Complete 2013 Freshwater Fishing DIGEST - State of New Jersey

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Complete 2013 Freshwater Fishing DIGEST - State of New Jersey

2013 Freshwater Fishing Season Dates and Limits • FREENew JerseyFreshwater FishingDigestJanuary 2013Yearsof Trout Production at thePequest Trout HatcheryFishing LicenseInformationpage 16A Summary of Regulations andFreshwater Fisheries Management InformationNJFishandWildlife.com


page 8 page 12 page 35contents6 Attention Anglers: River Herring Closure7 Calendar of Fish and Wildlife Events16 License Information17 Summary of General Fishing Regulations18 General Trout Information20 Trout Fishing Regulation Tables24 New Jersey Freshwater Fish Identification26 Fishing Regulations: Size, Season and Creel Limits28 Delaware River30 Greenwood Lake31 Baitfish, Turtles and Frogs31 Motorboat Registration, Title and Operators’ Requirements32 Fishing License Lines33 Wildlife Management Area Regulations34 Annual Open House at Pequest34 FREE Fishing Days: June 15 and 16, 201336 Health Advisories: Fish Smart — Eat Smart38 New Jersey’s Stocking Programs: Warmwater and Trout40 Protect New Jersey’s Waters42 New Jersey State Record Sport Fish43 Skillful Angler Awards Program44 New Jersey Trout Art ContesthotlinesTrout StockingSpring / Fall / Winter(609) 633-6765The computerized message is available24 hours per day, seven days a weekseasonally, or visit our website:NJFishandWildlife.com.Shad Run(610) 954-0577 or (610) 954-0578In April, the Delaware River Shad Fishermen’sAssociation provides a message onthe shad run in the Delaware 24 hours perday, seven days a week. Information onriver conditions and the status of the shadrun is offered. Call in late evening or earlymorning to avoid a busy signal.Environmental Alert(877) WARNDEPfeatures8 Thirty Years of Trout Production12 Shad of the Raritan River23 Fish Handling and Care35 Catch and Release—WhoDecides?41 Invasive Alert: DidymoContact this 24-hour hotline to report a fishkill, illegal waterbody drawdown, pollutionor other environmental offense.For 2013 License Fees andInformation, see page 16.Scan this QR code with your smartphonefor instant access to NewJersey Division of Fish and Wildlife’swebsite: NJFishandWildlife.comThis DIGEST is availablephotocopied in anenlarged formatfor the visually impaired.Write to:New Jersey Division of Fish and WildlifeLarge Format Freshwater Fishing DigestMC501-03, P.O. Box 420Trenton, NJ 08625-0420Operation Game Thief(800) 222-0456Call this number to anonymously reporta fish or wildlife violation.This is not the full law. Consult the Division of Fish and Wildlife for further details. All persons are reminded that the statutes, code and regulations are the legal authorities.


AttentionNew Jersey SALTWATER Anglers© Elena Elisseeva | Dreamstime.comREGISTER. You make a difference! It’s free, easy and required.Before you head out to catch your favorite marine fish thisyear, be sure to join the hundreds of thousands of otheranglers who have already registered with the New JerseySaltwater Recreational Registry Program (NJSRRP).Who needs to register?NOTE: Anglers with either a valid registration from theNational Saltwater Angler Registry, a valid license from anotherexempted state or a New Jersey freshwater fishing license arerequired to register (for free) with the New Jersey SaltwaterRecreational Registry Program. Registration with New Jersey willexempt you from having to register with the National SaltwaterAngler Registry. Registered anglers must still comply withsaltwater license requirements in other states.Individual saltwater anglers ages 16 and older MUSTregister if ANY of the following criteria are met:• Recreationally fish with a hand line or rod and line,spearfish or fish by hand• Recreationally fish in the marine and fresh tidal waters ofthe State of New Jersey• Recreationally fish in marine waters outside the State ofNew Jersey but land the catch in New JerseyIndividual saltwater anglers are EXEMPT from registeringif either of the following apply:• Under the age of 16• Solely fish on for-hire (party and charter) vesselsthat are registered with the New Jersey SaltwaterRecreational Registry ProgramFor-hire vessel owners/operators MUST register if they:• Carry individuals who engage in recreational fishingin the marine and fresh tidal waters of the State ofNew Jersey OR• Carry individuals who engage in recreational fishingin the marine waters outside the State of New Jerseybut land their catch in New JerseyFor more information on the New Jersey Saltwater RecreationalRegistry Program and to register, visit www.SaltwaterRegistry.NJ.govNew Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife receives federal assistance from the U.S. Fishand Wildlife Service and thus prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, nationalorigin, disability, age and sex pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of1964, Section504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of1990, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 and Title IX of the Educational Amendmentsof 1972. If you believe that you have been discriminated against in any program, activityor service, contact New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife, MC501-03, P.O. Box 420,Trenton, NJ 08626-0420. The telephone number is (609) 292-9410. You may also writeto the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Civil Rights Coordinator for Public Access, 4401 N.Fairfax Drive, Mail Stop: WSFR-4020, Arlington, VA, 22203.State of New JerseyChris Christie, GovernorKim Guadagno, Lieutenant GovernorDepartment of Environmental ProtectionBob Martin, CommissionerIrene Kropp, Deputy CommissionerOffice of Natural and Historic ResourcesRich Boornazian, Assistant CommissionerDivision of Fish and WildlifeDavid Chanda, DirectorLarry Herrighty, Assistant DirectorLisa Barno, Chief, Freshwater FisheriesThomas McCloy, Marine Fisheries AdministratorRussell Babb, Acting Chief, ShellfisheriesBrandon Muffley, Chief, Marine FisheriesMark Chicketano, Chief, Law EnforcementMatt Brown, Deputy Chief, Law EnforcementJim Sciascia, Chief, Information and EducationTony Petrongolo, Chief, Land ManagementDavid Jenkins, Chief, Endangered and Nongame SpeciesCindy Kuenstner, EditorNew Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife is a professional, environmental organizationdedicated to the protection, management and wise use of the state’s fish and wildlife resources.The Digest is available at license agents and Fish and Wildlife offices. Informationmay be reprinted with permission. Subscriptions are not available.This Digest is designed and produced by J.F. Griffin Publishing, LLC; www.jfgriffin.comPartial funding for the Digest is provided by Federal Aid through the Sport FishRestoration Program.Cover photo: Brown trout (www.therawspirit.com)New Jersey Fish and Wildlife CouncilsFish and Game CouncilDave Burke, Acting ChairPhillip BrodheckerDr. Barbara BrummerAgust GudmundssonJeffrey A. LinkJohn MesserollRobert PuskasDan VanMaterAtlantic Coast Shellfish CouncilWalter L. Johnson, III, ChairJohn J. Maxwell, Vice ChairWalter HughesOliver Twist, IIIMarine Fisheries CouncilRichard N. Herb, Acting ChairScott BaileyErling BergDr. Eleanor Ann BochenekWalter L. Johnson, IIIFrances PuskasSergio RadossiJoe RizzoRobert R. Rush, Jr.Joseph A. ZaborowskiWaterfowl StampAdvisory CommitteeRobert VonSuskil, ChairBob AllenPete BacinskiCarl W. BlankDave BurkeGeorge HowardMike KantorJay LaubengeyerJim A. ShissiasDr. Elenore TedescoDelaware BayShellfish CouncilScott Bailey, ChairWarren Hollinger, Vice ChairStephen FleetwoodRichard MalinowskiEndangered and NongameSpecies Advisory CommitteeDr. Barbara Brummer, ChairDr. James ApplegateDr. Joanna BurgerDr. Emile DeVitoJane Morton-GalettoHoward GeduldigDr. Rick LathropDr. Erica MillerDr. David MizrahiDr. Dale SchweitzerJames ShissiasWildlife RehabilitatorsAdvisory CommitteeKelly Simonetti, ChairDonald BonicaPhillip BrodheckerLisa DeLambertHarriet ForresterTracy LeaverDr. Erica MillerDiane NickersonWhere to Write UsNew Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Fish and WildlifeMC 501-03 • P.O. Box 420 • Trenton, NJ 08625-0420 • NJFishandWildlife.comNew Jersey Division of Fish and WildlifeOur MissionTo protect and manage the state’s fish and wildlife to maximize their long-termbiological, recreational and economic value for all New Jerseyans.Our Goals• To maintain New Jersey’s rich variety of fish and wildlife species at stable, healthylevels and to protect and enhance the many habitats on which they depend.• To educate New Jerseyans on the values and needs of our fish and wildlife and tofoster a positive human/wildlife co-existence.• To maximize the recreational and commercial use of New Jersey’s fish and wildlifefor both present and future generations.2 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest


2013 Freshwater Fishing Season Dates and Limits • FREENew JerseyFreshwater FishingDigestJanuary 2013Director’s MessageBy Dave ChandaDuring my more than 30-year career with New Jersey Division of Fish andWildlife I have seen many changes and marked many milestones. Noneare as personal or special to me as those associated with the Pequest TroutHatchery and Natural Resource Education Center which celebrates its 30 thanniversary this year.Even as a young biologist I was impressed by the foresight of former DEPCommissioner Jerry Fitzgerald English who insisted that if New Jersey wereto construct a state-of-the-art trout production facility, it should also includea state-of-the-art natural resource education center. At that time, the StateCommission on Environmental Education stressed the importance of developing natural resourceinterpretative centers throughout New Jersey. The Pequest Natural Resource Education Center is,and continues to be, an excellent example of a successful center.One of my first tasks at Pequest was to develop the visitor experience and create a set of interpretativeexhibits that were more than the traditional “nature trivia.” A key component of the educationprograms at Pequest was—and still is—to help visitors understand their role in the conservation ofour fish and wildlife resources. The exhibits were designed to have visitors develop an awareness ofnatural resources, the good and bad impacts our actions have on fish and wildlife and the importantrole we all play collectively in the wise use and management of our natural world.Developing such an ambitious education program and raising the quality trout New Jersey’s anglershave come to expect from Pequest can be quite challenging. However, Fish and Wildlife is fortunate tohave a dedicated group of professionals managing this resource. In addition, as with many successfulprograms, we are also extremely fortunate to have an equally dedicated group of fish and wildlifevolunteers to assist our agency. More than 1,400 individuals are now recognized as part of Fish andWildlife’s Wildlife Conservation Corps, the largest volunteer force for a natural resource group in thestate. This dedicated group of volunteers has been instrumental in the success of the operations ofthe Pequest Trout Hatchery and Natural Resource Education Center.On the trout production end, these volunteers assist in distributing trout throughout the entirestate. The education center couldn’t operate without volunteer assistance. Each year they contributethousands of hours of time and help Fish and Wildlife to staff the visitor center and to provideinstruction to thousands of kids at the fishing education pond and during special events such as theannual open house.I am very proud to have worked with the professionals and volunteers who helped to make the PequestTrout Hatchery and Natural Resource Education Center one of the best facilities in the nation. Aswe look to the future, know that you are in good hands as the staff and volunteers at this facility arejust as dedicated today as those who came before them.Please join us at Pequest this year for the March Open House to celebrate this shining example offish and wildlife resource management and outdoor education that is thriving thanks to 30 years ofsupport from hunters and anglers like you.Dave Chanda is the Director of the Division of Fish and Wildlife.}} Get On The List!The Freshwater Fisheries e-mail lists, that is. This free service provides the latest information about Fishand Wildlife events, public hearings and other matters related to our freshwater fishing resources. And wehave seven other lists so you can maximize your enjoyment of New Jersey’s fish and wildlife resources.Fishing LicenseINFORMATIONpage 16Yearsof Trout Production at thePequest Trout HatcheryA Summary of Regulations andFreshwater Fisheries Management InformationNJFishandWildlife.comAbout this GuideThis high-quality regulation guide is offered to youby the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlifethrough its unique partnership with J.F. GriffinPublishing, LLC.J.F. Griffin is an award winning publishing housethat specializes in producing state fish & wildliferegulation books. J.F. Griffin supports the NewJersey Division of Fish and Wildlife's staff in thedesign, layout and editing of the guides. They alsomanage the marketing and sales of advertising toappropriate businesses within the book.The revenue generated through ad salessignificantly lowers production costs andgenerates savings. These savings translateinto additional funds for other important wildlifeprograms!If you have any feedback or are interested inadvertising, please contact us at 413.884.1001 oronline at www.JFGriffin.comGraphic Design:Jon Gulley, Erin Murphy,Evelyn Haddad, Chris Sobolowski430 Main St. Suite 5 | Williamstown, MA 01267available onlinein a new Digital Edition!Fully searchableLive hyperlinks toexpanded contentEmail pagesOne-click printingeRegulations.com/nj/fishing/freshwaterSign up today at: NJFishandWildlife.com/lstsub.htm4 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Attention Anglers:River HerringClosure!}The New Jersey DEP’s Division of Fish andWildlife is reminding recreational and commercialanglers who fish in New Jersey’s fresh,tidal or marine waters of important regulatorychanges for river herring made in 2012. Theseregulations were put in place due to concernsabout the significant coastwide decline of riverherring stocks. The exact cause for these coastwidedeclines remains uncertain, but numerousfactors such as loss of spawning habitat, impedimentsto fish passage (i.e. dams), water qualitydegradation and fishing all likely played a role.The term river herring is collectively appliedto two species of fish, the alewife (Alosa psuedoharengus),and blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis).The fresh waters of New Jersey have both migratoryand landlocked populations of herring.Migratory populations reside in the marine environmentand migrate each spring into freshwaterrivers and streams and even into some lakes toExplore. Experience. Enjoy!September 14 & 15, 201310 am – 5 pm dailyColliers Mills Wildlife Management AreaJackson Township, NJFishingKayakingBirdingRock Climbing3D and Target ArcheryHunting/Trapping InstructionFish and Wildlife ExhibitsOutdoor Supply Flea Marketspawn. Landlocked populations do not migrateand complete their entire life cycle in a numberof freshwater lakes across the state. There are nodistinctive identifying characteristics to determinebetween a landlocked or migratory herringregardless of species. Individuals in landlockedpopulations, however, are notably smaller in sizethan their migratory counterparts.These changes are necessary to comply withAmendment 2 of the Atlantic States MarineFisheries Commission’s (ASMFC) FisheriesManagement Plan for Shad and River Herring(FMP). Amendment 2 of the ASMFC fisherymanagement plan for river herring prohibitsboth the recreational and commercial harvestof river herring in the waters of states that donot have an ASMFC–approved river herring sustainablemanagement plan. New Jersey does nothave an approved plan since the available informationon river herring stocks is not sufficientHikingOrienteeringCamping SkillsTrap/22 Rifle ShootingAnd much more FREE family fun!For more information visit WildOutdoorExpo.comto definitively prove the state’s river herringstocks are sustainable. Other states along theEast Coast—Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland,Virginia, Massachusetts and Rhode Island—haveclosed their river herring fisheries as well.Freshwater Closure —Effective February 18, 2012In order to comply with the required fisheryclosure for migratory herring while still allowinglandlocked fisheries to remain open, theFish and Game Council— in coordination withthe Division of Fish and Wildlife— has adoptedthe following:1. The possession, take, attempt to take, saleor purchase of alewife or blueback herringfrom any freshwater stream or river isprohibited.2. Up to ten alewife or blueback herring, nogreater than six inches in length, may betaken for personal use, from freshwaterlakes in Morris, Passaic, Sussex andWarren counties, and from Spruce RunReservoir located in Hunterdon County.Landlocked herring taken from lakes withinthese counties may only be used on the lakefrom which they were taken. Any unusedherring must be returned to the waterbodyupon the conclusion of the angler’s fishingtrip. They may not be transported away fromthe shoreline of the lake by any mechanism.They may not be sold.3. For all other freshwater lakes, regardless ofownership (public or private), only purchasedherring no greater than six inchesin length may be possessed for up toseven days from date of purchase, whenaccompanied by a receipt. The receiptmust list the name, address and telephonenumber of the place of purchase, date of purchaseand quantity purchased. This receiptmust be without erasures or alterations ofany kind and must have a control number.Marine Closure —January 18, 2012No person shall take, possess, land, purchase,sell or offer for sale any river herring(alewife and blueback) in the marinewaters of the state. Only commercial vesselsfishing exclusively in federal waters while operatingunder a valid federal permit for Atlanticmackerel and/or Atlantic herring may possessriver herring up to a maximum of five percentby weight of all species possessed.6 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


}}Fish and Wildlife2013 Calendarof Events• Fisheries Forums,Feb. 23 and Dec. 7; page 7• Pequest Open Houseand Flea Market,March 23–24; page 34• Opening Day of Trout Season,April 6; page 18Newwww.RamseyOutdoor.comReels• FREE Fishing Days,June 15–16; page 34• NJ ColdwaterConservation School,June 27–30; page 45• Teen Angler Youth Day,July 20, page 34• Wild Outdoor Expo,Sept. 14–15; page 6The new Sahara FE frontdrag spinning reels providetrouble-free, tanglefreecasting. VarispeedII oscillation system layersline in two differentspeeds for excellentcastability. Four differentsize reels to handle justabout anything!973-584-7798281 Rt. 10E, Succasunna, NJThe new Saros FA reelsfeature a super stronghigh tech frame, rotor andsideplate, exceptionallysolid feel. The four newSaros FA reels featureRapid Fire Drag for easyand accurate adjustmentswhen fi ghting fi sh. A newstandard in spinning reels!201-327-8141835 Rt. 17S, Ramsey, NJThe all new Symetre FLfront drag reels offersolid cranking power.Varispeed II oscillationsystem layers the line intwo different speeds forexcellent castability. Sizesfor trout and panfi sh,bass and walleye, andbigger species.201-261-5000240 Rt. 17N, Paramus, NJ}}Freshwater Fisheries Forums1st Forum:February 23, 2013; 10 a.m.Batsto Village Visitor’s Centerin Wharton State Forest2nd Forum:December 7, 2013; 10 a.m.Hackettstown HatcheryWarren CountyCome and share your views and recommendations for the future of freshwaterfisheries in New Jersey and learn about current research, management and fishculture activities!The forum at Hackettstown will include a tour of the fish production facilities.For more information or to pre-register (helpful, but not required) please call(908) 236-2118 or send an e-mail to njfwfish@earthlink.net. E-mails shouldinclude name, address, phone number and number of people attending.Presented by NJ Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Fish and WildlifeShawn Crouse/NJ Div. Fish and WildlifeNote the fluorescent tag behindthe eye of this wild brook troutwhich was marked and releasedfor a trout movement study.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 7Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Thirty Years ofTroutProductionat Pequest Trout HatcheryBy Jeff Matthews | Hatchery SuperintendentClint Decker/ NJ Div. of Fish and Wildlife


A specialized hatchery feed truck distributespelleted feed four times daily along thehatchery’s 1.5 miles of raceways.Jeff Matthews / NJ Div. of Fish and WildlifeHaving a reliable water supply, dedicated employees,using the latest in trout culture technology andfollowing stringent disease-prevention guidelinesenables the staff at Pequest to reach productionobjectives every year.The production cycle beginsearly in the fall when hatcherystaff will manually strip andfertilize the eggs from adulttrout.The eggs are then placed in incubators forapproximately twenty eight to thirty five days.Upon hatching, the young trout are called “sacfry,”so named because the yolk sac remainsattached to the abdomen and nourishes theyoung fish for about two weeks. The sac-fryare moved from the incubators to special tankslocated in the nursery building. Once the yolkis absorbed, the young fish swim up from thebottom of the tanks. They are then started ona high protein diet and fed eight times per day.Following a three-month growing period inside,the fry—now called fingerlings—are sorted forsize and moved outside in the summer to a seriesof pools known as raceways. The hatchery has1.5 miles of raceway. Here, a specialized feedingtruck distributes pelleted feed four times a dayin each one hundred foot section of raceway.After the summer growing period the fish areagain sorted for size and left in the racewayswhere they attain a 10.5-inch average lengthby early spring.By mid-March the hatchery trucks are loadedand rolling, stocking quality trout in over twohundred lakes, streams and rivers for the enjoymentof anglers statewide. During the processof spring stocking, excess and older broodstockare liberated along with the regular productionstock. These fish range from 15 to 25 inches andaverage 3 to 8 pounds.Fish and Wildlife has consistentlyproduced qualitybrook, brown and rainbowtrout as a result of moderntechnology and a high qualitywater supply.There are seven artesian production wells in thePequest Valley that supply up to seven thousandgallons of water per minute. The continuouslyflowing waters of Pequest remain at a constant52 degrees Fahrenheit year round. Clean, moving,cold water is a key factor that is essential tosuccess in a trout-rearing facility.Along with the hatchery’s complex systemsmaintaining water flow is the demand of electricityto keep the pumps running. The PequestValley experiences many power outages a year.During the original construction, one dieseldrivengenerator and four direct-drive dieselswere installed to drive the wells and to keep thewater flowing always. A state-of-the art radiotelemetry system was installed to monitor andcontrol the operation of each individual well.Water flow, diesel motor operations and wellstatus are all now monitored and operated withsmartphones by the supervisory staff, alongwith desktop computer controls. Variable-speedmotors have recently been installed in each ofthe wells. The old-style pumps ran at a constantspeed and valves were used to adjust water flow.The new motors enable staff to control theamount of water being pumped from each wellwhile reducing electrical usage and cost.10 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Note: Total number of monitoring days varied annually due to changing river conditions.obstruction free and retrieving the videos forviewing at the Lebanon Fisheries Laboratory.As there is no electricity to the viewing room,that is located below the river’s flood stage, batteriesthat power the system have to be changedthree times each week. These videos were thenreviewed at the Lebanon Fisheries Laboratoryfor the purposes of fish enumeration andidentification, with American shad being thetargeted fish species. In the first year Fish andWildlife was able to record the movement ofAmerican Shad up the Raritan River, they weresurprised to find that 49 American Shad madethe journey upstream of the Island Farm weir.“We were only anticipating one or two shad,and to see there were 49 really gave us hope forthe future,” remarked Lisa Barno the Chief ofState’s Bureau of Freshwater Fisheries. 2,740 fishwere documented using the ladder that firstyear, representing 20 different species. The yearsimmediately following, provided some initialoptimism with numbers slowly increasing eachyear, with the height of passage occurring in 2001with 592 shad, and over 6,000 fish documentedusing the ladder. Fish passage monitoring in 2003,and 2005 noted a disturbing decline, with 364and 22 shad, respectively.The declining numbers are consistent withthe decline of American shad seen up and downthe east coast. The lack of data to demonstrate asustainable fishery in the Raritan will no doubtresult in a closure of the fishery in 2013 in accordancewith the Atlantic States Marine FisheriesCommission Shad and River Herring Plan.Fish passage at the Island Farm Weir is affectednot only by the number of shad in the river butalso by the ability of fish to navigate the Calcodam, located a mile downstream. After thebreaching of the Fieldsville dam, the Calco dambecame the lowermost impediment to fish passageon the Raritan. Through the efforts of theDelaware River Shad Fishermen’s Association, theCalco Dam, a notch was cut in the concrete damface to permit for passage of fish through the dam.Fish passage through the Calco notch, however, isonly effective during higher flows of 800 cfs ormore. Consistent low spring time flows no doubtprevented shad from getting above the dam.Efforts ContinueOver the past few years NJDEP has workeddiligently to remove three dams on the RaritanRiver, including the Calco dam, the Nevius Streetdam, and the Robert Street dam. The removal ofthese barriers would open up a 10 mile stretch ofthe Raritan River for American Shad and otherfish species to utilize. NJDEP’s Natural ResourceDamages Program negotiated removal of thethree dams as part of a settlement agreementwith the El Paso Corporation.On July 19, 2011 the removal of the Calco dambegan. Today, the Raritan River flows freelyfrom the Island Farm weir and fish ladder, allthe way to the Raritan Bay. A total of 6.1 milesof unobstructed river is now available for fishto move through. The Island Farm fish ladder istheir next challenge. After they navigate the fishladder, they are then headed for the Nevius Streetdam. During higher water flows, the NeviusStreet dam is passable by fish, allowing themto travel upstream to the Robert Street dam. InJuly of 2012 the removal of the Roberts Streetdam was completed. This elimination clearedthe way for fish to access another two miles ofwaterway for possible breeding grounds on theRaritan River. The removal of Nevius Street damis anticipated sometime in 2013.Shad of the Raritan River, continued on page 15.Jamie Darrow / NJ Div. of Fish and Wildlife


Shad of the Raritan River, continued from page 13.One of the first American Shad to pass by the viewingwindow of the Raritan River fish ladder.As a result of these removals monitoringof shad passage at the Island Farm Weir wasresumed for 2011, and 2012 to collect currentinformation on the status of the shad.The removed and breached dams will increasethe quality of the water and surrounding habitat.Water quality will become more favorable fornative species and will facilitate the eradicationof undesirable species that were once favored bythe pooling effects of dams. Native species willbe able to disperse throughout the water bodyLisa Barno / NJ Div. of Fish and Wildlifeand aid in increasing the biodiversity upstreamand downstream of the previous obstructions.Fish and other species will also be able to reestablishtheir gene flow between individualsthat were once isolated. Sediment will be ableto travel downstream in the currents, preventinggeomorphic impacts, like the widening ofstreams. The removal of these dams, in theRaritan River, will help New Jersey restore theecological functions of a free-flowing river andwill show the beneficial effects over time.The future of the shad in the RaritanUnfortunately, the Raritan River Americanshad still face an uphill battle as their stocksare extremely low due to many decades of pollution,river impounding dams and commercialoverfishing. There may be a light at the end ofthe tunnel for shad though, as conditions on theRaritan River have greatly improved over theyears with the passing of State and Federal Actsaimed at reducing industrial pollution. Also inthe shad’s favor, is the push for the removal ofdams and other impoundments on the upperstretches of the Raritan. The removals of theCalco and Robert Street dams as well as theplanned removal of the Nevius Street dam areexcellent steps toward rebuilding the Americanshad run of the Raritan River. Such measureshave been shown to restore anadromous fish runsin other rivers throughout the country.FENWICK • SIMMS • GAMAKATSU • AIRFLO • YO-ZURI • PENN • DAIWA • PFLUEGER • RAPALA • COSTA DEL MARSAGE • MINN KOTA • GARY YAMAMOTO • EAGLE CLAW • ROSS • QUANTUMServing New Jersey for over 100 years!NJ’s LARGEST Sporting Goods StoreYOUR FISHING TACKLE DESTINATIONFresh & Saltwater Tackle – Friendly & Knowledgeable Staff!513 West Union Ave. Bound Brook, NJ · (732) 356-0604LIVE BAITShiners • Fatheads • WormsPlus Frozen BaitFULL SERVICE FLY SHOPOne of the Largest Fly TyingSelections in the StateNJ & PAHunting and Fishing LicensesSTATE & FEDERAL DUCK STAMPSEXPERT REEL REPAIRSpecial OrdersMaryland Style Crab TrapsEnter our 90thAnnual Trout ContestShop online atwww.efingersports.comHUNTING · FISHING · CAMPING · ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT · ARCHERY · KAYAKS · BICYCLES · GOLF · OUTDOOR & ATHLETIC CLOTHINGFOOTWEAR · TEAM, SCHOOL & CORPORATE SALES · BOY SCOUT UNIFORMS · LARGE SELECTION OF CUSTOM SURF PLUGSHours: Monday–Friday 9:30–9:00, Saturday 9:00–5:30, ·Sunday 10:00–5:00 · AMEX VISA M/C DEBITDirections: 2 blocks east of I-287, exit 13A from I-287N, exit 13 from I-287S. 3 Blocks So. of Rt. 22 at the Thompson Ave. exit. 1/4 Mile east of the Bridgewater Promenade on Rt. 28.POWER PRO • SHAKESPEARE • ORVIS • CORTLAND • SHIMANO • BERKLEY • RIO • G. LOOMIS • ST. CROIX • STORMRENZETTI • R.L. WINSTON • VAN STAAL • STREN • SCOTT • TEMPLE FORKJanuary 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 15Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


License Information2013 REGULATIONSThis is not the full law. Consult the Division of Fish and Wildlife for further details.All persons are reminded that the statutes, code and regulations are the legal authorities.Regulations in red are new this year. Purple text indicates an important note.Licenses• A valid New Jersey fishing license is requiredfor residents at least 16 years and less than 70years of age (plus all non-residents 16 years andolder) to fish the fresh waters of New Jersey,including privately owned waters.• Resident anglers age 70 and over do notrequire a fishing license. A driver’s license orother acceptable proof of age containing dateof birth and physical description will serveas the actual fishing license.• License must be visibly displayed on outerclothing.• License and trout stamp are both valid fromdate of purchase through Dec. 31.• A person must reside in New Jersey for at leastsix months to obtain a resident fishing license.• Farmers and immediate family memberswho live on the farm do not need a licenseto fish on their own farm, but must obey allfishing regulations.• Anyone convicted of a second fish or wildlifeviolation in this or another state within aperiod of five years will have his or her NewLICENSE & FEES •2013 License Fees andInformationLicenses and fishing-related permitsare valid from date of purchase toDec. 31 of each year.LicensesResident FishingAges 16–64 yrs............................... $22.50Senior Resident FishingAges 65 – 69 yrs.............................. $12.5070 & over..............................................FreeResident Trout StampAges 16–69 yrs............................... $10.50Non-resident FishingAge 16 yrs. and older............................ $34Non-resident Trout Stamp......................... $20Non-resident 2-Day Vacation Fishing.......... $9Non-resident 7-Day Vacation Fishing..... $19.50All-Around Sportsman (includes residentfishing, firearm hunting and bow/arrowhunting licenses)............................. $72.25PermitsAvailable online or through license agents:Boat Ramp Permit................................ $15Available through the Lebanon Field Office(908) 236-2118:Water Lowering, Fish Stocking,Baitfish Collecting, Fish Tagging............. $2Turtle & Frog Collecting.......................... $2Scientific Collecting............................. $22Jersey sporting licenses revoked for a minimumof two years.Trout StampsA valid fishing license and trout stamp are bothrequired to fish for or possess trout and salmonfor all anglers (residents and non-residents) 16and over, and residents under the age of 70. Notrout stamp is required for residents age 70years and over.Purchasing a LicenseLicenses may be purchased byphone at (888) 773-8450, online atwww.NJ.WildlifeLicense.com or at licenseagents such as sporting goods stores plusbait and tackle shops. Visit our website atNJFishandWildlife.com for details, or call(609) 292-2965. The Trenton Fish and Wildlifeoffice is no longer open to the public for licenseor permit sales.Replacement — Lost License or StampA license, permit or stamp can be replacedat any license agent or online at Fish andWildlife’s Internet license sales site,www.NJ.WildlifeLicense.com also linked throughour regular website at NJFishandWildlife.comor by phone at (888) 773-8450.Special LicensesServicemen and ServicewomenA person who is on active duty in the armedservices of the United States is entitled to fishwith a resident license.National Guard MembersEligible National Guard personnel are entitledto free licenses, permits, and stamps. Furtherinformation can be obtained by writing to:NJ Department of Military/Veteran Affairs, 101Eggerts Crossing Rd., Lawrenceville, NJ 08648.Or call (609) 530-6866 for 1st Sgt. Turrian.Disabled Veterans Licenses, Stamps and PermitsFree hunting and fishing licenses, stamps and permitsare available for resident disabled veterans.For the purposes of this program, legislationdefines disabled veterans as “…any resident ofNew Jersey who has been honorably dischargedor released under honorable circumstances fromactive service from any branch of the ArmedForces of the United States and who has beendeclared by the United States Department ofVeteran Affairs, or its successor, to have a serviceconnecteddisability of any degree…”New applicant disabled veterans may obtaintheir hunting and fishing licenses and stampsat the following Fish and Wildlife field offices:• Pequest Trout Hatchery/Natural ResourceEd. Ctr, Oxford, Warren Co., (908) 637-4125• Central Region Office, Upper Freehold Twp.,Monmouth Co., (609) 259-2132• Southern Region Office, Sicklerville, CamdenCo., (856) 629-0090Applications for disabled veteran certificationand your first disabled veteran license may bemade via the mail by sending the applicationand all required documentation to NJ Divisionof Fish and Wildlife, Attn: Disabled VeteranLicensing,.MC 501-03, PO Box 420 Trenton, ,NJ 08625-0420.All licenses, stamps and permits for which theveteran is eligible will be free of charge. This doesnot give preferential treatment in any lottery.For questions call (609) 984-6213.Disabled Veteran Applicants:1. Documentation of current benefits for aservice-connected disability and proof ofhonorable discharge (such as a copy of yourDD-214, VA card or monthly check stub)must be presented to obtain a free disabledveteran license.2. Applicant must provide a hunter education(archery, shotgun or rifle) course certificateapplicable to the license for which he or sheis applying or a previously issued residentarchery or firearm license or rifle permit.Resident licenses from other states issuedto hunters prior to establishing residency inNew Jersey will be accepted if the licenseindicates the sporting arm for which it wasvalid. Non-resident licenses from other statesare not acceptable.3. To obtain the free disabled veteran deer/turkey permits one must first have a freedisabled veteran hunting license.For the BlindResidents afflicted with total blindness mayobtain a free license from Fish and Wildlife’sTrenton office. Call (609) 292-9530 for anapplication.Summary of General Fishing RegulationsThe season, size and creel limits forfreshwater species apply to all waters ofthe state, including tidal waters.• Fish may be taken only in the manner knownas angling with handline or with rod and line,or as otherwise allowed by law.• When fishing from the shoreline, no more thanthree fishing rods, handlines or combination16 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Summary of Fishing Regulations2013 REGULATIONSthereof may be used (except on the DelawareRiver, see page 28). For the Delaware Riverthe three rod limit applies both to boat andshoreline anglers (see page 28).• Only one daily creel of any fish species may bein possession. Additional fish may be caughtonce the creel is reached if immediatelyreturned to the water unharmed.• Separate stringers or buckets must be usedfor each angler’s catch.• Boats may contain only the combined dailycreel limit for each legal angler on board.• A fishing license does not authorize trespasson private property. Permission first must beobtained from the landowner.It Is Unlawful To:• Fish within 100 feet (or as posted) of anyfish ladder entrance or exit from March 1through June 30.• Spear fish in fresh waters. See exception forDelaware River, page 28.• Possess a fishing device with more than ninehooks in total, or more than three treble hooks,except for the Delaware River; see page 28.• Use set lines.• Use cast nets in freshwater lakes or troutstocked waters. See Baitfish Regulations,page 31 for other exclusions.• Foul hook or snag any species of fish. Thisdoes not apply to fish taken through the ice.Bow and Arrow FishingCarp, including bighead, common, grass andsilver—as well as, eels, flathead catfish, bothAmerican and gizzard shad, snakeheads andsuckers—may be taken at any time by use ofa bow and arrow (with a line attached to thearrow) when in possession of a valid fishinglicense. See regulations for the Delaware Riverand Greenwood Lake, pages 28–30.Crossbows are NOT permitted for fishing.Emergency ClosuresIt is illegal to fish or attempt to catch or kill fishby any manner or means in any waters for whichthe Director of the Division of Fish and Wildlife,upon approval by the Fish and Game Council,issues an emergency closure notice. Such notificationis effective and/or rescinded immediatelyupon public notification. Emergency closuresshall be based upon imminent threat to the wellbeingof the fishery resources, and/or its users,and may include any exceptions to the totalban of fishing that the Director deems practical.Water Supply Reservoirs Open To Fishing By Permit OnlyPermits must be obtained from the specific reservoir owner listed below.A valid fishing license is also required.Newark-PequannockWatershed ReservoirsWaterbodyEcho LakeClinton ReservoirOak Ridge ReservoirCanistear ReservoirPoint View ReservoirOradell ReservoirWoodcliff LakeLake Tappan ReservoirLake DeforestCountyPassaicMorrisSussexPassaicType ofFishingBoat &ShorelineShoreline onlySat. & Sun7 a.m. to7 p.m.Ice FishingNo more than five devices may be used for takingfish when ice is present. The devices thatmay be used are:1. Ice supported tip-ups or lines with one singlepointed hook attached, or one burr of threehooks that measure not more than ½-inchfrom point to shaft;2. An artificial jigging lure with not more thanone burr of three hooks that measure notmore than ½-inch from point to point;3. An artificial jigging lure with not more thanthree single hooks measuring not more than½-inch from point to shaft;4. An artificial jigging lure with a combinationof the hook limitations described in 2 and3 above.Natural bait may be used on the hooks of theartificial jigging lures. All devices that are nothand-held must bear the name and address ofthe user and cannot be left unattended.See separate regulations for trout-stockedwaters and Greenwood Lake.Potentially Dangerous FishThe possession or release of live, potentially dangerousfish is prohibited. These species includeAsian swamp eel, bighead, grass (diploid) andsilver carp, brook stickleback, green sunfish,flathead catfish, oriental weatherfish, snakeheadand warmouth. Anglers MUST destroy thesespecies if encountered while fishing and aredirected to submit specimen(s) or photos to aFish and Wildlife Bureau of Freshwater Fisheriesbiologist for verification. To reach a biologist, call(908) 236-2118 for north Jersey or (856) 629-4950FeeYesNoBergen Shoreline only YesPermit SourcePermits available in person onlyat these locations:Newark Watershed Conserv. & Dev. Corp223 Echo Lake Road, Newfoundland, NJ 07435(973) 697-285040 Clinton Street, 4th Floor, Newark, NJ 07102(973) 622-4521Passaic Valley Water Commission1525 Main Avenue, Clifton, NJ 07015(973) 340-4309Send stamped, self-addressed envelope.A daily permit will be mailed.Permit allows two people to fish.United Water Company200 Old Hook Road, Harrington Park, NJ 07640(201) 767-9300 x3208for south Jersey. These non-native species arelikely to cause environmental harm to the state’sfisheries resources by outcompeting preferredgame fish species.Sale of FishIt is illegal to sell any freshwater fish speciesexcept under commercial permits as prescribedin the Fish and Game Code. Artificiallypropagatedtrout, if properly tagged, may be soldfor food purposes.Stocking FishA permit is required to stock fish or fish eggsinto any waters of the state, public or private,at any time. An application may be obtainedby contacting the Lebanon Field Office at(908) 236-2118. It is ILLEGAL to stock carp orkoi into any such waters.Tagging FishNo person may tag or mark and then releasea fish without first obtaining a fish stockingpermit or by special permit issued by Fish andWildlife. Contact the Lebanon Field Office at(908) 236-2118 for application information.Waste of FishFish of any species which are purposely killedbecome part of the angler’s daily limit andmust be removed from the waters from whichthey were taken, then either used or otherwisedisposed of properly.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 17Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


General Trout Information2013 REGULATIONSRegulations in red are new this year.Purple text indicates an important note.2013 General Trout Fishing Information• Opening day of trout season: Saturday, April 6, 2013 at 8 a.m.• To fish for trout or salmon, a valid annual New Jersey fishing licenseand trout stamp are both required for residents at least 16 years andless than 70 years of age plus all non-residents 16 years and older.• Waters stocked with trout in the spring are listed below (those withno in-season closures) AND on page 20 (those with in-season closures).Note: Special regulations may apply on some of these waters,or sections thereof.• During the three weeks prior to opening day, all ponds, lakes or sectionsof streams are stocked with trout, except Trophy Trout Lakes.These waters are closed to fishing for all species from March 18 toApril 6 at 8 a.m. Exceptions: Farrington Lake, Lake Hopatcong, LakeShenandoah, Prospertown Lake and Swartswood Lake are openyear round to fishing. However, all trout caught during this period(above) must be released immediately. Seasonal and Year-round TroutConservation Areas and designated Holdover Trout Lakes (see pages21–22) are also open to fishing but are catch-and-release only fortrout. Fishing is not permitted on seasonal trout conservation areasfrom 12:01 a.m. to 8 a.m. on April 6, 2013. Round Valley and MerrillCreek Reservoirs (Trophy Trout Lakes) are open to year-round fishing;trout may be harvested within the regulations as shown on page 22.• After opening day, trout stocked waters are open to fishing, includingthe days they are stocked, unless specifically listed with in-seasonclosures (page 20). In-season closures also apply to designatedSeasonal Trout Conservation Areas and Fly-Fishing Only areas(page 21).• Only one daily creel limit of trout may be in possession. Once the creellimit is reached, an angler may continue to fish provided any additionaltrout caught are immediately returned to the water unharmed.• When fishing from the shoreline, no more than three fishing rods,hand lines or combination thereof may be used.• Separate stringers or buckets must be used for each angler’s catch.• Containers in boats may hold only the combined daily creel limit foreach legal angler on board.• Fish and Wildlife reserves the right to suspend stocking when emergencyconditions prevail.Spring Trout Stocked Waters With No In-Season Fishing ClosuresAfter opening day, these waters may be fishedon the day they are stocked.Note: All waters listed are stocked with troutpre-season (the three-week period precedingopening day) except Round Valley and MerrillCreek reservoirs. The number in parenthesesindicates the anticipated number of in-seasonstockings (from April 6 through May 24). Azero indicates the water will be stocked onlyduring pre-season. For details on what’s beingstocked and when, call the Trout Hotline at(609) 633-6765. This recorded message is updatedweekly. (Spring stocking: April–May; Fallstocking: October; Winter stocking: November.)Or visit our website at NJFishandWildlife.comwhere you will also find directions to publicaccessportions of trout-stocked waters.Atlantic CountyBirch Grove Park Pond—Northfield (3)Hammonton Lake—Hammonton (3)Heritage Pond—Absecon (3)Opening Dayof Trout SeasonApril 6, 2013April 5, 2014April 4, 2015April 9, 2016Bergen CountyDahnert’s Lake—Garfield (4)Hackensack River—Lake Tappan to Harriot Ave.,Harrington Park (4)Hohokus Brook—Forest Rd. to Saddle River (4)Indian Lake—Little Ferry (4)Mill Pond—Park Ridge (3)Pascack Creek—Orchard St., Hillsdale, toLake St., Westwood (4)Potash Lake—Oakland (3)Saddle River—Lake St. to Dunkerhook Rd.,Fair Lawn (5)Tenakill Creek—Closter, entire length (3)Whites Pond—Waldwick (4)Burlington CountyCrystal Lake—Willingboro (4)Laurel Pond—Mt. Laurel (3)Pemberton Lake—Pemberton (3)Rancocas Creek, Southwest Br.—Medford,Mill St. Park to Branch St. bridge (4)Sylvan Lake—Burlington (3)Camden CountyGloucester City Pond—Gloucester (4)Grenloch Lake (see Gloucester County)Haddon Lake—Audubon (0)Oak Pond—Sicklerville (3)Rowands Pond—Clementon (3)Cape May CountyPonderlodge Pond —Villas (4)Tuckahoe Lake—Tuckahoe (4)Cumberland CountyCohansey River—Dam at Seeleys Pond topowerline above Sunset Lake, Bridgeton (4)Giampietro Park Lake—Vineland (0)Mary Elmer Lake—Bridgeton (3)Maurice River—Willow Grove Lake dam toSherman Ave., Vineland (4)Shaws Mill Pond—Newport (3)South Vineland Park Pond —Vineland (3)Essex CountyBranch Brook Park Lake—Newark (4)Diamond Mill Pond—Millburn (3)Rahway River, W/Br.—Campbells Pond toGlen Ave.—Milburn (3)Verona Park Lake—Verona (4)Gloucester CountyGreenwich Lake—Gibbstown (3)Grenloch Lake—Turnersville (3)Harrisonville Lake—Harrisonville (3)Iona Lake—Iona (3)Swedesboro Lake—Swedesboro (3)Westville Lake—Westville (0)Hudson CountyWest Hudson County Park Pond—Harrison (0)Woodcliff Lake—James J. Braddock Park,North Bergen (4)Hunterdon CountyAlexauken Creek—West Amwell, entire length (2)Amwell Lake—East Amwell (3)Beaver Brook—Clinton Twp., entire length (2)Capoolong Creek—Pittstown, entire length (5)Delaware-Raritan Feeder Canal—Bulls Island toHunterdon/Mercer County line (6)Hakihokake Creek—Holland Twp., entire length (2)Lockatong Creek—Kingwood Twp., entire length (5)Mannys Pond—Union Twp. (3)Mountain Farm Pond—Lebanon Twp. (3)Mulhockaway Creek—Pattenburg, source to SpruceRun Reservoir (5)Neshanic River—Kuhl Rd. to Rt. 514 (2)Nishisakawick Creek—Frenchtown/Everittstown,entire length (2)Rockaway Creek—Readington Twp., entire length (4)Rockaway Creek, S/Br.—Lebanon to Whitehouse,entire length (5)Round Valley Reservoir—Clinton Twp. (1)Sidney Brook—Grandin, entire length (1)Spruce Run—Glen Gardner and Lebanon Twp.,entire length (5)18 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


General Trout Information2013 REGULATIONSWickecheoke Creek—Covered Bridge, Rt. 604,Sergeantsville to Delaware River (2)Mercer CountyAssunpink Creek—Assunpink Site 5 dam upstream ofRt. 130 bridge to Carnegie Rd., Hamilton Twp. (4)Colonial Lake—Lawrence Twp. (3)Delaware-Raritan Canal—Mulberry St., Trenton toAlexander St., Princeton (4)Delaware-Raritan Feeder Canal—Hunterdon/MercerCounty line to Wilburtha Rd. bridge (6)Rosedale Lake—Rosedale (3)Stony Brook—Woodsville to Port Mercer (4)Middlesex CountyFarrington Lake—North Brunswick (3)Hook’s Creek Lake—Cheesequake State Park (3)Ireland Brook—Farrington Lake to point 500 ft.upstream of Riva Ave. (2)Lake Papaianni—Edison (0)Lawrence Brook—Dam at Farrington Lake to 2ndRR bridge (Raritan Railroad) below Main St.,Milltown (4)Roosevelt Park Pond—Edison Twp. (3)Monmouth CountyEcho Lake—Southard (3)Englishtown Mill Pond—Englishtown (3)Garvey’s Pond—Navesink (3)Hamilton Fire Pond—Neptune (3)Hockhockson Brook—Hockhockson Rd. toGarden State Parkway bridge (northbound) (5)Holmdel Park Pond—Holmdel (3)Mac’s Pond—Manasquan (0)Mingamahone Brook—Farmingdale, Hurley Pond Rd.to Manasquan River (5)Mohawk Pond—Red Bank (4)Shadow Lake—Red Bank (3)Shark River—Hamilton, Rt. 33 to Remsen Mill Rd. (5)Spring Lake—Spring Lake (3)Takanassee Lake—Long Branch (4)Topenemus Lake—Freehold (3)Yellow Brook—Heyers Mill Rd. to Muhlenbrink Rd.,Colts Neck Twp. (2)Morris CountyBeaver Brook—Rockaway, entire length (3)Burnham Park Pond—Morristown (4)Drakes Brook—Flanders, entire length (3)Hibernia Brook—Hibernia, entire length (5)India Brook—Mountainside Ave. to Rt. 24, Ralston (5)Lake Hopatcong—Lake Hopatcong (3)Lake Musconetcong—Netcong (3)Mt. Hope Pond—Mt. Hope (3)Passaic River—White Bridge Rd. to Rt. 24,Chatham Borough (4)Pequannock River—(see Passaic Co.)Pompton River—Pequannock Twp. (see Passaic Co.)Russia Brook—Jefferson Twp., Ridge Rd. to LakeSwannanoa (2)Speedwell Lake—Morristown (4)Whippany River—Tingley Rd., Morris Twp. toRidgedale Ave., Morristown (2)Ocean CountyLake Shenandoah—Lakewood, Ocean County Park(3)Pohatcong Lake—Tuckerton (4)Prospertown Lake—Prospertown (3)Passiac CountyBarbour’s Pond—West Paterson (3)Clinton Reservoir—Newark Watershed (3)Green Turtle Pond—Long Pond Ironworks State Park,Hewitt (3)Oldham Pond—North Haledon (3)Pequannock River—Rt. 23, Smith Mills to Paterson-Hamburg Turnpike, Pompton Lakes (6)Pompton River—Pompton Lake to Newark-PomptonTurnpike (4)Ringwood Brook—State line to Sally’s Pond,Ringwood State Park (5)Sheppard Lake—Ringwood State Park (3)Salem CountyHarrisonville Lake—Harrisonville (3)Maurice River—Willow Grove Lake dam to ShermanAve., Vineland (4)Schadler’s Sand Wash Pond—Penns Grove (3)Somerset CountyLamington River—Rt. 523 (Lamington Rd.) at BurntMills to jct. with the N/Br. of Raritan River (4)Middle Brook, E/Br.—Martinsville, entire length (2)Passaic River—(See Morris Co.)Peapack Brook—Peapack-Gladstone, entire length (5)Raritan River—Jct. of Raritan River N/Br., and S/Br.,to Rt. 206 bridge (4)Rock Brook—Zion, entire length (1)Spooky Brook Park Pond—Franklin (0)Sussex CountyAlm’s House Pond—Myrtle Grove, Hampton Twp. (3)Andover Junction Brook—Andover, entire length (2)Big Flat Brook, Upper—Saw Mill Pond, High PointState Park to 100 ft. above Steam Mill Bridge onCrigger Rd., Stokes State Forest (4)Blue Mountain Lake—Delaware Water Gap Nat’lRecreation Area (3)Clove River—Jct. of Rt. 23 and Mt. Salem Rd. to Rt. 565bridge (5)Culver’s Creek—Frankford Twp., entire length (5)Dry Brook—Branchville, entire length (3)Franklin Pond Creek—Hamburg Mtn. WMA, entirelength (5)Glenwood Brook—Lake Glenwood to state line (2)Lake Aeroflex—Andover (3)Lake Hopatcong—Lake Hopatcong (3)Lake Musconetcong—Netcong (3)Lake Ocquittunk—Stokes State Forest (3)Little Flat Brook—Sandyston Twp., entire length (5)Little Swartswood Lake—Swartswood (3)Lubbers Run—Byram Twp., entire length (5)Neldon Brook—Swartswood, entire length (2)Papakating Creek—Plains Rd. bridge to Rt. 565,Lewisburg (2)Papakating Creek, W/Br.—Libertyville, entire length(2)Pond Brook—Middleville, entire length (5)Saw Mill Pond—High Point State Park (3)Silver Lake—Hamburg Mountain WMA (0)Stony Lake—Stokes State Forest (3)Swartswood Lake—Swartswood (3)Trout Brook—Middleville, entire length (2)Wawayanda Creek—Vernon, entire length (5)Wawayanda Lake—Vernon (3)Union CountyGreen Brook—Rt. 527, Berkeley Heights to Rt. 22,Scotch Plains (2)Lower Echo Park Pond—Mountainside (3)Milton Lake—Rahway (4)Passaic River—(See Morris Co.)Rahway River—I-78 bridge, Springfield to St. GeorgeAve. (Rt. 27), Rahway (4)Seeleys Pond—Berkeley Heights (3)Warinanco Park Pond—Roselle (0)Warren CountyBeaver Brook—Silver Lake Dam to Pequest River (4)Blair Creek—Hardwick Center to Blair Lake (2)Blair Lake—Blairstown (3)Brookaloo Swamp - Hope, entire length (2)Buckhorn Creek—Roxburg, entire length (2)Columbia Lake and Gatehole—Knowlton Twp. (3)Furnace Brook—Oxford, entire length (2)Furnace Lake—Oxford (3)Honey Run— Knowlton-Hope township line toBeaver Brook, Hope Twp. (2)Jacksonburg Creek—Jacksonburg, entire length (2)Lopatcong Creek—Rt. 519 Harmony Twp., toSouth Main St., Phillipsburg (5)Merrill Creek Reservoir—Stewartsville (1)Pohatcong Creek—Mt. Bethel to Rt. 31 (2)Pophandusing Creek—Oxford Rd., Hazen toDelaware River (2)Trout Brook—Hackettstown, entire length (2)White Lake—Hardwick Twp. (3)}}WE NEED YOURCOOPERATION!The New Jersey Division of Fishand Wildlife has stocked browntrout in the lower ManasquanRiver, Monmouth County.Anglers are asked to report allcatches of brown trout thatexhibit characteristics of a searun. These fish tend to develop amore silvery coloration, maskingmost of the body spots after anextended time in salt water.Sea Run Brown TroutThe future of this program dependson these fish being reported.Call Pequest State FishHatchery (908) 637-4173or Lebanon Field Office(908) 236-2118.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 19Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Trout Fishing2013 REGULATIONSGeneral Trout Fishing RegulationsBrook, Brown & Rainbow Trout (and their hybrids and strains)Season Minimum Size Daily Limit ExceptionsJanuary 1– March 17 9 inches 4 1. Trout-stocked waters with spring in-season closures are closed to fishing5 a.m. to 5 p.m. on days listed for stocking (See listing below).Fishing prohibited on2. Special regulation areas (wild trout streams, year round and seasonaltrout stocked waters.March 18– April 6 at 8 a.m.trout conservation areas, trophy and holdover trout lakes).Catch and release for trout 3. On lakes Farrington, Hopatcong, Prospertown, Shenandoah andin all other waters.Swartswood fishing is permitted during the period March 18–April 6 atApril 6 at 8 a.m.– May 31 9 inches 68 a.m. All trout caught during this period must immediately be released.4. Greenwood Lake and Delaware River—see separate regulations forJune 1–Dec. 31 9 inches 4boundary waters, pages 28–30.Lake Trout RegulationsRegulations in red are new this year.Purple text indicates an important note.Season Minimum Size Daily Limit ExceptionsJan. 1–Dec. 31 15 inches 2Trophy Trout Lakes(Round Valley Reservoir, Merrill Creek Reservoir), see page 22Trout Stocked Waters Closed to Fishing on Spring In-season Stocking DatesAfter opening day, these waters are closed to fishing from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. on their designated stocking dates. Closures apply to all tributaries for 100 feet fromthe main channel. There are no closures for ANY waters in the fall.Trout Stocked Waters Closed to Fishing (5 a.m. to 5 p.m.) on Spring in-season Stocking DatesStocking Dates Waterbody County LocationMONDAYSApril 8, 15, 22, 29May 6, 13, 20TUESDAYSApril 9, 16, 23, 30May 7, 14, 21WEDNESDAYSApril 10, 17, 24May 1, 8, 15, 22THURSDAYSApril 11, 18, 25May 2, 9, 16, 23FRIDAYSApril 12, 19, 26May 3, 10, 17, 24Manasquan River Monmouth Rt. 9 bridge downstream to Bennetts Bridge, Manasquan WMAMetedeconk River, N/Br. Ocean Aldrich Rd. bridge to Ridge Ave.Metedeconk River, S/Br. OceanBennetts Mill dam to twin wooden foot bridge, opposite Lake Park Blvd.on South Lake Dr., LakewoodRockaway River Morris Longwood Lake dam (Jefferson Twp.) to Jersey City Reservoir in BoontonToms RiverOceanRt. 528, Holmansville, to confluence with Maple Root Branch, and Rt. 70 bridgeto Rt. 571 bridge (Exception: the section regulated as a Year Round TroutConservation Area; see separate regulation.)Wallkill River Sussex Lake Mohawk dam to Rt. 23, HamburgPohatcong Creek Warren Rt. 31 to Delaware RiverRaritan River, S/Br.Morris, Somerset,HunterdonBudd Lake dam to junction with N/Br. Raritan River (Exception: the sections regulatedas a Year-Round Trout Conservation Areas; see separate regulation.)Raritan River, N/Br. Somerset Peapack Rd. bridge in Far Hills to junction with S/Br. Raritan RiverBlack RiverPaulinskill River, andE/Br. and W/Br.MorrisSussex, WarrenRt. 206, Chester to the posted Black River Fish & Game Club property at thelower end of Hacklebarney State ParkLimecrest RR spur bridge on E/Br., Sparta Twp., and Warbasse Jct. Rd. (Rt. 663)on W/Br., Lafayette Twp., to Columbia LakeRamapo River Bergen State line to Pompton Lake (excluding Potash Lake)Big Flat BrookSussex100 ft. above Steam Mill bridge on Crigger Rd. in Stokes State Forest toDelaware River (Note: See special regulations pertaining to Fly Fishing Areas.)Musconetcong RiverPequest RiverWanaque RiverSussex, Morris,Warren andHunterdonWarren and SussexPassaicLake Hopatcong dam to Delaware River including all main stem impoundmentsexcept for Lake Musconetcong (Exception: the section regulated as a Year RoundTrout Conservation Area; see separate regulation.)Source downstream to Delaware River (Exception: the section regulated as aSeasonal Trout Conservation Area; see separate regulation.)Greenwood Lake dam to Wanaque Reservoir dam and from Wanaque Ave.bridge, Pompton Lakes to jct. with Pequannock River, excluding the Wanaque andMonksville reservoirs.20 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Trout Fishing2013 REGULATIONSTrout Conservation Areas (TCAs)Year Round TCAsSeason Minimum Size Daily Limit Restrictions (in effect year round)Jan. 1– March 17 15 inches 1 1. Only artificial lures may be used.2. Possession or use of bait (live or preserved) or any substance (natural orMarch 18– April 6 at 8 a.m. Catch and release onlysynthetic) that contains a concentration of bait scent is prohibited.3. Fishing is permitted during the spring in-season closures which apply to theApril 6 at 8 a.m.– Dec. 31 15 inches 1 (see #3 at right) river. All trout caught during these periods must be released immediately.Year Round TCA Waterbody (County)Driving Directions*Musconetcong River—Point Mountain Stretch (Hunterdon/Warren)Penwell Rd. bridge downstream to Point Mountain Rd. bridge(approx. 1.2 miles)Raritan S/Br—Ken Lockwood Gorge (Hunterdon)Section of S/Br within the Ken Lockwood Gorge Wildlife ManagementArea (approx. 2.5 miles)Raritan S/Br—Claremont Stretch (Morris)End of Angler’s Anonymous property (private) downstream toconfluence with Electric Brook (approx. 1.1 miles)Toms River (Ocean)End of Riverwood Park (Tom’s River Twp.) downstream to Rt. 571bridge (approx. 1 mile)seasonal TCAsRt. 31 to Rt. 57 E. Upper boundary: turn right on Penwell Rd. Lower boundary: turnright on Point Mountain Rd. Parking areas located near each bridge.Road in gorge is closed to through traffic. Rt. 31 to Rt. 513. Upper boundary:turn right at Hoffman’s Crossing Rd., take first right after bridge. Lower boundary:turn right on Silverthorne-Cokesbury Rd., turn left after crossing river. Park only indesignated areas.From light in Long Valley on Rt. 513 (Mill Rd.) and Rt. 517, go north on Schooley’sMt. Rd. Take immediate right after bridge onto Fairview Rd. Parking area approximately1 mile on right. Follow path to river.Rt. 195 (Exit 21) to Rts. 527/528 S. (Cedar Swamp Rd./ Veterans Hwy.) to Rt. 527S. (Whitesville Rd.) to Riverwood Dr. to entrance of Riverview Park.Season Minimum Size Daily Limit RestrictionsJan. 1–March 17 15 inches 1 1. Only artificial lures may be used.March 18–April 5Catch and release onlyApril 6 (12:01 a.m. to 8 a.m.)April 6 at 8 a.m.–May 19Gear restrictions do not applyFishing prohibited9 inches 6May 20–Dec. 31 15 inches 1Seasonal TCA Waterbody (County)Pequannock River (Morris/Passaic)Railroad trestle below Appelt Park, Bloomingdale, downstream toHamburg Turnpike bridge, Pompton Lakes (approx. 1.3 miles)Pequest River (Warren)Conrail Railroad bridge, located upstream of the Pequest TroutHatchery Access Road, downstream to Rt. 625 (Pequest Furnace Rd.)bridge (approx. 1.4 miles)2. Possession or use of bait (live or preserved) or any substance (natural orsynthetic) that contains a concentration of bait scent is prohibited.3. Pequest River—fishing is not permitted during the first six in-season stockingclosure dates. (See Trout Stocked Waters Closed to Fishing on SpringStocking Dates, page 20). Fishing is permitted during the last in-seasonstocking closure date (May 24), but all trout caught between 5 a.m. and5 p.m. must immediately be released.Driving Directions*I-287 (Exit 53). Proceed west on (Paterson) Hamburg Turnpike .34 miles. Right onBrant Ln. Railroad trestle below Appelt Park is the upstream boundary.Rt. 31 to Rt. 46 E, approx. 4 mi. to Pequest Trout Hatchery; paved parking lot.* Directions to public-access portions on other trout stocked waters are available at NJFishandWildlife.com/accesscnty.htmFly Fishing AreasSeason Minimum Size Daily Limit RestrictionsJan. 1– March 17 9 inches 4 1. Only artificial flies may be used, specifically limited to dry flies, wet flies,March 18– April 6 at 8 a.m.Fishing prohibitedbucktails, nymphs and streamers. Expressly prohibited are metal, plastic,or wooden lures, plugs, spinners and flies with spinners attached or anyApril 6 at 8 a.m.– April 15 at 5 a.m.multiple-hooked device. Spinning reels or any type of angling whereby a flyNo gear restrictions except 9 inches 6is cast directly from the reel are expressly prohibited.on Blewett Tract2. Possession or use of bait (live or preserved) or any substance (natural orApril 15 at 5 a.m.–May 31 9 inches 6synthetic) that contains a concentration of bait scent is prohibited.June 1–Dec. 31 9 inches 43. After opening day and through May, fishing is prohibited from 5 a.m. to5 p.m. on dates listed for stocking. (See Trout Stocked Waters Closed toFishing on Spring In-Season Stocking Dates, page 20.)Waterbody (County)Big Flat Brook (Sussex)Big Flat Brook [Blewett Tract](Sussex)LocationRt. 206 bridge downstream to the Roy Bridge on Mountain Rd., a distance of approx. 4 miles, except that portionknown as the Blewett TractA 0.5 mile portion on the Big Flat Brook clearly defined by markers, which extends from the Three Bridges Rd. to a pointupstream of the jct. of the Big Flat Brook and Little Flat Brook.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 21Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Trout Fishing2013 REGULATIONSTrout LakesTrophy Trout LakesWaterbody (County) Species Season Minimum Size Daily LimitMerrill Creek Reservoir(Warren)Round Valley Reservoir(Hunterdon)Holdover Trout LakesBrown & Rainbow Troutand their hybridsLake TroutBrown & Rainbow Troutand their hybridsLake TroutOpen year round 15 inches 2Jan. 1– Sept. 15 15 inches 2Sept. 16 –Nov. 30Catch and release onlyDec. 1–Dec. 31 15 inches 2Open year round 15 inches 2Jan. 1–Sept. 15Sept. 16–Nov. 30Dec. 1–Dec. 3115 to less than 24 inchesANDgreater than or equal to 24 inchesCatch and release only15 to less than 24 inchesANDgreater than or equal to 24 inchesWaterbody (County) Species Season Minimum Size Daily LimitClinton Reservoir (Passaic)Lake Aeroflex* (Sussex)Lake Wawayanda* (Sussex)Sheppard Lake (Passaic)White Lake (Warren)*Waterbodies stocked with salmonWild Trout StreamsBrook, Brown &Rainbow Troutand their hybridsLandlocked Atlantic Salmon6AND16AND1Jan. 1– March 17 9 inches 2March 18– April 6 at 8 a.m.Catch and release onlyApril 6 at 8 a.m.– May 31 9 inches 4June 1–Dec. 31 9 inches 2Jan. 1–March 17 12 inches 2March 18– April 6 at 8 a.m.Catch and release onlyApril 6 at 8 a.m.–Dec. 31 12 inches 2Season Minimum Size Daily Limit Location RestrictionsJan. 1– April 6 at 8 a.m. Catch and release only StatewideApril 6 at 8 a.m.–Sept. 15 9 inches 2 Statewide (exceptions below)April 6 at 8 a.m.–Sept. 1512 inchesBrown Trout9 inchesRainbow & BrookTrout2 combinedPequannock River, Van Campens Brookand Wanaque River.See designated sections below.Sept. 16 – Dec. 31 Catch and release only StatewideBear Creek (Southtown)Bear Swamp Brook (Mahwah)Black Brook (Clinton WMA)Burnett Brook (Ralston)Cold Brook (Oldwick)Dark Moon Brook (also known asBear Brook) (Johnsonburg)Dunnfield Creek (Worthington S.F.)Flanders Brook (Flanders)Hance’s Brook (Penwell)Hickory Run (Califon)India Brook (source toMountainside Ave., Mendham)Indian Grove Brook (Bernardsville)Jackson Brook (source to HeddenPark Lake, Mine Hill Twp.)Ledgewood Brook (Ledgewood)Boundary Waters (see page 28)Regulations in red are new this year.Purple text indicates an important note.Wild Trout Streams (entire length unless otherwise indicated)Little York Brook (Little York)Lomerson Brook (also known asHerzog Brook) (Pottersville)Merrill Creek (Stewartsville)Mill Brook (Montague)N/Br. Rockaway Creek(Mountainville)Parker Brook (Montague)Passaic River (source to Rt. 202,Bernardsville)Pequannock River (Oak Ridge Rd.bridge in Newark Watershed, downstreamto railroad bridge immediatelyupstream of Charlottesburg Res.and from Rt. 23 bridge at SmokeRise downstream to the Rt. 23bridge at Smith Mills)Rhineharts Brook (HacklebarneyS.P.)Rocky Run (Clinton Twp.)Saddle River (state line to Lake St.,Upper Saddle River)Stephensburg Creek(Stephensburg)Stony Brook (Stokes S.F.)Stony Brook (Washington Twp.,Morris Co.)Tetertown Brook (Tetertown)Trout Brook (Hacklebarney S.P.)Turkey Brook (Mt. Olive)Van Campens Brook (Del. WaterGap Nat. Rec. Area)1. Only artificial lures may beused.2. Possession or use ofbait (live or preserved) orany substance (natural orsynthetic) that contains aconcentration of bait scentis prohibited.Wanaque River (WanaqueReservoir Dam downstream toWanaque Ave. bridge—PomptonLakes)West Brook (source downstream toWindbeam Club property)Whippany River (source to TingleyRd., Mendham Twp.)Willoughby Brook (also known asBuffalo Hollow Brook) (ClintonTwp.)Locations Species Season Minimum Size Daily LimitDelaware River All trout speciesApril 13 at 8 a.m.–Oct. 15(Trout caught at other times must be released immediately.)No minimum 522 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Fish Handling&CareBy Chris Smith, Principal Fisheries BiologistLike many of us I started fishing at a veryyoung age and learned to fish from mydad. As I got older I continued my questto become a proficient angler by watchingfishing shows on TV, reading magazinesand books. I was like a sponge for anythingabout fish or fishing. I once received aplaque that said, “Fishing is not a matterof life or death…it’s more important thanthat.” Some call it passion…some say it’san obsession. Call it what you want, I callit a love for fishing. I know, this sounds alittle sappy but why else would we get upat 3 a.m., stand in the pouring rain for 10hours with the wind blowing 35 mph hopingto catch a 15-inch bass?Many anglers have this same obsessionand passion for fishing. However,someanglers have not yet acquired the passionand respect for the fish itself. The buildingblock of the sport begins with the fish, notjust the thrill of the fight. My dad taught mecore values early on and inspired me tobecome a biologist. Fish care and handlinghas always been very important to me,regardless of whether the fish was goinghome for dinner or back in the pond.Large predatory fish such as bass, trout andmuskies are generally well-respected butothers—including panfish, chain pickereland rough fish are not cared for equally.All fish are equal and serve an importantpart in the aquatic ecosystem. So allfish should be treated with respectand handled with care.Handling fish properly protects both you andthe fish. Most fish have sharp spines; somehave rather large sharp teeth. Learning theproper way to hold each species keepsyou and the fish safe. Largemouth andsmallmouth bass can be safely held by thelower jaw but don’t try that with a musky;they should be held horizontally and supportedby both hands. Catfish have largespines on their pectoral fins and dorsal finwhich should be avoided. If you are unsurehow to hold a fish, watch and learn from anexperienced angler or search online.A little common sense and some respectfor the fish can make for a more enjoyablefishing experience. Always wet your handsfirst before handling fish so as not to disturbthe protective surface slime layer. Don’tallow fish to flop around on the bank, thedock, or the deck of the boat. If keepingfish, put them on ice in a cooler or in anaerated livewell. If you intend to release thefish, take the fish off the hook as quickly aspossible and gently lower it into the wateruntil it begins to swim away.Proper Handlingand ReleasingTechniques ReduceFish Mortality.• Land fish as quickly as possible,except when retrieving from depthsof 20-feet or more. Fighting a fishto exhaustion increases mortalityas does rapidly bringing up a fishthrough the changing water pressureand temperature gradients.• Keep fish intended for release inthe water as much as possible. Planahead with tools and camera.• To bring a fish out of the watermomentarily, use a rubber net orone of knotless nylon. Handle thefish carefully using wet hands tominimize loss of the fish’s protectiveslime layer.• Minimize physical injury. Do nottouch gills or allow fish to floparound on deck.• Carefully remove hooks using adehooker or needle-nose pliers.• Use plain hooks, not stainless, torust away quickly if one must be leftin a gut-hooked fish. Cut this lineclose to the hook’s eyelet.• To revive lethargic fish hold in anormal, upright position. Move thefish forward in an “S” or figure-8pattern so that water flows over thegills only from front to back.• Use circle hooks or barbless hooks.An angler’s proper handling offish can greatly improve theirsurvival when released.Sean Cochran/ NJ Div. of Fish and Wildlife


Fish IdentificationNEW JERSEY FRESHWATER FISHESBrook TroutRainbow TroutBrown TroutLake TroutLandlocked Atlantic SalmonNorthern PikeMuskellungeChain PickerelRedfin PickerelWalleyeWhite PerchYellow PerchStriped BassHybrid Striped BassIllustrations: Duane Raver/USFWSWhite SuckerCommon Carp24 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Fish IdentificationNEW JERSEY FRESHWATER FISHESLargemouth BassSmallmouth BassRedbreast SunfishPumpkinseed SunfishBluegill SunfishWhite CrappieBlack CrappieBrown BullheadChannel CatfishWhite CatfishHerringDorsal fin forward of midlengthEye diameter greaterthan snout lengthTeeth on roofof mouthDorsal fin at midlengthRound snoutoverhangsclosed mouthLong, filamentous projectionfrom last ray of dorsal finDeepbodyNarrowbodyNo teeth onroof of mouthAlewifeAtlantic HerringGizzard ShadLarge mouthMay have a lineof spotsEye diameter lessthan snout lengthDorsal fin forward of midlengthUpper jawclose to rearedge of eyeAmerican ShadLargest in theherring familyNo teeth onroof of mouthBlueback HerringLower jaw projectswell beyond upper jawwhen mouth closedHickory ShadAlewife, American Shad, Blueback Herring and Hickory Shad illustrations ©Duane Raver; Atlantic Herring illustration ©Victor Young/NH. Fish and Game Department;Gizzard Shad illustration courtesy of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department ©2012.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 25Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Fishing RegulationsSize, Season And Creel LimitsCertain waters are closed to fishing for all species from March 18 to April 6, 2013 at 8 a.m. because of trout stocking.Refer to pages 18–20 for complete lists and exceptions. For Delaware River and Greenwood Lake, see regulations on pages 28–30.Largemouth & Smallmouth BassSEASON LOCATION MINIMUM SIZEDAILYLIMITLargemouth BassJan. 1– April 14April 15–June 15Catch & Release only(all waters)June 16–Dec. 31Statewide(exceptions below)Lunker Bass Lakes:Alloway, Assunpink, Parvin,Delaware lakes, SplitrockReservoir12 inches 5 combined15 inches 3 combinedConservation Regulations:Ryker Lake15 inches 2 combinedSmallmouth BassNorthern Pike, Tiger Musky, MuskellungeYear-Round Lake Audrey Catch & Release only 0Northern PikeMuskellungeOpen year roundMarch 20–May 20 areCatch & Release onlyforEcho Lake Reservoir,Mercer Lake,Mountain Lake,Monksville ReservoirStatewideStatewide(exceptions below)Trophy Musky Waters:Mountain & Echo LakereservoirsNorthern Pike:24 inchesTiger Musky &Muskellunge:36 inchesTiger Musky &Muskellunge:40 inches21 combinedChain Pickerel and Redfin PickerelOpen year round Statewide 15 inches 5 combinedChain PickerelWalleyeWalleyeJan. 1–Feb. 28March 1– April 30Catch & Release onlyMay 1–Dec. 31Statewide 18 inches 3Striped Bass (freshwater only)Striped bass regulations are subject to change. Consult our website NJFishandWildlife.com and the news media for updates.March 1–Dec. 31 Statewide 28 inches 2Striped BassHybrid Striped Bass (freshwater only)Striped bass regulations are subject to change. Consult our website NJFishandWildlife.com and the news media for updates.Open year round Statewide (exceptions below) 16 inches 2Hybrid Striped BassMarch 1–Dec. 31Raritan River(downstream ofDuke Island Park dam)28 inches 226 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Fishing RegulationsSize, Season and Creel LimitsRegulations in red are new this year.Purple text indicates an important note.American ShadSEASON LOCATION MINIMUM SIZEDAILYLIMITOpen year round** Statewide No minimum size 3American ShadChannel CatfishOpen year round Statewide 12 inches 5Channel CatfishCrappie (Black and White)Open year round Statewide 8 inches10combinedCrappieSunfish and All Other Species with No Specified Creel LimitsStatewide (exceptions below) No minimum size 25 combinedRock Bass, White Perch,Yellow Perch, Sunfish (see below for sunfishexceptions), Bullheads, White Catfish,Suckers, Carp, Bowfin, Pumpkinseed and allother species with no specified creel limit.Open year roundConservation RegulationRyker LakeSunfish: 7 inchesYellow Perch:No minimum size10 combined10Conservation RegulationRainbow Lake (Salem Co.)Sunfish: 7 inches10 combinedBanded, Blackbanded, BlueSpotted and Mud SunfishBanded Sunfish*Blackbanded Sunfish*Closed Statewide Protected 0Bluespotted Sunfish*Mud Sunfish* Illustrations by Ted Walke, PA Fish and Boat CommissionFreshwater BaitFIsh (See page 31 for complete description of gear types and restrictions)Golden Shiner, Banded Killifish, Mummichog,Spotfin Killifish, Rainwater Killifish,American Brook Lamprey, Fathead Minnow,Bluntnose Minnow, Tadpole Madtom,Margined Madtom, All Shiners, Daces,Minnows, Gizzard Shad and American Eel.For Herring, Alewife and Blueback—seeRiver Herring Closure (page 6) andBaitfish Regulations (page 31).Open year roundExceptionsBaitfish may not betaken in trout stockedwaters fromMarch 18 to June 15StatewideNo minimumExceptionAmerican Eel:6 inches35 combined** Due to serious declines in American Shad numbers, the taking of American Shad, except for the Delaware River, is anticipated to be prohibited beginningJanuary 1, 2013. Be sure to check for updates on Fish and Wildlife’s website, njfishandWildlife.com.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 27Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Delaware RiverSpecies Open Seasons Minimum Length Daily LimitBass, Largemouth & SmallmouthEel, American**Jan. 1– April 12June 16–Dec. 3112 inches 5 combinedApril 13–June 15 Catch and release only Catch and release onlyPennsylvania: 8 inchesOpen year round(but 6–8 inches for baitfish)50New Jersey: 6 inchesHerring, Alewife and Blueback (see pg. 6) Closed — —Muskellunge & Hybrids Open year round 40 inches 1Pickerel, Chain Open year round 12 inches 5Pike, Northern Open year round 24 inches 2Shad, American* Open year round No minimum 3Shad, Hickory Closed — —Striped Bass & Hybrids(upstream of Calhoun St. Bridge)March 1–Dec. 31 28 inches 2Striped Bass & Hybrids***March 1– 30(downstream of Calhoun St. Bridge)June 1– Dec. 3128 inches 2Sturgeon, Atlantic and Shortnose Closed — —Trout April 13 at 8 a.m.– Oct. 15 No minimum 5Walleye Open year round 18 inches 3All Other Freshwater Species Open year round No minimum No limitBaitfish Open year round No minimum 50* Due to serious declines in American Shad numbers, the taking of American Shad, except for the Delaware River, is anticipated to be prohibitedbeginning January 1, 2013. Be sure to check Fish and Wildlife’s website, NJFishandWildlife.com, for updates.** Pennsylvania also enforces an 8-inch minimum on American Eel. Eel used as bait must be at least 6 inches and no greater than 8 inches in length.Daily limit of 50.*** Pennsylvania allows anglers to harvest a daily limit of two striped bass measuring 20 to 26 inches for a two month period from April 1, 2013 throughMay 31, 2013, from the Calhoun St. Bridge in Trenton downstream to the Pennsylvania state line. New Jersey still has a closed season. Anglers fishingthe Delaware River from the New Jersey shoreline, or returning to New Jersey by boat and/or car in April and May must abide by New Jersey’sstriped bass regulations. Possession of striped bass in New Jersey is illegal during this time period.Nicholas A. Tonelli28 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Fishing The Delaware River: Regulation NoticesThe Delaware River is a boundary water shared by Pennsylvania and New Jersey with each state’s border generally following the centerline of theriver. Although the majority of the fishing regulations enacted by both states are identical, there are some distinct differences. Anglers fishing thisriver must be aware of each state’s fishing regulations.Regardless of an angler’s residency or point of boat launching, all are required to comply with the regulations of the state in which they are fishing.An angler fishing—or in possession of fish—between the centerline of the river and the New Jersey shoreline must comply with the New Jersey fishing regulations.An angler fishing—or in possession of fish—between the centerline of the river and the Pennsylvania shoreline must comply with the Pennsylvaniafishing regulations.The reciprocal agreement regarding fishing licenses remains in effect and anglers may continue to fish from shoreline to shoreline in the DelawareRiver between Pennsylvania and New Jersey using either state’s fishing license. Information on each state’s fishing regulations can be found atwww.fishandboat.com and www.NJFishandWildlife.com. It is incumbent upon anglers to determine in which state they are currently fishing, takinginto account that in areas where the river splits, such as around islands, the boundary is clearly and legally defined to one side of the island or another.All anglers are reminded to comply with each state’s marine registry requirements when angling for or catching anadromous species such asstriped bass, river herring or shad in the tidal portions of the Delaware River.• New Jersey and Pennsylvania fishing licenses are both recognizedwhen fishing the Delaware River from a boat or either shoreline. Thisapplies to the main stem of the river only.• Anglers may launch a boat from either shore and on return, may havein possession any fish which may be legally taken according to theregulations of the state where the landing is made.• No more than three rods, each with one line, or two hand lines—orone of each—may be used. No more than three single hooks or threetreble hooks per line.• To protect spawning striped bass, from the Calhoun Street bridge nearTrenton downstream to the Commodore Barry Bridge at Bridgeport,non-offset circle hooks must be used when using bait with a #2 sizedhook or larger, from April 1 to May 30.• Spears (not mechanically propelled) and bow and arrows may be usedto take carp, catfish, shad and suckers except within 825 feet of an eelweir. A valid fishing license is required.• Baitfish may be taken and possessed for personal use and are not tobe bartered or sold.• A Delaware fishing license is now required for anglers aged 16 andover fishing the Delaware Bay and Delaware River between theupstream tip of Artificial Island and the Delaware-Pennsylvania stateline. In that section of the river, the Delaware state boundary extendsto the New Jersey shoreline. However, when fishing from shore inNew Jersey along that section of the river, a Delaware fishing licenseis not required. Delaware fishing license information can be found atwww.fw.delaware.gov/Fisheries/Pages/NewFishingLicense.aspx.• A listing of fishing access locations along the Delaware River is availableat Fish and Wildlife’s website, NJFishandWildlife.com, underFreshwater Fishing.• Delaware River Basin Commission recreation maps are available for $25.An order form is available online at www.state.nj.us/drbc/recreation.htm.• Information for the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area isavailable online at www.nps.gov/dewa.Thompson Management, LLC“ St. Lawrence County has agreater variety of true trophy anglingthan any place on earth.”— Don Meissner, nationally-recognized angler and TV host+/- 6,000 Acres of Hunting LandAvailable for Bid in Central New JerseyAnnual bids begin July 1stFor more information, or to submit a bid,visit our website...ThompsonManagementLLC.comor call 609.921.7655It’s never too late…Submit your bid today!More than 200 Lakes, Ponds and Streams...the St. Lawrence River...and Waddington, a NationalUltimate Fishing Town Winner.St. Lawrence County. Fishing Like It Used To Be.Plan your trip at FISHCAP.net or contactthe St. Lawrence Chamber of Commerceat 877-228-7810.®NYSDED, used w/permission.®


Greenwood Lake• New York and New Jersey fishing licenses are both recognized anywhere on the lake or along the shoreline.• Fishing is permitted 24 hours a day.• In compliance with New York regulations, only certified virus-free baitfish may be transported to, or used on, the portion of Greenwood Lake ownedby the State of New York. Anglers are urged to use only certified virus-free baitfish when fishing any portion of Greenwood Lake.• Bow and arrow fishing for all carp, sucker, herring, catfish and eel is permitted. A valid fishing license is required.• No more than five tip-ups and two hand-held devices may be used when ice fishing. All devices that are not hand held must be plainly marked withthe name and address of the angler.Species Open Seasons Minimum Length Daily LimitJan. 1–June 15Catch and release onlyBass, Largemouth & SmallmouthJune 16–Dec. 1 12 inches 5 combinedDec. 1–Dec. 31Catch and release onlyCatfish, Channel Open year round 12 inches 5Crappie, Black & White Open year round 8 inches 10 combinedMuskellunge & Hybrids Open year round 36 inches 1Perch, Yellow Open year round No minimum 50Pickerel, Chain Open year round 15 inches 5Sunfish Open year round No minimum 50 combinedJan. 1–Feb. 28 18 inches 3WalleyeMarch 1– April 30Catch and release onlyMay 1–Dec. 31 18 inches 3Herring, Alewife, (landlocked) and blueback Open year round 6 inches10Any unused herringmust be returned toGreenwood Lakeupon conclusion of theangler’s fishing trip.Herring may not betransported away fromthe lake’s shoreline byany mechanism andmay not be sold.All Other Species Open year round No minimum No limit2013 New JerseyMUSKY SCHOOLMay 18, 2013 on Lake HopatcongLearn how to catch fi shlike this handsome tigermusky taken by KevinJohnson in June onGreenwood Lake.Join us forMusky Schoolto see what theexcitement isall about!You don’t want to miss the annual Musky School on Lake Hopatcong offeredby Muskies Inc! Learn how to catch these elusive fi sh. This course offersinformative tips and techniques to help any musky angler—beginner toexperienced angler—catch more muskies.Dave ChristinzioLearn from our seasoned veteran anglers. In the morning, classroom-stylesessions will orient anglers on locations to fi sh, forage base, lure presentations,fi shing tactics and more. Later in the day, participants will be on the water in afully-equipped boat to pursue muskies with a personal instructor. This 6-hourcourse includes a shore lunch. This is a catch and release event.Muskies Inc. is a non-profi t organization. This is a fundraising event. All proceeds benefi t the New Jersey musky fi shery.For more information, visitwww.MuskiesInc.organd www.mi22.comFee: $300Contact Jim Evers via e-mailat edbservice@aol.com orby phone (973) 220-7532Luke H. Gordon


Baitfish Regulations*Baitfish SpeciesBaitfish species: golden shiner, banded killifish, mummichog, spotfin killifish, rainwater killifish, Americanbrook lamprey, fathead minnow, bluntnose minnow, tadpole madtom, margined madtom, all shiners, daces,minnows, chubs and the American eel.SeasonOpen year roundException Season closedMarch 18–June 15 on troutstocked waters and specialregulation trout areasHerring,*Alewife and Blueback* See page 6 for moreinformation regarding thetaking or possessionof herring.LocationStatewide(freshwaters)All freshwater streams,rivers and marine watersFreshwater lakesin Morris, Passaic,Sussex, and WarrenCounties; and SpruceRun Reservoir(Hunterdon)All other freshwaterlakes (regardless ofownership)MinimumSizeNo minimumsizeExceptionAmerican eel:6 inchesCLOSED6 inchesCLOSEDDaily Limit35 per day,species combinedPossession, take or attempt totake herring PROHIBITED10Any unused herring must bereturned to the water uponconclusion of the angler’sfishing trip. Herring may notbe transported away from theshoreline of these lakes by anymechanism. They may not be sold.Only purchased herring, no greaterthan 6 inches, may be possessed.Receipt of purchase, dated within7 days, must be in possession.Notes: Any person with a valid fishing license (or those under 16 and residents 70 years or older) may takebaitfish in fresh waters. Possession limit is one day’s limit, regardless of the intent to use these fish. Baitfish maybe taken from the fresh waters of the state in numbers greater than 35 per day, in lakes over 250 acres, under aspecial permit issued by Fish and Wildlife at its discretion. Contact (908) 236-2118 for application information.GearSeineMinnow TrapUmbrella NetDip NetCast NetHookand LineTurtle and Frog RegulationsSpecies Season Location Minimum Size Daily LimitSnapping TurtleBull Frog andGreen FrogMeans of TakeSee separate regulations for Delaware River (page 28).For marine waters, see the New Jersey Marine Digest.January 1– April 30June 16 – December 31January 1– March 31July 1–December 31Gear DescriptionNot over 50 feet long in ponds and lakes over 100 acres; in all other waters not over30 feet in length.Exception: In trout-stocked waters and special regulation trout areas a seine may notbe more than 10 feet in length and 4 feet in depth.Not larger than 24 inches in length with a funnel mouth no greater than 2 inches in diameter.No greater than 3.5 feet square.Not more than 24 inches in diameter; may be used only for alewife or blueback herring.No greater than 8 feet in diameter; may be used only in streams that are not troutstockedor special regulation trout areas (may not be used in lakes).Maximum of nine single hooks or three hooks with three burrs per contrivance on allwaters except the Delaware River where only three single hooks are permitted.Statewide No minimum 3 per dayStatewideNo minimum15 per day,combinedSnapping turtles may only be taken in fresh waters of the state. See page 32 for establishedfishing license lines that designate between fresh and marine waters. Any person with a validfishing license or those entitled to fish without a license may take snapping turtles, bull frogs, and greenfrogs by means of spears, hooks, dip nets (not more than 24 inches in diameter), traps or by hand.Snapping turtles may not be taken with a gun or bow and arrow. Snapping turtles, bull frogs, and greenfrogs may be taken in numbers greater than the daily limit under a commercial harvest permit issued byFish and Wildlife at its discretion. Contact (908) 236-2118 for application information.MOTOR BOAT REGISTRATION & Title RequirementsBaitfish2013 regulationsMotor Boat Registrationand Title RequirementsNJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC)RegistrationMost boats must be registered to operate onNew Jersey waterways.• All titled boats must be registered also.• Any boat (including jet skis and non-titledwatercraft), mechanically propelled (incl.electric motors), regardless of length,must be registered.• Boats greater than 12 feet in length,regardless of propulsion means, must betitled and registered at an MVC office.Boats and marine equipment which need notbe registered:• Those not based in New Jersey or operatinghere less than 180 consecutive days thatare operating under a federally-approvednumbering system from another state• Ship’s lifeboats• Non-motorized vessels used exclusively onsmall lakes and ponds on private property• Racing vessels with New Jersey StateMarine Police permit• Non-motorized inflatable device, surfboard,racing shell, dinghy, canoe or kayak• Non-motorized vessel less than 12 feet inlengthTitleFor use on New Jersey waterways, all boatsmore than 12 feet in length must be titled,with the exception of ship’s lifeboat, canoe,kayak, inflatable, surfboard, rowing scull,racing shell, tender/dinghy used for directtransportation between a vessel and shore forno other purposes.Boat Operator License (MVC)An operator license is required to operatepower vessels on fresh, non-tidal waters suchas lakes, creeks and rivers. (Minimum age 16years; with certain exceptions.)For More Information:New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission(888) 486-3339 toll free in NJ or(609) 292-6500 from out-of-statewww.nj.gov/mvc/Boat Safety Certificate (NJSP)A boat safety certificate (from an approvedboat safety course; see NJSP website, below)is required to operate a personal watercraft orpower vessel, including electric motors, in NJwaters (tidal and non-tidal).New Jersey State Police (NJSP)(609) 882-2000www.njsp.org/maritimeJanuary 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 31Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Fishing License Lines2013 REGULATIONSA fishing license is required to fish the fresh waters of the state. Locations listed below mark the change from salt water(license not required) to fresh water. A fishing license is required at—and upstream of—these locations.Snapping turtles may only be taken from fresh waters of the state.ATLANTIC COUNTYAbsecon Creek—Dam at Lower Atlantic CityReservoirGreat Egg Harbor River—Power lines at confluenceof Gravelly RunMiddle River—None–all saline waterMullica River—Line between Seventh Ave.,Sweetwater, and ramp at Crowleys LandingNacote Creek—Port Republic damPatcong Creek—Bargaintown Lake damSouth River—Power lines immediately below Rt. 50Tuckahoe River—First northerly tributary downstreamof Rt. 49 bridge (McNeals Branch)BERGEN COUNTYHackensack River—Cedar Lane Bridge betweenHackensack and TeaneckHudson River—None–all saline waterPassaic River—Required whole lengthBURLINGTON COUNTYAssiscunk Creek—Required whole lengthBass River State—Fir Bridge on Stage Rd. in BassRiver State ForestBatsto River—Required whole lengthBlacks Creek—Required whole lengthCrosswicks Creek—Required whole lengthDelaware River—Required whole lengthMullica River—Line between Seventh Ave.,Sweetwater, and ramp at Crowleys LandingPennsauken Creek—Required whole lengthPompeston Creek—Required whole lengthRancocas Creek—Required whole lengthSwedes Run—Required whole lengthWading River—Charcoal Landing, Chips FollyCampgroundCAMDEN COUNTYLicense required on Delaware River and all otherwatersCAPE MAY COUNTYBidwells Creek—None–all saline waterCedar Swamp Creek—None–all saline waterDennis Creek—None–all saline waterEast Creek—100 ft. below East Creek Lake dam,EldoraTuckahoe River—First northerly tributary downstreamof lower Rt. 49 bridge (McNeals Br.)West Creek—100 feet below West Creek Lake dam(Pickle Factory Pond)CUMBERLAND COUNTYAndrews Creek—None–all saline waterBack Creek—None–all saline waterCedar Creek—100 ft. downstream of Cedar LakedamCohansey River—Rt. 49 bridge at BridgetonDividing Creek—Rt. 555 bridgeFishing Creek—None–all saline waterFortescue Cr./Branch of Oranoken Cr.—None–allsaline waterManumuskin Creek—Required whole lengthMaurice River—Mouth of Manumuskin Creek nearPort ElizabethMenantico Creek—Required whole lengthMill Creek—Tributary of Cohansey–Rt. 553 bridge, FairtonMuskee Creek—S. side of bridge on Weathersby Rd.Nantuxent Creek (Pages Run)—Rt. 553 north ofFrames CornerOranoken Creek—Whitecar Mill, North of Beaver damOyster Creek—None–all saline waterRiggins Ditch—Rt. 47 bridgeSow and Pigs Branch Nantuxent—None–all salinewaterStow Creek—Buckhorn Rd. bridge, JerichoStraight Creek—None–all saline waterWest Creek—100 ft. below West Creek Lake dam(Pickle Factory Pond)ESSEX COUNTYPassaic River—Erie Railroad bridge between Newark(at Verona Ave.) and KearnyPeddie Ditch—None–all saline waterGLOUCESTER COUNTYBig Timber Creek—Required whole lengthDelaware River—Commodore Barry bridge atBridgeportMantua Creek—Required whole lengthOldmans Creek—Rt. 295 bridgeRaccoon Creek—Required whole lengthWoodbury Creek—Required whole lengthHUDSON COUNTYHackensack River—None–all saline waterHudson River—None–all saline waterPassaic River—Railroad bridge between Newark(at Verona Ave.) and KearnyHUNTERDON COUNTYLicense required on Delaware River and all otherwatersMERCER COUNTYLicense required on Delaware River and all otherwatersMIDDLESEX COUNTYCheesequake Creek—Dam at Cheesequake Lake,Cheesequake State ParkLawrence Brook—N.J. Turnpike bridge, EastBrunswickRaritan River—Landing Lane bridge, New BrunswickSouth River—Rt. 527 bridge (New BrunswickOld Bridge Tpk.)Woodbridge River—N.J. Turnpike bridgeMONMOUTH COUNTYBlack Creek—Spillway at Ocean Rd.Branchport Creek—Mouth of Turtle Mill BrookDeal Lake—Top of damHockhockson (Pine) Brook—Garden State Parkwaynorthbound bridgeLittle Silver Creek—Little Silver Creek BrookManasquan River—Bennetts bridge, ManasquanWildlife Management AreaMatawan Creek—Lefferts Lake damOceanport Creek—Mouth of Husky BrookParkers Creek—Mouth of Parkers Creek BrookShark River—Remsen Mills Rd.Swimming River—Swimming River Rd. bridgeWreck Pond Creek—Rt. 71 bridgeMORRIS COUNTYLicense required on all watersOCEAN COUNTYBeaver Dam Creek—Rt. 88 bridgeCedar Creek—Rt. 9 bridgeCedar Run—Rt. 9 bridgeDinner Point Creek—None–all saline waterDouble Creek—None–all saline waterForked River—All branches Rt. 9Gunning River—None–all saline waterJakes Branch—Above Atlantic City Blvd.Jeffreys Creek—Ocean Gate Rd. to Ocean GateKettle Creek—Rt. 549 bridgeLake of the Lilies—Entire lakeLong Swamp Creek—Washington St. bridge, Toms RiverManahawkin Creek—Dams for Manahawkin WMAimpoundments baysideMetedeconk River—Rt. 70 bridge, LaureltonMill Creek—Mouth of Creek at lagoons in BeachHaven WestMill Creek—Pine Beach–Ocean Gate RoadOyster Creek—Rt. 9 bridgeParkers Run—None–all saline waterPotters Creek—None–all saline waterStouts Creek—None–all saline waterStouts Creek S. Br.—Bayside East ParkwayToms River—Garden State Parkway, northboundbridgeTuckerton Creek—Dam at Rt. 9 bridgeWaretown Creek—Rt. 9 bridgeWest Creek—Rt. 9 bridgePASSAIC COUNTYLicense required on all watersSALEM COUNTYAlloway Creek—Rt. 540 bridge at AllowayBlack Ditch—None–all saline waterDelaware River—None–all saline waterFishing Creek—None–all saline waterHope Creek—None–all saline waterMad Horse Creek—None–all saline waterMill Creek—None–all saline waterOldmans Creek—Rt. 295 southbound bridgeSalem River—Dupont dam near Cedar Crest ManorSalem Canal—Dam at DeepwaterStow Creek—Buckhorn Rd. bridge, JerichoStraight Ditch—None–all saline waterSOMERSET COUNTYLicense required on all watersSUSSEX COUNTYLicense required on Delaware River and all otherwatersUNION COUNTYElizabeth River—West Grand St., ElizabethGreat Ditch—None–all saline waterMorses Creek—Old Morses Mill Rd.Oyster Creek—None–all saline waterPeddie Ditch—None–all saline waterPiles Creek—None–all saline waterRahway River—Lawrence St. (Rt. 514), RahwayWARREN COUNTYLicense required on Delaware River and all otherwatersIMPORTANT FOOTNOTES:1. Absence of a river, creek, brook or otherwaterway from this list does not make itexempt from requiring a license to fish thefresh waters.2. Names of waters conform to those givenon the United States Geological Survey 7.5Minute Topographic Series Maps.32 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Wildlife Management Areas2013 REGULATIONSThis is not the full law. Consult the Division of Fish and Wildlife for further details.All persons are reminded that the statutes, code and regulations are the legal authorities.Regulations in red are new this year. Purple text indicates an important note.Regulations for use of wildlife managementareas (WMAs) are established by theDivision of Fish and Wildlife with penaltiesof not less than $50 nor more than $1,500. Asecond violation of any WMA regulation willresult in a five-year loss of all sporting licensesand privileges.Information on these regulations and permitapplications may be obtained by writing toNew Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife,MC501-03, P.O. Box 420, Trenton, NJ 08625-0420.Fish and Wildlife may revoke any permitor other authorization issued for violation ordue cause.The following are prohibited: camping, swimming,picnicking, dumping, cutting or damagingvegetation, alcoholic beverages and fires.Restricted HoursWildlife Management Areas are closed from9 p.m. until 5 a.m. unless engaged in lawful hunting,fishing or trapping activities.Special permission may be granted for Fishand Wildlife approved activities.Motor VehiclesNo person shall operate an unregistered vehicleon roads under the control of the Division of Fishand Wildlife. All motor vehicles are restrictedto established public roads and parking areas.The use of dog sleds and dog carts, off-roadvehicles, ATVs, trailbikes or snowmobiles isprohibited on all wildlife management areasunless authorized by Fish and Wildlife.Target PracticeOnly archery, shotgun, muzzleloading shotgun,muzzleloading rifle and .17 plus .22 caliber rimfirerifle shooting is allowed in designated huntertraining ranges according to posted regulations atthe training area. Other target practice is allowedonly with permission from the Division of Fishand Wildlife.Field TrialsPermits for use of wildlife management areasfor running of field trials may be granted byFish and Wildlife. Apply for a permit by calling(609) 259-2132.Dog Training and ExercisingDogs may be exercised or trained on any WMAfrom Sept. 1 to April 30. All dogs must be properlylicensed. Select WMAs with designated dogtraining areas also permit dogs to be exercisedor trained from May 1 to Aug. 31. For moreinformation, see the New Jersey Hunting andTrapping Digest or call (609) 984-0547.Outboard MotorsOnly electric motors are allowed on freshwaterlakes and ponds owned by New Jersey Divisionof Fish and Wildlife with the exception of UnionLake, where outboard motors not exceeding 9.9hp. may be used. On Prospertown Lake, onlymanually operated boats and canoes are allowed.Horseback RidingHorseback riding is allowed on designatedWMAs only by permit from the Divisionof Fish and Wildlife. Apply online atwww.NJ.WildlifeLicense.com. Horseback ridingpermits should be displayed on outer clothingwhile riding. For more information on horsebackriding permits, call (609) 259-2132.Fishing TournamentAny club or organization that would like touse a New Jersey wildlife management areafor fishing tournaments must apply for andsecure a permit from Fish and Wildlife. No feeis required. Applications will be accepted inJanuary at Fish and Wildlife’s Southern Regionoffice, 220 Blue Anchor Rd., Sicklerville, NJ08081 at (856) 629-4950.Boat Ramp Maintenance PermitAny vehicle used to transport or launch avessel or water conveyance on the followingWMAs must have affixed to the lower corne rof the driver’s side rear window a boat rampmaintenance permit, or a photocopy of a validhunting, fishing or trapping license. Be sure yourConservation ID number is clearly displayed; allother personal information may be blacked outfor reasons of privacy.The boat ramp maintenance permit feeis $15, available from a license agent or atFish and Wildlife’s Internet sales site,www.NJ.WildlifeLicense.com.Residents 70 years and older are not requiredto obtain a boat ramp maintenance permit andneed no license, but must affix to their windowproof of age, such as a former license displayingyour date of birth.1. Round Valley Angler Access2. Assunpink3. Dennis Creek4. Tuckahoe5. Mad Horse Creek6. Union Lake7. Menantico Ponds8. Prospertown Lakei-MapNJ •Create Your Own WMA MapNew Jersey Department of EnvironmentalProtection (DEP) has a Web-based tool calledNJ-GeoWeb. Those with Internet accesscan create mapsfor any WildlifeManagement Area.NJ-GeoWeb providesa wealth of otherenvironmentalinformation, too!This interactiveprogram is updated on a regular basis so most ofthe latest information is available.To access NJ-GeoWeb, go to the DEP’s websiteat www.state.nj.us/dep/gis/geowebsplash.htm.Click on “Launch NJ - GeoWeb, then GeoWebProfile.Those without Internet access can request aspecific wildlife management area by calling(609) 984-0547.Accessibity •Accessible Fishing SitesFor people with disabilities, visit:NJFishandWildlife.com/sites.htmAn Accessible Fishing Sites list is available to assist anglers whose mobilityis impaired.All sites are wheelchair-accessible except for the Musconetcong River inMorris County, where vehicle access is to the shoreline.Musconetcong GorgeBrian Cowden, Trout UnlimitedJanuary 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 33Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Take me fishing!The memories will last a lifetime.New Jersey’sFree Freshwater Fishing DaysJune 15 and 16, 2013On these two days, residents and nonresidentsmay fish New Jersey’s public freshwaters without a license or trout stamp. Allother regulations, including size and dailycatch limits, remain in effect.Department of Environmental ProtectionDivision of Fish and WildlifeAnnual Pequest Open Houseand Fishermen’s Flea MarketMarch 23 and March 24, 201310 a.m.–4 p.m.Pequest Trout Hatchery and Natural ResourceEducation Center• Wildlife Artists, Conservation Groups,Taxidermists, Guides and Vendors!• Kids can fish in our famous education pond!3-D Archery Range –Kids Activities • AndMore!Pequest is located on Rt. 46, nine mileswest of Hackettstown. For information call(908) 637-4125 or go to NJFishandWildlife.com.}}Display Your License:It’s the Law!Show your support of Fish andWildlife activities and programs.Trout in the Classroom (TIC)Trout in the Classroom(TIC) is a sciencebasedprogram thatteaches childrenthe importance ofcoldwater conservationthrough a hands-onlearning approach. Over 14,000 New Jersey studentsparticipate in the TIC program annually.Schools receive brook trout eggs in mid-Octoberfrom our Pequest Trout Hatchery. Studentshatch and raise the trout, monitor water quality,learn fish biology, anatomy and much more aspart of this cross-curricular, hands-on format.At the end of the school year students releasetheir fish into approved streams.Trout in the Classroom is an exciting, inexpensiveprogram enlivening year-round curriculanationwide. For more information about theTIC program, visit NJTroutInTheClassroom.org.Hunter Education Program •Continue the TraditionBecome an instructor with Fish andWildlife’s Hunter Education Program.Our Hunter Education Unit is lookingfor New Jersey’s best sportsmen andsportswomen to become instructorsat locations where students take thetest and field course after first havingcompleted the home study portion. Aminimum of six weekend days each yearare required.Call (856) 629-0552Leave your name and address to receivean application. Or visit our website:NJFishandWildlife.comTeen Angler Youth Day10th Annual PequestJuly 20, 2013New Jersey Teen Angler Chapters:• Garfield New JerseyJohn Nasutaphantombuckusa@optonline.netGo to www.teenanglers.org to register and formore details!© Justshootme | Dreamstime.com34 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Catch & Release:Who Decides?By Christopher Smith, Principal Fisheries BiologistShawn Crouse / NJ Div. of Fish and WildlifeSigns like these are appearing at manylakes throughout the state. Althoughwell-intentioned, this may not be in thebest interest of the fishery.The Division of Fish and Wildlife hasobserved a steady increase in the numberof waterbodies managed by catchand release regulations in the last fewyears. These regulations have beenestablished by local municipal or county governmentagencies and not by our agency. Inmost cases, the regulations were created withthe best intent but unfortunately with a lackof sound science.Fish and Wildlife completes extensive samplingand research before regulations are establishedor changed. Placing regulations on a waterbodythat contradicts Fish and Wildlife’s establishedfishing regulations could have negative impactson that fish population.From a fisheries management perspective,unnecessary catch and release regulation canlead to overpopulation of a species; affectinggrowth rates, condition and population balance.From an angler’s perspective some may find catchand release regulations attractive, whereas forothers it is a deterrent from fishing a waterbody.Catch and release regulations in many cases havebeen utilized as a deterrent to anglers and not asan actual fisheries management tool. Remember,Fish and Wildlife manages the state’s resourcesfor all residents.The popularity of catch and release anglingcontinues to grow every year. Not all anglersrelease fish for the same reasons. Some anglersrelease fish to maintain fish populations, othersbelieve that the fish are not safe to eat andshould be released, while some anglers simply gofishing for the sport and do not want to eat thefish. Despite the popularity of catch and releaseangling, others welcome the opportunity toharvest some fish from time to time. Let’s faceit, fish are tasty! Other anglers want the chanceto bring home the trophy fish of a lifetime.Fishing regulations are established by theDivision of Fish and Wildlife in order to protectand maintain balanced fish populations for allanglers to utilize and enjoy. As long as anglersadhere to the state fishing regulations the decisionto “catch and keep” or “catch and release”should be left to the angler.Fish and Wildlife recently utilized catch andrelease regulations in a very specific managementsituation to protect a developing fishpopulation at Lake Audrey. This managementstrategy was appropriate for this waterbody. Inother instances, catch and release regulationshave actually been a hindrance, preventinganglers from being recognized for catching astate record fish.Fish and Wildlife’s mission is to protect andmanage the state’s fish and wildlife resources tomaximize their long-term biological, recreationaland economic value for all New Jerseyans. Thisis achieved through the regulations establishedby our agency.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 35Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Foreclosed LandDeeply DiscountedRecreational and Residentialand located inFL, NC, TX, AR, NY,PA, WA, AZ, NV888-758-5687www.dfcland.com“Your Freshwater Headquarters!”oPen7 daysaweek2 Locations403 Rt. 92045 Hwy. 35Waretown, NJ 08758 Wall, NJ 07719(609) 242-1812(732) 282-1812lhwoodsandwater.comMaking Hunting & Fishing Dreams Come Truefor YoungsTers, 21 & unDer, withLiFe-THreaTening iLLnessesToll Free: 866-345-4455www.HuntofaLifetime.orgFishing provides enjoyable and relaxingrecreation. Fish are an excellent sourceof protein and other nutrients andplay a role in maintaining a healthy,well-balanced diet. Many anglers enjoycooking and eating their own catch.However, elevated levels of potentiallyharmful chemical contaminants suchas dioxin, polychlorinated biphenyls(PCBs), pesticides and mercury have beenfound in certain fish and crabs in someNew Jersey waters. Fish consumptionadvisories have been adopted to guidecitizens on safe consumption practices.The current list of fish consumptionadvisories consists of statewide, regionaland water body-specific warningsfor a variety of fish species and fishconsumers. The New Jersey Departmentof Environmental Protection (DEP) andthe Department of Health and SeniorServices have prepared literature and anew website to help you make informedchoices about which fish to eat andhow to reduce your exposure to theseharmful chemicals.To reduce exposure to harmful chemicalcontaminants when preparing andeating the fish species taken fromthe identified waters, it is essential tofollow the guidelines provided. TheDEP encourages you to consult the FishFish Smart,Eat SmartEating Fish And CrabsCaught In New Jersey Waters}}Warning: wildlife hazardCould this be your line?Smart-Eat Smart Fish Advisory Guide orFishSmartEatSmartNJ.org when makingdecisions about eating recreationallycaught fish and crabs.The Fish Smart-Eat Smart Advisory Guideincludes contaminant information,advisory charts, plus preparation andcooking methods to reduce contaminantlevels, as well as specific guidelines,advice and prohibitions for people athigh risk, such as children, pregnantwomen and women of child-bearing age.The Guide also includes website links toPennsylvania, Delaware and New Yorkfor information about fish consumptionadvisories for shared waters.For a complete list of state and federalmarine fish consumption advisories visit:FishSmartEatSmartNJ.org.The fish consumption advisories and FishSmart-Eat Smart website are updatedperiodically and are available online or fromthe Office of Science at (609) 984-6070 andthrough the Division of Health and SeniorServices at (609) 826-4935.Check online for fish consumptionadvisories on the local waterbody in which you fish!Go to FishSmartEatSmartNJ.orgPlease properly disposeof all fishing line. Plasticdebris can endangeraquatic life and snarepropellers.Do NOT litter.36 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Download the Official NJ Fishing, Hunting & Wildlife App!Powered by Pocket Ranger®• Places to hunt and fish• Species profiles• Rules and regulations• License and permit information• Safety communication tool• Advance GPS mapping features- Cache map tiles for offline use- Record tracks, distance and time- Mark waypoints and photo waypoints- Recall, post or share saved data• Trophy Case, join a community ofanglers and hunters!• Real-time calendar of events• News and alerts featureFor more information, please visit: PocketRanger.comSanctioned and approved by New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife.New Jersey’s Oldest Hatchery - Est. 1865Certified Disease FREE!All Species of Game and Pan Fish in New JerseyY“We Specialize in Sportsmen’s Club Stocking”YWhereQualityCounts!Fresh Brown Trout Eggs For Steel Head FishingMusky Trout Hatchery, LLCStocking• Trout• Largemouth Bass• Bluegills• Channel Catfish• Water Plants• Crappies• Yellow Perch• Fat Head Minnows• White Amur(Grass Eating Carp)• Koi & Koi FeedFish Delivered or Picked-up at our Scenic Hatchery in Warren County279 Bloomsbury Road, Asbury, NJ 08802(908) 479-4893 • www.muskytrouthatchery.comAfter 5:00 PM call Jeff or Vern Mancini (908) 638-8747 or Email: musky279@yahoo.comJanuary 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 37Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


New Jersey’sStocking ProgramsLori CrouseWARMWATER STOCKINGRaised with pride at New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Hackettstown State Fish HatcheryMUSKELLUNGE— 9–11"• Carnegie Lake (500) • Little Swartswood Lake (184)• Deal Lake (320) • Manasquan Reservoir (1,440)• D & R Canal (150) • Mercer Lake (550)• Echo Lake Reservoir (501) • Monksville Reservoir (505)• Furnace Lake (168) • Mountain Lake (267)• Greenwood Lake (2,645) • Shenandoah Lake (100)• Lake Hopatcong (2,640)Northern Pike—6"• Budd Lake (3,760) • Passaic River (2,764)• Cranberry Lake (1,790) • Pompton Lake (2,055)• Deal Lake (1,627) • Pompton River (2,028)• Farrington Lake (2,900) • Spruce Run Reservoir (6,700)• Millstone River (1,647)Walleye—4"• Canistear Reservoir (10,614) • Lake Hopatcong (10,134)• Delaware River (1,854) • Monksville Reservoir (10,100)• Greenwood Lake (7,638) • Swartswood Lake (9,800)Hybrid Striped Bass—4"• Lake Hopatcong (24,993) • Spruce Run Reservoir (12,914)• Manasquan Reservoir (7,284)Smallmouth Bass—3–4"• Lake Audrey (3,161) • Spruce Run Reservoir (1,900)• Saffins Pond (1,091)Largemouth Bass—2–4"• Cape May Zoo Pond (875) • Greenwood Lake (5,000)• Cressy Lane Pond (1,875) • Heritage Park Pond (875)• Daretown Lake (1,500) • Patriot Lake (875)• Delaware Lake (1,734) • Spruce Run Reservoir (1,000)• Elmer Lake (4,500)• 10 other smaller waterbodies• Furnace Lake (1,734)Lake Trout—9"• Merrill Creek Reservoir (1,300) • Monksville Reservoir (4,007)Channel Catfish—6"• Seventeen watersChannel Catfish—12"• Twenty-six watersChannel Catfish—28"• Thirteen waters• Plus thousands of black crappie, bluegill sunfish, and brownbullheads stocked in over 100 waterbodies throughout the state!The Hackettstown Hatchery is located in the heart of Hackettstown.It encompasses over 230 acres, consisting of over 65 extensive cultureponds, and a large intensive culture building. The hatchery raises anddistributes over 1,500,000 each year, representing 15 species of fish.38 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Take a friendfishing!The memories will last a lifetime.FREE Fishing Days— June 15 and 16, 2013—No License Needed!(see page 34)Share yourexciting productor servicewith the New Jerseysporting community!2013 Freshwater Fishing Season Dates and Limits • FREENew JerseyFreshwater FishingFishing LicenseINFORMATIONpage 16Yearsof Trout Production at thePequest Trout HatcheryDigestJanuary 2013A Summary of Regulations andFreshwater Fisheries Management InformationNJFishandWildlife.comFor advertising inquiries, please call(413) 884-1001Outdoor Books for Kids!Discover the great outdoors and the joys of huntingand fishing through these fun adventure books!Good Fishing Depends on Clean WaterMany of our rivers, lakes and coastal areas are experiencing algae bloomsthat cover our favorite fishing spots with green slime, cause fish killsand create “dead zones” where no aquatic life can survive. The cause isusually nitrogen and phosphorus pollution that comes from farm and lawnfertilizers, septic systems, animal waste and sewage treatment plants.Here’s what you can do to keep the water clean:• Take care not to over fertilize; closely follow package instructions• Pick up pet waste; properly manage waste from livestock• Use green practices such as rain barrels, rain gardens and permeable pavements• Maintain a properly functioning septic system• Encourage your community to invest in its wastewater infrastructure“The FishingTrip”NOW JUST$12.95Plus S&H...or buy a set of THREE for $30!(The Fishing Trip, Deer Camp, Turkey Season )Shipping & handling charges will vary.To order, call or visit us online!716-553-8548Find out more about this book and others at:outdoorbooksforkids.comLOW COST INSURANCEFor your Boat & EquipmentSupporting water quality protection supports great fishing!Learn more at www.epa.gov/nutrientpollutionAgreed Value coverageBroad cruising areaOptional fishing guide coverageTournament coverageFishing equipment coverageFor a free quote call866-532-1829BoatUSAngler.commention priority code 4870Policies subject to limits and exclusions.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey Fishing Regulations_NJ_4c_2.25x2.indd 2013 New Jersey Freshwater 1 Fishing 10/24/12 Digest 12:08 | 39PMDivision of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Protect New Jersey’s WatersInvasive FishFish identification can be easy for species caught frequently, but trickyfor species new to New Jersey waters. An untrained eye can mistakespecies that look similar.Bowfin are native species, actually dating back 250 million years andshould be released unharmed. However, snakeheads are invasive andshould be destroyed and submitted to the Division of Fish and Wildlifefor verification. Snakeheads have recently been found in the lowerDelaware River and some of its tributaries.BOWFIN—NATIVEAlthough not a native species, channel catfish are stocked by Fish andWildlife in select locations as a recreational and food species. The flatheadcatfish is considered an invasive species capable of causing ecologicaldamage by out-competing other recreationally important species forfood and habitat. Flatheads have been confirmed in the middle sectionof the Delaware River.CHANNEL CATFISH—STOCKEDUpper jaw protrudes past lower jaw; tail deeply forked.Short anal fin.SNAKEHEAD—INVASIVELong anal fin.American eels are a diadromous native species, using both fresh andmarine waters during their lifecycle. These eels are found in nearlyevery waterbody in New Jersey. American brook lamprey are a harmlessnative species that serves as an indicator of clean substrate. The Asianswamp eel is an invasive species with documented presence in SilverLake, a 10-acre waterbody located in Gibbsboro.American Eel—NativePectoral fins present; no gill slits.American Brook Lamprey—NativeNo pectoral fins; gill slits present.Asian Swamp Eel—invasiveNo pectoral fins; no gill slits.Painting: Susan Trammellwww.SusanTrammell.comPat Hamilton/NJDFWFLATHEAD CATFISH—INVASIVELower jaw protrudes past upper jaw; tail not deeply forked.Water ChestnutFan-shaped,stronglytoothed leaves.Nut-like fruitwith foursharp spines.Invasive Mussels—Zebra MusselsHow to Identify Zebra Mussels• Resembles a clam with a striped“D”–shaped shell, less than two inches long• Usually grow in clusters• ONLY freshwater mollusk that can firmlyattach itself to solid objects• If found, keep the mussel(s). Note date and specific location.Immediately, call Dr. Peter Rowe, New Jersey Sea Grant Headquarters,(732) 872-1300 extension 31, or write prowe@njmsc.org.Keep on ReportingThe most effective way to succeed in containing aquatic invasivespecies is to report each encounter. Anglers are reminded that possessionor release of flathead catfish, snakehead, Asian swamp eel, brookstickleback, oriental weatherfish, green sunfish and warmouth, bigheadcarp, silver carp and grass carp (diploid) is prohibited. Anglers mustdestroy these species if encountered and submit specimen(s) to theBureau of Freshwater Fisheries at (908) 236-2118 for north Jersey andat (856) 629-4950 for south Jersey. For photo I.D. confirmation, writeus at njfwfish@earthlink.net.40 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Eric Wentz, DRBCDidymo, Didymosphenia geminate, is the latest invasive aquaticspecies to reach New Jersey waters. Didymo is a single cell algae that—unlike other algae—prefers cold, clean (low nutrient) waters and posesa serious threat to the Delaware River and New Jersey’s trout streams.Didymo forms massive blooms that smother plants, insects and mollusksand covers stream substrate. Through competition, it reducescritical fish habitat and food. It poses no human health threat or threatto non-aquatic animals.IdentificationDidymo can create large amounts of stalkmaterial that form thick mats of grey, white, orbrown, but never green, cottony material on thebottom of rivers and streams. Unlike filamentousalgae (which is green in color) didymo does notfeel slimy, but rather has a coarse wet wool orcotton-like feel.The SpreadDidymo has been present in the upper branchesof the Delaware River since 2007. In 2012, it wasconfirmed in the Delaware River from its upperbranches all the way to Trenton, spanning adistance of 200 miles, and in the Flat Brook, atit’s confluence with the Delaware River. As withother invasive plants it is spread through directcontact, including fishing equipment and waders,boats, kyacks, life vests, float tubes and justabout anything else that has come in contactwith didymo-infected water.Stopping The SpreadPreventing the spread of didymo, is similar topreventing the spread of other aquatic invasives.Only one cell is needed for it to spread!Invasive Alert:DIDYMO CHECKBefore you leave a river, stream or lake, check,remove and leave mud, algae, plants and otherdebris at the site. If you find any later, treatand put in trash. Do not wash down drains. CLEANSoak or spray and scrub gear with one ofthe following:• 2% bleach• 5% detergent• 5% salt solution• disinfectant cleaner DRYDry equipment until dry to the touch, thenlet dry for at least an additional 48 hours. Dryeverything that came in touch with the waterincluding clothes, life jackets, fishing gearand boots. Didymo can survive for monthsin damp conditions! For Boats• Inspect every inch of your boat, trailerand equipment — the hull, drive unit, trimplates, props, anchor, centerboards, paddles,wheels, hitch, chassis, etc. — then removeaquatic plants, animals and mud from theboat, trailer and equipment before leavingany body of water.• Drain any and all water from your boat andequipment on land before leaving the area.• Do the following when away from directdrainage areas to lakes or rivers:— Dump any leftover bait on land, especiallyif the live aquatic bait has been incontact with potentially infested waters.— Disinfect live wells and bait wells, bilges,cooling systems, hulls, and decks with a 1:9solution of household bleach and waterallowing at least 10 minutes contact time.Rinse well to remove all residual chlorine.An easy recipe is a half gallon of bleach intoa 5-gallon bucket, then fill with water (or aquart of bleach to a half bucket).• Rinse your boat after use, preferably withhot water. If hot water is not available, usetap water and then allow at least five daysto become completely dry before enteringa new water body.• D O NO T transport any live fish, bait, othercritters, plants or water from one body ofwater to another!The most effective way to succeedin containing aquatic invasive species is toreport each encounter. Anglers are remindedthat possession or release of flathead catfish,snakehead, Asian swamp eel, brook stickleback,oriental weatherfish, green sunfish andwarmouth, bighead carp, silver carp and grasscarp (diploid) is prohibited. Anglers mustdestroy these species if encountered and submitspecimen(s) to the Bureau of FreshwaterFisheries at (908) 236-2118 for north Jerseyand at (856) 629-4950 for south Jersey.For more information on speciesthreatening New Jersey’s aquatic resourcesvisit NJ Fish and Wildlife’s website atwww.nj.gov/dep/fgw/aquatic_invasives.htm.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 41Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


New Jersey State RecordFreshwater Sport FishThe New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Record Fish Programhonors anglers who catch the largest of select species of freshwaterand saltwater fish. Record size is based on weight alone; there are noline classes. Currently there are 31 freshwater species eligible for entryinto the program.Anglers are reminded that the objective of the Record Fish Programis to increase the awareness of fishing opportunities for species thatare regularly sought and routinely found in the freshwaters or off thecoast of New Jersey.Anglers should also be aware that several procedural changes are now ineffect for the Record Fish Program. First, there are different applicationsfor freshwater and saltwater species. Second, for freshwater species, it isnow mandatory that a freshwater biologist confirm the identificationand weight of any potential record fish within three days of it beingcaught. Anglers must call Fish and Wildlife’s Lebanon Fisheries Office at(908) 236-2118 (Hunterdon County), the Hackettstown Hatchery at(908) 852-4950 (Warren County), or the Southern Region Office at(856) 629-4950 (Camden County) to make arrangements. Hours areMonday–Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. These offices have a certified scaleon site, so an entry can be weighed and identified. Depending on thetime and location of your catch, you may elect to have the fish weighedon a local certified scale, but you must still have a freshwater biologistpersonally confirm the identification and weight at one of the above offices.Delaware River near Stockton.Please note that all scale certification requirements still apply, includinga valid Certificate of Inspection/Test Report and current RegistrationCertificate issued by the county Office of Weights and Measures. Entrydeadline: Applications must now be submitted no later than one monthafter the date of catch. All other program rules still apply.For a complete list of state record fish or to print an application withcomplete program rules, visit the Division of Fish and Wildlife’s websiteat NJFishandWildlife.com/recfish.htm.New Jersey State Freshwater RecordsSpecies lbs. oz. Year Angler Where CaughtBass, Largemouth 10 14 1980 Robert EiseleMenantico SandWash PondBass, Rock 1 5 1982 Eric Avogardo Saddle RiverBass, Smallmouth 7 2 1990 Carol MarciniakRound ValleyReservoirBluegill 3 0 1990 Dom SantarelliFarm Pond inPenningtonBowfin 10 14 2011 Chris Hoffman Delaware RiverBullhead, Brown 4 8 1997 Gary SchmidtLake of Woods,Ft. DixCarp 47 0 1995 Billy FriedmanSouth Branch ofRaritan RiverCarp(Archery)43 14 2008 Mark Kronyak Delaware RiverCarp, Grass 55 8 2011 Jack Demsey, Jr. Curlis LakeCarp, Grass(Archery)65 0 2008 Mark Kronyak Delaware RiverCatfish, Channel 33 3 1978 Howard Hudson Lake HopatcongCatfish, White 14 4 2004 Timothy Jasko Dallenbach PondCrappie, Black 4 8 1996 Andy Tintle Pompton LakeCrappie, White 3 11 2009 William Lewis Mercer LakeEel, American 6 13 2005 David J. PayneRound ValleyReservoirMuskellunge 42 13 1997 Bob NealsMonksvilleReservoirMuskie, Tiger 29 0 1990 Larry Migliarese Delaware RiverPerch, White** 3 1 1989 Edward Tango Forest Hill LakeSpecies lbs. oz. Year Angler Where CaughtPerch, Yellow 2 6 1989 Gene Engels Holiday LakePerch, Yellow* 4 4 1865 Charles Abbott Crosswicks CreekPickerel, Chain 9 3 1957 Frank McGovern Lower Aetna LakePickerel, Redfin 1 13 1982GeraldHumphreyLake AssunpinkPike, Northern 30 8.5 2009 John Viglione Pompton LakeSalmon(Landlocked)8 0 1951 John MountLake Aeroflex(formerly NewWawayanda)Shad, American 11 1 1984 Charles Mower Delaware RiverStriped Bass 51 0 2002 John ChristianGreat EggHarbor RiverStriped Bass,Hybrid16 4 1999 Bill Schmidt Culvers LakeSunfish,Pumpkinseed1 8 1987 Daryl Donalson Farm Pond inBurlington CountyTrout, Brook 7 3 1995 Andrew DuJack Rockaway RiverTrout, Brown 21 6 1995 Lenny SaccenteRound ValleyReservoirTrout, Lake 32 8 2002 Greg YoungRound ValleyReservoirTrout, Rainbow 13 0 1988 Gene Rutkoski Lake HopatcongTrout,Sea Run Brown— Vacant —(Minimum Weight 5 lbs.)Walleye 13 9 1993 George Fundell Delaware River* Denotes historical record** Denotes fish has been certified by the IGFA as a world record42 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Skillful Angler Awards ProgramThe Skillful Angler Awards Program is designed both to supplementthe New Jersey Record Fish Program and to acknowledge that manyanglers catch freshwater and marine fish that are not record size, butare still worthy of recognition because the size and weight of the fishsufficiently tested the angler’s skill. Open to resident and non-residentanglers. All fish must be caught in New Jersey waters using a hook andline during legally open seasons. It is comprised of three categories: Adult(for anglers age 16 and older), Junior (under age 16) and Catch and Release(based on length). A clear, side-view photo that allows accurate speciesidentification must be included with each application.Take time to compose a good quality (and high resolution) photo tosubmit with your application. The best photo may be selected for publicationin this Digest next year! Include your e-mail address on back ofthe photo so we may contact you for a digital copy of your print.Anglers qualifying for a Skillful Angler award receive a certificate asa testament to their achievement. Anglers may submit applications forlarger fish caught even after receiving a certificate.At the end of the year, special recognition is given to anglers who catchthe largest fish in each species category. The winner of each categoryis sent a special certificate recognizing his/her accomplishment as thebest of New Jersey’s Skillful Anglers.Fish must be measured from the tip of the nose (with mouth closed)Five year old AustinHudak landed this9 1 ⁄16-inch bluegill atMuriel Hepner NaturePark in Denville usinga live worm on hisfavorite spincaster.New Jersey Skillful Angler ApplicationName________________________________________ Age________Address____________________________________________________________________________________________________City_______________________________State________ Zip_________Daytime Telephone Number (________)___________________________Entry Category (check only one):o Adult o Junior (16 years and under)o Catch and Release (Qualification based on length)Fish Species (Angler must complete. Subject to verification by a state biologist.)_____________________________________________________Weight_______lb(s).,_______oz. Length_______in. Girth_______in.Date Caught*_______/_____/________ Time_____________Location_______________________________________________Caught from (check only one):o Boat o Shore o Surf o Jettyo Other (specify)___________________________________________to the tip of the tail. For catch and release categories, the fish must bemeasured alongside a ruler. For Adult/Junior categories, fish must beweighed and measured by fishing license agents, tackle shops or authorizedFish and Wildlife fisheries biologists.Minimum Requirements for Each Freshwater Species:SpeciesAdult Weight(lbs., oz.)Junior Weight(lbs., oz.)Catch &Release(inches)Largemouth Bass 6 4 21Smallmouth Bass 4 3 19Striped Bass Hybrid 8 6 24Striped Bass 30 25 40Bullhead 2 1 lb., 8 oz. 14Carp 25 20 35Channel Catfish 10 8 29Crappie 2 1 lb., 8 oz. 14Muskellunge 20 15 40Yellow Perch 1 lb., 8 oz. 1 13Chain Pickerel 4 3 24Northern Pike 10 8 34American Shad 7 5 24Brook Trout 3 2 19Brown Trout 8 5 25Lake Trout 12 8 31Rainbow Trout 5 3 lbs., 8 oz. 23Salmon, AtlanticLandlocked4 3 20Sunfish 1 12 oz. 9Walleye 6 4 lbs., 8 oz. 24The New Jersey State Record Fish Program requires a separate applicationand is based on weight alone. Scale certification documentation anda weighmaster’s signature are necessary. Other rules apply. Visit Fish andWildlife’s website at NJFishandWildlife.com for a complete list of currentstate records.Line Test Used _______________ Reel Type______________Rod Type ____________________ Lure/Bait ________________Certification for Adult and Junior CategoriesName of Establishment ________________________________________(where fish was measured and weighed)Telephone Number______________________________________Weighmaster’s Name___________________________________Weighmaster’s Signature________________________________I certify: 1) this fish was caught in New Jersey waters in accordance withstate laws and regulations; 2) the entry was weighed on a certified scale(for Adult and Junior categories only).o I have enclosed a clear, side-view photo.Applicant’sSignature_________________________________________ Date___________* Applications and photo must be submitted within 30 days of catching the fish.Applications for fish caught in December will be accepted only until January 31.Mail to:NJ Division of Fish and WildlifeSkillful Angler Awards ProgramPequest Natural Resource Education Center605 Pequest Rd.Oxford, NJ 07863January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 43Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


}}Students Invited To Celebrate The 30th Anniversary Of ThePequest State Trout Hatchery By Entering The New Jersey Trout Art Contest!Students in grades K–12 are invited to celebrate the 30th Anniversaryof the Pequest State Trout Hatchery by participating in the NJDEPDivision of Fish and Wildlife’s 2013 New Jersey Trout Art Contest!This year’s contest is for fish art only (no writing component) and focuseson the three fish species raised at Pequest—brook, brown and rainbowtrout. Students should choose one of these trout then, using their artisticskills, draw a scene with the trout selected in a natural habitat where thisfish would be found in New Jersey. Artwork should be creative, originaland incorporate accurate biological and ecological information regardingthe fish’s appearance, habits and habitat.Students can use the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlifewebsite as a resource to learn about New Jersey’s trout, theFirst place winner Owen Korth is a fourth grader from Bordentown.Pequest Trout Hatchery and the trout stocking program. Artworkmust have a finished size of 8.5 x 11 inches and may be created in acrylic, pencil, watercolor, oil, oil pastel, crayon or ink.First place winners will be awarded for each grade level. Winners receive a rod and reel plusa certificate, as well as ayouth membership to Trout Unlimited. All winners are invited to attend a special luncheon and awards ceremony atthe Pequest Trout Hatchery on Opening Day of Trout Season, April 6, 2013. Prior to the luncheon, students will havethe opportunity to fish in the Pequest Fishing Education Pond which is stocked with trout from the hatchery.Artwork will remain on display at the Pequest Natural Resource Education Center for the year following the contest. Allentries become the property of the Division of Fish and Wildlife and will not be returned.Entries must be received by Friday, March 1, 2013. For more information, see NJFishandWildlife.com/fishart.htm.The Fish Art contest is sponsored by the New Jersey chapters of Trout Unlimited.The New JerseyFreshwater FishingDigest is nowavailable online!Full-featured websiteiPad, iPhone andsmartphone accessibleShare with friends onView it online today at:eRegulations.com/NJ/fishing/freshwater44 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


}}New Jersey’s ColdwaterConservation School}}“Hook a Winner” ProgramOnce again, the Division of Fish and Wildlife will bejaw-tagging more than 1,000 brook trout for releasein New Jersey waters.If you are a lucky angler who lands one of thesefish, send your name, address, fish tag number andlocation of catch to:Pequest Trout Hatchery605 Pequest RoadOxford, NJ 07863Attn: Hook a Winner ProgramIn recognition of your catch, a certificate and awardpatch will be mailed.June 27– 30, 2013Kids between the ages of 11–14 years can participatein this fun, hands-on program. The program is fourdays and three nights in the heart of trout country.Activities for participants include fly tying, fly casting,pond seining, river studies and more.For more information and applications(available in January) visit NJFishandWildlife.com.Tom PagliaroliBeat The Fall Rush!Take Your Hunter Education Class This Spring!}}The best time to take your Hunter Education class is spring!Last year over 6,000 students completed the course butmore than 4,000 waited until the fall.Register for a class this April or Mayand enjoy the following:• Smaller class size• Greater student to teacher ratio• Shorter lines• Greater selection of classes• Good weatherWith classes in the fall averagingover 100 students, you may not finda class if you wait. Classes in Apriland May seldom exceed 50 students.So Beat The Fall Rush—Register Now!For class information and toregister, go to:www.NJFishandWildlife.comJanuary 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 45Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


DEP PUBLICATIONS OFSPECIAL INTEREST TO ANGLERSNJFishandWildlife.comItem Cost Website SourceAccessible Fishing Sites For People With Disabilities Free Yes 1Commercial (fee-based) Fishing Preserves in NJ Free Yes 1Delaware River Boat Access Free Yes 1Disabled Veterans—Free Fishing License application Free Yes 1Field Guide to Dragonflies and Damselflies of NJ—Book $39 No 4Field Guide to Reptiles & Amphibians of NJ—Book $18 No 4Field Guide to Reptiles & Amphibians of NJ—CD $12 No 4Field Guide to Reptiles & Amphibians of NJ—Book/CD Set $25 No 4Great Fishing Close to Home—New! (north, central, south)(specify which region when requesting)Free No 1Lake Survey Maps (specify waterbody) Free Yes 1List of Fishing Guides Free Yes 1Manasquan River Fishing Access Areas Free Yes 1State Parks & Forests Maps Free No 3USGS Topographic Maps $10 No 2Visually Impaired—Free Fishing License application Free No 1Visually Impaired—Large Format Freshwater Fishing Digest(Enlarged photocopy of this Digest)Free No 1Wildlife Management Area Maps (specify name of WMA) Free Yes 1Sources:Be sure to write item requested on the outside of the envelope.1. NJ Div. of Fish and Wildlife, 605 Pequest Road, Oxford, NJ 07863, (908) 637-41252. NJ Geological Survey, Maps & Publications, Sales Office, MC401-07A,P.O. Box 402, Trenton, NJ 08625-0402, (609) 777-10383. DEP, Div. Parks & Forestry, MC501-03, P.O. Box 420, Trenton, NJ 08625-0420,(800) 843-6420 (Specify name of park.)4. NJ Div. Fish and Wildlife, MC501-03, P.O. Box 420, Trenton, NJ 08625-0420Make check payable to Conserve Wildlife Foundation for items with a fee.POLICE STATIONS •State Police MarineLaw Enforcement StationsBivalve ..................................(856) 785-1330North Wildwood .....................(609) 522-0393Atlantic City ..........................(609) 441-3586Burlington .............................(609) 387-1221Ocean ....................................(609) 296-5807Point Pleasant .......................(732) 899-5050Monmouth Station .................(732) 842-5171Lake Hopatcong .....................(973) 663-3400Newark Bay ...........................(973) 578-8173}}Volunteers Needed To Get Kids Hooked On Fishing!New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife needs volunteers at thePequest Trout Hatchery and Natural Resource Education Centerto teach youths about fishing.Teaching experience is helpful—but not required—to become afishing education instructor. However, enthusiasm, energy and thedesire to teach children proper fishing techniques and ethics is amust!Jamie Darrow/NJ Div. Fish and WildlifeClasses run Monday through Friday from April through October.Interested applicants must become a Wildlife Conservation Corps(WCC) volunteer. Download a WCC application from our website at:NJFishandWildlife.com/wcchome.htm.Share the pleasures of fishing and pass on a conservation ethic tothe next generation. Become a fishing education instructor today!For more information on Fish and Wildlife’s fishing educationprograms, call Jessica Griglak at (908) 637-4125, or e-mailJessica.Griglak@dep.state.nj.us.46 | 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest Buy your license or permit online at January 2013NJFishandWildlife.com


Angler’s ShowplaceAdvertisementsfishing chartersSailing out of Plymouth Harbor for the Northeast’s bestfishing, without the Cape Cod traffic. We make sure thatyou have a great day at sea. Excellent option for trips of 4,5 or 6 anglers. Comfortable for corporate/business clientfishing. Tuna Trips, Shark, Striped Bass, Cod & Haddock.508.747.1577 · www.PlymouthWatersport.comcharity organizationsbait, Tackle and gearTel: (973) 835-2966www.frankstacklesportshop.comTaxidermyBob’s Taxidermy1115 Papen Rd • Bridgewater, NJ 08807908-347-0488908-722-9336We carrylive bait!81 Ringwood AveWanaque, NJ 07465Make Hunting & FishingDreams Come True!Our58thyearland managementKILL LAKEWEEDSProven AQUACIDE PELLETS work at any depth.Before800-328-9350After10 lb. bag treats up to4,000 sq. ft. $84.00. 50 lb.bag treats up to 20,000sq. ft. $331.00. FREESHIPPING! Certified andapproved for use by stateagencies State permit maybe required. Registeredwith the Federal E.P.A.www.KillLakeWeeds.com/14GOrder online today, or request free information.AQUACIDE CO.PO Box 10748, DEPT 14GWhite Bear Lake, MN 55110-0748We Provide HuntingOpportunities toLaw Enforcement AgentsInjured in the Line of Duty.To Volunteer Or Donate, Please Visit Our WebsiteHuntingForHeroes.orgHunt of a Lifetime is anonprofit organizationthat grants hunting andfishing dreams to children,age 21 and under, whohave been diagnosed withlife threatening illnesses.If you are interested in helping a child live theirdream, please contact us for more information.Toll Free 866.345.4455 HuntofaLifetime.orgHunting on facebookFollowonsurveyWin a $100 Gift Card!Take the monthlyJoin the conversation with1.5 Million hunting fans!• Share photos, articles and otherrelated hunting information• Find great offers and giveawaysJoin today!facebook.com/thehuntingpageScan with yourmobile device.And be entered to wina $100 gift certificate to yoursporting good retailer of choice.Your anonymous participation advances fi sh andwildlife conservation, helps protect your right tohunt, fi sh and shoot, and guides companies indeveloping better outdoor products.January 2013 For more information contact New Jersey 2013 New Jersey Freshwater Fishing Digest | 47Division of Fish and Wildlife at (609)292-2965


Angler’s Showplaceadvertisements2013 telephone directoryInternet Address.........................................................................................................................................................................NJFishandWildlife.comGeneral Information..................................................................................................................(609) 292-2965DEP ACTION LINE—24 HOURS.........................................................(877) 927-6337 — (877) WARNDEPAutomated Harvest Report System.........................................................(855) 448-6865 — (855) I HUNT NJCommercial Preserves and Semi-Wild Preserves................................................................................................................. (908) 735-7040Exotic & Nongame Captivity Permits............................................................................................................................................ (908) 735-5450Falconry Permits............................................................................................................................................................................................... (908) 735-8793Field Trial Permits.............................................................................................................................................................................................(609) 259-2132Freshwater Fisheries (north/south).................................................................................................................................................. (908) 236-2118Horseback Riding Permits..........................................................................................................................................................................(609) 259-2132Hunter Education.......................................................................................................................................... (877) 248-6865 — (877) 2HUNTNJHunting, Fishing and Duplicate Licenses.................................................................................................................................... (609) 292-2965Hunting and Trapping Permit Hotline......................................................................................................................................... (609) 292-9192License Sales.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... (888) 773-8450Operation Game Thief.............................................................................................................................................................................. (800) 222-0456Outstanding Deer Program..................................................................................................................................................................... (609) 633-7598Pheasant and Quail Stocking................................................................................................................................................................ (609) 984-0547Trout Stocking Hotline.............................................................................................................................................................................. (609) 633-6765Wildlife Conservation Corps..................................................................................................................................................................(856) 629-1014Wildlife Control.............................................................................................................................................................................................. (908) 735-8793Wildlife Education......................................................................................................................................................................................... (908) 637-4125Wildlife Management Areas................................................................................................................................................................. (609) 984-0547Trenton OfficeMail Code 501-03, P.O. Box 420, Trenton, NJ 08625-0420Endangered and Nongame Species.......................................................................................................................................... (609) 292-9400Land Management................................................................................................................................................................................. (609) 984-0547Marine Fisheries........................................................................................................................................................................................ (609) 292-2083Shellfisheries............................................................................................................................................................................................... (609) 984-5546Wildlife Management......................................................................................................................................................................... (609) 292-6685Northern Region Office26 Route 173 W., Hampton, NJ 08827Wildlife Management........................................................................................................................................................................ (908) 735-7040Endangered and Nongame Species (1 Van Syckel’s Rd.)......................................................................................... (908) 638-4127Hunter Education............................................................................................................................................................................. (877) 2HUNTNJWildlife Control...................................................................................................................................................................................... (908) 735-8793Land Management................................................................................................................................................................................... (973) 383-0918Law Enforcement (Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Hunterdon, Morris, Passaic, Somerset,Sussex, Union, and Warren counties) ...................................................................................................................................... (908) 735-8240Central Region Office1 Eldridge Rd., Robbinsville, NJ 08691Land Management................................................................................................................................................................................... (609) 259-2132Hunter Education............................................................................................................................................................................. (877) 2HUNTNJWildlife Control...................................................................................................................................................................................... (609) 259-7955Law Enforcement (Burlington, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, and Ocean counties)............................. (609) 259-2120Southern Region Office220 Blue Anchor Rd., Sicklerville, NJ 08081General Information............................................................................................................................................................................ (856) 629-0090Freshwater Fisheries...............................................................................................................................................................................(856) 629-4950Hunter Education............................................................................................................................................................................. (877) 2HUNTNJLand Management.................................................................................................................................................................................. (856) 629-5006Wildlife Control...................................................................................................................................................................................... (856) 629-7224Law Enforcement (Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester,and Salem counties).............................................................................................................................................................................. (856) 629-0555Pequest Natural Resource Education Center............................................................................. (908) 637-4125Pequest Trout Hatchery............................................................................................................. (908) 637-4173605 Pequest Rd., Oxford, NJ 07863Hackettstown Fish Hatchery..................................................................................................... (908) 852-367623 Reese Ave., Hackettstown, NJ 07840Lebanon Field OfficeFreshwater FisheriesP.O. Box 394, 1255 County Rt. 629, Lebanon, NJ 08833............................................................................................. (908) 236-2118Nacote Creek Research StationP.O. Box 418, 360 Rt. 9 N. (Milepost 51) Port Republic, NJ 08241Marine Fisheries........................................................................................................................................................................................ (609) 748-2020Shellfisheries.............................................................................................................................................................................................. (609) 748-2040Marine Education.................................................................................................................................................................................... (609) 748-2031Marine Law Enforcement................................................................................................................................................................ (609) 748-2050Millville Shellfish Office1670 E. Buckshutem Rd. Millville, NJ 08332.................................................................................................................... (856) 785-0730


NEW BOOK AVAILABLEONLINE NOW!The NEW JERSEYGUN LAW GUIDEis a comprehensivepresentation of the majortopics of New Jersey gunlaw, presented in aneasy-to-read FAQ format.