BFLO(G) Facts and Figures, Anglo-German Impact - British Forces ...

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BFLO(G) Facts and Figures, Anglo-German Impact - British Forces ...

British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

Mission

Organisation

Tas ks


Promote the long-term acceptance of British

Forces in Germany in order to maintain the

optimum operating environment for the

BFG community.

Mission


XXX

ARRC

Rhine

Garrison

10,459

BFG GARRISONS

20

OS Stn

>10

Gütersloh

Garrison

X

III

102

X

12,688

7

1

X

XX

9,431

9,616

Paderborn

Garrison

Bergen-

Hohne

Garrison


Anglo-German Levels Of Co-operation

FEDERAL

LÄNDER

REGIONAL RP

KREIS

BImA

Central

BImA

Regional

Offices

BImA

Local

Offices

FMOC

OFD

(Constr)

FMOD

(MIL) (CIV)

WBK

& LKdos

Bz Reg

Kdo

WBV

BLB SBN StOV

Kreis

Kdo

OTHER

FEDERAL

MINISTRIES

LAND

MINISTRIES

EQUIV

EXECUTIVE

AUTHORITIES

LOCAL AUTH

OFFICALS

HQ

BFLO(G)

CLO

CLO /

DLLO

SLOs

UKSC(G)

DIV HQ

BRIGADE

GARRISON

STATION


BFLO(G) Attributes

• Understand Host Nation

– Administrative system

– Political climate

– Business attitudes

– Cultural/social customs

– Knowledge of laws/ordinances/agreements

• Know both partners

• Speak both languages

• Provide continuity

• Appropriate status

• Single contact point


Services Liaison Officers - Tas ks

• Provide Host Nation liaison and advice to BFG

Garrisons on:

Anglo-German relations - including business

opportunities

Training

Movement

Environment

Protocol

Community Relations

Press and PR matters (with Media Ops)

• Process non-criminal legal matters.

•Representational Duties.


HOST NATION INFRASTRUCTURE LIAISON SECTION

• Provide liaison, advice and assistance to BFG

Estate Organisations in accommodation and

construction matters with the Host Nation

• Maintain close liaison with the other Sending

States on accommodation and construction

matters


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

IMPACT OF BFG IN THE COMMUNITY AND ASPECTS

OF ANGLO-GERMAN RELATIONS


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

FACTORS UNDERPINNING ANGLO-GERMAN

RELATIONS

• Commanders recognise the importance of a supportive

environment and set priorities accordingly.

• High regard for British military’s competence on

operations.

Impact of military training is much lower than during

cold war years.

• Local and regional financial factors.

• Empty barracks are a town council’s nightmare.


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

BFG STATISTICS AS AT APR 09

Military & UKBC 20,800

Families 21,400

Total 42,200

Local Employees 4,800


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

Nordrhein-Westfalen Niedersachsen

Services & UKBCs 14878 8967

Familienangehörige 17161 9249

Summe 32039 18216

Arbeitnehmer 3997 1670

Other Länder:

Military: 61 Families: 100

Local Employees: 95


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

• However, overall BFG figures do not indicate the

impact a Garrison might have in its community. For

that detail, one needs to include demographics.

• The following slides take Herford as an example.


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

HERFORD DEMOGRAPHICS as at Apr 09

• Herford’s Population 67,072

British Components:

• Military and UKBCs 824

• Spouses 515

• Children 584

• Total 1,923

• Percentage 2.86%


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

• Male Soldiers between 18 and 23 313

• Herford’s male population – 18 to 23 2,224

• Percentage 14%

British children under 11 years. 504

• Herford children under 11 years 8,348

• Percentage 6%


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

INTEGRATION POINTS

• BFG population is very young.

• Concentrate therefore on sport, school exchanges

and film clubs.

German population norms do not apply to BFG SFA

areas (young families - no grandparents - loud

neighbourhoods)

• Improve knowledge of German.

• Of interest to both Ambassadors (Berlin and

London) who wish to enhance Germany’s profile

amongst young Britons.


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

BFG’s FINANCIAL IMPACT

• BFG Budget: € 1,5 billion

(including military salaries)

• Contribution from other TLBs: € 0,5 billion

• Annual Total: € 2,0 billion

(of which a considerable share is spent in Germany)


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

EXAMPLE OF THE LOCAL FINANCIAL FACTOR

Monthly Annually

Euros Euros

Rent 1.000.000 12.000.000

Utilities 690.000 8.280.000

Rubbish Disposal 140.000 1.680.000

Maintenance 1.050.000 12.600.000

Local Salaries 2.250.000 27.000.000

Prvate Spend 3.750.000 45.000.000 Based on a private spend of Euros 750 per head

Total 8.880.000 106.560.000

Financial impact of each BFG Garrison on its region is

between €8 million and €10 million per month


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

SOME CONCERNS ON OVERALL ANGLO-

GERMAN RELATIONS

• Vulnerable to the stereotype on both sides of the

national divide.

• Imbalance of interest. German fascination with most

things British is not often reciprocated.

• Very low German language competence on the part of

most BFG members.

• Previously assumed levels of general knowledge on

Anglo-German topics cannot taken for granted.

• As a result of the above, coupled with easy access to

UK entertainment, increasing “ghetto-isation”.


British Forces Liaison Organisation (Germany)

Anglo-German Issues for Commanders


STATUS OF FORCES AND SUPPLEMENTARY AGREEMENTS

The NATO Status of Forces Agreement (NATO SOFA), the Supplementary

Agreement (SA) to it and the Protocol of Signature (POS) are the basic documents

under international law that regulate the mutual rights and duties in FRG of the

Sending State Forces (SSF) and the German authorities. It is envisaged that the SA

will remain in force as along as foreign forces are stationed in Germany, but it

contains a provision whereby alterations can be made to its text by agreement. This

provision was invoked on 11 July 1991, when the Federal Government formally

requested a review which culminated in the signing of an agreement to amend the SA

on 18 March 1993. Following ratification the amended SA then came into force on

29 March 1998.

While the whole of the SA is important in that it regulates the way in which we

conduct our day-to-day business with the Host Nation (HN) we should be especially

aware of the 4 key paragraphs, namely Articles 45.1, 46.1, 53.1 and 57.1 which

together ensure our ability to move and train effectively in Germany. From a

practical point of view we should also pay particular attention to Articles 67.1 and

67.3 which allow the Force to purchase goods and services for its own use and also

for distribution to its members. In this regard it should be noted that since the

individual has no right to purchase goods or services tax-free, such arrangements

must be made through an official procurement agency (OPA), such as a mess or PRI.


Articles of Note

Article II provides that it is the duty of a force and its members to respect the law of the

receiving state. The SSF have always taken the view that it means that they should pay

attention to German law when drafting their own internal regulations. Nevertheless, as far

as individual members of the Force are concerned, it is accepted that they must comply

with German law in their day-to-day activities which are unconnected with official

duties.

Article VII. contains provisions relating to criminal jurisdiction. It provides that both the

military authorities of a SSF and the authorities of the receiving state shall have

jurisdiction over personnel of the Force and their dependants in relation to criminal

offences committed within the territory of the receiving state. By virtue of Article 19 SA,

FRG has waived its primary right to jurisdiction under Article VII NATO SOFA, subject

to a right to recall this waiver and exercise jurisdiction over personnel of a force where

major interests of the German administration of justice make this imperative.

Article VIII contains provisions relating to the settlement of claims for civil damages

against SSF and their personnel in a receiving state. The general principle in SOFA and

the SA is that in all types of situation where legal proceedings could arise, a HN Agency

is interposed as a party in place of the SSF. In this way the SSF avoids becoming a party

to litigation in the German courts. This state of affairs does not of course apply in respect

of individual personnel of the SSF and their dependants.


TRAINING OUTSIDE TRAINING AREAS

• BFG units retain the right under SA Article 45 to train outside training areas

“insofar as a force is not able to carry out its training programme on accommodation

made available”. The old BAOR Form 443 was used to apply for such training,

hence the term “443” being commonly used.

• The CLO and SLO offices have brought the clearance system online and so

reduced the warning time required to:

Group 1 (Coy, Bty, Sqn trg or a CPX of up to 250 troops) 4 weeks

Group 2 (Bn or Regt exercises or a CPX of up to 600 troops) 6 weeks

Group 3 (Bde exercise or CPX of up to 1500 troops) 8 weeks

Group 4 (Larger exercises and CPXs above 1500 troops)16 weeks

(larger exercises have also to be categorised or co-ordinated in the FMOD

training programme.)

• Full details of the “443” process and other instruction are in “Training Over

Private Land (Germany)”. Commanders should be aware that the process is one of

informing military and local authorities. Specific permission to use private land

and property is still required from respective owners. Consult your SLO for advice.


POLITICAL CLEARANCE

BFG HQs and or Units must obtain FMOD political clearance for any of the

following activities:

• Any form of exercise or training in which non-BFG troops are involved. For

example, UK based troops or foreign troops on exchange training. The only

exception would be training involving troops normally stationed in Germany

from another Sending State.

• Any form of visit involving UK or foreign troops, which includes bands, sports

or demonstration teams, study days or battlefield tours.

• Any entry into or transit across the eastern Länder. This requirement is a

strange hangover of the 2+4 Agreement. However, it is something we must

abide by and includes recces as well as exercises.

Clearance is obtained through BFLO(G), involves basic details of what troops

and equipment, numbers, length of stay and point / method of entry. The FMOD

requires a minimum of 4 weeks’ notice. Once again, please consult your SLO


BFG (Bad) DEBT

Both GOC 1 (UK) Armd Div and GOC UKSC(G) agree that the level

of unpaid (bad) debt across BFG is high (over €5 million as at August

2009) and there is a corporate responsibility to address the issue.

Where debt exists as a result of court orders, that responsibility is

absolutely clear cut and Commanders are required to take action in an

appropriate and timely manner.

Fair assistance to firms who are owed money by soldiers is also

necessary. It should not be regarded as debt collection by proxy but

rather assistance to our soldiers, who will otherwise face court action

and considerable extra costs.

The GOCs require prompt and thorough action within units.

Respective SLOs should be kept informed of the results so debts may

be deleted from their records. Those statistics on bad debt are

regularly reviewed.

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