School of Engineering Embarks on First Hong Kong Student Exchange

engineering.cua.edu

School of Engineering Embarks on First Hong Kong Student Exchange

cuaengineer

THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA FALL 2008 ISSUE

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> ong>Embarksong> on First Hong Kong Student Exchange


Table ong>ofong> Contents

New Faculty and Staff.............................inside front cover

Dean’s Message ...............................................................1

Biomedical ong>Engineeringong> Prong>ofong>essor

Finds Success Close to Home .....................................2

German Prong>ofong>essor Finds Constructive Career at CUA ....3

CUA ong>Engineeringong> Prong>ofong>essors Prime

Recipients ong>ofong> $2.7 Million Grant..................................4

Revolutionary Body-Weight Support

System Developed by CUA/NRH ..................................5

CUA Prong>ofong>essor Earns Prestigious

National Science Foundation Grant.............................6

IRIS Research Center Seminars Cover the Earth............6

Kaman and Burns Awards Granted

To Outstanding ong>Engineeringong> Faculty ...........................7

ong>Engineeringong> Alum Inducted into

National Academy ong>ofong> Sciences....................................8

NASA Administrator Inaugurates

Alumni Wall ong>ofong> Fame....................................................8

ong>Schoolong> Establishes First Executive

Development Board......................................................9

2007–2008 Honor Roll ong>ofong> Donors...................................10

Robert Burns Receives

2007 ong>Engineeringong> Award............................................11

Vietnamese Students Arrive at

CUA for 2+2 Program.................................................11

Exploring Global Educational Opportunities .................12

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> ong>Embarksong>

On First Hong Kong Exchange...................................13

Visit Brings Closer Collaboration...................................14

U.S. Department ong>ofong> Defense

Honors CUA Graduate Student...................................14

Curbing Global Warming Workshop ..............................15

William Readdy Talks ong>ofong> Astronaut

ong>Engineeringong> Challenges .............................................15

Senior Awarded ASME Scholarship...............................16

Mentos Challenge Piques ong>Engineeringong>

Students and Faculty .................................................16

Concrete Canoe: Lessons in Stewardship,

Teamwork, New Beginnings ......................................17

Hovercraft Aids Humanitarian Efforts ...........................18

CUA Continues Partnership with

Clark Construction Group ..........................................19

Biomedical ong>Engineeringong> Names

2008–2009 Nagel Scholars........................................19

Engineers without Borders ong>Embarksong> to El Salvador.....20

Faculty Scholarly Activity ..............................................21

Student Awards..............................................................28

Two ong>Engineeringong> Doctoral Candidates

Attend Course in Italy .........................inside back cover

Society ong>ofong> Women Engineers

Keep Things Going ..............................inside back cover

Congratulations to the

Class ong>ofong> 2008.................................................back cover

Ph.D. Dissertations and Advisers .....................back cover

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

Administration...............................................back cover

New Faculty and Staff

Jae Choi, Ph.D.

Jae Choi, Ph.D. joins the Department ong>ofong> Electrical ong>Engineeringong> and

Computer Science in September 2008 as an assistant prong>ofong>essor.

He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in computer science

and engineering from Seoul National University, Korea, in 1992, 1994 and

2001 respectively. He was a research assistant prong>ofong>essor at Georgetown

University Medical Center from 2004 to 2008 and the chief technology

ong>ofong>ficer ong>ofong> a spin-ong>ofong>f company before joining Georgetown. His research interests are visualization,

computer graphics, computer games, image-guided surgery and bioinformatics.

Arash Massoudieh, Ph.D.

Arash Massoudieh, Ph.D., joins the Department ong>ofong> Civil ong>Engineeringong> as

an assistant prong>ofong>essor in September 2008. He received a B.S. in Civil

ong>Engineeringong> from Sharif University ong>ofong> Technology in 1997, an M.S.

degree in Civil ong>Engineeringong> from University ong>ofong> Tehran, Iran, in 2000,

and a Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental ong>Engineeringong> from University ong>ofong>

California at Davis in 2006. He continued his work at UC Davis as a

post-doctoral scholar until August 2008. His research interests are in mathematical and

numerical modeling ong>ofong> contaminant transport in aqueous systems.

Afshin Nabili, M.S.

Afshin Nabili, M.S., joins the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> as the laboratory

supervisor, a newly created position in the school. His main duty is the

supervision ong>ofong> maintenance, repair and upgrade ong>ofong> the teaching and

research laboratories ong>ofong> all engineering departments. Nabili came to

CUA as a junior transfer student from Prince George’s Community

College, Md., in September 2005. He went on to earn a bachelor’s

degree in biomedical engineering in May 2007 and master’s degree in biomedical engineering

with a concentration in bio-optics and instrumentation in May 2008. He continues

to work on his Ph.D. with Assistant Prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> Biomedical ong>Engineeringong> Jessica Ramella-

Roman, Ph.D.

Mary Kate Zabroske, B.A.

Mary Kate Zabroske, B.A., joined the dean’s ong>ofong>fice in February 2008

as the new assistant to the dean for administration. Zabroske received

a bachelor ong>ofong> arts in liberal studies from Shippensburg University.

She previously was employed as the sales assistant to the director ong>ofong>

business development at Tourism Montreal’s Washington, D.C.,

ong>ofong>fice.

Sheila Astacio

Sheila Astacio joined the biomedical engineering department in August.

2007 as assistant to the chair. Astacio has attended classes at Prince

George’s County Community College and is taking online classes for medical

coding, certified by the American Health Information Management

Association. She worked for the United States Department ong>ofong> Agriculture’s

“Ag in the Classroom” outreach program and served on special assignment

at U. S. Census headquarters in Suitland, Md., as a decennial computer specialist

during the 2000 census.


Dean’s Message

I write the dean’s message for

this issue ong>ofong> CUA Engineer with

great excitement because I

believe that 2007–2008 has

been the most successful year

during my seven-year tenure

as dean and I cannot wait to

report its successes to you. The

school has succeeded in all

aspects, including international

programs, funded research,

enrollment, accreditation and

development. I have highlighted

some ong>ofong> our greatest achievements

below:

■ In the fall semester ong>ofong> 2007,

63 new undergraduate students

including six transfer students

joined the school. The school

also welcomed 46 new graduate students. At the diploma distribution

ceremony in May 2008, the school granted 38 bachelor’s degrees, 44

master’s degrees and six doctoral degrees. See the back cover for a list

ong>ofong> graduates. We expect to receive 86 new freshmen in September

2008, an increase ong>ofong> 36 percent from last year. The coming academic

year will see the biggest enrollment ong>ofong> freshmen in the last 10 years.

■ The list ong>ofong> activities in the faculty section ong>ofong> this issue spotlights our faculty’s

achievements in the areas ong>ofong> research proposal submission, journal

publication and service to prong>ofong>essional societies. Most noticeably, the

Office ong>ofong> the Director ong>ofong> National Intelligence granted the Department ong>ofong>

Electrical ong>Engineeringong> and Computer Science $2.7 million to develop an

enhanced resolution digital camera based on a fly’s eye. In addition, a

member ong>ofong> the mechanical engineering faculty received the prestigious

National Science Foundation CAREER award. The school received a total

ong>ofong> about $6 million in new research funding, representing the biggest

amount ong>ofong> new research funding in the last seven years, with an average

ong>ofong> $2.4 million per year. Two engineering faculty members received the

2008 CUA provost awards for excellence in research and scholarship.

■ Robert Burns, B.M.E. 1951, received the 2007 ong>Engineeringong> Distinguished

Alumni Achievement Award. At the annual homecoming luncheon in

October 2007, his son, Matt Burns, B.E.E. 1980, accepted the award on

his behalf.

■ In October 2007, the ABET team visited our school to evaluate the

engineering programs for re-accreditation. Overall the visit was a big

success. The team was satisfied with the activities that the school has

conducted in the last several years for accreditation maintenance. Some

minor weaknesses that were cited by the team at the exit meeting ong>ofong> the

visit have been resolved. We submitted an institution response to the

ABET draft statement in January 2008 and expect that we will obtain in

July 2008 full accreditation for all engineering programs for six years.

■ Two new faculty members — an assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> civil engineering, and

an assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> electrical engineering and computer science —

will join our school in September 2008. In February 2008, we welcomed

the new assistant to the dean for administration, Mary Kate Zabroske.

■ The school’s international programs are in full swing. Five CUA engineering

students studied abroad in Hong Kong in the spring semester 2008 at the

Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU). That same semester CUA hosted

nine students from PolyU. In September 2007, we welcomed three students

from Vietnam who came to CUA under the 2+2 program established

between CUA and the International University ong>ofong> the Vietnam National

University-Ho Chi Minh City (HCMIU).

■ In August 2007, I visited The Catholic University ong>ofong> Leuven in Leuven,

Belgium, to explore academic collaboration opportunities. In September

2007, I went to Coimbra, Portugal, to receive a leadership award from

the International Network ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> Education and Research.

While there, I visited the Catholic University ong>ofong> Portugal in Lisbon and

signed a memorandum ong>ofong> understanding with the engineering school

there, which will serve as a mechanism for both institutions to explore

development ong>ofong> research and collaborative education programs.

■ During a 12-day trip in February and March 2008, I visited the Hong Kong

Polytechnic University to discuss the CUA/PolyU student exchange program,

and to meet with the CUA students there. During the trip I also visited

schools ong>ofong> engineering ong>ofong> two universities in Thailand, the Kasetsart

University in Bangkok and the Burapha University in Chonburi, signing an

MOU with each in which we agreed to explore collaboration in education

and research. Moving on to Vietnam, I visited the International University ong>ofong>

Vietnam National University-Ho Chi Minh City to renew an agreement

for 2+2 programs. At the Saigon Technology University, Ho Chi Minh City,

I signed an MOU to explore research and education collaboration. On

the final segment ong>ofong> the trip I visited the University ong>ofong> Danang where I

discussed potential collaboration between the two institutions.

■ I am happy to announce the establishment ong>ofong> the first ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

Executive Development Board, chaired by Matt Burns, B.E.E 1980. The

board consists ong>ofong> nine energetic and enthusiastic alumni. I look forward

to working actively with the members ong>ofong> the board.

In conclusion, I am very satisfied with the progress ong>ofong> the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

in the past academic year, especially in research funding efforts, international

programs, engineering accreditation and in the establishment ong>ofong> the

development board. I hope you enjoy reading this issue ong>ofong> CUA Engineer.

Regards,

Charles Cuong Nguyen

Dean, ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

nguyen@cua.edu

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Biomedical ong>Engineeringong> Prong>ofong>essor

Finds Success Close to Home

Faculty Prong>ofong>ile

Peter Lum has come full circle in his

academic career. A Washington, D.C.,

native, he spent his formative years

within the District’s boundaries: as a

student at Gonzaga High ong>Schoolong> and

then as an undergraduate at the

George Washington University. Now

an associate prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> biomedical

engineering, Lum left the District for

postgraduate work, but returned in

2005 to become an assistant prong>ofong>essor

at CUA.

For Lum, academia wasn’t always

the end goal. After earning his undergraduate

degree from GWU and a

master’s from the California Institute ong>ofong>

Technology in mechanical engineering,

Lum worked briefly in the private

sector.

“It was not very rewarding and

there was very little imagination or

creativity required to do the job,” he

says ong>ofong> that experience. “A colleague

introduced me to the idea ong>ofong> using

my skills as an engineer to solve

problems in biology and medicine.

I decided to go for it and went back

to school to get my Ph.D. in bio

engineering at Berkeley.”

Prong>ofong>essor Peter Lum

Lum describes the switch as a

perfect marriage ong>ofong> his previous training in mechanical systems with bioengineering problems in

medicine. He has since focused on researching stroke rehabilitation.

“There are over 750,000 new strokes in the U.S. each year and many ong>ofong> these people do not recover

ability to move their arms and legs,” he says. “It was once thought there was no recovery ong>ofong> function

beyond three to six months after the stroke but this has been proven to be incorrect. Use ong>ofong> robotics

has the potential to fill this need, without greatly increasing the costs ong>ofong> health care.”

As part ong>ofong> this research, Lum received a $250,000 contract from the U.S. Army Medical Research

and Materiel Command to work on a project to develop a new hand exoskeleton to help retrain hand

function after stroke. The hand exoskeleton could also be used someday as an orthotic to assist grasping in

patients who don’t recover full function.

He also received a $350,000 contract from NIH to develop a telerehabilitation workstation to provide

home therapy to stroke survivors who live in rural areas or cannot travel to the clinic for treatment. A

Department ong>ofong> Veterans Affairs Merit Review Award will provide Lum more than $600,000 over the next

four years to research robotic arm therapy for stroke rehabilitation.

Even with this busy research schedule, Lum still finds time to share his insights with CUA’s biomedical

engineering students. “I like the small school feel at CUA,” he says. “The small class size allows me to

get to know all ong>ofong> the students, which greatly increases the satisfaction ong>ofong> the teaching, and motivates

me to make the classes as interesting as possible. I really like what I am doing now.”

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German Prong>ofong>essor

Finds Constructive Career at CUA

Faculty Prong>ofong>ile

As a boy in Germany, Gunnar Lucko’s imagination was inspired by the stories his

grandfather would tell. A civil engineer in post-war Germany’s Rhine Valley, he had a

long career designing bridges and buildings. He would speak ong>ofong> how important engineers

were to a society; how it was they who created the structures within which a

civilization could flourish. And when it came time for Lucko to choose his own career

path, he knew exactly what he wanted to do: follow in his grandfather’s footsteps.

After obtaining a degree at Hamburg University ong>ofong> Technology, Lucko came to the

United States to attend graduate school at Virginia Tech, earning a Ph.D. in civil engineering

in 2003. He joined the CUA faculty in 2005 as an assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> civil

engineering and oversees the Construction ong>Engineeringong> and Management Program.

As a researcher, he specializes in mathematical analysis ong>ofong> schedule networks,

construction operations analysis and optimization, equipment economics, and

constructability analysis. The field is a relatively small one, with roughly 150 academics

conducting construction management research, and they are scattered around the

country. Lucko has worked diligently and successfully to cultivate strong relationships

with his long-distance fellow researchers; he regularly exchanges ideas and collaborates

on projects with colleagues based as far away as Israel. He even serves as an

external doctoral adviser to an engineer working on the NASA shuttle in Cape Canaveral,

Fla. His current research work seeks to dynamically forecast construction projects,

simulating operations before they actually take place to look for possible glitches.

“Planning and scheduling ong>ofong> construction projects have been interests ong>ofong> mine since

I worked on engineering projects [as a student] in Germany,” Lucko says.

In 2007, Lucko was awarded a two-year $67,000 grant from the National Science

Foundation to perform basic research on singularity functions, which had been used

in structural engineering. He discovered that these functions can help solve so-called

linear schedules. At the heart ong>ofong> his research lies optimizing the productivity ong>ofong> all

construction activities within a project’s time and space constraints. Case study

implementations with several construction companies are validating his new method.

In addition to his research, the assistant prong>ofong>essor is passionate about educating

tomorrow’s engineers. He was a finalist for the Provost’s Award for Excellence in

Teaching in both 2007 and 2008, and was recently awarded the Charles H. Kaman

Award for Teaching Excellence, the highest award within the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>.

Working with the group Engineers Without Borders, Lucko helps direct CUA

students in a field service project in Santa Clara, El Salvador, a remote village ong>ofong>

3,000 people accessible only by dirt roads. The project, funded in part by a threeyear,

$42,000 grant from the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators

Alliance, is enabling Lucko and his students to design a new health clinic and help

with providing a water distribution system for the town’s residents. He also mentors

high school students at Bell Multicultural High ong>Schoolong> in Washington, D.C., introducing

them to the construction field.

Away from engineering, Lucko has played the clarinet with a German chamber

orchestra and an American wind ensemble. Music even led him to his wife, who is a

graduate ong>ofong> CUA’s ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> Library and Information Science: They met through

practicing music in the CUA music library and married during Thanksgiving ong>ofong> 2007.

“I was looking for a university where I could grow and make a contribution in

my field and work in a personable place,” Lucko says, and he has found such an

environment here. “This makes for a fulfilling faculty life, and I’m proud I am carrying

on my grandfather’s prong>ofong>ession.”

Prong>ofong>essor Gunnar Lucko looks over blueprints in his ong>ofong>fice.

fall2008 | 3


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CUA ong>Engineeringong> Prong>ofong>essors

PRIME RECIPIENTS OF $2.7 MILLION GRANT

Prong>ofong>essors Scott Mathews and Mark Mirotznik demonstrate their fly’s eye camera.

A team led by Department ong>ofong> Electrical ong>Engineeringong>

and Computer Science Associate Prong>ofong>essor Mark

Mirotznik and Assistant Prong>ofong>essor Scott Mathews

has received a $2.7 million grant from the Office

ong>ofong> the Director ong>ofong> National Intelligence to continue

research on a highly sophisticated digital camera

for intelligence uses, iris recognition to identify

individuals. It will also have a range ong>ofong> potential

security and medical applications, including

detection ong>ofong> improvised explosive devices and

burn injury assessment.

Mirotznik and Mathews will lead a multidisciplinary,

multi-university team ong>ofong> researchers

from Wake Forest University, University ong>ofong> New

Mexico and University ong>ofong> Minnesota. They will

continue developing an enhanced resolution digital

camera that mimics a fly’s eye view ong>ofong> the world.

In what the researchers call “computational

imaging,” 18 smaller camera lenses take sub

images and then a computer combines their

information to produce a single, enhanced image

with an increased resolution.

The researchers have married the fly’s eye

imaging system to a computerized camera system,

known as a Practical Enhanced Resolution

Integrated Optical Digital Imaging Camera and

dubbed PERIODIC. The PERIODIC system resembles

a circuit-board sandwich, with the array ong>ofong>

lenses on the front and green circuit boards in

the middle carrying information to a computer.

Mirotznik explains, “The optical sensor and

song>ofong>tware components work in concert to solve

underlying complex image registration and

reconstruction problems in near real-time and

produce high definition, multi-layer images.”

Mirotznik ong>ofong>fers the example ong>ofong> a taking a

picture ong>ofong> a person in front ong>ofong> a brightly lit window.

A conventional camera wouldn’t know how

to adapt to the changes in light, and therefore

would not be able to properly capture most ong>ofong>

the details. The fly’s eye camera, however, can

capture even the smallest details in that scene.

The prototype, originally funded by a U.S.

Disruptive Technology Office challenge grant,

greatly improves the resolution and dynamic

range ong>ofong> imagery, removes glare, and performs

spectral filtering. This new grant will help fund an

additional 24 months ong>ofong> development, paying for

more equipment and graduate student assistants.

The camera is being developed for various

purposes including iris recognition. Existing technology

can scan an iris, which the researchers

liken to a fingerprint, to identify a person. But it

is not advanced enough to scan noncompliant

subjects who may not be at close range and do

not maintain eye contact with the camera for a

length ong>ofong> time. This enhanced camera technology

aims to solve that problem, a huge boon for

the intelligence community.

The researchers also see an application ong>ofong> the

technology for burn injury assessment. “The

most critical factors determining whether or not

burn patients recover are rapid assessment ong>ofong>

the degree ong>ofong> burns and quick, appropriate treatment,”

says Mirotznik.

The camera also has potential in identifying

improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, says

Mirotznik. By capturing details far beyond what a

conventional camera could, the PERIODIC could

determine objects that had not been in a location

the previous day or deemed unusual — a potentially

life-saving red flag for soldiers.

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Revolutionary

Body-Weight

Support System

Developed by

CUA/NRH

With most physical therapies, a quick intensive

start leads to better outcomes for the patient.

That’s certainly the case with walking therapies

for people who have traumatic neurological

injuries.

Delivering intensive yet safe therapy to individuals

with significant walking deficits, however,

presents great challenges to even the most

skilled therapists. In the acute stages ong>ofong> neurological

injuries such as stroke, spinal cord injury

and traumatic brain injury, individuals ong>ofong>ten

exhibit highly unstable walking patterns and poor

endurance, placing them at high risk for falls.

Therapists have had limited technologies

available to allow them to safely train their

patients to perform over-ground walking, particularly

in the early stages ong>ofong> recovery. Most overthe-ground

body weight support systems used in

physical therapy settings have many failings:

they lack dynamic body-weight support; are

usable only on smooth, flat surfaces; cannot

navigate obstacles such as stairs or uneven terrain;

and are so heavy that the therapist must

control their movement.

Recognizing these limitations, Joe Hidler,

associate prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> biomedical engineering,

developed the ZeroG dynamic over-ground bodyweight

support system, working with engineers

Ian Black, M.S.B.E., 2004, and Dave Brennan,

M.S.B.E., 1999, and physical therapists in the

Center for Applied Biomechanics and

Rehabilitation Research at the National

Rehabilitation Hospital (NRH). Hidler and his

team have incorporated extensive training features

into the ZeroG system that facilitate early,

intensive gait training in individuals with all levels

ong>ofong> gait impairments.

ZeroG consists ong>ofong> a revolutionary body-weight

support system that rides along a driven trolley

attached to an overhead rail system. As the

patient ambulates, the trolley automatically

moves forward or back, staying above the

patient. The therapist can set limits on the forward

progression speed ong>ofong> their patient, allowing

them to only walk within safe ranges. ZeroG can

also be used for body-weight supported treadmill

training, where the trolley is simply positioned

over the treadmill. At any time, the patient

can step ong>ofong>f the treadmill and begin or resume

over-ground gait training.

Because the system is mounted overhead,

people can practice walking on uneven terrain

and steps, and use walking aids such as walkers

or canes. The system also has a user-friendly

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interface, so the therapist can fully control the

system not only at the control station, but also

wirelessly through a pocket PC clipped to their

belt. This allows the therapist to remain at their

patient’s side at all times, encouraging patienttherapist

interaction.

ZeroG’s state-ong>ofong>-the-art electronics allows the

song>ofong>tware to track distance walked, walking speed,

falls prevented, gait symmetry and variability,

and unloading forces within and across sessions.

This allows therapists to track the patient’s

improvements over numerous therapy sessions.

Using ZeroG, individuals with gait impairments

can begin practicing walking early after their

injuries, in a safe, controlled way. The hope is

that by removing the fear ong>ofong> falling from patients

— particularly when practicing complicated

obstacles such as stairs — they will not develop

the compensatory strategies that ong>ofong>ten persist

into the chronic stages ong>ofong> injuries. In addition,

because ZeroG ong>ofong>fers the highest level ong>ofong> patient

safety, a single therapist can perform one-onone

therapy even with the most severely

impaired patients.

A clinical version ong>ofong> ZeroG has been installed

at NRH for therapists to begin using the system

with patients after stroke, spinal cord injury and

traumatic brain injury. In the summer ong>ofong> 2008,

the system was installed at Walter Reed Army

hospital to be used by soldiers with amputations

and traumatic brain injury. To follow the progress

ong>ofong> the ZeroG development, check out the Web

site at http://cabrr.cua.edu.

Prong>ofong>essor Joe Hidler oversees a demonstration ong>ofong> the ZeroG.

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CUA Prong>ofong>essor Earns Prestigious National Science Foundation Grant

Prong>ofong>essor John Judge

John Judge, assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> mechanical engineering, has been awarded a National

Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program award to study

vibration ong>ofong> collections ong>ofong> micromechanical and nanomechanical devices. He is the third

member ong>ofong> the engineering school to receive the award in the last two years.

The five-year grant, totaling $409,287, funds detection and study ong>ofong> very small differences

between micro- and nano-scale devices that are supposedly identical, and the ways in which

the differences affect the way the larger system that houses those devices vibrates.

Many applications ong>ofong> such systems, including filters for electrical signals in cell phones

and collections ong>ofong> sensors for detecting biological and chemical agents, depend on vibration

propagating freely across the system. However, small variations among seemingly identical

pieces ong>ofong> the larger system can disrupt the way energy disperses and can prevent the systems

from operating as intended.

“This builds on a lot ong>ofong> my past research, but it will be great to have the resources to create

some proong>ofong>-ong>ofong>-concept devices and to be able to explore in some new directions as

well,” Judge says ong>ofong> the grant.

Judge will construct prototypes ong>ofong> micro- and nano-scale systems, some with the variations

among individual components intentionally exaggerated by known amounts, and use

laser vibrometry to measure their vibration. The grant will help fund the construction ong>ofong> a

new experimental station at CUA to perform laser vibrometry through a microscope.

The NSF CAREER award seeks to honor young scientists whose activities best integrate

the realms ong>ofong> research and education, building the basis for long-term contributions to their

fields. It is considered the foundation’s most prestigious award in early career development.

“Dr. Judge has demonstrated outstanding talent both in the classroom and in his

research, and this award clearly recognizes his work,” said Charles Nguyen, dean ong>ofong> engineering.

“He has earned a place among a team ong>ofong> cutting-edge scientists, and we are proud

to have him among our junior faculty.”

Prong>ofong>essor Judge served as a 2007–2008 Burns Fellow. The research stipend he received

helped him prepare his proposal to the National Science Foundation.

Judge’s award follows last year’s CAREER grant awardees, Lu Sun, associate prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong>

civil engineering, and Otto Wilson, assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> biomedical engineering.

IRIS Research Center Seminars

Cover The Earth

This year the Interdisciplinary Remote Imaging and

Sensing (IRIS) Research Center took CUA on a

journey to the oceans, polar regions and continental

United States, as three speakers from

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center talked

about the programs they manage and their

research interests.

Ali Tokay, Ph.D ong>ofong> University ong>ofong> Maryland

Baltimore County gave humble buckets new

stature in his talk about how NASA’s Tropical

Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) ground validation

program keeps track ong>ofong> rainfall. Operating

in the Mid-Atlantic region for more than two

years, these mid-latitude coastal ground validation

sites in the United States include 23 tipping

bucket rain gauge stations within 15–200 km ong>ofong>

the National Weather Service S-band Doppler

radar located at Wakefield, Va. Tokay also mentioned

the possibility ong>ofong> CUA student internships

at NASA.

The second speaker, David Le Vine, Ph.D.,

took the audience from land to sea in his presentation

about NASA’s Aquarius Mission, which

senses sea surface salinity from space. Le Vine

revealed that salinity temperature determine

buoyancy. Satinity, he said, is critical for

understanding density-driven ocean circulation

and its impact on climate.

Markus Thorsten, Ph.D., took the audience to

more remote areas on earth — the South Pole,

including close-up photographs he took ong>ofong> penguins.

Thorsten talked about recent drastic

changes in the Arctic Sea ice cover and the significant

media attention it has drawn as part ong>ofong>

the discussions on global warming. He discussed

how NASA monitors the polar climate from space

and promised to come back with more pictures

and updates on his research and travels.

6 | cuaengineer


cuaengineer

Kaman and Burns Awards Granted to Outstanding ong>Engineeringong> Faculty

Each year to honor faculty for the excellence ong>ofong>

their research and teaching, the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong>

ong>Engineeringong> presents the Kaman Awards and

Burns Faculty Fellowships. For 2007–2008, John

Judge, Ph.D., assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> mechanical

engineering, received the 2008 Kaman Award for

Faculty Excellence in Research, and Gunnar Lucko,

Ph.D., assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> civil engineering

received the 2008 Kaman Award for Faculty

Excellence in Teaching. Ozlem Kilic, Ph.D., assistant

prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> electrical engineering, and Joseph

Vignola, Ph.D., assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> mechanical

engineering, received Burns Fellowships.

■ Judge was honored for his research on sensor

technology, which could help soldiers avoid

the types ong>ofong> blasts that have caused brain

injuries in the Iraq war. He also recently

received a CAREER award from the National

Science Foundation, which will support his

research on dynamics ong>ofong> microresonator

arrays. Judge is principal investigator or

co-principal investigator on three additional

grants, collaborating with other faculty

members working on detection ong>ofong> landmines

and improvised explosives as well as development

ong>ofong> sensors mentioned above.

■ Lucko directs the Construction ong>Engineeringong>

and Management Program ong>ofong> the Department

ong>ofong> Civil ong>Engineeringong>. In addition to his regular

courses, he has taught “Disaster-Mitigating

Design and Practice for the Developing

World,” which he developed with teaching

grant funding. Lucko’s students consistently

rank him highly on his end-ong>ofong>-semester

teaching evaluations. More over, he is well

liked by students. He advises four doctoral

students and directs five master’s theses. He

also serves as faculty adviser for the ASCE

Student Chapter and the Engineers Without

Borders student chapter and is lead mentor in

the ACE Mentor Program for Greater

Washington.

■ Kilic and Vignola were named 2008 Burns

Fellows. To be named a Burns Fellow, faculty

members must submit a proposal outlining

their research plan and be chosen by a

selection committee. This year, the selection

committee received six proposals. Kilic’s

proposal, “Collective Scattering Effects ong>ofong>

Plasmonic Nanoparticles,” considers the

medical applications ong>ofong> nanoparticles in treating

cancer. She proposes to develop an analytical

model to investigate the potential applications.

■ Vignola’s proposal, “The Effect Of Atmospheric

Turbulence on Performance ong>ofong> A Long-Range

Laser Doppler Vibrometer,” proposes to

construct a long-range laser vibrometer to

investigate issues related to the performance

ong>ofong> interferometric detection ong>ofong> structures that

camouflage improvised explosive devices.

The Kaman Awards for Faculty Excellence are

funded by a generous endowment from Charles

H. Kaman (B.A.E. 1940). The Burns Faculty

Fellowship was established in 2007 by a generous

endowment ong>ofong> the Burns family.

(From left) Prong>ofong>essors Joseph Vignola, Gunnar Lucko and John Judge.

fall2008 fall2007 | 7


cuaengineer

ong>Engineeringong> Alum Inducted into National Academy ong>ofong> Sciences

Mario Acuna, Ph.D.

Catholic University engineering alumnus Mario

Acuna has been fascinated by space and the stars

ever since his undergraduate years in his native

Argentina. That fascination led him to a career in

space research and, most recently, induction into

the prestigious National Academy ong>ofong> Sciences.

Acuna left Argentina in 1967, frustrated by

military intervention into university research

laboratories, and came to Washington, D.C. He

chose the nation’s capital largely for the area’s

space research opportunities. He then enrolled as

a graduate student in CUA’s then Space Science

program ong>ofong> the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>, attracted

by the department’s NASA graduate study program

and the work ong>ofong> faculty members C. C. Chang and

Y. C. Whang. He received his Ph.D. from the ong>Schoolong>

ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> in 1974.

“Another important element in that decision

was the recognition by CUA ong>ofong> graduate work

completed in Argentina,” Acuna says.

He began working at NASA Goddard Space

Flight Center in 1969 and focused on planetary

exploration, including magnetic fields and plasmas.

“The discovery ong>ofong> the Jovian ring and the

magnetic fields ong>ofong> Mars stand out as major

achievements,” says Acuna ong>ofong> his research. He

is now a senior astrophysicist and project scientist

with the International Solar Terrestrial Physics

Program at NASA Goddard.

At the moment, he is working on several

missions, including Juno, a mission to Jupiter to

understand the origins ong>ofong> this planet; Messenger,

a mission to Mercury to understand the origin ong>ofong>

its magnetic field; and Stereo, a mission to study

the sun and space weather in multiple dimensions.

“Most ong>ofong> this research is associated with

experimental magnetic field studies, including

the development ong>ofong> specialized instruments for

these missions,” Acuna says. The instruments he

has developed include ion mass and electron

spectrometers to measure the properties ong>ofong> the

ambient space plasma.

“Having [these] instruments visit almost all

the planets and objects in the solar system and

carry out fundamental discoveries makes me

feel extremely privileged to contribute to our

knowledge ong>ofong> the solar system,” he says.

Acuna’s contributions to the scientific community

led to his selection to the NAS in 2007.

Established in 1863 by Abraham Lincoln, the

NAS is a private organization ong>ofong> scientists and

engineers that act as ong>ofong>ficial advisers to the federal

government in science or technology.

“It was an unexpected honor,” Acuna says.

“This kind ong>ofong> recognition by your peers is incredibly

rewarding and puts the research carried out

for the last 40 years in a special perspective.”

NASA Administrator Inaugurates Alumni Wall ong>ofong> Fame

Faced with an abundance ong>ofong> accomplished alumni,

the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> has instituted the Wall

ong>ofong> Fame, which honors alumni who have reached

the pinnacle ong>ofong> their careers. Michael Griffin, Ph.D.,

M.S.E. 1974, administrator ong>ofong> NASA, first to be so

honored, was named to the wall on April 12, 2008.

Members ong>ofong> the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> Executive

Committee and current external member Marion

Gosney, B.A. 1975, director ong>ofong> alumni relations,

selected Griffin. Nominees for the Wall ong>ofong> Fame

are evaluated by members ong>ofong> the Selection

Committee, comprising faculty and alumni ong>ofong> the

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>, with finalists presented to

the dean, who makes the final decision. The

nominees must be recognized nationally as excelling and at the top ong>ofong> their

careers, e.g., president ong>ofong> a university as an educator, or CEO ong>ofong> a major

company as an engineer, or head ong>ofong> a government agency as a government

employee. In addition to having his or her name inscribed on the Wall ong>ofong>

Fame, each honoree receives a commemorative plaque. The wall is to be

installed in the Alumni Garden outside Pangborn Hall.

Griffin received a Master ong>ofong> Science in ong>Engineeringong> degree in aerospace

science in 1974. In March 2005, he was appointed by President George W.

Bush to serve as the administrator ong>ofong> NASA. Prior to that appointment,

8 | cuaengineer

Dr. Michael Griffin, NASA Administrator

Griffin served as chief engineer at NASA, deputy

for technology at the Strategic Defense Initiative

Organization, and later as CEO ong>ofong> Magellan

Systems, Inc. He has worked in the field ong>ofong>

space exploration and research for many years

and was called “a superb choice to lead NASA at

this critical moment,” Griffin is known for his “bold

leadership style, deep passion for space and

rigorous commitment,” as well as for his extensive

experience in the field ong>ofong> space exploration and

research. Griffin has been an adjunct prong>ofong>essor

ong>ofong> spacecraft design, applied mathematics and

aeronautics at the University ong>ofong> Maryland, Johns

Hopkins University and George Washington University.

He has published numerous technical papers in aerospace science and is

the author ong>ofong> the textbook Space Vehicle Design — widely considered an

essential text in the field.

Introducing Griffin, junior mechanical engineering major Kalin Petersen

said, “You are an inspiring example and we are proud to have you as an

esteemed Catholic University alumnus and to congratulate you on being the

first-ever inductee into the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> Wall ong>ofong> Fame.” In his

acceptance speech, Griffin expressed joy at receiving this recognition from

his alma mater and pride in being a “true” engineer.


cuaengineer

ong>Schoolong> Establishes

First Executive Development Board

Assembling a broad spectrum ong>ofong> talent across many disciplines, the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> has

established a volunteer board to assist Dean Charles C. Nguyen in strategic planning and alumni outreach.

The Executive Development Board held two on-campus meetings and several conference calls

during the last academic year.

“We have recruited an exemplary group ong>ofong> alumni to help the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> at this critical

stage,” said Dean Nguyen. “By all measures, the school is experiencing a great deal ong>ofong> success. The

board will play a key role in helping us sustain that momentum.”

“The ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> is poised to move to the next level,” said Board Chairman Matthew J.

Burns, B.E.E. 1980. “Dean Nguyen has recruited outstanding faculty who are winning prestigious

grants from the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Applications and enrollment

are up. We are implementing a five-year strategic plan. And, more and more alumni are supporting the

school. This is a good time to get involved,” he said.

Every board member made a charitable gift to the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> during the 2007–2008

academic year. In order to provide continuity and experience, they serve a two-year term with the option

to renew for an additional two-year term.

2008–2009 Executive

Development Board

Chair Matthew J. Burns, P.E. (B.E.E. 1980)

President

Burns ong>Engineeringong>, Inc.

Philadelphia, Pa.

Joseph L. Carlini (B.M.E. 1984)

Founder and CEO

McKean Defense Group, LLC

Philadelphia, Pa.

Trevor A. D’Souza (B.S.E. 1987)

Managing Director/Partner

Mason Wells Venture Capital

Milwaukee, Wis.

John R. Heisse, Esq. (B.C.E. 1976)

Partner and Chair, Construction and

Government Contracts

Thelen Reid Brown Raysman & Steiner LLP

San Francisco, Calif.

Thomas E. Laux (B.S.E. ’76, M.M.E. 1979)

Program Executive Officer

Air ASW, Assault and Special Mission Programs

U.S. Naval Air Systems Command

Patuxent River, Md.

Brien F. Morgan (B.E.E. 1987)

Managing Partner

Detente Group

McLean, Va.

Mark A. Peacock (B.Chem.E. 1983)

Principal

Archstone Consulting

Chicago, Ill.

Vincent N. Sica (B.M.E. 1983)

Vice President, Special Programs

Lockheed Martin

Fairfax, Va.

Barbara C. Wagner (B.S.Arch. 1980)

Senior Vice President

Clark Construction Group – California, LP

Costa Mesa, Calif.

For more information, contact:

Seated (from left): Thomas Laux, Brien Morgan, Dean Nguyen, Matthew Burns. Standing (from right): John Heisse, Barbara

Wagner, Vincent Sica.

Mark Roberts

Director ong>ofong> Development

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

robertsm@cua.edu

fall2008 | 9


cuaengineer

2007–2008 Honor Roll ong>ofong> Donors

The ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> gratefully acknowledges the following alumni and friends for their generosity. This list includes donors who made gifts between

May 1, 2007, and April 30, 2008. We have strived to list everyone correctly. If you find an error or omission, please contact us.

Anonymous

Jonathan J. Aarons, B.S.E. 1982

Adeyemi Adesina, M.S.C.E. 2005

American Electric Power

American Global Association, Inc.

Thomas J. Anessi, B.C.E. 1956

James B. Beckwith, B.S.Chem.E. 1983

J. Neil Birch, M.E.E. 1961, D.Engr. 1966

Mrs. Charles A. Bloedorn

Gregory F. Bock, M.S.E. 1973

John E. Burns, B.E.E. 1985

Matthew J. Burns, B.E.E. 1980

Robert C. Burns, B.M.E. 1951

Ronald Burrell

Courtney B. Burroughs, M.S.E. 1970, Ph.D. 1977

Michael P. Canavan, M.S.E. 1997

Joan R. Carlberg, M.S.E. 1971

Joseph L. Carlini, B.M.E. 1984

John J. Cecilio, M.Chem.E. 1971

James C. Chapman, B.A. 1983

Clark Construction Group, LLC

Donna M. Cookson, M.S.N. 1970

Ronald E. Couchot, M.M. 1978

H. Bruce Cranford, B.S.E. 1968

David L. Danner, Ph.D. 1982

Laura L. Dawson

Rex G. Early, B.A. 1953, B.Arch. 1953

Edward M. Nagel Foundation

ExxonMobil Foundation

Frederick R. Favo, B.Arch.E. 1955

Fidelity Investments Foundation

Ramsey W. Flynn

Jude Eric Franklin, B.E.E. 1965, M.E.E. 1968,

Ph.D. 1980

Lucy Elizabeth Fronheiser, B.M.E. 2002

G.T. McDonald Enterprises, Inc.

Christopher Gagliardi, B.C.E. 1995

Richard W. Galiher, LL.B. 1935, B.A. 1938

Jeffrey E. Giangiuli, M.S.E. 1991

Jeanine M. Gibbons, B.S.E. 1987

Albert A. Grant, B.C.E. 1948

Paul J. Guercio

Michael J. Hackert, B.E.E. 1980

Lawrence J. Hannon, M.M.E. 1979

Stephanie J. Healy

John R. Heisse II, B.C.E. 1976

Constance K. Hong>ofong>fman

Rembert F. Jones, M.C.E. 1964, Ph.D. 1973

Ursula Kelnhong>ofong>er

Charles D. Kepple, M.C.E. 1977

John J. Klisch, B.E.E. 1962

Francois J. Koenig, B.E.E. 1976

George F. Korkmas, B.S.Chem.E. 1952

Thomas E. Laux, B.S.E. 1977, M.M.E. 1979

Wah Hing Lee, B.E.E. 1973

Lockheed Martin

Michael Lombardi

Aileen Mary MacDonald, B.S.E. 1979

Joanne Magoulas, M.C.E. 1984

William D. Mark, B.M.E. 1956

Richard W. Martin, B.C.E. 1949

Thomas E. Maslen, B.C.E. 1982

Robert E. Matthews, B.M.E. 1950

Gordon H. McCormick, B.A. 1943

Elizabeth A. McGuire

Gerald S. McKenna, B.C.E. 1949

Edward J. Michuda, B.M.E. 1950

Brien F. Morgan, B.E.E. 1987

Anthony C. Newbauer, B.M.E. 1975

Northrop Grumman Foundation

James G. O’Boyle

Robert E. Oldani, M.S.E. 1997

Sheila C. Palmer, B.M.E. 1990

Estate ong>ofong> Thomas W. Pangborn

Geong>ofong>frey A. Pascoe, B.E.E. 1984

Mark A. Peacock, B.Chem.E. 1983

James W. Pereira, B.C.E. 1951

Frank J. Pruss, B.E.E. 1985

Dorothy E. Przygocki, B.A.E. 1947

Thomas A. Pugliese, B.S.Chem.E. 1964

John H. Quillinan, B.A. 1949

Raytheon Company

Nathan H. Rinehart, M.S.E. 1990

John A. Robbins, B.C.E. 1950

Albert E. Rottini, B.S.Arch. 1981

Nabil S. Saad, M.Chem.E. 1972, Ph.D. 1974

Serafin Y. Samson, B.S.E. 1985

Brian Walter Sheron, Ph.D. 1975

Vincent N. Sica, B.M.E. 1983

Russell A. Smith, M.M.E. 1964, Ph.D. 1969

Steven J. Smith, B.C.E. 1990, M.C.E. 1992

Christopher J. Snodgrass, B.M.E. 2003

J. Michael Suraci, B.S.E.E. 1962

Anthony Taddeo, B.S.E. 1987

Daniel J. Tracy, B.S.E. 1967

Barbara C. Wagner, B.S.Arch. 1980

John Mack Wall, M.S.E. 1982, M.C.E. 1986

Kate Tremper Walser, B.B.E. 1996

Chauncey Edward Warner, B.A. 1951

Robert A. Wilson, M.M.E. 1971

Jonathan Carl Wright, B.E.E. 1981

Addison Yeaman

10 | cuaengineer


cuaengineer

Robert Burns Receives

2007 ong>Engineeringong> Award

In honor ong>ofong> his outstanding achievements in the

field ong>ofong> engineering, Robert (Bob) Burns, B.M.E.

1951, received the 2007 ong>Engineeringong> Distinguished

Alumni Award at the October 2007 homecoming

luncheon. Accepting on his behalf was Burns’ son,

Matt Burns, B.E.E. 1980. More than 80 students,

faculty, alumni, administrators and staff were on

hand at the October 2007 homecoming luncheon,

where Dean Nguyen presented the plaque following

brief remarks by Provost James Brennan.

Sixty years ago, in 1947, Robert Burns returned

home from serving in World War II, and enrolled

in engineering classes at CUA on the GI Bill. He

graduated with a Bachelor ong>ofong> Mechanical

ong>Engineeringong> degree in 1951 and worked for an

engineering firm in Washington, D.C. opening a

branch ong>ofong>fice in Philadelphia, where the company

was working on a project for the airport. When

the project was completed, Burns stayed to

start his own firm in Philadelphia: Robert C.

Burns Associates.

Under his leadership, Robert C. Burns Associates

provided mechanical, electrical and plumbing

engineering services. He developed expertise in

airfield lighting systems, for which he gained

international recognition. In 1972 he received an

ong>Engineeringong> Achievement Award from the American

Council ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> Companies for the design

ong>ofong> an in-pavement airfield lighting system. Today

the firm, now called Burns ong>Engineeringong>, Inc. is run

by his sons Matt and John, and continues to thrive.

Burns was a founding member ong>ofong> the Consulting

Engineers Council ong>ofong> Philadelphia and has taken

the city’s history to heart. As host committee cochairman

for the 1981 ACEC National Convention,

Burns dressed up like Ben Franklin to greet engineers

visiting Philadelphia. He served on the City

ong>ofong> Philadelphia’s Electrical Code Advisory Board, as

well as the American Arbitration Association. He is

a member ong>ofong> several prong>ofong>essional organizations,

including the Pennsylvania Society ong>ofong> Prong>ofong>essional

Engineers, the Illuminating ong>Engineeringong> Society;

Matthew Burns, son ong>ofong> Robert Burns

and the American Society ong>ofong> Heating, Refrigeration

and Air Conditioning. Burns is a prong>ofong>essional engineer,

registered in Pennsylvania and 23 other

states. He retired in 1991 and currently resides in

Media, Delaware County, Pa., with his wife,

Betty. Mr. and Mrs. Burns have four sons —

three ong>ofong> whom are electrical engineers from

CUA — and eight grandchildren.

Vietnamese Students Arrived at CUA for 2+2 Program

The 2+2 program between the CUA ong>Schoolong>

opinion after being at CUA for a year, the

ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> and the International

Vietnamese students expressed their happiness

with the size ong>ofong> CUA, particularly in

University ong>ofong> the Vietnam National

University-Ho Chi Minh City had a good

terms ong>ofong> student-faculty interaction, small

start. After the Undergraduate Board ong>ofong> the

class size and personal attention. In addition,

CUA Academic Senate approved the proposed

2+2 program in May 2007, an

facilities and engineering curricular that

they were impressed by the laboratory

agreement was ong>ofong>ficially signed by the two

emphasize design and experiments versus

institutions. Students who participate in this

the theoretical emphasis ong>ofong> the curriculum

2+2 program spend the first two years at

at HCMIU. “The students here at CUA can

HCMIU and the last two years ong>ofong> their bachelor’s

degree program at CUA. As a result ong>ofong>

pared to my university. They are very helpful

access more easily to prong>ofong>essors as com-

the agreement, three Vietnamese students

and friendly…The CUA campus is so big

arrived at CUA in September 2007. Despite

and beautiful,” said Thang Hoang. Trang

its modest size, this group ong>ofong> students

Dinh added, “The university and the dean’s

From left: Du Le, Trang Dinh, Thang Hoang

made history at the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

ong>ofong>fice really helped us a lot to adapt to the

because it was the first-ever group ong>ofong> students

who transferred to CUA together as a group from a foreign institution better. We have a chance to practice by doing many class projects that deal with

new life here. The program at CUA is a lot

thanks to a 2+2 program.

real world problems.” All these positive comments in no way implied that

Du V. Le and Thang Hoang major in biomedical engineering and electrical everything was perfect. The students initially encountered issues adapting to

engineering, respectively, while Trang Dinh studies electrical engineering. life in the United States, registering for courses, transferring credits, and

Despite some initial difficulties with the English language, all transfer students finding ong>ofong>f-campus housing. The ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> has conducted a

managed to be on the dean’s list for both semesters ong>ofong> the 2007-2008 survey with the transfer students whose feedback will be used to improve

academic year by earning a grade point average ong>ofong> over 3.5. Asked for their the 2+2 program to better serve the students coming to CUA in the future.

fall2008 | 11


cuaengineer

Exploring Global

Educational

Opportunities

Continuing to expand international programs ong>ofong>

the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>, Dean Nguyen and his

directors ong>ofong> international programs visited eight

universities in Europe and Asia during the 2007–

2008 academic year. In August 2007, the dean and

Prong>ofong>essor Frank Pao met with the dean and key

ong>ofong>ficials and visited the laboratory facilities ong>ofong> the

engineering school ong>ofong> The Catholic University ong>ofong>

Leuven, Belgium. The next month, during a trip to

Portugal to accept a leadership award from the

International Network ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> Education

and Research in Coimbra, the dean, along with a

CUA delegation, met the vice-rector and dean ong>ofong>

engineering ong>ofong> The Catholic University ong>ofong> Lisbon

and visited their facilities. The two schools signed

a memorandum ong>ofong> understanding to explore

collaboration in research and education.

In February 2008, Dean Nguyen, Pao, and

Uyen Nguyen, Ph.D., who was recently appointed

International Director ong>ofong> Programs in Asia, visited

Kasetart University in Bangkok, Thailand, and

signed an MOU with the faculty ong>ofong> engineering ong>ofong>

this university to develop mutual education and

research programs. While in Thailand, the CUA

delegation also visited Burapha University in

Chonburi, meeting with the dean and faculty ong>ofong> the

college ong>ofong> engineering ong>ofong> this university. An MOU

was also signed between the two engineering

schools with goals similar to the one signed with

KU.

After the Thailand trip, Dean Nguyen, Director

Nguyen and Associate Prong>ofong>essor Binh Tran, Ph.D.,

chair ong>ofong> the CUA biomedical engineering

department, visited the International University

ong>ofong> the Vietnam National University-Ho Chi Minh

City, where an agreement was signed by the two

institutions to re-energize the existing 2+2

program. Dean Nguyen gave a presentation to the

faculty and students about CUA and the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong>

ong>Engineeringong> and explained the application

process ong>ofong> the 2+2 program. The CUA delegation

then visited the Saigon Technology University,

signing an MOU with this university. At STU, Dean

Nguyen received an honorary prong>ofong>essorship. Dean

Nguyen and Director Nguyen then traveled to

Danang, Vietnam, visiting with ong>ofong>ficials ong>ofong> Duy Tan

University and University ong>ofong> Danang, with the

probability ong>ofong> an MOU to be signed with these

universities in the near future.

12 | cuaengineer

Dean Nguyen received the leadership award at the INEER banquet in Coimbra, Portugal.

Faculty and administrators ong>ofong> CUA and Kasetart University at the MOU signing ceremony.

The signing ceremony ong>ofong> the MOU between CUA and the Saigon Technology University.


cuaengineer

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> ong>Embarksong> on First Hong Kong Exchange

Civil engineering student Thomas Lee has wanted

to travel to Asia since he first met a group ong>ofong>

Japanese children when he was in the fourth

grade. Lee got his wish in January, when he

flew to Hong Kong as one ong>ofong> five CUA students

participating in the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>’s

pioneer study-abroad student exchange.

Lee, along with fellow juniors Kristen Kennedy,

Sarah Luffy, Kathryn Kazior and Emily Growney,

studied last spring at the Hong Kong Polytechnic

University in the first ong>ofong> several student-exchange

programs that will link CUA’s engineering school

and foreign universities.

Besides realizing a childhood dream, Lee sees

this as an opportunity to gain experience in the

international engineering world that might set

him apart from other young engineers.

In fact, China is producing more engineers

than the United States and, increasingly, U.S.

engineering firms are outsourcing their work and

ong>ofong>fices to China, says engineering Dean Charles

Nguyen, making China a hotbed ong>ofong> engineering

activity. China’s ongoing industrial and economic

boom also provides plenty ong>ofong> work for engineers.

As part ong>ofong> the exchange, nine students from

Hong Kong Polytechnic took courses at CUA for

the spring semester. The CUA students arrived in

Hong Kong on Jan. 9. Students studying at CUA

from Hong Kong Polytechnic arrived on campus

in mid-January.

The exchange with Hong Kong Polytechnic has

been several years in the making, part ong>ofong> what

Nguyen sees as a necessary ong>ofong>fering for top

American engineering schools. Other exchange

programs are planned with universities in Taiwan,

Vietnam, Malaysia and China. As with Hong Kong

Polytechnic, CUA students in these future programs

will attend an overseas university for a semester

while paying tuition at CUA and earning credit

toward their CUA degrees.

This year’s crop ong>ofong> CUA students are biomedical

and civil engineering majors, and their courses

while in Hong Kong focused on the core curricula

ong>ofong> those subjects, taught in English.

While students took the same core curricula

ong>ofong>fered at CUA, the benefit ong>ofong> taking those courses

in China is an opportunity to see, firsthand, how a

country with such an emerging, global engineering

presence frames those subjects.

In preparation for their travels, the five CUA

students spent the fall 2007 semester preparing

to better integrate into Chinese culture by taking

Chinese 101, an introductory course on Chinese

language and culture organized by the engineering

school in collaboration with the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> Arts and

Sciences.

The students stayed in Hong Kong until May,

when the semester ended, with an option to

extend the stay. Many ong>ofong> the students traveled in

mainland China during their exchange. Dean

Nguyen visited them in February to observe the

program and see how they were acclimating.

Nguyen says he believes these partnerships

are a two-way street, allowing for the best and

brightest foreign engineers to attend CUA for a

semester — and perhaps return here for graduate

school.

“This study abroad program was established to

make our future graduates fully immersed in what

is, increasingly, a global engineering market,” says

Dean Nguyen.

(From left) Emily Growney, Thomas Lee Jr.,

Kathryn Kazior, Kristen Kennedy, Sarah Luffy

Hong Kong students in Pangborn Hall.

fall2008 | 13


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Visit Brings Closer

Collaboration

A delegation from Taiwan’s Chung Yuan Christian

University visited the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> on Oct.

26, 2007. Led by President Cheng and his wife, the

group included Prong>ofong>essor S. P. Tung, dean ong>ofong> the

College ong>ofong> Science; Prong>ofong>essor S. H. Wang, director

ong>ofong> the Center ong>ofong> Alumni Services; and Prong>ofong>essor J.

T. Teng ong>ofong> the Department ong>ofong> Mechanical ong>Engineeringong>.

In 2006, Dean Nguyen worked with Teng, then

dean ong>ofong> CYCU’s College ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>, to draft a

memorandum ong>ofong> understanding with CYCU, which

fostered collaboration between the two schools.

The CYCU delegation came to CUA to forge a closer

partnership relation between two institutions and

for further discussion ong>ofong> collaboration on 4+1

and 1+1 graduate degree programs.

The delegation toured the research and instruction

laboratories at the departments ong>ofong> biomedical engineering

and electrical engineering. The group also

met with Provost James Brennan and Very Reverend

David M. O’Connell, C.M., the university president.

The visit concluded with a dinner hosted by

Dean Nguyen and his wife at their home, attended

by the delegation and several engineering faculty.

CYCU president visited with CUA president,

Father O’Connell.

CYCU president and CUA provost Brennan,

during the CUA visit.

U.S. Department ong>ofong> Defense Honors

CUA Graduate Student

Rocco Arizzi has been overcoming hurdles since the age ong>ofong> 3, when he was diagnosed with

spinal muscular atrophy. Last December, Arizzi was recognized for his many accomplishments in

the face ong>ofong> adversity: The Catholic University graduate student and Naval Surface Warfare Center

employee received the Department ong>ofong> Defense Outstanding Employee with a Disability Award for

2007 — the only naval employee worldwide to receive that honor.

Arizzi, who is wheelchair bound and has limited use ong>ofong> his hands, has been balancing his doctoral

research with a full-time job with the center in Washington, D.C., for the last four years as

he works toward a doctorate in electrical engineering.

“There are a lot ong>ofong> ways that people with disabilities can participate in our national defense and

they may not realize it,” Arizzi says. “I hope something like this will, in the future, put into the minds ong>ofong>

children with disabilities that they can make a positive impact on their country — without necessarily

being a soldier.”

Arizzi has been raising awareness about spinal muscular atrophy — and the potential for those

afflicted to lead full and active lives — since he was selected as the Muscular Dystrophy Association’s

Goodwill Ambassador for New Jersey at age 4. He became the National Goodwill Ambassador soon after.

At age 16, Arizzi Rocco was one ong>ofong> 200 Texas high school students chosen to attend the

Texas Academy ong>ofong> Mathematics and Science, a two-year early entry college program, at the

University ong>ofong> North Texas. He received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering at the

University ong>ofong> Texas in San Antonio. And while enrolled in his master’s degree studies at Florida

Atlantic University, Arizzi worked as an adjunct algebra instructor and tutor at a local community

college.

“Rocco’s achievement is truly exceptional and well deserved,” said Mark Mirotznik, associate

prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> electrical engineering and Arizzi’s doctoral adviser. “CUA's Department ong>ofong> Electrical

ong>Engineeringong> is very fortunate to have a graduate student like him. He is a very gifted engineer, conducting

research on how naval ship designers can learn from nature when designing new electronic

sensing systems. Above all, however, he is simply a great person who inspires everyone around him.”

14 | cuaengineer


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Curbing Global Warming Workshop

Hosted by Center for Environment and Energy

In October 2007, 70 multinational experts from the

United States, China and Africa came to CUA’s campus

for a two-day workshop organized by the new

CUA’s Center for Environment and Energy under

the direction ong>ofong> Frank H.P. Pao, Ph.D., prong>ofong>essor

ong>ofong> civil engineering. Participants — prong>ofong>essors

from Catholic University, Howard University, West

Kentucky University, West Virginia University, 10

experts from universities and institutions in China,

as well as representatives ong>ofong> governmental institutions

— addressed the topic ong>ofong> how to curb

global warming by carbon sequestration. They

were welcomed to CUA by Provost James Brennan,

Ph.D., and Dean Charles Nguyen, D.Sc.

The workshop focused on technology that

converts CO 2 from the flue gas ong>ofong> fossil fuel-fired

power plants into a water-soluble and carboncontaining

fertilizer, which ultimately leaches to

underground aquifers. There it eventually turns

into limestone, a stable form ong>ofong> carbon.

Considered an environmental “win-win” as it

removes carbon from the air and provides fertilizer,

this technology will help curb global warming

and benefit both developing countries that rely

heavily on agricultural production as well as

developed countries, says Pao, who co-chaired

the workshop with Jerry Shang, chief scientist for

the Center for Environment & Energy.

Among the financial supporters for the workshop

was America Global Association, Inc. ong>ofong> New

York, a trade and culture exchange company working

primarily with the United States and China. A

working group ong>ofong> multinational experts identified

at the workshop is undertaking efforts to further

develop this technology in both the United States

and China. A second international workshop will

be organized in the near future to report and

assess the progress ong>ofong> this new technology.

William Readdy

Talks ong>ofong> Astronaut

ong>Engineeringong>

Challenges

William Readdy, managing partner ong>ofong> Discovery

Partners International, LLC, visited the CUA

campus to speak with approximately 30

mechanical engineering students in December

2007. Sponsored by ASME, Readdy’s speech on

space flight through the years was informative

and socially engaging — the students shared

conversation and pizza with Readdy prior to the

presentation.

The former astronaut’s firsthand knowledge ong>ofong>

NASA and the technological challenges ong>ofong> space

flight gave students an insider’s perspective on

life as an astronaut, many ong>ofong> the engineering

challenges that are involved in space flight, and

the management ong>ofong> the U.S. space program.

Throughout the presentation Readdy took time to

give detailed answers to all ong>ofong> the students’

questions.

Readdy, a graduate ong>ofong> the United States Naval

Academy with a degree in aeronautical engineering,

earned his wings as a naval aviator. He

went on to become a Navy test pilot, serving as

the project test pilot on several programs. He

logged 7,000 flying hours in more than 60 types

ong>ofong> fixed wing aircraft and helicopters and more

than 550 carrier landings. He was selected as an

astronaut by NASA in 1987. He is a veteran pilot

astronaut with three space flights — STS-42

(Jan. 22–30, 1992), STS-51 (Sept. 12–22, 1993)

and STS-79 (Sept. 16–26, 1996) — and has

logged more than 650 hours in space. He subsequently

served as the first manager ong>ofong> the Space

Shuttle Program and the associate director ong>ofong>

space flight for NASA, overseeing the safe return

to flight after the loss ong>ofong> the Columbia.

Attendees ong>ofong> the Curbing Global Warming Workshop.

fall2008 | 15


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Senior Awarded

ASME Scholarship

Mentos Challenge

Piques ong>Engineeringong> Students and Faculty

Omar Monterrubio, a senior mechanical engineering

major, has received a scholarship for

$1,000 from the Washington, D.C., branch ong>ofong> the

American Society ong>ofong> Mechanical Engineers.

Monterrubio, who juggles his many campus

community activities with a work-study position in

the Department ong>ofong> Mechanical ong>Engineeringong>, adds

this scholarship to several others at CUA.

Monterrubio became interested in engineering

while still in high school, gaining early experience

as an intern at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in

Houston, Texas, for two summers, where he

worked with biomedical and electrical engineers.

He graduated from Mount Carmel High ong>Schoolong> in

Houston as valedictorian in 2005. He also received

Mount Carmel’s MVP award for varsity soccer.

At CUA, Monterrubio is the treasurer ong>ofong> the

student chapter ong>ofong> the American Society ong>ofong>

Mechanical Engineers, vice president ong>ofong> the Latin

Alliance Club, an extraordinary minister ong>ofong> Holy

Communion, a member ong>ofong> FOCUS (Filipino

Organization ong>ofong> Catholic University Students), and

member ong>ofong> the Career Services Student Advisory

Board. He also plays intramural soccer. After

graduation in May 2009, he plans to seek fulltime

employment and then later plans to pursue

a master’s degree in engineering.

Almost every college student who has seen You

Tube can tell you what happens when you drop a

handful ong>ofong> Mentos candies into a bottle ong>ofong> diet

soda: a spontaneous eruption ong>ofong> soda-foam,

shooting out the top ong>ofong> the soda bottle. Two years

ago, this rather unassuming bit ong>ofong> physics gave

Assistant Prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> Electrical ong>Engineeringong>

Scott Mathews, Ph.D., the idea to organize an

engineering competition: The CUA Diet Soda and

Mentos Challenge.

He challenged all the students ong>ofong> the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong>

ong>Engineeringong> to design and build “nozzles” that

would screw onto a standard two-liter soda bottle,

hold a number ong>ofong> Mentos inside, confine the stream

ong>ofong> soda to get the “fountain” to shoot up as high as

possible after the Mentos were dropped into the

diet soda. The ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> ong>ofong>fered a

cash prize ong>ofong> $50 to the student who could produce

the tallest fountain. The event was a huge

success, with about 25 students participating. It

was an excellent example ong>ofong> CUA engineering

students learning hands-on engineering.

The event was so successful that Mathews

and the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> decided to do it

again this year. This time, Mathews handed ong>ofong>f

most ong>ofong> the work to student Patrick Boughan,

president ong>ofong> the IEEE student chapter at CUA,

and his fellow chapter members. They bought

dozens ong>ofong> bottles ong>ofong> diet soda, bulk packages ong>ofong>

Mentos, and ong>ofong> course lots ong>ofong> hamburgers and

hot dogs to entice hungry engineers to participate.

Once again, the event was a great success!

More than 30 students participated, and this

year a few prong>ofong>essors even tried out some ong>ofong>

their own nozzle designs (although they were not

eligible for the $50 cash prize). About 50 people

showed up to watch and eat. Last year’s record

ong>ofong> 32 feet was broken, albeit by only one foot!

Mathews and the IEEE Chapter plan to hold the

event every year and may broaden the project to

include a separate challenge for local high school

students.

A CUA student tests his design in the annual Mentos challenge. Students measured their “fountains” against an

oversized ruler.

16 | cuaengineer


Concrete Canoe:

Lessons in

Stewardship,

Teamwork, New

Beginnings

A group ong>ofong> CUA engineering students traveled to

West Virginia to compete in the American Society ong>ofong>

Civil Engineers’ annual concrete canoe competition.

The Virginia conference was co-hosted by

Fairmont State University and West Virginia

Institute ong>ofong> Technology, and it featured competition,

engineering-related sightseeing and teambuilding

events.

The process ong>ofong> designing and preparing the

canoe and team for the competition started in

August 2007. The team faced many new challenges

from the beginning. The rules for the concrete

mixture had been significantly changed from

prior years, which required the team to test new

and unconventional aggregates, including air song>ofong>t

gun pellets. Testing those pellets led to the idea

ong>ofong> using recycled plastic cylindrical pellets. This fit

with CUA’s efforts to be good stewards concerned

with the carbon footprint ong>ofong> the projects and

with to recycling, reducing and reusing as much

as possible.

As the team aggregate tested the plastic

cylindrical pellets over the academic year, it

found that recycled plastic chips with jagged

edges would better integrate themselves with the

concrete mix. The canoe was then created using

a male Styrong>ofong>oam form and three layers ong>ofong> concrete

placed in one day over about a 12-hour period.

With the placement complete, the canoe was cured

inside a humidity tent created by students.

Following the curing, the team took several

weeks to put the finishing touches on the canoe

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and prepare for the trip to West Virginia. In honor

ong>ofong> the April visit to campus ong>ofong> Pope Benedict XVI,

the canoe was named The Vatican Vessel and

stained an appropriate gold to match the theme ong>ofong>

the papal visit.

The competition challenged the students and

carried lessons that could not have been learned

in a traditional setting, bringing them together to

find new solutions when things did not work

according to plan. The team is proud to have

placed third in the oral presentation section ong>ofong>

the competition.

fall2008 | 17


cuaengineer

Hovercraft Aids Humanitarian Efforts

CUA students and faculty work together on a project to help in the

global humanitarian landmine crisis

The challenge is daunting: how to help rid the

world ong>ofong> landmines left behind after military conflicts.

But a group ong>ofong> CUA engineering students

spent their senior year tackling the issue, coming

up with an elegant and relatively low-cost possibility.

Landmines kill and maim civilians in more

than 100 countries, ong>ofong>ten decades after a conflict

has passed, and they represent a prong>ofong>ound

humanitarian crisis. Fourth-year mechanical

engineering students set out to use their senior

project class to design and construct a prototype

robotic hovercraft capable ong>ofong> carrying and

powering landmine detection hardware into

minefields. Building on the previous year’s design

project, students devised a fully autonomous

craft so that no operator is put in harm’s way.

The hovercraft concept, which uses a large

fan to create a cushion ong>ofong> air that the vehicle

rides on, has several important advantages over

the vehicles with tires that are currently used for

this dangerous yet important work. These

include the inherent nimbleness ong>ofong> a craft that

rides on air that allows the vehicle to move from

side to side as easily as it moves forward and

backward and over all manner ong>ofong> terrain. In fact

the craft can operate over sand, marshes and

wetlands as well as grassy pastures and never

get stuck. Riding on this cushion ong>ofong> air also distributes

the weight on the vehicle and its payload

over the entire footprint ong>ofong> the craft, reducing the

ground pressure to about 0.1 psi, far below the

approximate 5 psi pressure required to detonate

the most sensitive mines.

Using rigorous engineering design practices

and state ong>ofong> the art song>ofong>tware, students created a

craft with a deceptively simple structure made ong>ofong>

wood, a lawnmower engine, a PC, and other

commonly available components. This inexpensive,

reliable craft is also repairable in the field using

rudimentary tools — important details in the

developing countries where most ong>ofong> these landmines

are located.

A gratifying sign ong>ofong> the value ong>ofong> this project

came when the team won a competitive grant

from the U.S. Department ong>ofong> State, Office ong>ofong>

Weapons Removal and Abatement, to further

develop their prototype. The students enjoyed

this opportunity to use the sometimes abstract

book skills learned in the classroom to build

something that could serve the world community

on this critically important problem and see that

engineering is ultimately about solving real

problems in the world we live in.

Omar Monterrubio working on the hovercraft.

18 | cuaengineer


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CUA Continues Partnership with Clark

Construction Group

Volunteers, corporate contributions help students and faculty

2008 COMMENCEMENT

The Catholic University ong>ofong> America ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> has created the Clark Construction Group, LLC

Fund for Construction Management to recognize our long-standing partnership with one ong>ofong> the most

respected contracting firms in the United States. Supported by contributions from the firm, located in

Bethesda, Md., the Clark Fund will support CUA’s ong>Engineeringong> Construction Management Program.

“We are extraordinarily grateful to Clark Construction Group for supporting our students,” said

Prong>ofong>essor Poul V. Lade, Ph.D., chair ong>ofong> the Department ong>ofong> Civil ong>Engineeringong>. “Their generosity will allow

us to ong>ofong>fer scholarships to some very bright students, and give our students and faculty an opportunity

to attend conferences and visit construction sites.”

Three employees ong>ofong> Clark Construction Group have also agreed to serve as alumni-volunteers: John

P. Cooper (B.C.E. 1997), project executive; Lawrence E. Moore II (B.C.E. 1994), director ong>ofong> engineering;

and Barbara C. Wagner (B.S.Arch. 1980), senior vice president. The first three scholarship winners are

pictured below.

Angel A. Pena Orozco, master’s student James P. Cooper, master's student E. Phillip Schied, doctoral candidate

Biomedical ong>Engineeringong> Names

2008–2009 Nagel Scholars

Each year, through a generous financial gift from the Edward M. Nagel Foundation, CUA’s biomedical

engineering department identifies and recognizes the program’s top students, its Nagel Scholars.

Edward M. Nagel was an entrepreneur and businessman who co-founded the OroweatTM Baking

Company. His immigrant experience, especially during the Great Depression, engendered in Nagel a

strong desire to support hard-working, enterprising students seeking an education. In 1992, he founded

the Edward M. Nagel Foundation to provide scholarships for students. CUA is one ong>ofong> only six universities

funded by the foundation throughout the United States. The biomedical engineering department

selects Nagel Scholars based upon demonstrated excellence in the classroom and service, as well as

active involvement in the CUA community and beyond. In addition, these students are chosen for their

potential for entrepreneurial success and leadership in the field ong>ofong> biomedical engineering. The

cumulative average GPA ong>ofong> this year’s Nagel Scholars is 3.91.

The 2008–2009 Nagel Scholars are Thomas Giuliani (2009), Megan Jamiokowski (2010),

Theresa Murray (2010), Katherine Rucky (2010), Jenna Graham (2011), Andrew Gravunder (2011),

Patrick Noonan (2011), Timothy Mierzwa (2012) and Joseph McAnaney (2012). Each student named

receives a scholarship in the amount ong>ofong> $5,000 for each ong>ofong> their four years ong>ofong> undergraduate study.

fall2008 | 19


cuaengineer

Engineers without Borders ong>Embarksong> to El Salvador

After months ong>ofong> preparation, a group from CUA

finally set foot in the small village ong>ofong> Santa Clara

in El Salvador in January ong>ofong> 2008. The eight

undergraduate students from CUA; Gunnar

Lucko, assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> civil engineering;

civil engineer and CUA alumnus Tim Garland;

and architect Alex Higbee arrived in Santa Clara,

a village ong>ofong> approximately 2,100 inhabitants in

the rural eastern part ong>ofong> El Salvador, to begin two

projects under the umbrella ong>ofong> CUA’s Engineers

Without Borders chapter. The projects are expected

to be completed after several more visits.

The EWB chapter, started in 2005 with guidance

from John Judge, Ph.D., assistant prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong>

mechanical engineering, draws active members

from several engineering departments. The CUA

chapter, collaborating with the local prong>ofong>essional

chapter ong>ofong> this humanitarian organization, is

designing a distribution system for potable water

that will serve 260 households, with an ultimate

capacity ong>ofong> 400. Most Santa Clara residents now

supply their drinking water from hand-dug wells,

which have been found to contain various

bacteriological contaminants. Public health

proponents will be trained with support from

George Washington University to augment the

water system with information on hygiene.

For the second project, the group seeks to

develop low-cost structural solutions to improve

earthquake-resistance. The students prepared for

the site inspection in Santa Clara through coursework

in two Disaster-Mitigating Design courses, CE

434 and CE 435, taught by Lucko and Panos

Tsopelas, Ph.D., associate prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> civil

engineering. This project is funded by a grant from

the National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators

Alliance. Students and the two instructors have

been working together in a workshop-like learning

environment to design a small building for Santa

Clara that will house the ong>ofong>fices ong>ofong> the new water

administration and a health clinic. Having studied

the local building techniques and the impact ong>ofong>

the 2001 earthquake firsthand helps the students

design a safer and healthier facility appropriate

for the conditions and culture ong>ofong> Santa Clara.

The weeklong stay in Santa Clara gave CUA

students plenty ong>ofong> time to explore the local topography,

take survey measurements and dig test

trenches to examine the soil. They also built a

prototype household water hookup and greywater

pit with local volunteers. Rounding ong>ofong>f the

memorable journey, students interviewed

representatives ong>ofong> the National Water Development

Board and the Earth-quake Institute in the capital

city ong>ofong> San Salvador.

20 | cuaengineer


Faculty

Grants

■ Brown, J. S., “Identification and Evaluation ong>ofong>

Working Fluids for High Temperature Heat

Applications (including replacements for R-

114),” ASHRAE, April 3, 2006–Nov. 1, 2007,

$68,497.

■ Brown, J.S., “Research on Automated Planning

and Programming for Intelligent Systems,

National Institute ong>ofong> Standards and Technology,”

April 1, 2006–March 31, 2007, $260,197.

■ Brown, J.S., “Research on Automated Planning

and Programming for Intelligent Systems,”

National Institute ong>ofong> Standards and Technology,

April 1, 2007–March 31, 2008, $273,103.

■ Chang, L., “Quantitative Image Analysis ong>ofong>

Diffusion Tensor MRI data,” National Institutes ong>ofong>

Health (NIH), Sept. 2007–Sept. 2008, $ 40,000.

■ Brennan, Dave (PI), and Hidler, Joseph M.,

(Co-PI), “Telehealth system for cognitivecommunication

treatments,” National Institute

ong>ofong> Health, April 2006–March 2008, $341,256.

■ Hidler, Joseph M., “Smart over-ground body

weight support system,” NIDRR

(#H133G050259), Nov. 2005–Oct. 2008,

$448,483.

■ Hidler, Joseph M., (Co-PI), “National Capitol

Area Rehabilitation Research Network (NCAR-

RN),” NIH-NCMRR, Oct. 2005–Sept. 2010,

$517,785 ($3,715,503 total).

■ Hidler, Joseph M., “Zero G: Dynamic Over

Ground Body-Weight Support System,” U.S.

Army Medical Research and Material Command

(USAMRMC), Aug. 2007–Aug. 2008, $241,179.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica (PI), and Hidler,

Joseph M., (Co-PI),”The impact ong>ofong> autonomic

dysreflexia on SCI patient skin and its role in

skin ulcer formation,” Christopher and Dana

Reeves Foundation, Aug. 2007–July 2009,

$150,000.

■ Judge, J. A., “Dynamics ong>ofong> micro- and

nanomechanical resonator arrays,” National

Science Foundation CAREER Award, May

2008–April 2013, $410,000.

■ Judge, J. A. (PI), and Mathews, S. A. (Co-PI),

“Fabrication and Testing ong>ofong> a Blast Concussion

Burst Sensor,” U. S. Army / Office ong>ofong> the

Congressionally Directed Medical Research

Programs, June 2008–Nov. 2009, $190,920.

■ Vignola, J. F. (PI) and Judge, J. A. (Co-PI),

“Autonomous Hovercraft Platform for Landmine

Detection Technology,” U.S. Department ong>ofong>

State, July 2007–June 2008, $61,777.

■ Vignola, J. F. (PI) and Judge, J. A. (Co-PI),

“Synthetic Aperture Acoustics for Detection ong>ofong>

Foam covered IEDs,” U.S. Army Night Vision &

Electronic Sensors Directorate through Alion,

Inc., Sept. 2007– Aug. 2008, $65,000.

■ Kilic, O. “DURIP: Accelerated Reconfigurable

Programming for Hybrid Modeling and

Analysis ong>ofong> Complex Systems,” Army Research

Office, May 1, 2007–April 30, 2008, $54000.

■ Kilic, O., “Hardware Accelerated Reconfigurable

Programming for Electromagnetic Simulations

and Optimization ong>ofong> Advanced Material Design,”

ONR, April 27, 2007–April 26, 2010,

$230,000.00.

■ Kilic, O., “Enhanced Multi-beam Satellite

Antenna Performance Using Particle Swarm

Optimization,” CUA Grant in Aid, June 2007–

Aug. 2007, $2000.00.

■ Lade, P. V., “Experimental Investigation ong>ofong>

Stress Rotation Effects in Soils,” Small Grant

for Exploratory Research (SGER), National

Science Foundation, March 1, 2004–Feb. 28,

2007, $68,023.

■ Lade, P. V., “Instability ong>ofong> Geological Materials

under Three-Dimensional Stress Conditions,”

American Chemical Society (The Petroleum

Research Fund), May 1, 2004–Aug. 2008,

$80,000.

■ Lucko, G., “Enabling higher dimensionality ong>ofong>

temporal-spatial analysis applied to linear

scheduling ong>ofong> construction operations based on

singularity functions in structural engineering.”

National Science Foundation, July 2007–June

2009, $67,571 + $50,000 tuition remission.

■ Lucko, G. (PI), and Tsopelas, P. (Co-PI),

“Teaching structural design, construction

practices, and sustainable technologies for

mitigation ong>ofong> natural disaster damages in

coastal and fault areas ong>ofong> developing regions,”

National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators

Alliance, July 2006–July 2009, $42,450.

■ Lum, P. S., “Extension ong>ofong> the MIME robotic

system for stroke rehabilitation,” Department

ong>ofong> Veterans Affairs Merit Review Award, July

2007–June 2011, $612,400.

■ Uswatte (PI), Lum, P. S. (Co-PI), “Home-based

automated therapy ong>ofong> arm function after stroke

via tele-rehabilitation,” NIH R01 Award April

2008–March 2012, $1,215,835.

■ Healton (PI), Lum, P. S. (Co-PI), “A Robotic

Exoskeleton for Post-stroke Hand Neuro-rehabilitation,”

U.S. Army Medical Research and

Materiel Command, Nov. 2006–Oct. 2008,

$250,000.

■ Healton (PI), Lum, P. S. (Co-PI), “Neuroscientific

aspects ong>ofong> upper extremity amputation,” U.S.

Army Medical Research and Materiel Command

Nov. 2006–Oct. 2008, $200,000.

■ Healton (PI), Lum, P. S. (Co-PI), “Assessment

ong>ofong> Motor System Function in the First Days after

Brain Injury,” U.S. Army Medical Research and

Materiel Command Nov. 2006–Oct. 2008,

$200,000.

■ Mathews, Scott A., “Compact Multi-Aperture

Imaging System,” University ong>ofong> New Mexico,

2007, $151,890.

■ Mathews, Scott A., (Co-PI), Defense

University Research Instrumentation Project

(DURIP), “Millimeter Wave Characterization

System for Composite Electromagnetic

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Materials,” Office ong>ofong> Naval Research (ONR),

2007, $297,000.

■ Mathews, Scott A., (Co-PI), “A Practical

Enhanced-Resolution Integrated Optical-

Digital Imaging Camera (PERIODIC),” Defense

Microelectronics Activity (DMEA), 2007–2009,

$2,699,907.

■ Mathews, Scott A., (Co-PI), “Fabrication and

Testing ong>ofong> a Blast Concussion Burst Sensor,”

Congressionally Directed Medical Research

Program (U.S. Army Medical Research

Acquisition Activity June 1, 2008–Nov. 30,

2009, $190,920.00.

■ Mathews, S. A. (Co-PI) and Mirotznik, M. S.

(Co-PI), “Compact Multi-aperture Imaging

Camera,” Disruptive Technology Office ong>ofong> the

Director ong>ofong> National Intelligence, May 2007 –

Oct. 2007, $112,000.

■ Mirotznik, M. S., “Millimeter Wave

Characterization System for Composite

Electromagnetic Materials,” Office ong>ofong> Naval

Research (ONR), Defense University Research

Instrumentation Project (DURIP), April 2007–

May 2008, $297,000.

■ Mirotznik, M. S. (PI), “Electromagnetic Codes

for the Analysis ong>ofong> Planar Periodic Structures,”

Navy Surface Warfare Center, Carderock

Division, Oct. 2007–Oct. 2008, $50,000.

■ Mirotznik, M. S. (Co-PI) and Mathews, S. A.

(Co-PI), “A Practical Enhanced-Resolution

Integrated Optical-Digital Imaging Camera

(PERIODIC),” Defense Microelectronics Activity

(DMEA), Dec. 2007–Sept. 2010, $2,699,907.

■ Mirotznik, M. S. (PI), “Design and Modeling ong>ofong>

Resonant LWIR Structures,” Army Research

Office (ARO), April 2008–April 2011, $300,000.

■ Mirotznik, M. S. (PI), “Antenna Isolation using

Antireflective Micro-Surface Coatings” Office ong>ofong>

Naval Research (ONR), April 2008–April 2010,

$124,534.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., “Retinal Oximeter

using Novel Multi-aperture Camera for assessment

ong>ofong> early signs ong>ofong> Diabetic Retinopathy,”

Coulter Foundation, 2007–2009, $240,000.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., and Hidler,

Joseph M., “Skin hypoxia and the formation

ong>ofong> skin ulcer in individuals with autonomic

dysreflexia,” Christopher Reeve Foundation.

2007–2009, $140,000.

■ Nguyen, Quan, and Ramella-Roman, Jessica

C.,“Novel Assessment ong>ofong> Early Changes in

Diabetic Retinopathy,” NIH-NEI, 2008–2011,

$1,775,811.

■ Regalia, P. A., “Two Problems in Multiuser

Communications over High Occupancy

Channels,” National Science Foundation, Jan.

2007–Dec. 2010, $120,000.

■ Regalia, P. A., “Distributed Estimation in

Wireless Sensor Networks via Expectation

Propagation,” National Science Foundation,

Sept. 2007–Aug. 2010, $194,016.

■ Tran, B. Q. (Co-PI), “Community-based Clinical

eStorefront & In-Home Biomedical Access @

fall2008 | 21


cuaengineer

Edgewood Terrace,” Agency: Dept ong>ofong>

Commerce-TOP/NTIA, Oct. 2004–Sept. 2007,

$679,282.

■ Tran, B.Q., “Evaluation ong>ofong> MRI magnetic fields

on implanted medical devices,” Agency: Food

& Drug Administration, Nov. 2007–Dec. 2008,

$86,142.

■ Lucko, G. (PI) and Tsopelas, P. (Co-PI),

“Teaching Structural Design, Construction

Practices, and Sustainable Technologies for

Mitigation ong>ofong> Natural Disaster Damages in

Coastal and Fault Areas ong>ofong> Developing Regions,”

National Collegiate Inventors and Innovators

Alliance, Aug. 2006–Sept. 2008, $50,000.

■ Wang, Z., “Research ong>ofong> Algorithms for Biometric

Data Compression and Verification,” SETECS,

Inc. Dec. 2006–Oct. 2007, $24,000.

■ Wang, Z., “Real-Time, High-Accuracy 3D

Imaging System,” NCIIA, April 2008–Sept.

2009, $14,500.

■ Wilson Jr., O.C., “CAREER: Bone Inspiration in

Research and Education,” National Science

Foundation, March 1, 2007–Feb. 28, 2012,

$450,000.

Presentations and Publications

■ Ahmed, F., “Integrated Fingerprint Verification

method using a composite-signature based

watermarking technique,” Opt. Eng. vol. 46,

087005, Aug. 2007.

■ Ahmed, F., “Intelligent Multimedia for

Information Security,” Invited Speech at the

IEEE International Conference on Computers

and Information Technology, Dhaka,

Bangladesh, Dec. 2007.

■ Ahmed, F., and Ira S. Moskowitz, “Analysis

and Reduction ong>ofong> Embedding Error for a semireversible

image authentication watermark,” to

appear in Proc. IASTED International Conference

on Telehealth and Assistive Technologies,

Baltimore, April 2008.

■ Ahmed, F., and Gomes, C., Digital Watermarking

for Digital Rights Management in Handbook ong>ofong>

Research on Modern Systems Analysis and

Design Technologies and Applications, 2008

Chapter XXVII, Igi Global.

■ Ahmed, F., and Selvanadin, M. K. B.,

“Fingerprint Reference Verification method

using a Phase-encoding based Watermarking

Technique,” Journal ong>ofong> Electronic Imaging, Vol.

17, No. 1, 011010, pp. 1–9, 2008.

■ Moskowitz, I. S.,Lafferty, P. A., and Ahmed, F.,

“Stego Scrubbing — A New Direction for

Image Steganography,” in Proc. 8th Annual

IEEE SMC Information Assurance Workshop

(IAW 2007) United States Military Academy,

West Point, N.Y., pp. 119–126, June 2007.

■ Osicka, T., Freedman, M. T., and Ahmed, F.,

“Characterization ong>ofong> Pulmonary Nodules on

Computer Tomography (CT) Scans: sample

size effects on Features Selection and

Classification Performance,” in Proc. SPIE Vol.

22 | cuaengineer

6915, Medical Imaging 2008: Computer Aided

Diagnosis, San Diego, 2008.

■ Brown, J. S., “Evaluation ong>ofong> potential R-22

substitute refrigerants using fundamental

thermodynamic parameters,” 22 nd International

Congress ong>ofong> Refrigeration, Beijing, China,

August 2007.

■ Brown, J. S., “Evaluation ong>ofong> potential R-22

substitute refrigerants using fundamental

thermodynamic parameters,” in Proc. 22 nd

International Congress ong>ofong> Refrigeration,

Beijing, China, August 2007.

■ Brown, J. S., “Predicting performance ong>ofong> new

refrigerants using the Peng-Robinson equation

ong>ofong> state,” International Journal ong>ofong> Refrigeration,

Vol. 30, No. 8, pp. 1319–1328, 2007.

■ Brown, J. S., “Preliminary selection ong>ofong> R-114

replacement refrigerants using fundamental

thermodynamic parameters,” HVAC&R

Research, Vol. 13, No. 5, pp. 697–709, 2007.

■ Brown, J. S., “Methodology for estimating

thermodynamic parameters and performance

ong>ofong> alternative refrigerants,” ASHRAE Winter

Annual Meeting, N.Y., Jan. 2008.

■ Brown, J. S., “Methodology for estimating

thermodynamic parameters and performance

ong>ofong> alternative refrigerants,” ASHRAE

Transactions, Vol. 114, No. 1, 2008.

■ Brown, J. S., “Potential R-114 replacement

refrigerants,” ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 114,

No. 2, 2008.

■ Chang, L. C., Koay, C. G., Deoni, S., and

Pierpaoli, C., “Comparison ong>ofong> Linear and Nonlinear

Fitting Methods for Estimating T1 from

SPGR Signals,” ISMRM 15th Scientific Meeting,

Berlin, Germany, May 2007.

■ Chang, L. C., and Pierpaoli, C., “Improving the

Accuracy ong>ofong> Diffusion MR Tractography Using

RESTORE,” in Proc. Annual Biomedical

ong>Engineeringong> Meeting at Taiwan, Dec. 2007, pp

224–226.

■ Freidlin, R.Z., Ozarslan, E., Komlosh, M. E.,

Chang, L. C., Koay, C. G., Jones, D. K., and

Basser, P. J., “Parsimonious Model Selection

for DTI Tissue Segmentation and Classification:

Study on Simulated and Experimental Data,”

ISMRM 15th Scientific Meeting, Berlin, Germany,

May 2007.

■ Freidlin, R. Z., Özarslan E., Komlosh, M. E.,

Chang, L. C., Koay, C. G., Jones, D. K., and

Basser, P.J., “Parsimonious model selection

for tissue segmentation and classification

applications: A study using simulated and

experimental DTI data,” IEEE Transaction on

Medical Imaging, Vol. 26, Issue 11,

pp.1576–1584, Nov. 2007.

■ Koay, C. G., Chang, L. C., and Basser, P. J.,

“The Cone ong>ofong> Uncertainty is Elliptical:

Implications for DTI Tractography,” ISMRM 15th

Scientific Meeting, Berlin, Germany, May 2007.

■ Koay, C. G., Chang, L. C., Pierpaoli, C., and

Basser, P.J., “Diffusion Tensor Representations

and Their Applications to DTI Error Propagation,”

ISMRM 15th Scientific Meeting, Berlin, Germany,

May 2007.

■ Koay, C. G., Chang, L. C., Deoni, S., and

Pierpaoli, C., “An Optimal Framework for T1

Estimation in an SPGR Acquisition,” ISMRM 15th

Scientific Meeting, Berlin, Germany, May 2007.

■ Koay, C. G., Chang, L. C., Pierpaoli, C., and

Basser, P. J., “Error Propagation Framework

for Diffusion Tensor Imaging via Diffusion

Tensor Representations,” IEEE Transaction on

Medical Imaging, Vol. 26, Issue 8,

pp.1017–1034, Aug. 2007.

■ Koay, C. G., Nevo, U., Chang, L. C., Pierpaoli,

C., and Basser, P.J., “The elliptical cone ong>ofong>

uncertainty and its normalized measures in

diffusion tensor imaging,” IEEE Transaction on

Medical Imaging (in press).

■ Ozarslan, E., Chang, L. C., Pierpaoli, C., and

Basser, P. J., “Roughness: A reshuffling-variant

differential geometric index for DWI,” ISMRM

15th Scientific Meeting, Berlin, Germany, May

2007.

■ Wu, M., Chang, L. C., Barnett, A. S., Marenco,

S., and Pierpaoli, C., “A Framework for

Evaluating the Performance ong>ofong> EPI Distortion

Correction Strategies in Diffusion Tensor MRI,”

ISMRM 15th Scientific Meeting, Berlin,

Germany, May 2007.

■ Waber, D. P., De Moor, C., Forbes, P.W., Almli,

C. R., Botteron, K. N., Leonard, G., Milovan, D.,

Paus, T., Rumsey, J., Chang, L. C., and The

Brain Development Cooperative Group, “The

NIH MRI study ong>ofong> normal brain development:

Performance ong>ofong> a population-based sample ong>ofong>

healthy children aged 6 to 18 years on a

neuropsychological battery,” Journal ong>ofong> the

International Neuropsychological Society,

Vol.13, pp.1–18, 2007.

■ Almli, C. R., Rivkin, M. J., McKinstry, R. C.,

Chang, L. C., and The Brain Development

Cooperative Group, “The NIH MRI study ong>ofong>

normal brain development (Objective-2):

Newborns, infants, toddlers, and preschoolers,”

NeuroImage, Vol. 35, pp. 308–325, 2007.

■ Black, I., Nichols, D., Pelliccio, M., and Hidler,

J., “Quantification ong>ofong> reflex activity in stroke

survivors during an imposed multi-joint leg

extension movement,” Experimental Brain

Research, Vol.183, Issue 2, pp. 271-281, Nov.

2007.

■ Brady, K., Black, I., Brennan, D., and Hidler,

J., “ZeroG: Dynamic over-ground body-weight

support system,” APTA 2008 Combined

Sections Meeting, Feb. 2008.

■ Hidler, J., “21 st -Century Rehabilitation After

Stroke: What Has Six Years ong>ofong> Research at

NRH Taught Us,” National Rehabilitation

Hospital, Grand Rounds Series, Nov. 2007.

■ Hidler, J., Carroll, M., and Federovich, E.,

“Strength and coordination in the paretic leg

ong>ofong> individuals following acute stroke,” IEEE

Transactions on Neural Systems and

Rehabilitation ong>Engineeringong>, Vol.15, Issue 4, pp.

526-534, Dec. 2007.


cuaengineer

■ Hidler, J., “Understanding Lower Extremity

Impairments and Contemporary Treatments

Options for Hemiparetic Stroke Patients,”

University ong>ofong> Twente, Netherlands, March 2008.

■ Hidler, J., “New Developments in Lower

Extremity Robotics for Stroke Rehabilitation,”

New York Presbyterian Hospital, Symposium

2008: Advances in Stroke Rehabilitation

Innovations for Practice, April 2008.

■ Hidler, J., Hamm, L, Lichy, A., and Groah, S.,

“Automating activity-based interventions: the

role ong>ofong> robotics,” Journal ong>ofong> Rehabilitation

Research and Development Special Issue, (in

press).

■ Hosler-Smythe, C., Brady, K., and Hidler, J.,

“Locomotion therapy in individuals with motor

complete spinal cord injury: effects on health

and well-being,”APTA 2008 Combined Sections

Meeting, Feb. 2008.

■ Lee, S. J., and Hidler, J., “Quantification ong>ofong> joint

moment errors associated with inaccurate center

ong>ofong> pressures,” Northeast American Society

ong>ofong> Biomechanics, College Park, Md., 2007.

■ Lee, S. J., and Hidler, J., “Biomechanics ong>ofong>

treadmill versus over-ground walking in

healthy individuals,” J Appl Physiol, Vol.104,

Issue 3, pp. 747–755, 2008.

■ Neckel, N. D., Nichols, D., and Hidler, J.,

“Joint moments exhibited by chronic stroke

subjects while walking with a prescribed

physiological gait pattern,” International

Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics,

Noordwijk, Netherlands, June 2007.

■ Neckel, N. D., Nichols, D., and Hidler, J.,

“Lower limb synergy patterns ong>ofong> stroke subjects

while walking in a Lokomat robotic

orthosis,” American Society ong>ofong> Biomechanics

Annual Meeting, Aug. 2007.

■ Nichols, D., Neckel, N., and Hidler, J., “Synergy

patterns ong>ofong> chronic stroke subjects while

walking in a Lokomat robotic orthosis,” APTA

2008 Combined Sections Meeting, Feb. 2008.

■ Ramella-Roman, J., and Hidler, J., “A fiber

optic probe for measurement ong>ofong> an autonomic

dysreflexia event on SCI patients,” SPIE

Symposium on Biomedical Optics (BiOS), San

Jose, Calif., 2008.

■ Ryerson, S., Byl, N., Brown, D., Wong, R., and

Hidler, J., “Altered trunk position sense and

its relation to balance functions in people

post-stroke,” J Neurol Phys Ther., Vol. 32, pp.

14-20, 2008.

■ Schwbowsky, C., Hidler, J., and Lum, P.,

“Greater reliance on impedance control in the

nondominant arm compared with the dominant

arm when adapting to a novel dynamic

environment,” Experimental Brain Research,

Vol.182, Issue 4, pp. 567–577, October 2007.

■ Judge, J. A., Vignola, J. F., and Jarzynski, J.,

“Dissipation from microscale and nanoscale

beam resonators into a surrounding fluid,”

Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 92, No. 12,

124102, March 2008.

■ Mathews, S. A., Judge, J., and Ortega, C.,

“A myoelectric interface for video games,” in

Proc. 23rd Southern Biomedical ong>Engineeringong>

Conference, Washington, D.C., 2007, published

as Biomedical ong>Engineeringong>: Recent

Developments, Wilson, O.C., Tran, B. Q,

Vossoughi, J., eds., Medical and ong>Engineeringong>

Publishers, Inc., 2007.

■ O’Malley, P. F., Judge, J. A., and Vignola, J.

F., “Three Dimensional Vibration

Measurements Using a Five-Axis Scanning

Laser Vibrometry System,” in Proc. ong>ofong> ASME

2007 International Design ong>Engineeringong>

Technical Conferences & Computers and

Information in ong>Engineeringong> Conference, Las

Vegas, Nev., 2007.

■ Basiri, A., and Kilic, O., “Interference Analysis

for Cellular Satellite Systems Using a Sub-

Beam Approach,” USNC Int. Union ong>ofong> Radio

Scientists (URSI), Boulder, Colo., 2008.

■ Kilic, O., “Comparison ong>ofong> Nature-Based

Optimization Methods for Multi-beam Satellite

Antennas,” in Proc. ACES International

Conference, Niagara Falls, Canada, 2008.

■ Kilic, O., “Interference Analysis for Spot Beam

Partitioning in Cellular Satellite Communication

Systems,” in Proc. IEEE International Symposium

on Antennas and Propagation, San Diego, Calif.,

2008.

■ Kilic, O., “Millimeter Wave Dielectric

Measurement ong>ofong> Sand for Sand Cloud

Attenuation Estimations,” USNC Int. Union ong>ofong>

Radio Scientists (URSI) 2008, Boulder, Colo.,

2008.

■ Kilic, O., “Modeling Electromagnetic Wave

Interactions with Sea Spray,” ACES Journal

Special Issue (submitted 2008).

■ Kilic, O., and Zaghloul, A. I., “Antenna Size

Reduction Using Sub-Beam Concept in

Cellular Satellite Systems,” IEEE Trans.

Aerospace and Electronics Sys. (submitted

2008).

■ Weiss, S., Coburn, K., and Kilic, O., “FEKO

Simulation ong>ofong> a Wedge Mounted Four Element

Array Antenna,” ACES Journal Special Issue,

2007.

■ Abelev, A. V., Gutta, S. K., Lade, P. V., and

Yamamuro, J. A., “Modeling Cross-Anisotropy

in Granular Materials,” Journal ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

Mechanics, ASCE, Vol. 133, No. 8, pp.

919–932, 2007.

■ Lade, P. V., “Experimental Study and Analysis

ong>ofong> Creep and Stress Relaxation in Granular

Materials,” Geo-Denver, Denver, Colo., 2007.

■ Lade, P. V., “Factors Affecting Three-Dimensional

Failure in Soils,” Geoong>Engineeringong> Centre,

Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, 2007.

■ Lade, P. V., “Factors Affecting Three-

Dimensional Failure in Soils,” Tenth

International Symposium on Numerical

Models in Geomechanics, NUMOG X, Rhodes,

Greece, 2007.

■ Lade, P. V. “Modeling Failure in Cross-

Anisotropic Frictional Materials,” International

Journal ong>ofong> Solids and Structures, Vol. 44, No.

16, pp. 5146–5162, 2007.

■ Lade, P. V., “Overview ong>ofong> Constitutive Models

for Soils,” Department ong>ofong> Civil ong>Engineeringong>,

Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, 2007.

■ Lade, P. V., “Overview ong>ofong> Constitutive Models for

Soils,” Institute ong>ofong> Geotechnical ong>Engineeringong>,

Southeast University, Nanjing, China, 2007.

■ Lade, P. V., “Overview ong>ofong> Constitutive Models

for Soils,” College ong>ofong> Architecture and Civil

ong>Engineeringong>, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou,

China, 2007.

■ Lade, P. V., “Failure Criterion for Cross-

Anisotropic Soils,” Journal ong>ofong> Geotechnical

and Geoenvironmental ong>Engineeringong>, ASCE, Vol.

134, No. 1, pp. 117–124, 2008.

■ Lade, P. V., Nam, J., and Hong, W. P., “Shear

Banding and Cross-Anisotropic Behavior

Observed in laboratory Sand Tests with Stress

Rotation,” Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Vol.

44, pp. 74–84, 2008.

■ Anton, G. A., Lucko, G., and Duzkale, A. K.,

“Optimizing the graphical arrangement ong>ofong> network

construction schedules,” in Proc. 2007

Construction Research Congress, Freeport,

Commonwealth ong>ofong> the Bahamas, 2007, p. 10.

■ Lucko, G., “Computational analysis ong>ofong> linear

and repetitive construction project schedules

with singularity functions,” in Proc. 2007

International Workshop on Computing in Civil

ong>Engineeringong>, Pittsburgh, Pa., 2007, pp. 9–17.

■ Lucko, G., Tsopelas, P., Garland, T. J., González

Rugelli, R., Lee, T. M., and Molineaux, J. P.,

“Disaster-mitigating design and practice: A

student-centered program developing sustainable

and earthquake-resistant designs for

residential structures in developing regions,”

in Proc. 2007 ASEE Annual Conference and

Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii, 2007, p. 13.

■ Lucko, G., “Flexible modeling ong>ofong> linear schedules

for integrated mathematical analysis,” in

Proc. 2007 Winter Simulation Conference,

Washington, D.C., 2007, pp. 2159–2167.

■ Lucko, G., “Mathematical analysis ong>ofong> linear

schedules,” in Proc. 2007 Construction

Research Congress, Freeport, Commonwealth

ong>ofong> the Bahamas, 2007, p.10.

■ Lucko, G., Madden, M. G., and Molineaux, J.

P., “Spatially recursive spreadsheet computations:

Teaching the critical path method ong>ofong>

scheduling using two-dimensional function

ranges versus traditional one-dimensional

programming,” in Proc. 2007 ASEE Annual

Conference and Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii,

2007, p. 13.

■ Lucko, G., Hildreth, J. C., and Vorster, M. C.,

“Statistical considerations and graphical presentation

ong>ofong> the residual value ong>ofong> heavy construction

equipment,” in Proc. 2007 International

Workshop on Computing in Civil ong>Engineeringong>,

Pittsburgh, Pa., 2007, pp. 18–25.

fall2008 | 23


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■ Lucko, G.,Gonzalez, E. C., Sherwin, J. C., Collins,

E. L., Gilmore, B. M., Pisani, D. A., Heisman,

E. A., Smith, A. T., and Murray, T. M., “Engineers

Without Borders — Santa Clara, El Salvador,

assessment trip,” ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>,

Catholic University ong>ofong> America, Washington,

D.C., 2008.

■ Lucko, G., “Productivity Scheduling Method

Compared to Linear and Repetitive Project

Scheduling Methods,” Journal ong>ofong> Construction

ong>Engineeringong> and Management (in press).

■ Shapira, A., Lucko, G., and Schexnayder, C.

J., “Cranes for Building Construction Projects,”

Journal ong>ofong> Construction ong>Engineeringong> and

Management, 50 th Anniversary Special Issue

(invited paper; peer-reviewed), Vol.133, Issue

9, pp. 690–700, Sept. 2007.

■ Dromerick, A. W., Schabowsky, C. N., Holley,

R. J., Monroe, B., Markotic, A., and Lum, P. S.,

“Effect ong>ofong> training on upper extremity prosthetic

limb performance and motor learning:

An n=1 study,” Archives ong>ofong> Physical Medicine

and Rehabilitation (in press).

■ Lum, P. S., “Improvements in upper extremity

function with mass-practice therapy,”

American Congress ong>ofong> Rehabilitation Medicine

Annual Conference, Washington D.C., 2007.

■ Schabowsky, C. N., Hidler, J. M., and Lum, P.

S., “Greater reliance on impedance control in the

nondominant arm compared with the dominant

arm when adapting to a noveldynamic environment,”

Experimental Brain Research, Vol.

182, Issue 4, pp. 567–577, Oct. 2007.

■ Schabowsky, C. N., Dromerick, A. W., Holley,

R. J., Monroe, B., and Lum, P. S., “Transradial

upper extremity amputees are capable ong>ofong>

adapting to a novel dynamic environment,”

Experimental Brain Research (in press).

■ Auyeung, Raymond C. Y., Heungsoo, K.,

Mathews, S. A., and Piqué, A., “Laser Direct-

Write ong>ofong> Metallic Nanoparticle Inks,” Journal

ong>ofong> Laser Micro/Nanoengineering, Vol. 2, No. 1,

pp. 21–25, 2007.

■ Barnard, R., Gray, B., Pauca, V., Torgersen, T.,

Mirotznik, M. S., Van der Gracht, J., Plemmons,

R., Behrmann, G., Mathews, S. A., and Prasad,

S., “PERIODIC: State-ong>ofong>-the-Art Array Imaging

Technology,” in Proc. 2007 ACM Southeast

Conference, March 2007, pp. 544 – 546.

■ Mathews, S. A., Mirotznik, M. S., Good, B. L.,

and Piqué, A., “Rapid prototyping ong>ofong> frequency

selective surfaces by laser direct-write,” in

Proc. SPIE, (invited), San Jose, Calif., Jan.

2007, Vol. 6458, pp. 64580R-1–64580R-14.

■ Mathews, S. A., “Microscale Fabrication

Techniques ong>ofong> EHD Pumps,” Interagency

Advanced Power Group, Fort Belvoir, Md., April

2007.

■ Mathews, S. A., Judge, J., and Ortega, C.,

“A Myoelectric Interface for Video Games,” in

Proc. Twenty-Third Southern Biomedical

ong>Engineeringong> Conference: BIOMEDICAL ENGI-

NEERING Recent Developments, ISBN 1-

930636-06-7, April 2007.

24 | cuaengineer

■ Mathews, S. A., “Rapid Prototyping ong>ofong> an

Electro-Hydro-Dynamic MicroPump using

Laser MicroFabrication,” Swales Aerospace

Corp., Beltsville Md., June 2007.

■ Mathews, S. A., Chaipar, N. A., Metkus, K., and

Piqué, A., “Manufacturing Microelectronics

Using ‘Lase-and-Place,” Photonics Spectra,

Vol. 41, No. 10, pp. 70–74, October 2007.

■ Mathews, S. A., Auyeung, R. C. Y., and Piqué,

A., “Use ong>ofong> Laser Direct-Write in Micro-electronics

Assembly,” Journal ong>ofong> Laser Micro/

Nanoengineering, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 103–107,

2007.

■ Piqué, A., Charipar, N. A., Auyeng, R. C. Y., Kim, H.,

and Mathews, S. A., “Assembly and Integration

ong>ofong> Thin Bare Die Using Laser Direct-Write,” in

Proc. SPIE, (invited), San Jose, Calif., Jan.

2007, Vol. 6458, pp. 645802-1–645802-10.

■ Ramella-Roman, J. C., and Mathews, S. A.,

“Spectroscopic measurements ong>ofong> oxygen saturation

in the retina,” IEEE Journal on Selected

Topics in Quantum Electronics, Vol.13, No. 6,

pp. 1697–1703, Nov.–Dec. 2007.

■ Mavroeidis, G. P., “Friction problems in earthquake

source mechanics,” NSF Workshop on

Friction: A Grand Challenge at the Interface ong>ofong>

Solid and Fluid Mechanics, Montreux,

Switzerland, March 13–16, 2008.

■ Mavroeidis, G. P., and Papageorgiou, A. S.,

“Effect ong>ofong> fault rupture characteristics on

near-fault strong ground motions,” in Proc.

Fourteenth World Conference on Earthquake

ong>Engineeringong> (14WCEE), Beijing, China, Oct.

12–17, 2008.

■ Mavroeidis, G. P., Zhang, B., Dong, G.,

Papageorgiou, A. S., Dutta, U. and Biswas, N.

N., “The Great 1964 Prince William Sound,

Alaska, earthquake (M w =9.2): Estimation ong>ofong>

strong ground motion,” in Proc. Fourteenth

World Conference on Earthquake ong>Engineeringong>

(14WCEE), Beijing, China, Oct. 12–17, 2008.

■ Curt, P. F., Durbano, J. P., Bodnar, M. R., Shi,

S., and Mirotznik, M. S., “Enhanced

Functionality for Hardware-Based FDTD

Accelerators,” Applied Computational

Electromagnetics Society (ACES) Journal, Vol.

22, No. 1, pp. 39–46, March 2007.

■ Biswas, I., Prather, D. W., Schuetz, C. A, Martin,

R. D., and Mirotznik, M. S., “Sparse aperture

detection and imaging ong>ofong> millimeter sources

via optical image-plane interferometry,” in

Proc. SPIE, Electro-Optical Remote Sensing,

Photonic Technologies and Their Applications,

(invited), Florence Italy, Sept. 2007.

■ Mait, J. N., Wikner, D. A, Mirotznik, M. S.,

Behrmann, G. P., and Van der Gracht, J.,

“Extended Depth-ong>ofong>-Field Imaging at 94 GHz,”

in Proc. OSA Technical Digest, Conference on

Computational Optical Sensing and Imaging

(COSI), Vancouver Canada, 2007.

■ Martin, R., Schuetz, C., Chen, C., Biswas, I.,

Samluk, J., Stein Jr., E., Mirotznik, M. S., and

Prather, D. W., “Two-dimensional Snapshot

Distributed Aperture Millimeter-Wave Imaging

using Optical Upconversion,” in Proc. SPIE,

Defense and Security, Orlando Fla., Feb. 2008.

■ Mirotznik, M. S., Kilic, O., Mathews, S. A.,

and Good, B., “Design ong>ofong> Moth-eye Antireflective

Surfaces at Microwave and Millimeter

Wavelengths,” in Proc. North American Radio

Science Meeting (URSI), Ottawa Canada, July

2007.

■ Mirotznik, M. S., Mathews, S. A., and Creazzo,

T., “Design ong>ofong> Diffractive Elements at Millimeter

Wavelengths using Subwavelength Cylindrical

Microstructures,” Microwave and Optical Tech.

Letters, Vol. 49, No. 8, pp. 1880–1884, Aug. 2007.

■ Mirotznik, M. S., Van der Gracht, J., Pustai,

D., and Mathews, S. A., “Design ong>ofong> cubicphase

optical elements using sub wavelength

microstructures,” Optics Express, Vol. 16, No.

2, pp. 1250–1259, Jan. 2008.

■ Mirotznik, M. S., Mathews, S. A., Good, B.,

Schuetz, C., Wikner, D., and Mait, J. N.,

“Iterative Design ong>ofong> Moth-Eye AR Surfaces at

Millimeter Wave Frequencies,” IEEE Trans on

Antennas and Propagation, Jan. 2008.

■ Smith, J. R., and Mirotznik, M. S., “Estimation ong>ofong>

Wave Spectra via Remote RF Forward Scattering

Measurements,” North American Radio Science

Meeting (URSI), Ottawa Canada, July 2007.

■ Prather, D. W., Biswas, I., Schuetz, C. A.,

Martin, R. D., and Mirotznik, M. S., “Multiple

Aperture Imaging ong>ofong> Millimeter Sources via

Image-Plane Interferometry,” in Proc. IEEE

International Geoscience and Remote Sensing

Symposium, Barcelona Spain, July 2007.

■ Schuetz, C. A., Martin, R. D., Biswas, I.,

Mirotznik, M. S., and Prather, D. W.,

“Technologies for Distributed Aperture

Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Imaging using

Optical Up-conversion,” in Proc. IEEE

International Geoscience and Remote Sensing

Symposium, Barcelona Spain, July 2007.

■ Namazi, Nader M., “Demodulation ong>ofong> FM

Data in Free-Space Optical Communication

Systems using Discrete Wavelet

Transformation,” Optical Society ong>ofong> America,

SPIE, San Diego, Calif., July 2007.

■ Namazi, Nader M., and Burris, R.,“Analytical

Approach to the Calculation ong>ofong> Probability ong>ofong>

Bit Error and Optimum Thresholds in Free-

Space Optical Communication,” Optical

ong>Engineeringong>, Vol. 0, No. 46, Feb 2007.

■ Coombe, H. S., and Nieh, S., “Analysis ong>ofong> a

Well-Stirred Burner Employing Oxygen-

Enriched Combustion for Thermophotovoltaic

and Thermionic Energy Conversion,”

Combustion Theory and Modeling, (under consideration),

pp. 1–24, 2007.

■ Coombe, H. S., and Nieh, S., “Polymer

Membrane Air Separation Performance for

Portable Oxygen-Enriched Combustion

Applications,” Energy Conversion and

Management, Vol. 48, No. 5, pp. 1499–1505,

2007.


cuaengineer

■ Dubois, T.G., and Nieh, S., “Design and

Performance ong>ofong> an Experimental 3 kW th

Autothermal Reformer Test Bed for Heavy

Hydrocarbon Fuels,” in Proc. 43 rd Power

Sources Conference at Philadelphia, Dec. 2007.

■ Nieh, S., “Heaven Condemn Chinese

Communist Party and God Bless Taiwan,”

Epoch Times, http://epochtimes.com/

b5/7/5/18/n1714116.htm (in Chinese); article

on invited guest speech ong>ofong> S. Nieh at the

Annual Meeting ong>ofong> Global Alliance for

Democracy and Peace, Baltimore-D.C.

Chapter (Gaithersburg, Md.) on May 12, 2007.

■ Zhang, J., He, J. B., Zhou, L. X., and Nieh, S.,

“Simulation ong>ofong> Swirling Turbulent Heat

Transfer in a Vortex Heat Exchanger,”

Numerical Heat Transfer, Part A, Vol. 48, pp.

607–625, 2005 (notified 2007).

■ Ling, S. C., and Pao, H. P., “On the mechanics

ong>ofong> an electron,” Chung Yuan Christian University,

Fu Jen Catholic University, and National

Taiwan University, in Taiwan, May 2007.

■ Ling, S.C., and Pao, H. P., “On the mechanics

ong>ofong> an electron,” in Proc. 9 th Asian Symposium

on Visualization, Hong Kong, June 2007.

■ Pao, H. P., “Nonlinear internal waves,” National

Sun Yat-sen University, Taiwan, May 2007.

■ Pao, H. P., Lee, M. P., and Ling, S. C., “Intense

nonlinear internal waves: numerical modeling,”

in Proc. 9 th Asian Symposium on

Visualization, Hong Kong, June 2007.

■ Boulbry, B., Ramella-Roman, J. C., and

Germer, T. A., “Self-consistent calibration ong>ofong> a

spectroellipsometer using a Fresnel rhomb as

a reference sample,” Applied Optics, Vol. 46,

pp. 8533–8541, 2007.

■ Gupta, N., and Ramella-Roman, J. C.,

“Detection ong>ofong> blood oxygen level by noninvasive

passive spectral imaging ong>ofong> skin,” in

Proc. SPIE — Photonic Therapeutics and

Diagnostics IV, Kollias, Nikiforos, Choi,

Bernard, Zeng, Haishan, Malek, Reza S.,Wong,

Brian J., Ilgner, Justus F. R., Kenton, Gregory

W., Tearney, Guillermo J., Hirschberg, Henry,

and Madsen, Steen J., eds., 68420C, 2008.

■ Kandimalla, H., and Ramella-Roman, J. C.,

“Polarized fluorescence for skin cancer diagnostic

with a multi-aperture camera,” in Proc.

SPIE — Photonic Therapeutics and

Diagnostics IV, Kollias, Nikiforos, Choi,

Bernard, Zeng, Haishan, Malek, Reza S.,

Wong, Brian J., Ilgner, Justus F. R., Kenton,

Gregory W., Tearney, Guillermo J., Hirschberg,

Henry, Madsen, Steen J., eds., 68420J, 2008.

■ Nabili, A., Bardakci, D., Helling, K., Matyas, C.,

Muro, S., and Ramella-Roman, J.C.,

“Calibration ong>ofong> a retinal oximeter with a

dynamic eye phantom,” in Proc. SPIE —

Design and Performance Validation ong>ofong>

Phantoms Used in Conjunction with Optical

Measurements ong>ofong> Tissue, Robert J.

Nordstrom, ed., 68700N, 2008.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., “A lensletbased

device for measuring oxygen saturation

in the retina and other biomedical applications,”

The Catholic University ong>ofong> America,

Biology Department, 2007.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., “Spectroscopic

measurement ong>ofong> oxygen saturation in the retina,

Food and Drug Administration,” Modern

Topics in Biomedical Optics, 2007.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., “Introduction to

Biomedical Optics,” Johns Hopkins University,

APL, 2008.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C. , A. Nabili, D.

Bardakci, K. Helling, C. Matyas, and S. Muro,

“Calibration ong>ofong> a retinal oximeter with a dynamic

eye phantom,” SPIE-BIOS, San Jose, Calif., 2008.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., and Hidler, J.

M., “A fiber optic probe for measurement ong>ofong>

an autonomic dysreflexia event on SCI

patients,” SPIE-BIOS, San Jose, Calif., 2008.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., and

Kandimalla, H., “Polarized fluorescence for

skin cancer diagnostic with a multi-aperture

camera,” SPIE-BIOS, San Jose, Calif., 2008.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., Hidler, J. M.,

and Nabili, A., “Measurement ong>ofong> an autonomic

dysreflexia event on SCI patients,” Oregon

Health and Science University, 2008.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., and Hidler, J.

M., “A fiber optic probe for measurement ong>ofong>

an autonomic dysreflexia event on SCI patients,”

in Proc. SPIE — Optical Fibers and Sensors

for Medical Diagnostics and Treatment

Applications VIII, Israel Gannot, ed., 685202,

2008.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., Mathews, S.

A., Kandimalla, H., Nabili, A., Duncan, D. D.,

D’Anna, S. A., Shah, S. M., Nguyen, Q. Q.,

“Measurement ong>ofong> oxygen saturation in the

retina with a spectroscopic sensitive multi

aperture camera,” Optics Express (in press).

■ Ramella-Roman Jessica C., and Mathews,

S. A., “Spectroscopic Measurements ong>ofong>

Oxygen Saturation in the Retina,” IEEE J. ong>ofong>

Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics,

Vol.13, pp. 1697–1703, 2007.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., “Monte Carlo

models ong>ofong> polarized light into scattering

media,” NATO ASI on Optical Waveguide

Sensing and Imaging, Springler, in Optical

Waveguide Sensing and Imaging, Nato

Science for Peace and Security Series B:

Physics and Biophotonics, 2007.

■ Ramella-Roman, Jessica C., “Polarized light

scattering in skin, hemispherical scattering,”

NATO ASI on Optical Waveguide Sensing and

Imaging, Springler, in Optical Waveguide

Sensing and Imaging, NATO Science for Peace

and Security Series B: Physics and

Biophotonics, 2007.

■ Regalia, P. A., “Gradient Decoding revisited,”

Asilomar Conference on Circuits, Systems and

Computers, Pacific Grove, Calif., Nov. 2007,

pp. 1918–1922.

■ Regalia, P. A., “Cryptographic measures in

information hiding,” IEEE International

Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal

Processing, Las Vegas, Nev., April 2008.

■ Regalia, P. A., “Cryptographic measures in

information hiding,” in Proc. IEEE International

Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal

Processing, Las Vegas, Nev., April 2008.

■ Regalia, P. A., Turbo Equalization in Adaptive

Signal Processing: Next Generation Solutions,

Wiley, N.Y., 2008.

■ Regalia, P. A., and Walsh, J. M.,“Optimality

and Duality ong>ofong> the Turbo Decoder,” in Proc. ong>ofong>

the IEEE, Vol. 95, pp. 1362–1377, June 2007.

■ Regalia, P. A., and Walsh, J. M., “Belief propagation

distributed estimation in sensor networks:

An optimized energy-accuracy tradeong>ofong>f,”

IEEE International Conference on

Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, Las

Vegas, Nev., April 2008.

■ Walsh, J. M., and Regalia, P. A., “Expectation

propagation for distributed estimation in sensor

networks,” IEEE International Workshop on

Signal Processing Advances in Wireless

Communications, Helsinki, Finland, June

2007, pp. 1–5.

■ Sun, L., “A new method for highway and airport

pavement condition assessment,” The

2nd International Conference on Smart

Structure and Health Monitoring, Chongqing &

Nanjing, May, 2007 (Paper ID 143).

■ Sun, L., “Travel time estimation using PQT,”

The 3rd National Conference on Intelligent

Transportation System, Nanjing, China, Dec.

2007.

■ Sun, L., and Luo, F., “Transient wave propagation

in multilayered viscoelastic media

theory, numerical computation and validation,”

Journal ong>ofong> Applied Mechanics, ASME,

Vol. 75, No.3, 2008.

■ Sun, L.,Yang, J., and Mahmassani, H., “Travel

time estimation based on piecewise truncated

quadratic speed trajectory,” Transportation

Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Vol. 42,

pp.173–186, 2008.

■ Sun, L., and Gu, W., “Steady state response ong>ofong>

multilayered viscoelastic media under a moving

dynamic distributed load,” Journal ong>ofong>

Applied Mechanics, ASME (in press).

■ Sun, L., and Luo, F., “Steady-state dynamic

response ong>ofong> a Bernoulli-Euler beam on a viscoelastic

foundation subject to a platoon ong>ofong>

moving dynamic loads,” Journal ong>ofong> Vibration

and Acoustics, ASME (in press).

■ Bertera, E. M., Tran, B. Q., Wuertz, E. M., and

Bonner, A., “A study ong>ofong> the receptivity to telecare

technology in a community-based elderly

minority population,” J. Telemed & Telecare,

Vol. 13, pp. 327–332, 2007.

■ Nabili, A., Dinga, R., and Tran, B. Q., “Patient

Imaging Transfer System (PITS): Novel device

for patient transport and transfer in imaging

facilities,” in Biomedical ong>Engineeringong>: Recent

Developments, Tran, B. Q., Wilson, O. C.,

fall2008 | 25


cuaengineer

Vossoughi, J., eds., Medical & ong>Engineeringong>

Publishers, 2007.

■ Tran, B. Q.,Wilson Jr., O. C., and Vossoughi,

J., Biomedical ong>Engineeringong>: Recent

Developments, Medical & ong>Engineeringong>

Publishers, Inc., Sunshine, Md., 2007.

■ Tran, B. Q., Buckley, K. M., Wuertz, E., and

Bertera, E., “Clinical eStorefront: Updates and

Lessons Learned,” American Society on

Aging, Washington, D.C., 2008.

■ Bishop, S.S.,Vignola, J. F., Judge, J. A.,

Tsopelas, P., and Kurdila, A. J., “Direct

mechanical landmine excitation with scanning

laser Doppler vibrometer surface measurements”

SPIE, Vol. 6553, Orlando Fla., May 7, 2007.

■ Bishop, S. S., Judge, J. A., Vignola, J. F.,

Smith, C., Chen, T. H., and Tsopelas, P.,

“Dynamic analysis ong>ofong> mass loaded highway

guardrails,” DTIC Report, AD Number:

ADB332946, Unclassified Source Code:

076450 (2007).

■ Chen, L., and Tsopelas, P., “Seismic

Performance ong>ofong> Shear Walls Utilizing Cellular

Material,” World Forum on Smart Materials

and Smart Structures Technology, Chongqing

& Nanjing, China, May 22–27, 2007.

■ Gdela, K., Pietruszczak, S., Lade, P. V., and

Tsopelas, P., “Experimental verification ong>ofong> a

macroscopic fracture criterion for human cortical

bone,” Journal ong>ofong> Applied Mechanics,

ASME (in press).

■ Roussis, P., Tsopelas, P., and Constantinou,

M. C., “Dynamic analysis ong>ofong> base-isolated

structures under conditions ong>ofong> bearing uplift,”

10th World Conference on Seismic Isolation,

Energy Dissipation and Active Vibrations

Control ong>ofong> Structures, Istanbul, Turkey, May

28–31, 2007.

■ Ucak, A., and Tsopelas, P., “Response ong>ofong>

Seismic Isolated Bridges Including Soil

Structure Interaction Effects,” 4th

International Conference on Earthquake

Geotechnical ong>Engineeringong>, Thessaloniki,

Greece, June 25–28, 2007.

■ Ucak, A., Pekcan, G., Xu, D., and Tsopelas, P.,

“Demand Uncertainties on a Seismically

Isolated Multi-span Bridge due to Soil-

Foundation-Structure Interaction,” 10th World

Conference on Seismic Isolation, Energy

Dissipation and Active Vibration Control ong>ofong>

Structures, Istanbul, Turkey, May 28–31, 2007.

■ Ucak, A., and Tsopelas, P., “Response ong>ofong>

Seismic Isolated Bridges Including Soil

Structure Interaction Effects,” 4th

International Conference on Earthquake

Geotechnical ong>Engineeringong>, Thessaloniki,

Greece, June 25–28, 2007.

■ Ucak, A., Pekcan, G., Xu, D., and Tsopelas, P.,

“Demand Uncertainties on a Seismically

Isolated Multi-span Bridge due to Soil-

Foundation-Structure Interaction,” 10th World

Conference on Seismic Isolation, Energy

Dissipation and Active Vibration Control ong>ofong>

Structures, Istanbul, Turkey, May 28–31, 2007.

26 | cuaengineer

■ Ucak, A., and Tsopelas, P., “Effect ong>ofong> Soil

Structure Interaction in Seismic Isolated

Bridges,” Journal ong>ofong> Structural ong>Engineeringong>,

ASCE (in press).

■ Ucak, A., and Tsopelas, P., “Stability and

Ductility ong>ofong> Thin-Walled Circular Steel Columns

under Cyclic Bidirectional Loading,” Journal ong>ofong>

Structural ong>Engineeringong>, ASCE, Vol. 134, p. 865,

2008.

■ Bishop, S. S.,Vignola, J. F., Judge, J. A.,

Tsopelas, P., and Kurdila, A. J., “Direct

mechanical landmine excitation with scanning

laser Doppler vibrometer surface measurements”

SPIE, Vol. 6553, Orlando Fla., May 7, 2007.

■ Diggs, E.C., Bilgen, O., Kurdila, A. J.,

Kochersburger, K., Inman, D., and Vignola, J.

F., “Structural characteristics via SLDV for a

class ong>ofong> morphing micro-air-vehicles,” in

Proc. SPIE Int. Soc. Opt. Eng. 6561, 65611F,

May 2, 2007.

■ Judge, J. A., Photiadis, D. M.,Vignola, J. F.,

Houston, B. H., and Jarzinski, J., “Attachment

Loss ong>ofong> MEMS Resonators in the Limits ong>ofong>

Thick and Thin Support Structures,” Journal

ong>ofong> Applied Physics, Vol.101, 013521, May

2007.

■ Judge, J. A., Vignola, J. F., and Jarzynski, J.,

“Dissipation from microscale and nanoscale

beam resonators into a surrounding fluid,”

Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 92, March 2008.

■ O’Malley, P. A., Judge, J. A., and Vignola, J.

F.,“Three Dimensional Vibration Measurement

Using a Five-Axis Scanning Laser Vibrometry

System,” ASME, Las Vegas, Nev., Sept. 4–7,

2007.

■ Prazenica, R. J., Kurdila, A. J., and Vignola, J.

F., “Spatial filtering and proper orthogonal

Decomposition ong>ofong> scanning laser Doppler

vibrometry data for the nondestructive evaluation

ong>ofong> frescos,” Journal ong>ofong> Sound and

Vibration, Vol. 304, pp. 735–751, July 24, 2007.

■ Romano, A. J., Bucaro, J. A., Abraham, P. B.,

and Vignola, J. F., “An Application ong>ofong> a Local

Inversion Algorithm for Fault Detection

Utilizing LDV Measurements,” Journal ong>ofong> the

Acoustical Society ong>ofong> America, Vol. 121, pp.

2667–2672, May 2007.

■ Du, H.,Wang, Z., and Xie, H., “Measurement

ong>ofong> full-field large deformations at microscale,”

in Proc. ong>ofong> the SEM Annual Congress

and Exposition on Experimental and Applied

Mechanics, Springfield, Mass., 2007.

■ Du, H., and Wang, Z.,“Fast 3-D shape measurement

with high accuracy and low cost,” in

Proc. ong>ofong> the Conference on Lasers and

Electro-Optics (CLEO) and the Quantum

Electronics and Laser Science Conference

(QELS), Baltimore, 2007.

■ Du, H., and Wang, Z., “Three-dimensional

shape measurement with an arbitrarily

arranged fringe projection prong>ofong>ilometry system,”

Optics Letters, Vol. 32, pp.

2438–2440, 2007.

■ Wang, Z., Du, H., and S. Park, “Three-dimensional,

real-time, and high-accuracy inline

monitoring system for roll to roll manufacturing,”

in Proc. ong>ofong> the 7th Annual USDC Flexible

Electronics and Displays Conference and

Exhibition, Phoenix, Ariz., 2008.

■ Yoon, S., Han, B., and Wang, Z., “On moisture

diffusion modeling using thermal-moisture

analogy,” ASME Journal ong>ofong> Electronic

Packaging, Vol. 129, pp. 421–426, 2007.

■ Gyer, L. S., Kulkarni, P., Bruck, H.,Gupta, S. K.,

and Wilson Jr., O. C., “Replamineform

Inspired Bone Structures (RIBS) Using Multipiece

Molds and Advanced Ceramic

Gelcasting Technology,” Mater Sci Eng C, Vol.

27, Issue 4, pp. 646–653, 2007.

■ Hayman, I., Mehl, P., Kapoor, V., and Wilson

Jr., O. C., “Toxicity ong>ofong> BSA-stabilized Silver

Nanoparticles on Immune Circulating Cells,”

Materials Research Society (MRS) Society

Meeting, Boston, Mass., Nov. 2007.

■ Patrick-Boardley, N., Ayres, E., Wilson Jr., O.

C., Mehl, P., Anderson, W. A., and Harris, G.,

“Surface Manipulation ong>ofong> Magnetic

Nanoparticles for Controlled Communication/

Interaction with Human Cells,” Materials

Research Society Society Meeting, Boston,

Mass., Nov. 2007.

■ Wilson Jr., O. C., “Nanoscale Hetero-coagulation

and Adsorption Phenomena: Magnetic

Bone Mineral,” ASEE Conference, Oahu,

Hawaii, June 2007.

■ Wilson Jr., O. C., “Bone Inspiration in

Research and Education,” South Dakota

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> Mines, June 5, 2007.

■ Wilson Jr., O. C., and Agrawal, A., “Inorganic

Liquid Crystals for Biomedical Imaging,”

Materials Science and Technology (MS&T

2008) Conference, Detroit, Mich., Oct. 2007.

■ Wilson Jr., O. C., “Novel Chitosan Scaffolds

for Orthopedic and Cardiac Tissue ong>Engineeringong>,”

NASA, Greenbelt, Md., for the National Society

for Black Engineers, Oct. 18, 2007.

■ Wilson Jr., O. C., Mehl, P., Guggsa, A., Patrick-

Boardley, N., Harris, G., and Anderson, W. A.,

“Cancer Therapies Based on Surface Modified

Magnetic Nanoparticles,” Howard University

for BioNano Conference, Nov. 2007.

■ Wilson Jr., O.C., “Bone Inspired

Nanocomposites,” 32nd International

Conference on Advanced Ceramics and

Composites, Daytona Beach, Fla., Jan.

27–Feb. 1, 2008.

■ Wang, Y., Lee, J. J., Lloyd, I. K., Wilson Jr., O.

C., Rosenberg, M., and Thompson, M. P.,

“High Modulus Nanopowder Reinforced

Dimethacrylate Matrix Composites for Dental

Cement Applications,” Journal ong>ofong> Biomedical

Materials Research: Part A, Vol. 82A, Issue 3,

pp. 651–657, 2007.

■ Burgess, S. A., Yuan, B., Bouchard, M. B.,

Ratner, D., and Hillman, M., “Simultaneous

Multi-Wavelength Laminar Optical


cuaengineer

Tomography Imaging ong>ofong> Dermal Lesions,”

Optical Society ong>ofong> America (Biomedical

Optical), St. Petersburg, Fla. March 16–19,

2008.

■ Xu, C.,Yuan, B., and Q. Zhu, “An optimal

probe design for breast imaging using near

infrared diffused light,” Journal ong>ofong> Biomedical

Optics (in press).

■ Yuan, B., and Hillman, E., “Feasibility ong>ofong> 3-D

Frequency-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime

Imaging based on Laminar Optical

Tomography,” Optical Society ong>ofong> America

(Biomedical Optical), St. Petersburg, Fla.,

March 16–19, 2008.

■ Yuan, B., Gamelin, J., and Zhu, Q.,

“Mechanisms ong>ofong> the ultrasonic modulation ong>ofong>

fluorescence in turbid media,” Optical Society

ong>ofong> America (Biomedical Optical), St.

Petersburg, Fla., March 16–19, 2008.

■ Yuan, B., Gamelin, J., and Zhu, Q., “On mechanisms

ong>ofong> the ultrasonic modulation ong>ofong> fluorescence

in turbid media,” Journal ong>ofong> Applied

Physics (submitted).

Activities

■ Ahmed, F., Ph.D., electrical engineering and

computer science, served as the associate

editor ong>ofong> the EURASIP Journal on Wireless

Communications and Networking, 2007.

■ Kilic, O., Ph.D., electrical engineering and

computer science, elected to serve as an Ad

COM member for the IEEE Antennas and

Propagation Society, 2007–2010; as the

International Union ong>ofong> Radio Scientists (URSI)

Commission a Chair for the U.S. 2008–2011

(has served as vice chair 2005–2008). Chair

ong>ofong> the IEEE Constitution and Bylaws Committee

for IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society,

Feb. 2008; member ong>ofong> the technical program

committee for IEEE Antennas and Propagation

Society since 2003. Special session organizer

and session chair for the following prong>ofong>essional

organizations: IEEE Antennas and Propagation

Society, Applied Computational Electromagnetic

Society and International Union ong>ofong> Radio

Scientists.

■ Lade, P. V., Ph.D., civil engineering, and

Yamamuro, J.A. “Soil Constitutive Modeling

for Engineers: Fundamentals, Evaluations and

Calibration,” two-day short course presented

for ASCE in San Francisco, Calif., Jan. 25–26,

2007; at the Port Authority ong>ofong> New York and

New Jersey, in Newark, N.J., Feb. 5–6, 2007;

in Newark, N.J., Feb. 8–9, 2007; and in

Atlanta, Ga., July 26–27, 2007.

■ Lucko, G., Ph.D., civil engineering, track

coordinator ong>ofong> the construction engineering

and project management track at the Winter

Simulation Conference, Washington D.C.,

2007. Track chair ong>ofong> the operations, productivity

& workforce issues and the project risks

and safety tracks and as a member ong>ofong> the

technical committee at the Construction

Research Congress, Freeport, Commonwealth

ong>ofong> the Bahamas, 2007. Assistant specialty

editor ong>ofong> the project planning and design specialty

area ong>ofong> the Journal ong>ofong> Construction

ong>Engineeringong> and Management, 2007; member

ong>ofong> the 2006 best paper awards committee ong>ofong>

the Journal ong>ofong> Construction ong>Engineeringong> and

Management, 2007; acting specialty editor ong>ofong>

the project planning and design specialty area

ong>ofong> the Journal ong>ofong> Construction ong>Engineeringong>

and Management, 2007.

■ Lum, P. S., Ph.D., biomedical engineering, NIH

study section, National Institute ong>ofong> Child

Health and Human Development: Function,

Integration and Rehabilitation Sciences

Program, Washington D.C., 2007; U.S.

Department ong>ofong> Education, NIDRR Switzer

Research Fellowship review panel,

Washington D.C., 2007. Review committee ong>ofong>

the American Society ong>ofong> Biomechanics 2007

Annual Conference, Stanford Calif., 2007.

Review committee ong>ofong> the IEEE International

Conference on Robotics and Automation,

Pasadena Calif., 2008. Review committee ong>ofong>

the “Biomedical aids to the disabled,”

BioCAS2007 conference, Montreal Canada,

2007.

■ Mavroeidis, G. P., Ph.D., civil engineering,

reviewer for the Bulletin ong>ofong> the Seismological

Society ong>ofong> America, Journal ong>ofong> Earthquake

Technology, ISET, and Scientia Iranica.

■ Nguyen, C. C., D.Sc., dean, visited

Universidade Catolica Portuguesa, in Lisbon,

Portugal on Sept. 5, 2008, and signed a memorandum

ong>ofong> Understanding for collaboration in

research and education with its engineering

school; Hong Kong in Feb. 2008 to meet with

the key managers ong>ofong> the Office ong>ofong>

International Programs ong>ofong> the Hong Kong

Polytechnic University to discuss the existing

student exchange program between CUA and

PolyU and visit the five CUA engineering students

there; visited the faculty ong>ofong> engineering

ong>ofong> Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand,

Feb. 2008, signed an MOU to explore collaboration

in research and education. Visited the

faculty ong>ofong> engineering ong>ofong> Burapha University,

Bangsaen, and Chonburi, Thailand in Feb.

2008 and signed an MOU with this university

for research and education collaboration.

Visited the International University ong>ofong> Vietnam

National University-Ho Chi Minh City in Feb.

2008 and signed an agreement for 2+2 programs.

Visited the Saigon Technology

University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam in March

2008 and signed an MOU to explore research

and education collaboration between CUA and

STU. Visited with the ong>ofong>ficials ong>ofong> the University

ong>ofong> Danang, Danang, Vietnam, in March 2008

and discussed about potential collaboration

between this university and CUA.

■ Nieh, S., Ph.D., mechanical engineering,

organized (with ASME Student Chapter ong>ofong>

CUA) a field trip (open to all students/faculty)

to the Chalk Point Power Plant Generating

Station in Nov. 2007. Directed doctoral student

H. Scott Coombe, M.M.E. 2007; dissertation

“Oxygen-Enriched Combustion ong>ofong>

Hydrocarbon Fuels.” Invited to speak at U.S.

congressional seminar “Democracy and

Human Rights in Asia,” May 2008 on

“Intensified Persecution ong>ofong> Falun Gong

Practice in the Name ong>ofong> 2008 Beijing

Olympics.”

■ Pao, H. P., Ph.D., civil engineering, session

chairman at the 9 th Asian Symposium on

Visualization, Hong Kong. Under the sponsorship

ong>ofong> the Center for Environment and

Energy, chairman for “2007 International

Workshop on Curbing the Global Warming by

Carbon Sequestration,” held at CUA on Oct.

29-30, 2007. Reviewer for the special volume

“Innovations 2008 World Innovations in

ong>Engineeringong> Education and Research,”

published by iNEER. Visited National Taiwan

University, Chung Yuan Christian University, St.

John’s University, Fu Jen Catholic University

and National Sun Yat-sen University in Taiwan,

May 2007. In Sept. 2007, visited Katholieke

Universiteit Leuven, Belgium, and

Universidade Coimbra and Universidade

Catolica Portuguesa in Portugal with Dean

Nguyen. In February 2008, visited Hong Kong

Polytechnic University in Hong Kong, Kasetart

University and Burapha University in Thailand

with Dean Nguyen.

■ Regalia, P. A., Ph.D., electrical engineering

and computer science, editor-in-chief ong>ofong> the

EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications

and Networking, (term completed, Dec. 2007).

Associate editor ong>ofong> the IEEE Transactions on

Circuits and Systems I: Fundamental Theory

and Applications, (term completed, Dec.

2007). Editor-in-chief ong>ofong> the EURASIP Journal

on Advances in Signal Processing, since Jan.

2008. Editorial Board ong>ofong> the IEEE Signal

Processing Magazine, since Jan. 2008.

Editorial Board ong>ofong> Signal Processing (Elsevier).

■ Sun, L., Ph.D., civil engineering, reviewer for

Journal ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> Mechanics, Journal ong>ofong>

Sound and Vibration, Journal ong>ofong> Vibration and

Control, Journal ong>ofong> Applied Mechanics,

Proceedings ong>ofong> Royal Society: Series A,

Journal ong>ofong> Transportation Research Board,

and International Journal ong>ofong> Numerical and

Analytical Methods in Geomechanics.

Member ong>ofong> two proposal review panels for

National Science Foundation.

■ Tran, Binh Q., Ph.D., biomedical engineering,

Department ong>ofong> Education’s National Institute

on Disability and Rehabilitation Research’s

Rehabilitation ong>Engineeringong> Research Center

grant review panel 2007. Associate editor for

the IEEE Transactions on Information

Technology in Biomedicine. Reviewer for

RESNA’s assistive technology journal.

■ Tsopelas, P., Ph.D., civil engineering, associate

editor for the ASCE Journal ong>ofong> Structural

ong>Engineeringong>. Reviewer for Journal ong>ofong>

fall2008 | 27


cuaengineer

Structural ong>Engineeringong> (ASCE), Earthquake

Spectra (EERI), Journal ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

Mechanics (ASCE), Earthquake ong>Engineeringong>

and Structural Dynamics, Scientia Iranica, and

ong>Engineeringong> Structure, 2004–present.

■ Vignola, J. F., Ph.D., mechanical engineering,

appointed to the scientific committee ong>ofong> the,

Eight International Conference on Vibration

Measurements by Laser Techniques:

Advances and Applications, Ancona, Italy,

June 2008. Secretary for the mechanical

engineering faculty meetings. Chair ong>ofong> the

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong> committee on failing

grades.

■ Wang, Z., Ph.D., mechanical engineering,

reappointed secretary ong>ofong> the Electronic

Packaging Committee ong>ofong> SEM, June 2007.

Reviewer for Optics and Lasers in ong>Engineeringong>,

Optics Letters, Experimental Mechanics, and

Optics and Laser Technology, 2007.

■ Yuan, B., Ph.D., biomedical engineering,

reviewer for academic journals such as

Applied Optics, Optics Express, 2007–2008.

Awards and Honors

■ Ahmed, F., Certified Information Systems

Security Prong>ofong>essional (CISSP), issued by

International Information Systems Security

Certification Consortium, Jan. 2008.

■ Moskowitz, Ira, and Ahmed, F., Edison Patent

Award, Naval Research Laboratory 2007.

■ Judge, J., Provost’s Award for Excellence in

Teaching, Catholic University, May 2007.

■ Judge, J., Burns Junior Faculty Fellowship,

Catholic University ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>, May

2007.

■ Zaghloul, A. I., and Kilic, O., PATENT: “Wideband

modular MEMS phased array,” US

Patent #7,262,744 issued August 2007.

■ Lucko, G., Corporate Cornerstone Award (for

ACE Mentor Team), Bell Multicultural High

ong>Schoolong>, Washington, D.C., 2007.

■ Lucko, G., Finalist for Provost Award for

Excellence in Teaching, Catholic University ong>ofong>

America, 2007.

■ Lucko, G., Outstanding Young Alumni Award,

Vecellio Construction ong>Engineeringong> and

Management Program, Virginia Tech, 2007

(postponed).

■ Lum, P. S., California American Physical

Therapy Association Research Publication

Award, 2007.

■ Nguyen, C. C., Honorary Prong>ofong>essorship,

Saigon Technology University, Ho Chi Minh

City, Vietnam, March 2008.

■ Nguyen, C. C., Leadership Award for visionary

leadership in international collaboration from

INEER, International Network ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

Education and Research, Coimbra, Portugal,

September 2007.

■ Nieh, S., Charles H. Kaman Award for

Excellence in Teaching, ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>,

Catholic University ong>ofong> America, 2007.

■ Regalia, P. A., Charles H. Kaman Award for

Excellence in Research, Catholic University,

May 2007.

■ Sun, L., University Provost Award for

Excellence in Research and Scholarship,

Catholic University ong>ofong> America, 2007.

Student Awards

■ Nicholas J. Backert, 2009, Construction

Management Association ong>ofong> America National

Capital Chapter Scholarship, ($1,500)

■ Alexander W. Bautz, 2010, 2007–2009

Senator’s Club Alumni Scholarship ($3,500

per semester for four semesters)

■ Matthew T. Brady, 2011, civil engineering,

Associated Builders and Contractors

Metropolitan Washington Chapter Scholarship

Fund, 2007; Construction Management

Association ong>ofong> America National Capital

Chapter Scholarship, 2007; Construction

Management Association ong>ofong> America National

Capital Chapter Scholarship, ($2,000);

Associated Builders and Contractors

Metropolitan Washington Chapter Scholarship

Fund, ($1,500)

■ Erica C. Gonzalez, 2010, civil engineering,

Construction Management Association ong>ofong>

America National Capital Chapter,

Scholarship, 2007

■ Andrew R. Kalna, 2010, civil engineering,

Associated Builders and Contractors

Metropolitan Washington Chapter Scholarship

Fund, 2007

■ Michael J. Kuklinski, 2010, civil engineering,

Associated Builders and Contractors

Metropolitan Washington Chapter Scholarship

Fund, 2007; Construction Management

Association ong>ofong> America National Capital

Chapter Scholarship, 2007

■ Bryan A. Logsdon, 2008, civil engineering,

Associated Builders and Contractors

Metropolitan Washington Chapter Scholarship

Fund, 2007

■ Kelly A. McDonald, 2009, civil engineering,

Construction Financial Management

Association Scholarship (through Associated

Builders and Contractors Metropolitan

Washington Chapter), 2007; Dennis F.

McCahill Award for Service in Civil

ong>Engineeringong>, 2008

■ Hassan Taheri Nejad, graduate student in

civil engineering, Associated Builders and

Contractors Metropolitan Washington Chapter

Scholarship Fund, 2007, M.S.E.

■ Paul de Vuyst, graduate student in civil

engineering, Construction Management

Association ong>ofong> America National Capital

Chapter, Scholarship, Civil ong>Engineeringong>, 2007

■ Alexander N. Walendziak, 2008, Timothy W.

Kao Award for Academic Excellence in Civil

ong>Engineeringong>, 2008

2008 COMMENCEMENT

28 | cuaengineer


Two ong>Engineeringong> Doctoral Candidates Attend Course in Italy

Last October, CUA doctoral

candidates Patrick O’Malley

and Teresa Woods participated

in something fairly routine for

graduate students: a seminar

on their area ong>ofong> interest, in this

case, laser vibrometry.

The location ong>ofong> their two-day

classroom was less routine:

Ancona, Italy.

The pair, who are both

working toward their doctorates

in mechanical engineering,

attended two daylong courses

at the Polytecnic University ong>ofong> Patrick O’Malley and Teresa Woods.

Marche in Ancona, thanks to a

grant provided by the European Commission. The seminar that caught their

attention was on vibration measurements, a subject both students studied in

Advanced Topics in Acoustic Vibrations, a graduate class under the direction

ong>ofong> Assistant Prong>ofong>essor ong>ofong> Mechanical ong>Engineeringong> Joe Vignola.

Vignola and his colleague, Assistant Prong>ofong>essor John Judge, have been working

on detecting structural abnormalities based on vibrations that are detected

by a laser. Vignola has worked with colleagues at the Italian university for

several years, using this process to detect unseen damage to frescoes. He

suggested that Woods and O’Malley apply to the program. The CUA faculty

and their doctoral students are also exploring the use ong>ofong> this technology

to detect land mines and improvised explosive devices buried underground.

O’Malley, who graduated from CUA

in 2006 and received his master’s

degree in mechanical engineering from

the university in 2007, has been working

with Judge and Vignola for the past year

to build a research apparatus to take 3-

dimensional vibration measurements in

the ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>’s Pangborn

Hall. He was co-author ong>ofong> a paper about

their work for the International Design

ong>Engineeringong> Technical Conference and

presented it in Las Vegas in September.

“These courses were extremely helpful

for us in continuing to improve our

facility,” O’Malley says, “and gave me a

deeper understanding ong>ofong> the various

vibration measurement techniques that exist.”

Woods is already planning to return to Ancona in the summer ong>ofong> 2009,

when the Italian university will host a major conference on the subject. She

and O’Malley hope to have a paper accepted based on research they’ll do in

the coming academic year.

Ancona is located on the Adriatic Sea, a few hours drive from Venice,

Florence and Rome. O’Malley, a Buffalo native who took Italian from kindergarten

through eighth grade, took the opportunity to do some translating.

“The trip gave me a good excuse to brush up on my Italian, which is,

unfortunately, something I have neglected for the last few years!”

O’Malley says.

Society ong>ofong> Women Engineers Keep Things Going

Md. President Caitlin Matyas, Vice President Deniz Bardakci and Treasurer Kyrie

Jig organized the casino-themed event with the help ong>ofong> the other executive

board members and general members. More than 150 students, faculty and

staff attended, enjoying a delicious five-course meal that was followed by

music and dancing. This annual event was again a success and will surely be

continued for years to come.

Thanks to the dedication and hard work ong>ofong> its executive board, which led to

greatly increased numbers ong>ofong> members, the CUA Student Chapter ong>ofong> the Society

ong>ofong> Women Engineers (SWE) accomplished many things this school year.

National ong>Engineeringong> Week

SWE organized the events involved with the National ong>Engineeringong> Week with

student chapters ong>ofong> ASCE, ASME, BMES, EWB and IEEE each hosting an

event throughout the week. The week concluded with the 6th Annual

ong>Engineeringong> Ball, which was held at Maggiano’s Little Italy in Friendship Heights,

Fund Raising and Networking

Two other new events were organized by SWE during the 2007–2008 school

year. Executive member Samantha Muro organized a fundraiser selling mugs,

which went very well and allowed the organization to decrease costs to

attendees at their events.

The second event was SWE Day, organized by Caitlin Matyas. This was a

networking event for SWE collegiate members in the D.C. area. Students from

the University ong>ofong> Maryland, George Mason University and Howard University

were in attendance, along with many CUA SWE members. Held Saturday, April

12, in Pangborn Hall, the day featured speaker April Jones, a member ong>ofong>

the Prong>ofong>essional Women’s Speaker Bureau who presented a talk on women

in leadership roles, and a lunch. After lunch, the students got to know each

other more while playing games and designing and printing their own business

cards. The event was deemed successful by the attendees. The 2007–2008

SWE executive board is very proud to have started this event, which we

hope will become a lasting tradition at CUA.


CUA ong>Engineeringong>: Cutting-edge Research Driving Superb Education

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong>

ong>Engineeringong>

Charles C. Nguyen, Dean

202-319-5160

Jeffrey Giangiuli, Director

ong>Engineeringong>

Managment Program

202-319-5191

Binh Q. Tran, Chair

Department ong>ofong>

Biomedical ong>Engineeringong>

202-319-5181

Poul Lade, Chair

Department ong>ofong>

Civil ong>Engineeringong>

202-319-5163

Philip Regalia, Chair

Department ong>ofong>

Electrical ong>Engineeringong>

and Computer Science

202-319-5193

Sen Nieh, Chair

Department ong>ofong>

Mechanical ong>Engineeringong>

202-319-5170

Master ong>ofong> Biomedical ong>Engineeringong>

Abdulaziz Ahmad Alsomali

Hakan Emre Bardacki

John Ivanong>ofong>f

Haripriya Kandimalla

Michelle Anne Mattera

Caitlin Matyas

Roberto Silva

Kota Takahashi

Master ong>ofong> Civil ong>Engineeringong>

Dawitt G. Muluneh

Master ong>ofong> Electrical ong>Engineeringong>

Joseph A. Nguyen

Andrew Nicholas Riel

Michele Ruth Suite

Master ong>ofong> Science in Computer Science

Raid Ghrmallah Alzahrani

Nizar Mohammed Bukhari

Angel Castillo-Nieves

Azhandeh Koorosh

David E. Moore

Ellsworth W. White

Master ong>ofong> Mechanical ong>Engineeringong>

Clinton John Farrell Jr.

Master ong>ofong> Science in ong>Engineeringong>

Mohammed Alhussein

Khlaed Saad M. Altassan

Eucario Bakale

Christian Ezeji

Carmen Denise Garzone

Congratulations to the Class ong>ofong> 2008!

Issam Hourani

Edwin T. Okonkwo

Anupont Thaicharoenporn

Master ong>ofong> Science in ong>Engineeringong> —

ong>Engineeringong> Management

Abdulrahman Rashed Al Sabt

Amr Esam Al Thagafi

Andrew F. Dohse

Thomas Charles Dooley Jr.

Tyler W. Forrest

Jerry R. Gray

Bradley D. Harrison

Robert Wendell Maddan

Lukas C. McMichael

Jeffrey S. Mitchell

George James Morgan IV

Eric Garrett Nelson

Elizabeth Ann Newdeck

Alexander R. Razzook

Anupont Thaicharoenporn

Abdullah Misyar Ibin Tuwalah

Robert Fredrick Zuppert Jr.

Bachelor ong>ofong> Biomedical ong>Engineeringong>

Deniz Bardacki

Joseph Edward Blanc

David C. Eastwood

Brendan Matthew Gilmore

Kaitlyn Elizabeth Helling

Ronald James Hupczey Jr.

Ke Ma

Caitlin M. Matyas

Jason E. Merkerson

Bradley James Miller

R E A S O N . F A I T H . S E R V I C E .

Samantha Ameila Muro

Cristina Emerita Ortega

Gregory Leverette Powell

Ph.D. Dissertations and Advisers

Bachelor ong>ofong> Civil ong>Engineeringong>

John Daniel Blades

Michael Robert Geraghty

Joseph Martin Gilfoil

Patrick V. Keenan

Christopher S. Kronenthal

Bryan A Logsdon

Gregory Walter Lyons

Ross J. Mackey

Rachel Nicole Marz

Kelly Anne McDonald

Michael Vernon Michalski

Robert Daniel O’Brien

Robert F. Soler

Jose Domingo Targa

Alexander Noyes Walendziak

Paul T. Yantosh

Daniel R. Zmijewski

Bachelor ong>ofong> Electrical ong>Engineeringong>

Patrick Andrew Boughan

Brandown Lowell Good

Bachelor ong>ofong> Mechanical ong>Engineeringong>

William Joseph Breslin

Michael C. Cullen

Patrick Brendan Fry

Matthew Furdyna

Jessica L. Newson

Richard Michael Scenna

Abigail Thornton Wallis

Nathan Daniel Neckel, Dissertation: Quantification ong>ofong> Static and Dynamic Muscle Synergy Patterns in the Paretic Leg ong>ofong> Stroke Patients. Adviser: Joseph Hidler, Ph.D.

Patricia Lafferty, Dissertation: Texture Measures and the Steganographic Active Warden Model. Adviser: Farid Ahmed, Ph.D.

Teresa Osicka, Dissertation: Wave-let Based Pulmonary Nodules Features Characterization on Computer Tonography (CT) Scans. Adviser: Farid Ahmed, Ph.D.

Hong Yu, Dissertation: A Multiple Access Protocol for Multimedia Transmission over Wireless Asynchronous Transfer Mode Network. Adviser: Mohammed Arozullah, Ph.D.

Feiquan Luo, Dissertation: Dynamic Back Calculation ong>ofong> Pavement Properties Using Optimization in Nondestructive Evaluation. Adviser: Lu Sun, Ph.D.

Steven Bishop, Dissertation: Investigation ong>ofong> Mechanical Excitation as a Means for Buried Landmine Detection. Adviser: Panos Tsopelas, Ph.D.

THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA

ong>Schoolong> ong>ofong> ong>Engineeringong>

Washington, DC 20064

NON PROFIT ORG.

U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

PERMIT 711

WASHINGTON, D.C.

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