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SAFETY ALERT (ALT-015)

Passengers on Mobile Machinery

BACKGROUND

Self propelled work equipment is often

incorrectly used to carry passengers. A

recent incident provides an example of

this, where two workers were observed

riding on a forward tipping site dump

truck, designed for one driver and no

passengers. The driver was positioned

correctly in the seat provided but the

other worker was perched dangerously

on the engine compartment with his

feet resting on the wheel arch. The

temporary road being driven upon

was rough and undulating and it

was noted that pedestrians were

walking alongside the road without

any form of vehicle/pedestrian

segregation or traffic control.

There was therefore a risk of

serious injury or fatality, as the

side passenger could have fallen

and been run over, or rolled onto,

by the machine.

© On-track Multimedia

PRACTICAL GUIDANCE

Regulation 25 ‘Employees carried on

mobile work equipment’ of the Provision

and Use of Work Equipment Regulations

(PUWER, 1998) states that:

Every employer shall ensure that no

employee is carried on mobile work

equipment unless

a) it is suitable for carrying persons;

b) it incorporates features for reducing

to as low as is reasonably

practicable risks to their safety,

including risks from wheels

or tracks.

Self propelled work equipment should

only be driven by fully trained, competent

operators who have been authorised

to do so and any operation should

be accompanied by a suitable risk

assessment. The nationally recognised

qualification for competence within

Britain is a Scottish/National Vocational

Qualification (S/NVQ) Level II Plant

Operations.

Where one seat is fitted to a machine,

then only one operator must be allowed

to operate that machine. At all times seat

restraint systems should be used and

passengers should never be carried under

any circumstance. Any second passenger

seat fitted by the Original Equipment

Manufacturer (OEM) or retro-fitted by

another manufacturer, should afford the

passenger (and driver) with the same level

of protection with regards to seat restraint

and roll over protective structures.

Pedestrians must be segregated from the

‘operational area’ of the machine and its

transport routes; these routes should have

good clear signage and appropriate traffic

control measures.

Site managers must be knowledgeable about

safe plant operation and must take an active

role in monitoring, controlling and managing

all plant operations on site.

When training novice operators, it is

permissible to work within close proximity of

the machine but a thorough risk assessment

must first be completed and this should

take into account (amongst other things)

the type, size and configuration of machine

being operated, falls from height and

unexpected movement of the machine.

Because such activity is deemed to be high

risk, training should be conducted in a tightly

controlled environment and the

use of handfree mobile

technology (e.g.

phones or walkie

talkies) should be

considered if the

risks identified

cannot be fully

controlled.

Further guidance can be found in the

HSE publications ‘Workplace transport

safety, an employers’ guide’ (HSG 136 –

ISBN 9780717661541) and ‘PUWER 1998.

Provision and Use of Work Equipment

Regulations 1998’ (ISBN 9780717662852),

as well as in other safety alerts issued by

OPERC (www.operc.com).

Images for illustrative purposes only

OPERC: The home of plant and equipment professionals

www.operc.com


SAFETY ALERT (ALT-015)

Passengers on Mobile Machinery

BACKGROUND

Self propelled work equipment is often

incorrectly used to carry passengers. A

recent incident provides an example of

this, where two workers were observed

riding on a forward tipping site dump

truck, designed for one driver and no

passengers. The driver was positioned

correctly in the seat provided but the

other worker was perched dangerously

on the engine compartment with his

feet resting on the wheel arch. The

temporary road being driven upon

was rough and undulating and it

was noted that pedestrians were

walking alongside the road without

any form of vehicle/pedestrian

segregation or traffic control.

There was therefore a risk of

serious injury or fatality, as the

side passenger could have fallen

and been run over, or rolled onto,

by the machine.

© On-track Multimedia

PRACTICAL GUIDANCE

Regulation 25 ‘Employees carried on

mobile work equipment’ of the Provision

and Use of Work Equipment Regulations

(PUWER, 1998) states that:

Every employer shall ensure that no

employee is carried on mobile work

equipment unless

a) it is suitable for carrying persons;

b) it incorporates features for reducing

to as low as is reasonably

practicable risks to their safety,

including risks from wheels

or tracks.

Self propelled work equipment should

only be driven by fully trained, competent

operators who have been authorised

to do so and any operation should

be accompanied by a suitable risk

assessment. The nationally recognised

qualification for competence within

Britain is a Scottish/National Vocational

Qualification (S/NVQ) Level II Plant

Operations.

Where one seat is fitted to a machine,

then only one operator must be allowed

to operate that machine. At all times seat

restraint systems should be used and

passengers should never be carried under

any circumstance. Any second passenger

seat fitted by the Original Equipment

Manufacturer (OEM) or retro-fitted by

another manufacturer, should afford the

passenger (and driver) with the same level

of protection with regards to seat restraint

and roll over protective structures.

Pedestrians must be segregated from the

‘operational area’ of the machine and its

transport routes; these routes should have

good clear signage and appropriate traffic

control measures.

Site managers must be knowledgeable about

safe plant operation and must take an active

role in monitoring, controlling and managing

all plant operations on site.

When training novice operators, it is

permissible to work within close proximity of

the machine but a thorough risk assessment

must first be completed and this should

take into account (amongst other things)

the type, size and configuration of machine

being operated, falls from height and

unexpected movement of the machine.

Because such activity is deemed to be high

risk, training should be conducted in a tightly

controlled environment and the

use of handfree mobile

technology (e.g.

phones or walkie

talkies) should be

considered if the

risks identified

cannot be fully

controlled.

Further guidance can be found in the

HSE publications ‘Workplace transport

safety, an employers’ guide’ (HSG 136 –

ISBN 9780717661541) and ‘PUWER 1998.

Provision and Use of Work Equipment

Regulations 1998’ (ISBN 9780717662852),

as well as in other safety alerts issued by

OPERC (www.operc.com).

Images for illustrative purposes only

OPERC: The home of plant and equipment professionals

www.operc.com

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