31 - 2:00 pm

Admission Free

With Donation

Free Press

Photos by

Deb Barrington

It’s just another day at the office.

Valley Heights Classroom Supply List

2011-2012

Kinder-prep thru Sixth Grade

Kinder-Prep

1 1 FULL SIZED BOOK BAG 2 2 Elmer’s glue

1 1 Prang or or Crayola Watercolors 1 1 container of of Antibacterial wipes (girls bring)

1 1 box box small zipper baggies (girls bring) 1 1 box box (or (or refill pkg) baby wipes (boys bring)

1 1 box box large zipper baggies (boys bring) 1 1 box box of of Kleenex

Change of of clothes to to be be kept in in book bag bag 6 6 large glue sticks

Kindergarten

2- 24 count crayons backpack (no wheels) 4 – large glue sticks

2 –large beginner pencils 1 large box Kleenex 1-spiral notebook (wide rule)

1-pocket folder 1 pkg colored pencils Boys-1 box snack zip-lock baggies

Girls-1 box quart zip-lock baggies 1 bottle of school Glue Boys-1 pkg. baby wipes

Girls-1 pkg. disinfecting wipes

First First Grade Grade

1 1 24 24 count count crayon crayon 2 large glue 2 sticks large glue sticks 2 boxes Kleenex 2 boxes Kleenex

Small Small school school box box 12 yellow pencils 12 yellow pencils 2 large erasers 2 large erasers

1 1 pkg. pkg. eraser eraser tops tops colored pencils colored pencils wide ruled spiral notebook wide ruled spiral notebook

1 1 pocket pocket folder folder back pack (no back wheels) pack (no wheels)

Girls-1 Girls-1 pkg. pkg. baby baby wipes wipes Boys-1 pkg. disinfecting Boys-1 pkg. wipes disinfecting wipes

Second Grade

2 large glue sticks 2- large erasers 1-pkg. eraser tops

12 ct yellow #2 pencils 24-count crayons small school box

2 boxes Kleenex colored pencils wide rule spiral notebook

3 pocket folder backpack (no wheels) highlighter

Girls-small pkg. dry erase markers Boys- 1 pkg. baby wipes

Girls 1 box quart zip-lock baggies Boys 1 box gallon zip-lock baggies

Third Third Grade

12 12 pencils Small Small box box of of crayons 2 2 boxes boxes Kleenex

Big Big pink pink eraser Colored pencils Quart size size Ziploc bags-girls

Elmer’s glue glue bottle Markers Gallon size size Ziploc bags- bags- boys boys

2 2 glue glue sticks sticks Loose Loose leaf leaf wide wide ruled ruled notebook paper paper Baby Baby wipes/Antibacterial wipes wipes

Pencil box box or or pencil case case 2 2 folders with with pockets Hand Hand sanitizer- optional

Fourth Grade

School Scissors 2 glue sticks Colored Pencils

Eraser 1 ream white printer paper 2pkgs. Wide-lined loose leaf

1”3-ring binder 3 boxes Kleenex notebook paper

Homework Folder box of Crayons 12-No. 2 pencils (no mechanical)

Fifth Fifth – – Sixth Sixth Graders Graders

School School Scissors Scissors 1” 1” 3 3 Ring Ring Binder Binder 1 Spiral 1 Spiral Notebook Notebook *Colored Pencils 4 Pocket Folders

*Colored *Box of Pencils 24 Crayons *Box 4 Pocket of 24 Crayons Folders

1 1 Composition Notebook Notebook Eraser Eraser *3 *3 Boxes Boxes of Kleenex of Kleenex

12 12 No. No. 2 2 Pencils Pencils *2 Glue *2 Glue Sticks Sticks *1 ream *1 ream of white of white printer printer paper paper

*2pkgs *2pkgs Wide-Lined Wide-Lined Loose Loose Leaf Leaf Notebook Notebook Paper Paper Pencil Bag (with 3 holes to insert in binder)

Pencil *All Bag (with starred 3 holes consumable to insert in binder) supplies will be shared with other students.

Note to Parents: Consumable supplies will be replenished throughout the year. The

teacher will notify you if your student needs to replace supplies.

7A

It looks like the cars at the Marshall County Fair Demolition Derby are coming right at you, oh, they are.


News Blue Rapids Free Press - Thursday, July 21, 2011

Marshall County Minutes

July 11, 2011

The Board of Marshall

County Commissioners met in

regular adjourned session with

Charles R. Loiseau, Chairman;

Robert S. Connell and Thomas

K. Holle members; and Sonya

L. Stohs, County Clerk present.

The meeting was called to

order at 9:00 a.m.

The Board opened the meeting

with the flag salute.

The minutes and agenda

were approved as presented

upon a motion by Robert S.

Connell moved, seconded by

Charles R. Loiseau.

Unanimous.

Agency on Aging Director

Heather Ruhkamp met with the

Board to present the following

bids for painting the interior of

the Helvering Center and making

some minor wall repair and

new flooring in the kitchen.

Painting:

Knott Painting, Marysville,

KS - $3,920.00 if 2nd coat

needed it will be .35 per square

foot

Flooring:

Dusin Enterprise,

Washington, KS - $4,624.96

for tile flooring for the kitchen

Thomas K. Holle moved,

seconded by Robert S. Connell

to approve the bid from Dusin

Enterprise, Washington, KS in

the amount of $4,624.96 for

Dane’s Automotive

Stop in and see us for all your

welding supplies and tires.

All Automotive Repairs.

Your Drop and Lock Hitch Dealer

324 E. Front St., Waterville, Ks

785-363-2143

new flooring in the Helvering

kitchen. Unanimous. Agency

on Aging Director Heather

Ruhkamp will come back with

more information on the Knott

Painting bid next week.

Thomas K. Holle moved,

seconded by Robert S. Connell

to approve the following purchase

order. Unanimous.

Dusin Enterprises,

Washington, KS for Glaud

porcelain tile for kitchen at

Helvering Center $4,624.96-

Agency on Aging fund-P.O. #

3947

RSVP Director Joni

Spellmeier met with the Board

to give her 2012 budget request

in the amount of $15,000.00

which is the same as the 2011

budget.

Thomas K. Holle moved,

seconded by Robert S. Connell

to approve the vouchers, as presented,

and issue manual warrant

from the respective funds.

Unanimous.

Thomas K. Holle moved,

seconded by Robert S. Connell

to approve the following purchase

orders. Unanimous.

Modern Marketing, for

emergency services handouts

for kids $593.18-EMPG grant

fund-P.O. # 3936

Merck, Carol Stream, IL for

private vaccine $2,452.08-

Health fund-P.O. # 3798

Midland Medical, Lincoln,

Get the care you need at home.

Learn how a long-term care insurance policy can

help you live life your way.

Call:

Susan D. Durando

1-866-411-7752

Underwritten by Mutual of Omaha Insurance Company,

Mutual of Omaha Plaza, Omaha, NE 68175-0001

AFN41503

Carolyn’s Kitchen - Buffet

Serving Breakfast, Lunch and

Dinner Buffet.

We Specialize in Chicken.

Roast Beef and Chicken

Everyday.

1806 Center St., Marysville, Ks * 785-562-2830

Open 6 am to 9 pm everyday

NE for medical supplies

$1,206.73-Health fund-P.O. #

3799

CMI, Inc., Owensboro,

KYfor intoxilyzer

repair$1,108.38-General

(Sheriff) fund-P.O. # 3976

Ed Roehr Safety for 28 taser

cartridges $545.20-General

(Sheriff) fund-P.O. # 3975

Network Computer

Solutions, Manhattan, KS for

computer and backup

$1,762.17-Health fund-P.O. #

3639

Kinsley Mortuary,

Marysville, KS for coroner

expense $1,025.00-General

(District Court) fund-P.O. #

3990

Public Works Administrator

Mike Craig and Public Works

Coordinating Supervisor Larry

Polson met with the Board.

Thomas K. Holle moved,

seconded by Robert S. Connell

to approve the purchase orders.

Unanimous.

Farm Plan (Oregon Trail

Equip), Marysville, KS for

power washer $798.00-Solid

Waste fund-P.O. # 107268

Koch Excavating, Axtell, KS

for machine hire $700.00-Road

& Bridge fund-P.O. # 107267

Kansas Department of

Transportation, Topeka, KS for

balance of 58C-4269-01

$200,000.00-Special Road &

Bridge fund-P.O. # 107266

Amending P.O. #107264

Kansas Department of

Transportation, Topeka, KS for

payment share of 58C-4269-01

$184,000.00-Road & Bridge

fund-P.O. # 107264

Cross/Dillion Tire, Lincoln,

NE for 2-recap tires $708.00-

Road & Bridge fund-P.O. #

107271

Public Works Administrator

Mike Craig discussed a road

vacating petition in Section 36

of Walnut Township. Thomas

K. Holle moved, seconded by

Charles R. Loiseau to approve

the notice of proposed vacation

of county road in Walnut

Township, Marshall County

beginning at a point on Road

Record 142C twenty five (25)

feet South of the North section

line of Section 36, Township 3

South, Range 6 East, THENCE

running in a South

Southwesterly direction to a

point where Road Record 185F

intersects the East-West onesixteenth

(1/16th) section line

running through the Southwest

quarter (SW ¼ ) and Southeast

quarter (SE ¼ ) of said Section

36; being 1320 feet more or

less, North of the South line of

said Section 36-T3S-R6E the

hearing will be on July 25,

2011 at 10:00 a.m. Unanimous.

Tom Knott, Knott Painting

placed a call to the Board to let

the Board know that a second

coat will cost $1,114.00.

Sheriff Daniel A. Hargrave

met with the Board to notify the

BUYING

SCRAP IRON

Board that he is eliminating a

part-time food service position

in the Sheriff’s department. He

recommended moving Lisa

Mooradian, Marysville from

part-time to a full-time food

service/dispatch position at

$11.85 an hour effective

August 1, 2011. Charles R.

Loiseau moved, seconded by

Thomas K. Holle to approve

the creation of a full-time

food/dispatch position and

moving Lisa Mooradian from

part-time to the full-time food

service /dispatch position at

$11.85 an hour effective

August 1, 2011. Unanimous.

County Attorney Laura

Johnson-McNish met with the

Board to present the 2012

County Attorney budget in the

amount of $175,700.00 which

is an increase of $20,100.00

from the 2011 budget with an

additional part-time employee

and $183,600.00 which is an

increase of $28,000.00 with an

additional full-time employee.

Charles R. Loiseau moved,

seconded by Thomas K. Holle

to approve a payroll and related

vouchers, as presented, and

issue manual warrants from the

respective funds. Unanimous.

Charles R. Loiseau moved,

seconded by Robert S. Connell

to approve the Neighborhood

Revitalization application for

Jeffrey J. and Amy E. Adams,

Frankfort, KS with the preconstruction

pictures that were

provided by the applicant.

Unanimous.

Economic Development

Director George McCune and

Community Development

Coordinator Juanita McCune

met with the Board to give

them a weekly update.

George Black, RPM Access

Wind Development LLC, West

Des Moines, IA met with the

Board to give them an update

on the Marshall County project.

Robert S. Connell moved,

seconded by Thomas K. Holle

to approve the vouchers, as presented,

and issue warrants from

the respective funds.

Unanimous.

County Attorney Laura

Johnson-McNish met with the

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203 Commercial, Washington, Ks - 325-2379 or 1-800-491-2379

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Advertising Gets

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Competitive Pricing per ton for scrap

iron.

SMITTY’S

785-736-2964

Axtell, Kansas

Board.

Charles R. Loiseau moved,

seconded by Robert S. Connell

to adjourn at 2:07 p.m.

D. Roche Fencing, Inc.

Farm • Commercial •

Residential

Don & Deb Roche

Quality Fencing Since 1980

8A

Unanimous. The next scheduled

meeting will be Monday,

July 18, 2011 starting at 9:00

a.m.

Frankfort-108 E. 5th- Spacious 3 bedroom, 2-story home with

detached garage on shaded lot.

Frankfort-701 N. Walnut- 3 bedroom, 1 level home on edge of town,

acreage w/ several outbuildings.

Ready to live in- 1998 16’x80’ Skyline mobile home. 3 bedroom, 2

bath, w/ vaulted ceilings, CA/CH, & vinyl siding.

Blue Rapids Free Press

Jon A. and Linda L. Brake, Publishers

Deb Barrington, Advertising, Photographer

Chris Taylor, Page Layout and Design

Web site: bluerapidsfreepress.com

Subscriptions: eFreePress subscriptions are Free

Street Address:

203 East 5th Street - NEW OFFICE - OPEN

Mailing Address:

Box 176, Blue Rapids, Kansas, 66411

E-Mail:

brfreepress@kansas.net or jonbrake@kansas.net

785-363-7779

If you like the Free Press please tell these Advertisers

Jim Daninghaus

785-799-5643

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Greg Anderson

785-747-8170

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2006 Center, Marysville, Ks * 785-562-1070

785-292-4271 • 785-587-4931 • Frankfort, Kansas • droche@bluevalley.net


News Blue Rapids Free Press - Thursday, July 21, 2011

News

City Of Blue Rapids Minutes

(unapproved)

The governing body of the

City of Blue Rapids met in regular

session July 13, 2011 at

7:00 p.m. in the Council Room

of the Community Center.

Council members present were:

Amy Bishop, Mike Minihan,

and Bob Roepke. Mayor

Nowak presided.

Jerry Pope was absent. The

minutes of the June 13, 2011

adjourned regular meeting

were approved as presented.

Approved pay ordinance 2219

with the addition of $660 to

Bailey Woodworks and $750 to

Valley Heights Recreation

Commission. The following

items were added to the agenda:

refund zoning application

fee and alleys.

Chad Parker, Sink, Gillmore

and Associates, LLP, presented

the 2010 audit. Council accepted

the account entries moving

the expenses from the general

fund to the storm sewer capital

projects fund for 2010 and

2011 and to close the storm

sewer capital projects fund

after all entries have been

made.

In other business the council:

Approved budget transfer of

$25,000 from the

water/sewer/refuse fund to the

general fund.

Approved ordinance 2221

increasing the minimum water

rate by $2.50 effective August

1, 2011.

Approved ordinance 2220

attesting to the increase in taxes

Classifieds

Adoption

ADOPT: A young 1st time

mom and dad will offer your

baby a lifetime of LOVE. Exp.

paid. Kim & Anthony, 1-888-

449-0803

ADOPTION Young, happily

married couple wishing for

newborn. Love, affection, security

and opportunities await

your baby. Expenses paid.

Please call Jillian/David anytime

877-613-8169

PREGNANT? Considering

Adoption? Call us First! Living

expenses, housing, medical and

continued support afterwards.

Choose adoptive family of your

choice. Call 24/7. Adopt

Connect. 1-866-743-9212

Career Opportunity

ALLIED HEALTH career

training - Attend college 100%

online. Job placement assistance.

Computer available.

Financial Aid if qualified.

SCHEV certified. Call 800-

4 8 1 - 9 4 0 9

www.CenturaOnline.com

Health/Beauty

IF YOU USED THE

ANTIBIOTIC DRUG LEV-

AQUIN AND SUFFERED A

levied for budget year 2012. At

7:35 p.m. Bishop moved to go

into executive session for 10

minutes to discuss non-elected

personnel. Motion seconded

by Minihan. Chad Parker and

Susan Hass were invited to the

executive session. Motion carried.

At 7:45 p.m. Bishop

moved and Minihan seconded

to resume the regular meeting.

At 7:45 p.m. a public hearing

on the birds at 1200 Genesee

was held. Marc Kruse reported

that 300 birds have been sold

and he has 30 left. Council

continued the hearing to

October 12.

Wayne and Donna Whitesell

were present to ask the city for

clarification about a perceived

alley running east and west

through property owned by

Brent Boyle. City attorney

John McNish determined that a

city-owned alley never existed.

Since the city never owned the

land, the city cannot take any

action. Therefore, it is up to the

property owners to reach an

agreement and resolve the

issue.

The sewer line that runs to

the city lagoons is under a tract

of land where the contractor is

taking dirt for the bridge construction.

The city has an easement

for the sewer line. CES

Engineering will draw a plan

for lowering the line and all

costs for lowering will be

assumed by the property owners

and a contract between the

owners and contractor will

include all stipulations by the

city to protect the sewer line

TENDON RUPTURE, you

may be entitled to compensation.

Call Attorney Charles

Johnson 1-800-535-5727.

Help Wanted/Truck Driver

Drivers - GET HOME

WEEKLY! Our Great Bend terminal

has openings for Class A

CDL holders! Great Pay &

Benefits! Weekly Home Time!

800-245-8775 ext. 108

Drivers- Flatbed .46/mi Paid

Vacations, 401K, Free Rider

Program CDL Training

Available! Call Prime Inc.

Today! 800-277-0212 or

www.primeinc.com

Quality Drive-Away, Inc. is

seeking 40 CDL qualified drivers

to deliver new trucks and

buses. We are the exclusive

transporter for Collins Bus in

Hutchinson, KS and have five

regional offices with other

large contracts. Call today 1-

866-764-1601 or visit

www.qualitydriveaway.com

“You got the drive, We have

the Direction” OTR Drivers

APU Equipped Pre-Pass EZpass

Pets/passenger policy.

Newer equipment. 100% NO

touch. 1-800-528-7825

Farmers Service

125 South Colorado

Waterville, KS

785-363-2581

Full Service

Mechanic On Duty

Services Provided: Gas, Oil Change,

Complete Car Care, Car Wash, Licensed Gun Dealer,

Interstate Batteries, Hydraulic Hoses, Roller Chains,

Oils and Greases

Blue Valley

Senior Living

710 Western Ave.

Blue Rapids, Ks 66411

785-363-7777

“We have a warm friendly home like environment that

you feel when you enter the door.”

All Your Ag Needs

See us for range cubes, salt, mineral and creep feed.

HEDKE AG. CO.

411 East Main Street

Dog Food, Cat Food, Water Softner and More

Call 363-2777 SCOTT HEDKE

Linda’s Insurance Agency

Specializing in Multi-Peril Crop Insurance

Agents Linda Linda Schmitz Schmitz

Agent/Owner Inez Plegge

400 Center Street • Oketo, KS 66518

785-744-3476 • Office

785-744-3477 • Fax

785-562-2902 • Home

and comply with the easement.

Council approved allowing the

owners to proceed with the

contract phase subject to council

approval to be sure the city’s

needs will be met.

Mayor Nowak recommended

that Jon Brake be appointed

to fill the unexpired term of

Bob Skillin. Joe O’Toole

declined to accept the appointment

because of a possible conflict

of interest with his position

on the school board. The

vote: Yes – Bishop, Minihan,

Roepke.

Minihan reported that he visited

with Don Diehl of

Diamond D Contracting about

repairing the storm sewer area

on 7th Street. Mike has promised

to call Don until the project

is completed.

Approved a public meeting

to be held by the pool committee

at which time a contractor

will present various ideas for a

new pool. The date of the

meeting will be published in

the Free Press.

Approved a beer garden for

the dates of July 30 from 12

p.m. to 12:00 a.m. and July 15-

16 from 6 p.m. to 12:00 a.m.

The beer gardens will be located

on private property and on

city property.

Approved ordinance 2223

amending section 3-201 of the

city code pertaining to cereal

malt beverages.

Granted Patsy Jackson a

continuance on her inoperable

vehicle to September 14.

Approved ordinance 2222

Manufactured Homes

NEW FINANCE PRO-

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what you need. It’s easy! Buy

new 3, 4 or 5 bedroom doublewides

and singlewides. 800-

375-3115

Misc.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING -

Train for high paying Aviation

Career. FAA approved program.

Financial aid if qualified

- Job placement assistance.

CALL Aviation Institute of

Maintenance. 888-248-7449.

ATTEND COLLEGE

ONLINE from Home.

*Medical *Business

*Paralegal, *Accounting,

*Criminal Justice. Job placement

assistance. Computer

available. Financial Aid if qualified.

Call 888-220-3977

www.CenturaOnline.com

Shrine Bowl, July 30, Hays,

Benefiting Shriners Hospitals

for Children. 1.800.530.5524,

ksshrine.com. 2M Race, FREE

Parade, HS Combine/Clinic,

All-Star Football & Cheer, All-

State Band, and MORE.

establishing a Bond and

Interest fund.

Approved a refund to Phil

Hanson a $25 zoning application

fee as recommended by the

planning commission.

Minihan reported that the

damaged mobile home at 700

Pomeroy will be dismantled by

the owner with all refuse

hauled away.

Approved changing the

city’s classification in the

National Flood Insurance

Program from “emergency

phase” to “regular phase”.

Increase the mileage payment

to 55.5 cents per mile to

comply with the IRS rate.

Approved a budget transfer

of $5000.00 from the

Water/Sewer/Refuse Fund to

the Utility Reserve Fund.

Donated the Sanborn maps

to the Blue Rapids Museum.

Approved a purchase of one

(1) load of MC-800 road oil

from Vance Brothers at a cost

of $3.32 per gallon.

Approved changing the following

certificates of deposit

from 24 month to 12 month

terms at time of maturity: 01-

005721, 01-005722 and 01-

005723.

Route 77 Corner Stores

Pope Disposal, Inc

Since 1977

Blue Rapids 785-363-7364

Waterville 785-363-2641

Roy and Mandi Hartloff

Commercial & Residential

Hauling

For Blue Rapids and

Waterville

785-363-7537 Jerry Pope, Owner

Located at 1149

Country Place Dr. —

East of the Airport

on North Street

Marysville, KS

785-562-4001

Thank You

Terry-Christie

Funeral Home

Open Mon-Thur 12 - 9 • Fri and Sat 10 - 10

9A

The family of James Gronquist would like to

thank everyone for cards, memorials and food.

The United Methodist Ladies for the delicious

food. Rev Bob Whitaker for helping us out.

The Family of Jim Gronquist

Painting

Need Some Painting Done?

Call Ron

Free Estimates, Lowest Prices

Call: 785-619-6021 - Cell: 785-268-0185

If you like the Free Press please tell these Advertisers

308 West Walnut, Waterville and 302 East 4th

Street, Blue Rapids; 785-363-2627

“A Personal Approach to Service at a Very

Personal Time.”

Vintage Charm

Breakfast and Guesthouse

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Enjoy the luxury of having this beautiful

3 bedroom home to yourself.

•Complimentary country-style breakfast served

• Each bedroom features its own bathroom

Ask about our special rates for parties, showers &

longterm stays.

A break from life that’s close to home.


News Blue Rapids Free Press - Thursday, July 21, 2011

News

Compiled by: Connie

Nugent From County

Newspapers.

The Blue Rapids Times

explained:

The most common type of a

fair is an agricultural fair. Such

fairs got started in the United

States in 1819 when Elkanah

Watson of Albany, New York

believed a fair would encourage

farming, manufacturing

and help businesses. The New

York legislature agreed and

$10, 000.00 was allocated yearly

for 6 years; which were

awarded to agricultural producers

and family manufactures.

The idea of a fair in Marshall

County soon followed after the

settling of Blue Rapids.

By February of 1873 a committee

of staunch farmers who

were interested in improving

livestock urged the County to

organize a Fair, work progressed

and on September 23

through the 25th of 1873 The

Marshall County Agricultural

Association County Fair was

held in Marysville, Nearly

$1,000.00 in premiums were

awarded with two horse trotting

and running matches

daily.

By the early 20th century,

The Marshall County Hereford

Association (area farmers) was

using the current Blue Rapids

Fairgrounds for livestock sales.

As Blue Rapids businessmen

promoted the use of Riverside

Park for social event, such as

the Chautauquas, a movement

began to bring a Fair to Blue

Rapids.

By March of 1916, citizens

met with the Blue Rapids City

Council to use Riverside Park

for a Fair and locate livestock

The History Of The Marshall County Fair


building for the fair’s usage.

The City Council approved of

the idea, which was granted to

the Marshall County Fair and

Livestock Association.

Within 2 months, the Fair

Association had sold approximately

600 shares of stock

(1,000 shares available). Stock

holders changed the date of the

fair due to conflict with showing

their livestock at the

American Royal Livestock

Show in Kansas City (dates

October 10-13)

June 21, 1916 the Officers of

the Marshall County Stock

Show and Fair Association

were elected and discussions

were held regarding: fair buildings,

conditions for a race

track, premiums and free

attractions.

By July 1916 County

Surveyor Gallup had surveyed

the tracks. A grand stand

would be built and a judges

stand. Dirt had to be removed

to reconstruct a ½ mile race

track. The Hereford Barn

would be repaired, a horse barn

would be constructed. All that

summer, (1916) carpenters

constructed; floral hall, grand

stand, horse barn, pens for pigs

and a judges stand. Also a band

stand was added to the front of

the grandstand.

Day 1 of the first Marshall

County Fair – the weather was

cold – it was October – remember

- yet – on the first two days

of the fair it’s estimated 8,000

people attended. Near the gate

were: eating stands, side

shows, concessions stand. At

the Floral Hall, crowds were so

packed you could see only the

tallest exhibits, displays there

were: the Power and Lights

2011 PARADE CATEGORY WINNERS

COMMERICALS: 7 R’s Bar and Grill, Blue Rapids, Ks.

ORGANIZATIONS: New Hope Evangelical Presbyterian

Church, Blue Rapids, Ks.

CHILDRENS: The Valley Heights All Stars Youth Theater

4-H: Wide Awake 4-H Club, Blue Rapids, Ks.

INDIVIDUAL: Gose Brothers, Marysville, Ks.

ANTIQUE: Steve Harries w/ 1952 John Deere A

HORSE DRAWN: Blue Rapids Historical Society, Blue

Rapids, Ks.

HORSES OR SADDLE CLUBS: Brad Hull, Frankfort, Ks.

THEME: Blue Valley Senior Living, Blue Rapids, Ks.

The New Hope Presbyterian Church took a trophy.

The Community Theatre was here to advertise.


Marysville High School Auditorium


Tickets available at Marysville Chamber of Commerce or by calling Barb Buck at 785-337-2562.

The old Blue Rapids Fire Department No. 1 pumper gets a blue ribbon.

Company, Sealy Mattresses,

Nevins and Son Nursery,

American Cement Plaster,

Fannen Piano Company. In the

barns you could find hogs

weighing up to 750 pounds, a

few breeds of poultry,

Hereford, Jersey and Holstein

cattle and many fine horses.

There were horse races,

motorcycle and automobile

races and for the calmer of

heart, baseball games and band

music. Every candidate for

every election was there with a

smile and handshake.

By the end of that first fair,

probably over 15,000 people

passed through the gate. All

fairgoers said it passed their

expectation

At the end of the 1916

Marshall County Fair the

Marysville News stated: The

success of the first meeting

assures the permanency of the

organization and annual fair. It

is in the hands of good management.

As the years have passed in

1922 a sale pavilion was added

to the hog barn.

In 1923 Blue Rapids Church

Ladies received permission to

construct a permanent eating

house on the fairgrounds – The

Church Stand.

The city of Blue Rapids in

1927, shouldered half the

expense to enlarge the grandstand.

Other improvements continued

since then and in spite of

droughts and a struggling economy

2011 marks the 95th

anniversary of the Marshall

County Fair.

What an accomplishment for

early farmers of our area. For

they are still fostering Elkanah

Watson’s dream – to encourage

locally: farming, manufacturing

and business growth.

July 1 - July 31, 2011

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