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SURF IS FREE... LIKE MAGS SHOULD BE<br />

HOME: SOUTH COAST MAGIC P64<br />

DEBATE:<br />

SUP, UP AND AWAY P48<br />

WORDS: THE KANTENDER P26<br />

THE MAGAZINE FOR THOSE WHO LOVE TO SURF<br />

ISSUE #2 NOV/DEC <strong>2010</strong>


Photo courtesy of Dick Hoole<br />

“is what surfing is all about”<br />

www.goodtime.com.au


Since 1971<br />

Come and see Gail and<br />

the Goodtime team at<br />

the Gabba<br />

Goodtime Surf & Sail<br />

29 Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba, Brisbane<br />

07 3391 8588<br />

WE SURF...


INSIDE<br />

26<br />

FROM SURF<br />

THUG TO CHAMP<br />

32<br />

CAPTURING THE<br />

PERFECT WAVES<br />

42<br />

THE IRON MAIDEN STAND<br />

OF SURF BUSINESS<br />

48 56<br />

UP AND<br />

BE COUNTED<br />

PASSED DOWN<br />

FROM DAD<br />

How Noosa’s Israel<br />

Kani turned negatives<br />

into positives<br />

Photographer Sean<br />

Scott gives an insight<br />

into his inspiration<br />

Gail Austin’s neversay-die<br />

attitude has<br />

kept the wins coming<br />

People with paddles...<br />

Where is this SUP<br />

thing heading?<br />

Four different fathers<br />

and sons talk about<br />

surfing and bonding<br />

ALL THE<br />

USUAL BITS<br />

THE LATEST<br />

Feedback P14<br />

News P18<br />

And Greatest P20<br />

TRAVEL<br />

Road trip: The Gong and Beyond P64<br />

Tropical itch P86<br />

Plane Trip: Muizenberg P88<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

GEAR<br />

Shaper profile: Thomas Bexon P96<br />

Latest surfboard designs P103<br />

Skateboarding P113<br />

<br />

CLOSEOUT<br />

History P117<br />

Music, Film & Books P120<br />

First Aid & Fitness P122<br />

Get learning P124<br />

People out and about P130<br />

Toasty warm on the Bass Coast<br />

Photo: Jeff Tull<br />

6 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


DETAILS<br />

& THINGS<br />

WHAT WE’RE ALL ABOUT<br />

<strong>Smorgasboarder</strong> is for all of us that love surfing,<br />

whether it’s to relax, unwind, get in a healthy bit of<br />

exercise or to catch up with friends and family.<br />

WHERE TO PICK US UP<br />

Quality surf stores, shapers and cool cafes within 10kms of<br />

the coast from Agnes Water to Warrnambool. We also supply<br />

select stores in Brisbane, Sydney and Melbourne. For a full list<br />

of distributors, visit the directory in the back of the mag or at<br />

www.smorgasboarder.com.au - or get to your local surf<br />

shop and talk to some real people in the flesh. <strong>Smorgasboarder</strong><br />

is published six times a year - September/October, November/<br />

December, January/ February, March/April, May/June.<br />

CAN’T GET THERE? SUBSCRIBE<br />

If you want <strong>Smorgasboarder</strong> delivered to your door, you can<br />

become a home subscriber. The mag is still free, but Australia<br />

Post need to get paid. $18 gets you six editions. Just sign up<br />

at www.smorgasboarder.com.au and go and wait by your<br />

mailbox. It’ll arrive every two months.<br />

THANK YOU<br />

Thank you once again to all our creative contributing<br />

writers, fantastic photographers and excellent people<br />

who made this edition possible. We’d like to make special<br />

mention of Louise ‘Squirrel’ Gough and Gus Brown as well<br />

as Helen Chapman and Katie Swan for putting up with us.<br />

THE TEAM<br />

If you’re after any information on advertising, distribution,<br />

editorial, subscribing, contributing or just plain getting<br />

involved in some way, drop us a line...<br />

Mark Chapman<br />

Dave Swan<br />

mark@hugecmedia.com.au<br />

0400 875 884<br />

dave@hugecmedia.com.au<br />

0401 345 201<br />

CONTRIBUTORS<br />

WRITING TALENT: John Hart, Dr Pete Kirkham, Nigel Potts,<br />

Craig Baird, Kent Ladkin, Hoges and Will at Island Surfboards<br />

PHOTOGRAPHIC GENIUS: Sean Scott, Mark ‘Crumpet’<br />

Taylor, Joel Coleman, Keith Hamlyn, Jules Phillips, Jeff Tull,<br />

Grant Molony, Steev S, Keith LBG, Richard Higgins, Lainey<br />

Brown, Simon Muirhead, Phil Burnham, Michael Dawes, Ray<br />

Collins, Ben Vos, Lucas Muro, Trevor Skinner, Tom Woods,<br />

Jin Han Teng, Lee Slabber, Craig Wilson, Timothy Van der<br />

Venter, Simon Allard, Jason Mercer, Terry ‘Spud’ Murphy and<br />

newcomer Lachy MacMackin.<br />

Tech specs: Mark - studio@hugecmedia.com.au<br />

Money matters: Dave - money@hugecmedia.com.au<br />

Ideas & submissions: editorial@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

Distribution: mags@hugecmedia.com.au<br />

WWW.SMORGASBOARDER.COM.AU<br />

smorgasboarder is published by Huge C Media Pty Ltd<br />

ABN 30944673055. All information is correct at time of going to<br />

press. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for errors in<br />

articles or advertisements, or unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or<br />

illustrations. The opinions and words of the authors do not necessarily<br />

represent those of the publisher. All rights reserved. Reproduction in<br />

part or whole is strictly prohibited without prior permission.<br />

8 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

We print with Pep<br />

Central and Craft<br />

Inprint Group, an<br />

environmentally aware<br />

and committed printer<br />

whose business is<br />

founded upon the<br />

principles of minimising<br />

waste and maximising<br />

recycling. Nice work.


nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

9


LATEST: EDITION<br />

BACK SO SOON<br />

Cole Richards/Narrabeen<br />

Photo: Crumpet Productions<br />

I was on my favourite beach this morning. It was raining, but the sun was<br />

shining. I told my little boy that when this happened, it was called a Monkey’s<br />

Wedding. He said that it was called a sunshower. At five years old, his name for<br />

it made more sense than mine. I’ve never really understood what a Monkey’s<br />

Wedding meant anyway. Or why monkeys would get married, for that matter.<br />

Kids are smart.<br />

But we were both right, according to wikipedia - the fountain of all knowledge.<br />

It seems that my description points to my South African youth, while my boy...<br />

well, he’s true blue. This little difference in terminology made me understand<br />

why often my friends have no idea what I’m on about. Smiling and nodding<br />

doesn’t fool me, people... That said, you obviously never completely forget<br />

where you came from and our international trip is exactly that: a visit back to<br />

South African shores, exploring the chilled surrounds of Muizenberg Beach in<br />

Cape Town on page 88.<br />

With an even bigger magazine that the first, we’ve crammed in more travel,<br />

more gear, more great surfing images and plenty of love for the ocean as we talk<br />

to men, women and even families that love and live for their surfing.<br />

It’s been a wild ride...<br />

Issue two has come around so much quicker than we had ever imagined. Still<br />

reeling from all the positivity and fantastic feedback from our launch edition,<br />

we are awestruck and incredibly grateful for the positive reaction from you, the<br />

reader, as well as for the fantastic involvement of all of the businesses along the<br />

east coast that have supported us by way of advertising to make this free mag<br />

possible for you.<br />

And we’re over the moon at the ridiculously talented and steadily growing army<br />

of contributors that have chosen to be involved with the mag. <strong>Smorgasboarder</strong><br />

just couldn’t happen and wouldn’t be what it is without these skills and talents.<br />

And it’s all spreading... We’re already getting around further afield than we<br />

originally planned as we welcomed Reef2Beach surf shop up in Agnes Water /<br />

1770 as our northernmost shop to now stock smorgasboarder.<br />

The amount of online readers we’ve picked up along the way has just amazed<br />

us. In only a few short weeks, an absolute wave of people got to flicking through<br />

the online version of the magazine at www.smorgasboarder.com.au, with people<br />

from all across the globe dropping us emails to say g’day.<br />

As to our hopes for the magazine being a way for the surf community to air<br />

views, share thoughts and generally get involved? These hopes are already<br />

being realised thanks to the staggering amount of feedback, subscriptions and<br />

contributions we’ve received so far, not to mention the connections that we’ve<br />

been told about: Businesses jumping on board to support organisations featured<br />

in the first edition, stores discovering new shapers and manufacturers to stock,<br />

people generally meeting and greeting through the pages of the mag... It’s truly<br />

what it’s all about and makes us happy little campers.<br />

All we can say is a massive thank you, thank you, thank you. It makes the sleepless<br />

nights and long hours worthwhile.<br />

Keep reading, keep writing, keep clicking and keep in touch.<br />

Mark<br />

10 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

11


LADIES FIRST<br />

AT THE TENDER AGE OF 20, BUDDING FITNESS<br />

GURU AND SUPER-HOT SURFER ANGIE KOOPS<br />

LEFT THE LAND OF THE LONG WHITE CLOUD<br />

BEHIND, TO BE ‘BEACHED AS’ ON THE GOLD<br />

COAST. IN A FEW SHORT YEARS, SHE SEEMS<br />

TO HAVE SETTLED IN REALLY QUICKLY .<br />

PLAYING<br />

FOR<br />

KOOPS<br />

No slouch in competition surfing, Angie<br />

Koops has racked up enough trans-Tasman<br />

titles in a few short years to fill a very large<br />

chilly bin.<br />

Since her arrival in Australia, she’s collected<br />

herself a decent little flock of sponsors, with<br />

companies like Diverse Surf, Fox, Smith,<br />

On A Mission, Maxum watches, Tahitian<br />

Noni, and even hometown biggies like<br />

Mountain Dew NZ all keen to kit her out with<br />

product and put her face to their brands.<br />

Not bad for an import, eh bro? Okay, no more<br />

Kiwi jokes... Over to you Ange...<br />

“Hi I’m Ange. I was born in NZ and grew up in a<br />

little country town called Kaikoura - a unique place<br />

where the mountains reach the ocean. In winter<br />

you can snowboard and surf in the same day. You<br />

just have to make sure you build a bonfire before<br />

you hit the surf... You’ll need it to thaw out.”<br />

“I was 14 when I first started stand up surfing, my<br />

bro did it a lot when he was younger and I got my<br />

first board off him. I started bodyboarding when<br />

I was about six, just mucking around with the<br />

cousins skim-boarding and playing in the dumpers.<br />

“I’m studying at present, learning to become a<br />

fitness specialist and I also have my own remedial<br />

sport massage business.“<br />

BIGGEST SURFING INFLUENCE?<br />

In Australia would have to be my boyfriend Dru...<br />

He’s fun to surf with.<br />

BEST SURF SPOTS?<br />

I live on the beach at Palmy and I love it. I also love<br />

a spot in Bali, but I’d have to kill you if I told you...<br />

WHAT BOARD WORKS BETTER IN NEW<br />

ZEALAND? A SUX-FOOTER, OR A FUSH?<br />

Haha! None of the above... Maybe a fiieeeeve<br />

nine rounded pun tail.<br />

WHAT’S MOST IMPORTANT IN YOUR LIFE?<br />

Family<br />

12 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


photo: Shane Newman<br />

Angie enjoying some time in the<br />

Land of the Long White Rooster Tail<br />

Photo: Simon Muirhead/Simsurf<br />

BEING A PERSONAL TRAINER, WHAT ARE YOUR TOP TIPS FOR<br />

GETTING AND STAYING SURF FIT?<br />

Fuel your body with ‘real foods’, try to stay away from the processed<br />

packaged foods and work both the anaerobic and aerobic energy systems as<br />

we use both in surfing. So for example, going for a distance run is good but<br />

you also have to do explosive work, such as sprints.<br />

WHAT’S SCARIER: TEAHUPOO OR A TRIPLE-DIAMOND BLACK<br />

SNOWBOARD RUN?<br />

Haven’t done either. I think a triple is considered suicidal? And Teahupoo,<br />

well, just watching those guys deep scares me.<br />

Thank you miss Koops. And never mind: just writing the question<br />

scared us. Next time you’re surfing the Goldie and a girl on a Diverse<br />

board rockets by? Make sure to say g’day to Angie.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

13


LATEST: FEEDBACK<br />

THE CAN<br />

IS NOW OPEN...<br />

JOIN IN THE CONVERSATION:<br />

Email all your innermost thoughts, letters, stories, photos,<br />

praise, rants to letters@smorgasboarder.com.au or send<br />

other contribution ideas, surf photography or fantastic ideas for<br />

stories to editor@smorgasboarder.com.au.<br />

Yes, it’s getting fiery... The Making Waves For<br />

Recognition Of Shaper’s Skills article in the first edition<br />

of smorgasboarder certainly hit a nerve and has people<br />

talking. Thanks for the feedback. Keep it coming!<br />

NOT HAPPY, JAN<br />

Now to start let’s get something straight set about me. I am all for shapers<br />

and do believe it’s a dying art that needs saving.<br />

Yes, board prices have only risen 20 dollars in the past 15 years. But today’s<br />

manufacturing processes have increased profit margins and boards are being<br />

made with less material not to mention being extremely fragile. Boards were<br />

made with thicker foam, more glass and had a gloss coat. Now days the<br />

standard is a thin 4 x 4 x 4 sanded, and that’s it.<br />

I believe shapers are killing their own industry, with little or no innovation in<br />

the construction process.<br />

The other problem that’s fuelling this whole debacle is pro surfers who get<br />

boards either for free on contract, or at a significantly reduced cost. These pros<br />

go through more boards per year than most mugs would go through in a lifetime.<br />

If more pros followed innovation, instead of following what the other sheep are<br />

doing we might see some MORE innovation and a total revision of the industry.<br />

I’m personally sick of being taken advantage of by shapers and pro surfers<br />

inability to innovate or try something new.<br />

James<br />

Palm Beach<br />

Not a happy customer there, James? There are plenty of shapers out there<br />

making high quality boards. We know they’re out there.<br />

And as to innovation, we’ve discovered some truly creative shapers<br />

on our travels up and down the east coast over the last year in<br />

particular - just check out the Gear section. As with any quest for<br />

quality and innovation, you just have to look that little bit harder to<br />

find the right person.<br />

WE WANT<br />

YOUR LETTERS<br />

This edition’s giveaways include copies<br />

of the excellent Isaac Paddon and the<br />

Tides CD “Where we once stood” and sets<br />

of Elofant Straps, which will keep your<br />

boards stored safely - see page 22 for<br />

more info on the straps.<br />

Send in your letters and thoughts to<br />

be in line for the freebies! Email us on<br />

letters@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

TEACH ME, TEACH ME<br />

I’ve been trying to get a foothold into the shaping industry for ages but no<br />

one seems to be willing to help me gain the necessary skills of board making.<br />

Many shapers don’t have the funds to take on an apprentice, due to the lack of<br />

profit made on surfboards. It would be great if the government stepped in and<br />

gave support to established shapers to pass on their skills and knowledge.<br />

If you know anyone in Vicco that can teach me please let me know.<br />

Luko<br />

Recently I wanted to understand more about surfboard design and<br />

construction. I bought a heap of reading material and got some John Carper<br />

shaping and glassing DVD’s. After doing my homework I wanted to jump in<br />

with both feet and have a go at making my one. I looked for where I could<br />

have a lesson and found the only place that would give me one was in<br />

Newcastle at a University. I then found out they had stopped running the<br />

course last year. I continued to look but found nothing, wondering how other<br />

people like me learned.<br />

Based on Chris Garrett’s comments, and the fact that I have found it hard to<br />

find a place to shape and learn this very underrated skill I totally understand<br />

and support his quest to formally recognise and provide a career path for<br />

people who want to work in the surfboard manufacturing industry in Australia.<br />

I would think a good way to raise awareness of this part of the surf industry<br />

and gain further funds would be to also run courses for amateur builders like<br />

myself. I have been really amazed at how many people have been interested<br />

in what I am doing when I tell them.<br />

I have a lot to thank the surfing world for not least the constant rush I get out<br />

in the water every time I catch a wave. I look forward to the next edition of<br />

smorgasboarder and If anyone knows of courses for surfboard shaping or is<br />

willing to give me a lesson then let me know as you would easily part me from<br />

some of my hard earned cash and would bet others would follow.<br />

Ed<br />

Newcastle<br />

Gents, we feel your pain. Finding an official course is difficult as we<br />

found out many phonecalls later, but there ARE people out there. Up on<br />

the Gold Coast, Richard Harvey runs a short course, a few of the wood<br />

board guys run courses... But talk to your local shapers. If they brush<br />

you - and they shouldn’t - just remind them that they had to learn too.<br />

SATISFIED AND SMILING<br />

Hi guys,<br />

Thought I should give you some feedback about <strong>Smorgasboarder</strong>. I loved the<br />

issue, particularly the wooden board segments, and hope you continue to<br />

have a “maker focus “ in upcoming issues. Great stuff. I grabbed my copy from<br />

Byron Longboards, couldn’t believe such a quality piece was free.<br />

Russell<br />

Mudgeeraba<br />

No, no... thank you, Russ! Plenty more shapers on the way for you!<br />

14 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


Join us on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/<br />

<strong>Smorgasboarder</strong>-Surf-Magazine/133229320054947 (or easier, just<br />

search for smorgasboarder) We promise not to poke you.<br />

photo: Shane Newman<br />

LETTER OF THE MONTH<br />

YOU’RE NEVER TOO OLD<br />

I have just returned home from an extended eight-month business trip to<br />

Victoria, surfing mainly around the Surf Coast area. The locals back home are<br />

sick of me telling them about how good it was (although very cold) and how<br />

average my home break now feels. That aside, some things were the same.<br />

Just like home, I was taken back by how accepting the locals were as long<br />

as you showed some respect, and how everyone had the time to chat about<br />

where I had come from, why I was there, board design and the like.<br />

I had taken with me my two 6’5”s Jye Byrnes Quad and Bonzer, and the<br />

pleasing thing to note was the amount of older surfers like me that had not<br />

opted for the easy way out and jumped onto a mal as soon as they hit 40. Most<br />

were still surfing short (-ish) boards that had been adapted accordingly - maybe<br />

a little bit longer or thicker, but still performance boards. And they were still<br />

surfing well.<br />

Now don’t get me wrong. I am not anti-mal; I say “ride em’ all”. Watching a<br />

highly-skilled longboarder surfing a well-trimmed log is a thing of beauty, but<br />

“straight-legging” it to the beach is just awful to watch, no matter how long<br />

the ride or how big the wave.<br />

The point is, as you get older, don’t get sucked into the everyday “you’re old<br />

so you should surf a mal because its cool” guff that we are fed from the some<br />

areas of the surf industry. If you surfed a 6’7” x 19” x 3” single-fin, twinny, or<br />

whatever, when you were 18, why not keep it up?<br />

If your shaper is worth his salt he should be able to craft something that will<br />

suit your needs and circumstances. Go do some laps in the pool. Don’t go the<br />

easy, and ultimately, dull option because someone tells you so. With surfing,<br />

quality is always better than quantity.<br />

Grant<br />

Nelson Bay<br />

Hear, hear... It’s about ‘ride whatever you want’ and whatever makes<br />

sense for the day and the conditions. But we reckon you’re just being<br />

nice to those tough Surf Coast boys so you don’t get your windows<br />

waxed again... Watch your mailbox Grant - a prize pack is on its way.<br />

NASTY LITTLE ENTRY<br />

Ali Stewart sent us this pic of a<br />

dodgy way in, all the way from Cape Town in South Africa.


LATEST: FEEDBACK<br />

INBOX OVERLOAD<br />

When we put the word out for photo submissions last edition<br />

we didn’t expect the volume of responses or such great quality<br />

images to arrive!<br />

That’s right - we got some great images from all across our<br />

coastline, so rather than just show off one good one, we<br />

figured we may as well show you a few more.<br />

We love ‘em, keep ‘em coming! Next edition again, the best<br />

reader submitted photograph will win a great prize pack as a<br />

thank you for sharing. The January edition prize is sponsored<br />

by the kind folks at On A Mission, who are putting up a<br />

special package including a board bag, deck grip and leggie!<br />

Yamba is most definitely a photographic favourite of<br />

ours with some incredible images arriving regularly,<br />

contributed by talented folk like Trevor Skinner (above)<br />

and Simon Allard (below). See more of Trevor’s stuff in<br />

the People of the lens section starting on page 36<br />

So get snapping and email your attempts at glory to us:<br />

letters@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

Below: Jason Mercer got us this cracker<br />

from somewhere in the Illawarra. Don’t<br />

you just wish you were there?<br />

Victoria’s Jeff Tull (above)<br />

is quickly becoming a firm<br />

office favourite. Jeff has<br />

followed up on his great<br />

shots in our Phillip Island<br />

feature in September with<br />

some even more exciting<br />

ones from the Victorian<br />

coast. See more of Jeff’s<br />

photos in the People of the<br />

lens section starting on<br />

page 36, and also page 6!<br />

16 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


...AND THE WINNING SHOT<br />

We really couldn’t go past this ‘perfect day’ pic sent to us by Terry ‘Spud’ Murphy. Could<br />

you? To explain this Gold Coast beauty, he says: “Ask Where’s Wally... that gives it<br />

perspective.” Check your mailbox, Terry. There’s some prizes on the way!<br />

15-year-old Lachlan<br />

McMackin sent us<br />

these photos he had<br />

taken “with a cheap,<br />

waterproof camera”<br />

on the Sunshine Coast.<br />

Imagine what he could<br />

do with expensive<br />

gear! Above, Lachy’s<br />

mate, Ryan Forman is<br />

practicing for his future<br />

surf mag cover shot.<br />

How’s this shot? Sanctuary Cove Security Officer Steve Lazzaro<br />

out of the office and in the Green Room at Burleigh.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

17


LATEST: NEWS<br />

A reserved spot... Manly morning<br />

Photo: saltmotion<br />

BUILDING UP OUR RESERVES<br />

The new Manly-Freshwater National Surfing Reserve became the 11th official<br />

surfing reserve to be declared in Australia on September 25, <strong>2010</strong>. Manly-<br />

Freshwater joins ten other iconic surf spots including Killalea State Park,<br />

Maroubra, Lennox and Crescent Head. The four kilometre area stretches from<br />

Harbord Point to Fairy Bower including Freshwater Beach, Queenscliff, North<br />

Steyne, Manly Beaches and Shelly Beach to Fairy Bower Point.<br />

Commonly known as the birthplace of Australian surfing, the area’s rich surfing<br />

history truly justifies the declaration. As the site of Australia’s first legal daylight<br />

bathing in 19<strong>02</strong>, Manly hosted the first known body surfing contest in 1908 and<br />

hosted the first World Surfboard-riding Championship in 1964 won by ‘Midget’<br />

Farrelly and Phyllis O’Donnell. And most famous in surf folklore perhaps is the<br />

Freshwater Beach board surfing demonstration by Duke Kahanamoku in the<br />

summer of 1914-1915.<br />

All said, a reserve well deserved.<br />

DRAGONS FANCY FINE FISH<br />

Balsa board guru Mark Riley had some rugby league royalty drop in<br />

at his showroom in Miranda. First try scorer of this year’s NRL Grand<br />

Final, Mark Gasnier of the victorious St George Illawarra Dragons,<br />

came in checking out the range - with the fish taking his fancy.<br />

Mark’s here with Scott Campbell - the strength and conditioning<br />

coach for the Dragons. For more Riley, check out the first edition of<br />

smorgasboarder online, or see www.balsasurfboardsriley.com.au<br />

18 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


SURF AID FOR<br />

TSUNAMI RELIEF<br />

Firstly, we’d like to give a big thumbs<br />

up to Surf Aid International for their<br />

wonderful efforts in assisting the local<br />

villages affected by the recent Mentawai<br />

tsunami. It is amazing what lengths<br />

people will go to in assisting others.<br />

Secondly, on behalf of Surf Aid<br />

International we would like to request<br />

your support to help the decimated<br />

villages of South Pagai where over 300<br />

lives have been lost. To make a donation<br />

go to www.surfaidinternational.org<br />

It’s great to see local businesses like<br />

World Surfaris and Kirra Surf actively<br />

getting behind the relief effort to raise<br />

funds at a recent film night this October.<br />

INDUSTRY GROUP<br />

GETS UNDER WAY<br />

The Australian Surf Craft Industry<br />

Association (ASCIA) - the proposed<br />

national industry voice for manufacturers,<br />

suppliers, wholesalers and retailers<br />

of surf craft - will hold a meeting on<br />

Tuesday, November 9 from 6.30 - 8.30pm<br />

upstairs at the Cooly Hotel, Coolangatta.<br />

The intention of the meeting is to develop<br />

a set of objectives for the association and<br />

what parties it will represent, along with<br />

electing a steering committee to drive<br />

the charter.<br />

To register your intention to attend RSVP<br />

by email to info@darcysurfboards.com<br />

Stuart D’Arcy shares a laugh with Chris<br />

Garrett at a recent Shaper’s Forum<br />

QUICKIES<br />

STAR SHEPHERD<br />

Not even Darth<br />

Vader would be<br />

messing with any<br />

whales if he got a look at the<br />

latest Sea Shepherd vessel, the<br />

Ocean Adventurer. The 12-yearold,<br />

115-foot, stabilised monohull<br />

fills the role of fast interceptor<br />

for the Antarctic Whale Defense<br />

Campaign, replacing the Ady Gil<br />

which was rammed and destroyed<br />

in January.<br />

Not only does it look cool, it saves<br />

whales... 528 whales in fact, are<br />

alive and swimming thanks to Sea<br />

Shepherd’s work in this year alone.<br />

Find out more, support the cause<br />

and get involved. See the website:<br />

www.seashepherd.org<br />

CARA-BEEN AND GONE<br />

Mick Carabine has sold his business<br />

and is retiring to Shoalhaven Heads.<br />

Well done Mick and all the best<br />

for the future. A great result for a<br />

champion bloke.<br />

BINGIN IN BALI<br />

Speaking of businesses for<br />

sale, Warwick Martin of Dukes<br />

Longboards fame on the Gold Coast<br />

is selling up and heading for his<br />

Bingin Villa in Bali for good. If you<br />

love surfing and surfboards, why not<br />

buy a whole shop! You couldn’t go<br />

past a shop like Dukes. Established<br />

fourteen years, the lease for the<br />

store also comes with a couple of<br />

two bedroom units, a garage and a<br />

few car parks out the back.<br />

FANCY A BISCUIT?<br />

How about a wooden one?<br />

Rumour has it Cape Boatworks in<br />

Fairy Meadow, near Wollongong,<br />

will soon have the new Grain<br />

Homegrown Surfboard Kit for the<br />

Channel Islands Wood Biscuit. Grain<br />

have partnered with Al Merrick who<br />

originally developed the board with<br />

Rob Machado. The board looks set<br />

to be available in a 5’6”, 5’8” and<br />

6’2” Biscuit.<br />

HUEY YOU GONNA CALL?<br />

www.askhuey.com.au has<br />

changed the format of their online<br />

weather and swell forecasting<br />

website. Now you can find out<br />

what’s happening around 2 million<br />

locations globally. There are 7-day<br />

swell and wind forecasts and soon<br />

to be introduced global wind and<br />

swell maps.<br />

The new<br />

Symba<br />

presents: the summer solution...<br />

Carver<br />

Surf rack<br />

+ +<br />

www.scooterstyle.com.au<br />

175 Eumundi Road, Noosaville Qld 4566 Phone: 07 5455 5249<br />

Board<br />

= FUN<br />

10% off<br />

Carver Surf Racks<br />

with this ad<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

19


LATEST: & GREATEST<br />

NOW HERE’S<br />

A REVELATION<br />

Word has it Takuya (Tappy) Yoshikawa of<br />

Revelation Surfboards in Japan, is making<br />

his way to Australia in early December<br />

to shape boards for two weeks alongside<br />

Southcoast Surfboards’ Ian Chisholm. Want<br />

to get your hands on one of these limited<br />

edition customs? To find out more, see<br />

www.southcoastlongboards.com.au<br />

Speaking of Southcoast, Ian is set to<br />

have Tyler Hatzikian’s new creation - The<br />

Magneato - in store soon. Tyler’s made<br />

some radical, radical advances in singlefin<br />

design. For more on Tyler Surfboards, see<br />

www.tylersurfboards.com<br />

Finally (he sure has been busy) Ian is now<br />

the agent for Axxe Wetsuits (shown left)<br />

from Japan. The latest suits are designed<br />

for the Spring/ Summer season for our<br />

brothers and sisters down south that don’t<br />

always get to enjoy donning boardies for<br />

the warmer months. For those unfamiliar<br />

with the brand, Axxe custom makes high<br />

performance wetsuits that are handmade<br />

specifically for your body. Choose your<br />

style, colours and materials... The quality<br />

has to be seen to be understood.<br />

A STEP BLACK IN TIME<br />

Jesse Watson of Black Apache Surfboards is set to launch<br />

his own range of extremely cool retro-influenced wetsuits - the<br />

perfect match to his boards. These custom suits - which would<br />

be just as at home on the pages of a 1970’s edition of Surfer<br />

Magazine - are made from a mix of neoprene and Japanese<br />

rubber, said to be super soft, stretchy, comfortable and of course,<br />

warm. With plenty of time to go before winter, start saving your<br />

pennies. See www.blackapachesurfboards.com.au<br />

MUST-LISTENS<br />

MUSIC THAT KEPT US SANE ON THE ROAD AND IN THE OFFICE<br />

LAST MINUTE BUDGET CUTBACKS<br />

Got a travel itch? www.gosea.com.au is a new surf travel website that is basically the wotif.com of water<br />

sports. Travel operators from the surf, dive and sailing field list their vacancies at the best rates available. If you<br />

are flexible enough to book your surf trip within 60 days of departure, you could save yourself some big bucks.<br />

There’s nothing better than getting a good deal at the last minute.<br />

JOHN BUTLER TRIO<br />

APRIL UPRISING<br />

JARRAH RECORDS<br />

A much rockier release than the<br />

Trio’s previous rootsy offerings.<br />

Take that, naysayers. Infectious<br />

tunes and truly meaningful lyrics<br />

when you can understand him.<br />

www.johnbutlertrio.com<br />

ALO<br />

MAN OF THE WORLD<br />

BRUSHFIRE RECORDS<br />

Start with a truly incredible group<br />

of musos with ridiculously catchy<br />

songs and tons of talent, add<br />

in Jack Johnson magic and you<br />

have the perfect soundtrack to<br />

everything. www.alomusic.com<br />

THE LONELY ISLAND<br />

INCREDIBAD<br />

UNIVERSAL REPUBLIC RECORDS<br />

Childish, crude and stupid, this is<br />

true medicine for staying awake<br />

two days straight. Jack Black’s<br />

Saxman will be a classic that has<br />

us in tears for the next ten years.<br />

www.thelonelyisland.com<br />

20 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


*<br />

MUST-READS<br />

GREAT PUBLICATIONS WE ENJOY<br />

GET A GRIP<br />

We do like the sound of a local company<br />

making some cool new custom and very special<br />

signature deck grips for some top companies. Around<br />

since the early ‘90’s, Crosslink Traction in Byron Bay<br />

are funking up your footrest with these homegrown<br />

tail pads using a unique process that lets them embed<br />

full colour logos and designs. But it’s not just for your<br />

shortboard... They also do grips for SUPs, kneeboards,<br />

mals, retros and more. Fancy your own personal<br />

touch? They can do you a custom. For more,<br />

see www.deckgrips.com<br />

*Score yourself a super-cool<br />

smorgasboarder deck grip from Crosslink<br />

Traction. See page 120 for more.<br />

KURUNGABAA<br />

Available for $15 at kurungabaa.net<br />

Most definitely not what you would<br />

expect from a surf-related publication,<br />

Kurungabaa is a not-for-profit volunteer<br />

publication, published bi-annually by a<br />

collective group of dedicated writers<br />

and artists. The journal is a collection of<br />

poetry, fiction and other ocean-inspired<br />

writing printed with a colour, card cover<br />

and mostly black and white internal<br />

pages. It’s a huge read, not to be<br />

attempted in one sitting. This is no surf<br />

mag, but rather a deep and reflective<br />

document that you’ll be able to read on<br />

and off for years to come. At $30 per<br />

year for something thought-provoking<br />

it’s definitely worth supporting.<br />

For more information and to subscribe<br />

visit www.kurungabaa.net<br />

INFLATABLE FUN BAGS FOR SURFERS<br />

Are you like us, wondering what the hell PaddleAir actually is? Well,<br />

technically speaking, PaddleAir is an adjustable inflation chamber that is<br />

integrated into a rashie.<br />

Why do that? If paddling your board hurts like hell, particularly on your<br />

sternum, PaddleAir elevates you off the board. It can also relieve paddle pain<br />

and assist you with stronger strokes. It even sounds like fun. The new model<br />

is out now and has a more concealed system than the original. Interested?<br />

Contact Sput Keevers at www.byronbaylongboards.com.au for more info.<br />

FOAM MAGAZINE<br />

Available for $3 in Vic surf shops<br />

WAXING LYRICAL<br />

We recently tried Stomp Surf Wax and we’re sold.<br />

Wanting to know more, we were very interested to find out<br />

the guy behind Stomp has a long history in the wax industry.<br />

He knows his wax... www.burleighwaxco.com.au<br />

If you prefer the all-natural experience, there’s an alternative<br />

for you in Treehugger Wax. Made from beeswax and natural<br />

resins, it’s an eco-friendly way to stick to your board.<br />

More at www.surfinggreen.com.au<br />

In 2009 and at only 17, James Jacobi<br />

left school to launch his own surf<br />

magazine, FOAM. The landscape format<br />

mag presents a different perspective<br />

on Victorian surfing and is produced<br />

in dramatic black and white, complete<br />

with moody photography by Ocean<br />

Grove snapper Ed Sloane and a talented<br />

handful of contributors. For more, see:<br />

www.foammag.com.au and to see more<br />

imagery by Ed - in colour even - visit his<br />

website at sloanephotos.blogspot.com<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

21


The mosT amazing<br />

range of Longboards,<br />

reTro and<br />

shorTboard brands on<br />

The easT CoasT<br />

LATEST: & GREATEST<br />

STORE FOR LESS<br />

BUDGET BOARD STORAGE SOLUTIONS<br />

Surfboard’s aren’t cheap, but thankfully, keeping your precious craft stored neatly out of harms way<br />

needn’t break the bank. There are plenty of fantastic storage solutions - racks, straps, shelves, grips,<br />

clips - enough options out there to suit most needs and budgets. We’ve looked at two entry-level<br />

storage ideas to keep your boards off the floor and leave a few dollars in your pocket.<br />

ELOFANT STRAPS<br />

This simple system of velcro straps holds two boards, is easy to install and use, and is yours from<br />

under $30. Not really a system you’d use as a display in your lounge for that 70’s singlefin you bought<br />

for far too much at that vintage surfboard auction after a few too many beers, but most definitely a<br />

simple setup for the garage for easy access and safe storage. It can hold surfboards, snowboards,<br />

wakeboards, kiteboards... Anything up to around 15kg. See www.elofant.com for more info.<br />

including<br />

mandala, mackie, Van straalen, Takayama, neal<br />

Purchase jnr, bing, Zed, formular energy, gato<br />

heroi, mctavish, firewire, Chilli, Js, al merrick, Lost,<br />

dahlberg, stacey, Insight, fibre flex, Webber, 7s,<br />

Clear, Xanadu, aloha...<br />

40 Bronte Rd, Bondi Junction<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 9389 5477<br />

www.surfculture.com.au<br />

www.sixounceboardstore.com.au<br />

SURF N’ RAK<br />

If you prefer the idea of a steel rack, Surf N’ Rak has a range of wall mounted racks that start at $29<br />

for a single rack, up to $180 for a 6-tier setup. A good in-betweener is the 3-tier version, the SR3,<br />

which goes for $95. With a load capacity of 15kg per support, it’s safe, easy to use and provides quick<br />

access to your boards. And for those of you with bigger toys to store, there’s a new range of SUP racks<br />

to check out as well. For more info, and the rest of the range, see www.surfnrak.com.au<br />

22<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


The more things<br />

change, the more<br />

they stay the same<br />

36 years on, surfers still surf<br />

and Southern Man Surf still<br />

stands strong as Ulladulla’s<br />

original and best surf shop.<br />

Stocking the best range of surf, skate<br />

and bodyboards as well as leading<br />

surf brands such as Vern Jackson<br />

Surfboards, Rip Curl, Billabong, Roxy,<br />

Rusty and Quiksilver, you can expect<br />

the same great service and advice the<br />

surf community has enjoyed since 1974.<br />

Sponsored rider<br />

Scott ‘Whippy’ Denis<br />

(photo: Simon Punch)<br />

For personal service and a great range of surfboards<br />

and accessories, skateboards, bodyboards, clothing<br />

and much more, visit Southern Man Surf in Ulladulla on<br />

your next surf trip to the South Coast of NSW.<br />

138 Princes Highway, Ulladulla, NSW 2539<br />

www.southernman.com.au


24 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


NEW SINGLE AND NEW SHOWS FOR THE GIRLS<br />

With a new single in hand entitled My Mind Is An Echo Chamber, Sydney’s The<br />

Beautiful Girls hit the road this December and January for shows along the coast.<br />

The tour kicks off on Friday, December 10 at the Mona Vale Hotel in Sydney and<br />

continues in the new year with shows in Wollongong, Bateau Bay, Yamba, Byron Bay,<br />

Coolangatta, Brisbane, Caloundra, Ferntree Gully, Melbourne, Frankston and Barwon<br />

Heads. See www.thebeautifulgirls.com for dates in your area.<br />

POSITIVE<br />

PROGRAM<br />

Keen to get involved?<br />

Visit www.desert2surf.org to<br />

learn more about partnership and<br />

volunteer opportunities, and how<br />

you can support this empowering<br />

and inspiring initiative.<br />

Desert2Surf is a not-for-profit organisation,<br />

established in 2008 to build the capacity<br />

of indigenous youth living in remote and<br />

disadvantaged communities through outdoor<br />

activities like surfing.<br />

Using the power of surfing as a catalyst<br />

to engage, inspire and empower young<br />

indigenous people, a group of dedicated and<br />

passionate people help youth aged 12-15 to<br />

participate in challenging and fun outdoor<br />

activities like tackling the waves - something<br />

many of these kids have never laid eyes on, let<br />

alone experienced.<br />

Desert2Surf trips facilitate development<br />

of leadership and personal skills, provide<br />

cultural exchange opportunities, and directly<br />

assist indigenous youth through advocacy and<br />

community representation.<br />

See our next edition for Desert2Surf tales<br />

of stand up paddleboarding with freshwater<br />

crocs, and how you can get your hands on a<br />

uniquely designed indigenous surfboard direct<br />

from the Northern Territory.<br />

SURF CELEBRATION TIME AT KIRRA<br />

November is most definitely surf festival month, with the first cab off<br />

the rank Kirra Surfstock Festival - a non-profit community project that<br />

celebrates surf culture while raising awareness of coastal management.<br />

Now in its second year, the family friendly event will feature a number of<br />

beach lifestyle events ranging from surfing to bikini parades, from beach<br />

soccer to music - which will include amongst others Band of Frequencies<br />

and one of our favourites, Isaac Paddon and the Tides.<br />

The festival runs from November 12 -14 and activities include two days of<br />

markets, an attempt on the Guinness World Record for the most number<br />

of surfers riding one wave, various surfing competition events and much<br />

more. Best of all, and close to our hearts, of course... it’s free! There is<br />

no charge for the community to enjoy the live music, markets and all the<br />

other activities the Kirra Surfstock Festival has to offer.<br />

For more information, visit www.kirrasurfstock.com.au<br />

A MANLY LOOK BACK AT BELLS<br />

Kirra heiroglyphics<br />

Photo: Michael Dawes<br />

LATEST: COMMUNITY<br />

On the subject of surf festivals, the Manly Festival of Surfing <strong>2010</strong> kicks off<br />

on November 18. With a promised four days of surf, surf, surf the festival<br />

organisers are squeezing in shortboards, longboards, stand up paddleboards,<br />

kombis, music, art, film, and fashion.<br />

As part of the festival, saltmotion gallery and Byron Bay surf identity Rusty Miller<br />

have teamed up to exhibit previously unseen photographs from the 1970 Bells<br />

World Championship and the migration of surfers to the Byron Bay region.<br />

This will be an exhibition worth visiting. For more, see www.saltmotion.com<br />

When: 18-21 November. Opening Night Thursday, November 18, 6-9pm<br />

Where: saltmotion, Market Place, Manly (opposite Manly Library)<br />

What: Turning point: Trimming Lifestyles<br />

Contact: <strong>02</strong> 9976 6518 or gallery@saltmotion.com<br />

Rebecca Dennis<br />

from Minyerri NT<br />

surfing with Sunny<br />

Oliver-Bennetts<br />

of Desert2Surf in<br />

background.<br />

Photo: Deb Oliver<br />

One of the photos on display: Wayne Parkes with a Morris 1100 and some racy<br />

S-decks at the 1970 World Surfing Contest, Bells Beach, Victoria<br />

If you have any news and events that should be in these pages, please feel<br />

free to drop us a line at editorial@smorgasboarder.com.au.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

25


LATEST: INTERVIEW<br />

THE<br />

KANTENDER<br />

NOOSA’S ISRAEL KANI... FROM THE BOARD TO THE BOXING RING<br />

An angry and explosive young local at Noosa’s points,<br />

Israel Kani’s early years saw his life heading down a<br />

destructive path of violence and partying, where getting<br />

into fistfights in the surf was just a normal part of any<br />

session. Fortunately, a small gem of advice from a fellow<br />

surfer helped him channel his aggression and turn his life<br />

around to excel as one of Australia’s top boxers.<br />

WORDS BY MARK CHAPMAN<br />

Photo: Supplied


“FIVE FOOT SHEET-GLASS SHORIES AT SUNSHINE, JUST CLEAN AND<br />

BARRELLING WITH ALL MY MATES OUT THERE. THE PAYOUTS ARE THICK AND<br />

FAST AND THE GIRLS ARE ON THE BEACH. THAT’S A PRETTY GOOD DAY.”<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

27


LATEST: INTERVIEW<br />

“A CLIP OVER<br />

THE EAR... A<br />

PUNCH ON THE<br />

CHIN AND IN YOU<br />

GO, SON.”<br />

Photo: Supplied<br />

When you first meet Israel Kani, it’s not<br />

what you would expect from a hard-nut<br />

boxing champ with numerous belts to<br />

his name which include an Australian<br />

National Title. With a wide grin and<br />

plenty stories to tell, he’s anything but<br />

unfriendly or intimidating. And despite<br />

his record of KOs and the fact that I<br />

would pity anyone that finds themselves<br />

on the receiving end of a swift smack<br />

to the chops from him, these days you<br />

would have to be in the ring to get a<br />

belting from him, as the years of meeting<br />

out vigilante justice in the surf and<br />

parking lots of Noosa have long since<br />

been left behind.<br />

Now a doting Dad of two – Tikana-<br />

Lea and Sienna – Israel was born on<br />

the Central Coast of NSW and first<br />

discovered a love for the ocean on a<br />

foam surfboard in the waves of Terrigal<br />

main beach at 8 years old.<br />

“My parents would go to church and<br />

afterwards I’d go down and ride my<br />

foamy. I had a cousin that kneeboarded<br />

at the time, but me and a few mates<br />

really got into surfing. It was good.”<br />

He practiced his skills around magic<br />

spots like Shelly Beach, Avoca and<br />

Wamberal, but a trip to Queensland in<br />

his teens introduced him to what would<br />

become his future home.<br />

“When we first came here on holiday,<br />

the points at Noosa were pumping. I<br />

came over the hill to First Point, saw it<br />

and thought ‘No way...’ and fell in love<br />

with the place straight away. A couple of<br />

months later, we were living here and I<br />

was surfing the points on a regular basis.”<br />

But the new breaks also came with<br />

crowds and plenty of excuses for conflict.<br />

“The points used to break all the time.<br />

We got good waves all the time. I‘d finish<br />

school and would surf Tea Tree till dark. We<br />

were the ratbags out there, the full locals,<br />

telling people to go in … bad attitude.<br />

“We’d be out surfing Sunshine. Guys<br />

would be dropping in or hassling the<br />

young guys. I’d be the first one out there<br />

to send them in. A clip over the ear… a<br />

punch on the chin and in you go, son. I<br />

was pretty renowned for it.”<br />

As a competent surfer and a solid<br />

competitor in his 20’s, Israel - who was<br />

part of the Noosa Boardriders Club<br />

- even picked up some professional<br />

sponsors along the way including Water<br />

Pistols, Fox, Shaping Company, Balin<br />

and Mrs Palmers. Some of his favourite<br />

surfboards, he recalls, were from those<br />

early days, including his first serious<br />

surfboard from Shaping Company.<br />

“SC… Rounded square [tail]. Loved it.<br />

Snapped it three times, but I loved it so<br />

much, I kept getting it fixed. And it still<br />

went good. I loved that board, man…<br />

“My next board was a Shaping Company<br />

rounded square, six channels, deep…<br />

And I loved it. It was that good for the<br />

points, because you could get a bit of air<br />

under the channels and the tail would<br />

slide. It had heaps of drive. Single to<br />

double concave in the end, but always<br />

rounded squares.”<br />

Unfortunately, despite good<br />

performances in competitions, he<br />

explains that the surfing environment at<br />

the time wasn’t the most conducive to<br />

positive living.<br />

“We’d be in tents smoking cones. But<br />

boxing really saved me. In surfing I didn’t<br />

have to try too hard to compete, but in<br />

boxing there’s no smoking cones and<br />

getting into the ring. You’ll get yourself<br />

killed.”<br />

28 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


ON FEAR...<br />

“Just big waves man. My hat’s<br />

off to them. I would fight anyone,<br />

and I mean anyone, before taking<br />

off deep at Pipe. It’s a different<br />

sort of courage. In boxing, you<br />

get knocked out, you’re out cold,<br />

you don’t feel a thing. Getting<br />

pummelled in 15-foot Pipe is a<br />

different ballgame. That’s ballsy I<br />

reckon. Big waves are a different<br />

sort of fear I guess. You’ve got<br />

to have fear in boxing because it<br />

makes you sharp. Keeps you on<br />

edge. Fear in surfing is different.<br />

If you have that fear and you<br />

stuff up on take-off in 15-foot<br />

Pipe, you get smashed, big-time.<br />

Teahupoo… Man, my hat’s off to<br />

those guys. I wouldn’t be surfing<br />

that joint. That’s mental to me…I<br />

don’t mind the bigger stuff but<br />

that’s out of control.”<br />

Finally the big change came<br />

where the very reason for getting<br />

himself in trouble was what would<br />

set his life on course, thanks to<br />

a few words of advice after a<br />

particularly nasty day in the water.<br />

“One day at Tea Tree, I’d punched<br />

four guys and caught three waves.<br />

An old dude’s told me ‘Man, why<br />

don’t you take up boxing. You’re in<br />

the wrong sport’. “<br />

And it all made sense. After<br />

getting in from the surf, Israel<br />

found a gym in Peregian Beach<br />

and started training under Victor<br />

Pinzuk, winning his first fight at 25<br />

– a late start for a boxer. Ignoring<br />

warnings that he was too old, he<br />

turned professional at 31.<br />

“Everyone’s going ‘You’re never<br />

going to make it as a pro’ and then<br />

I ended up winning the Australian<br />

Super Middleweight title.“<br />

This achievement sits alongside a<br />

Pan-Pacific belt, two Queensland<br />

Professional titles and a host of<br />

others, but Israel is most proud of<br />

the Australian title - the pinnacle<br />

of Australian boxing.<br />

One belt that unfortunately did<br />

elude him was that of the reality<br />

television series, The Contender<br />

Australia, where he was up<br />

against 14 top Australian boxers,<br />

competing for $250,000 prize<br />

money and the opportunity to<br />

hop in the ring with The Man -<br />

Anthony Mundine. He exited the<br />

competition on a split decision<br />

that went in favour of former<br />

Australian Light Middle and<br />

Middleweight Champion Josh<br />

Clenshaw, and then ended up<br />

being unlucky once again in a<br />

wildcard return bout, bowing out<br />

to the series winner Garth Wood.<br />

“After 55 fights that was the first<br />

time I’ve ever been knocked out<br />

or stopped in a fight. But I was still<br />

pretty lucky to get to where I was<br />

anyway.”<br />

Since the series, Israel – who still<br />

maintains a surf connection in<br />

sponsors, being supported by My<br />

Brother’s Keeper - has very much<br />

turned his attention to training<br />

young up-and-coming boxers in<br />

his gym – the Noosa Box Office<br />

– located in Noosaville. And with<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

29


LATEST: INTERVIEW<br />

his focus on his new career and business,<br />

surfing competitively has been off the<br />

cards for a long time now.<br />

“For me it’s all or nothing. I know what it<br />

takes to surf well. I used to be in the water<br />

four times a day, if I got out at all… And<br />

that’s what you have to do to become good.<br />

I have to do it all the way. I couldn’t halfbox<br />

and half-surf.”<br />

“I’D PUNCHED FOUR<br />

GUYS AND CAUGHT<br />

THREE WAVES. AN<br />

OLD DUDE’S TOLD ME<br />

‘MAN, WHY DON’T<br />

YOU TAKE UP BOXING.<br />

YOU’RE IN THE<br />

WRONG SPORT”<br />

So these days, with his fighting being<br />

positively focused into a career, it’s all<br />

about relaxation when it comes to picking<br />

up the surfboard.<br />

“It’s not even so much catching a wave. It’s<br />

just being out in the water on a good sunny<br />

day. Clean water clears you head. It’s a<br />

good de-stresser…<br />

“It’s a different lifestyle and it’s awesome.<br />

I love being surfed out and I love being<br />

trained out – so sore in the shoulders and<br />

arms that you can’t move. I love going to<br />

the beach all day, you get home and you’re<br />

decked, sun-decked… it’s a good feeling.”<br />

But despite being a Noosa local, Israel<br />

tends to avoid his old stomping grounds<br />

when possible. He says it’s not worth<br />

getting injured and putting your life and<br />

career on the line, and even on the busy<br />

days, when things can get heated, he<br />

prefers to take the high road.<br />

“I love Tea Tree when it’s on but the<br />

crowds are just ridiculous. I try to avoid<br />

surfing the points now.<br />

“I had one guy coming out, dropping in on<br />

everyone and I sorta gave him an earful.<br />

He offered to put me on the beach, but one<br />

of my mates said ‘no man, don’t, don’t…<br />

‘ so he just paddled off. If you’re reading,<br />

mate, you’re lucky... You’re lucky, son”<br />

(laughs) But no, I couldn’t be bothered. I’m<br />

just having too much fun.”<br />

“I’ve got a tip for most of the old guys out<br />

there but… Look after the young guys,<br />

because the old guys are just getting older<br />

and weaker and the young guys are getting<br />

older and stronger, so you gotta watch out<br />

for them. You’re better off making friends<br />

with them now, so you get a few more<br />

waves as you get older. Hassle ‘em now<br />

and you’re not going to get any waves off<br />

‘em, and you’ll probably get a hiding in the<br />

carpark.”<br />

It’s very easy to see why he’d rather brush<br />

the conflict, with so many positive aspects<br />

to focus on at the moment, including a<br />

return to the ring.<br />

“I got a few good fights left in me. I’d like to<br />

get a couple of different belts… a couple<br />

more belts for the mantle and then get my<br />

boys and girls winning belts.”<br />

“I like training people, bringing the best<br />

out in people. I get more nervous for them<br />

fighting than when I fight.”<br />

With the Noosa Box Office Gym going<br />

from strength to strength, a loving family<br />

at home and the ocean just around the<br />

corner, the future looks like a happy place.<br />

So, will he end up one of the silver surfers<br />

hassling in the surf?<br />

“Nah, you won’t catch me doing that. I’ll be<br />

out somewhere, where there’s no-one else<br />

out or a couple of mates down the beach.<br />

There’s plenty of beach out there…”<br />

ON FAMILY<br />

“Sienna was two weeks old when I<br />

was fighting for the Australian title.<br />

My fiancée, Kristy, her uncle and dad<br />

were taking turns, round by round,<br />

to watch her in the car while I was<br />

fighting, so she was pretty much<br />

there. And then I got a knockout in<br />

the fifth round, and out with the belt,<br />

wrapped around my little bub… So<br />

yeah, family is everything.”<br />

L-R: Israel with daughters Tikana-Lea,<br />

Sienna and fiancée Kristy<br />

Photo: Supplied


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nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

31


LATEST: IMAGES<br />

20th of March <strong>2010</strong>:<br />

Category 3 Tropical Cyclone<br />

Ului is bearing down on<br />

North Queensland. To add<br />

to the intensity of it, the<br />

cyclone is also cradled by a<br />

large high-pressure system<br />

moving over New Zealand<br />

and directing huge gale force<br />

swell towards the Southern<br />

Queensland Coast.<br />

“As I had anxiously been watching these developments over the past<br />

week and deliberating where to go, I decide to pack up the cameras,<br />

throw a mattress and board into the back of the car and head north to<br />

Noosa. I arrive early afternoon to light rain and a few large waves but<br />

nothing epic just yet.<br />

“After spending that night at the caravan park, I roll out of bed at 4<br />

am to get a decent car park in Noosa for the day ahead. The car park<br />

is already busy but I am lucky enough to snag a spot and I prepare<br />

my camera gear ready to shoot the sunrise. After squinting into the<br />

darkness, trying to get some idea of what is happening through the<br />

very overcast skies, light starts to win the battle over the darkness.<br />

“Large unruly waves start to appear roaring into the Noosa headland<br />

and soon enough the rain starts again. I soon came to my realisation<br />

that the epic eight foot sunny blue-sky scenario I had in my head<br />

was not going to happen. As I walk up and down the headland, like<br />

a surf junky desperately looking for something to shoot to salvage<br />

the situation, I realise that I am still in love with the ocean and the<br />

lifestyle that it brings, from those rare precious moments I live to<br />

capture, to the unexpected, and through to all the pure beauty it<br />

brings in between.<br />

32 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


THE WEATHER WATCHER<br />

“I have based my photography around<br />

these utopian ideas I have in my head.<br />

“My passion involves watching the<br />

weather maps and forecasts, searching for<br />

those areas where Mother Nature whips<br />

up a frenzy creating large ocean swell that<br />

then travel thousands of kilometers.<br />

“I then try to meet these swells where<br />

they hit land (hopefully with sunny skies<br />

and offshore winds) and capture my idea<br />

of a coastal landscape photograph. I also<br />

enjoy capturing images of surfers, who<br />

too, have been waiting for these swells to<br />

meet them, dancing with them to the end.<br />

More often then not it doesn’t work out as<br />

I had planned, but I have found that it only<br />

reinforces my love for photography, as it is<br />

these searches that open my eyes to the<br />

beauty of the very existence around us.<br />

“I have traveled all the way to Western<br />

Australia to come home with my best image<br />

being that of a surfboard fin. I have been<br />

down at The Wreck at Byron Bay waiting<br />

for the tide and to see if the same cyclone<br />

swells produce the goods here, only to leave<br />

with one of my most treasured images of<br />

a lone girl riding her bike along the beach.<br />

My Noosa trip is only another example of<br />

this - a sunset image of The Golden Girl, and<br />

an action shot of surfers jumping into the<br />

Boiling Pot were captured on my trip.<br />

“The ocean and the surf has become more<br />

than just a lifestyle - it is life. I have always<br />

loved to share my interests with others and<br />

I think photography for me has been the<br />

best way to achieve this. The underlying<br />

surf culture in Australia along with all<br />

the scenery, we as surfers are blessed to<br />

witness, has given me enough inspiration to<br />

keep on shooting for several lifetimes.<br />

“I have been very fortunate to be able to<br />

capture images exclusively for my own<br />

galleries and have tried to create my own<br />

path by printing the images onto canvas<br />

and displaying them as photographic art.<br />

I now love nothing more than to hit the<br />

road with my young family, camping and<br />

photographing up and down the east coast<br />

of Australia.”<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

33


LATEST: IMAGES<br />

“Sasha Stocker at Burleigh Heads. This shot was a<br />

sequence that went on Coastalwatch and I had about<br />

five people claim it was them”<br />

“This was taken on one of my trips chasing the<br />

cyclone swells. The swell backed off a bit and the<br />

rain cleared for sunset and I was very happy with the<br />

golden girl image”<br />

“Taken at Byron Bay. I just got on one of the<br />

backpacker boats out to Julian Rocks and snorkelled<br />

around to get this image of a green turtle.”<br />

34 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


“Taken at Byron when I was heading down<br />

chasing a cyclone swell. The swell was<br />

a lot smaller than I had hoped and the<br />

tide was all wrong so I just went for a<br />

walk on the beach with my camera and<br />

I was stoked with the shot I got - a total<br />

random image that is timeless”<br />

Sean Scott is a passionate and talented<br />

photographer living on the Gold Coast. He has<br />

two galleries - in Burleigh Heads and Coolangatta<br />

- that display and sell his prints and he supplies<br />

his images to other quality surf art retailers<br />

further afield, such as the Water Surf Art Cafe in<br />

Coffs Harbour and the Sound Lounge in Yamba.<br />

“These are some of my favourite types of shots.<br />

I love to get into the water as it is almost as much<br />

fun as surfing. The reflections in the water are<br />

incredible to shoot”<br />

Easy-going and personable, Sean’s love for life<br />

is evident in the beautiful work he produces.<br />

Meeting him in person is as much of a pleasure<br />

as is looking through his huge collection of waterinspired<br />

photography.<br />

His eye for a well-formed wave and a beautiful<br />

surf scene, as well as his dedication to spending<br />

time in the water - even putting himself in harm’s<br />

way - just to capture that magic moment in time<br />

has firmly established him as a favourite amongst<br />

lovers of surf art and water photography.<br />

For more information and to see more of his<br />

work, visit www.seanscottphotography.com and<br />

if you’re on the Gold Coast, check out the work<br />

in person.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

35


LATEST: IMAGES<br />

“Don’t need to know where I’m going...<br />

Just need to know where I’ve been.”<br />

Photographer Jeff Tull captures a bit<br />

of Victorian spray art.<br />

Assorted waves, chilled<br />

rides and great big boards<br />

seen around Yamba, NSW.<br />

Photos by Trevor Skinner<br />

36 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


It’s fun to stay at the Y-A-M-B-A... Phil Blanch of Yamba goes disco on his morning walk. Photo by Trevor Skinner<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

37


LATEST: IMAGES<br />

“Hey! You’re the guy that took my wallet...”<br />

Coffs Harbour waterboy Johnny Craig about to<br />

speed past Tom Woods of ST IMAGES<br />

www.stimages.com.au<br />

38 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


PEOPLE<br />

OF THE<br />

LENS<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

39


LATEST: IMAGES<br />

Standing around in the sun on Sydney’s Northern beaches. Above: Jules/Oceaneye www.oceaneye.com.au<br />

Below: Joel/Saltmotion www.saltmotion.com<br />

40 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

41


NEVER OUT OF BUSINESS FOR A DAY: Not even<br />

the complete destruction of the Goodtime store<br />

fire could break the Gailforce. Photo: Supplied<br />

LATEST: PEOPLE<br />

42 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


IN IT FOR A GOOD TIME<br />

Some think she’s Wonder Woman and others think she’s an old battleaxe. Either way, Gail Austen is one woman<br />

who leaves an indelible mark on you. We talk with the enigma and surf business icon that is ‘Gailforce’.<br />

WORDS BY DAVE SWAN<br />

She has been awarded the Order of Australia for her<br />

services to youth, won the 1997 Telstra Australian<br />

Business Woman of the Year, been inducted into the<br />

Australian Businesswomen’s Network Hall of Fame,<br />

come close to winning a State surf title in her youth<br />

and even been crowned world marathon kayaking<br />

champion at the Masters Games. But it is possibly<br />

her role as the leading lady of Goodtime Surf, Skate,<br />

Sail and Kite megastore in Brisbane that has truly<br />

brought her to the attention of the surf community.<br />

BUT FIRST, LET’S CLEAR THE AIR.<br />

Is she as hard as people assume? I must confess, my<br />

initial perception was that she was. You see, in my<br />

teens, I had on several occasions tried to sell Gail a<br />

crappy secondhand surfboard for above market value.<br />

In true Gail style she promptly let me know I was<br />

dreaming, hence my earlier, yet unfair assessment.<br />

Truth be told, Gail is not mean-spirited in the least.<br />

She is determined beyond belief and has achieved so<br />

much despite adversity. She’s tough, determined and<br />

won’t put up with any bullshit. If that means she’s<br />

hard, then yes - she’s tough as nails. You don’t run a<br />

surf shop for close to forty years through all the trials<br />

and tribulations of the industry and survive if you’re<br />

a fool. And one thing is for certain, Gail Austen is<br />

nobody’s fool.<br />

THE START OF GOOD TIMES<br />

Having worked for Jackson Surfboards in Caringbah,<br />

near Cronulla, Brian Austen moved to Queensland<br />

to shape surfboards for Ray Woosley and later, Joe<br />

Larkin. Following stints with these famous shapers,<br />

Brian started his own surfboard factory in July<br />

1971 at 28 Bolton Street, Kirra, called Goodtime.<br />

His explanation for the business name was simple:<br />

“Goodtime, that’s what surfing is all about.”<br />

During this time Gail was working in the fashion<br />

industry in London and planning to travel to America<br />

to work in film production. But a trip home for<br />

Christmas changed her life forever.<br />

“I arrived back in Australia on Christmas Eve, 1972.<br />

My parents picked me up in Sydney and took me down<br />

the Gold Coast, where they were living at the time.<br />

They said, ‘We would like you to look at your brother’s<br />

factory, see what he is up to and what you think.‘ They<br />

recognised my brother needed a hand on the business<br />

side of things.<br />

“So I went around on Boxing Day and had a look at his<br />

factory. It was the most dangerous place I had been<br />

in my life. It was unhealthy. It was toxic. I thought it<br />

was dreadful! But I could see the pieces of art there. I<br />

recognised that. I had surfed as a youngster, so I knew<br />

what surfing was about.<br />

“The change from the big old boards to these short<br />

boards was amazing. We had the likes of Rabbit round<br />

there, Michael Peterson, Peter Townend. They were<br />

all working there. They were babies though, only kids.<br />

“They shaped the boards, would go for surf, have a<br />

wash, get all the stuff out of their ears, their lungs<br />

and their body and then get back to work. That’s<br />

what they did and that was fine. However, the factory<br />

needed tidying up and organising, which is what I did.<br />

“The shop my brother had opened in Coolangatta -<br />

which was just like a cigarette kiosk really - wasn’t<br />

making any money. The few surfboards he did sell<br />

were sold for far less than cost and when you looked<br />

at how many boards they actually made, it was only<br />

half to one surfboard a week… between all of them!<br />

“I said to him, ‘You’re not going to get very far doing<br />

that. But if you’re able to make more surfboards, you’ll<br />

be able to open a shop in Brisbane, where people<br />

have got money.’<br />

“Down the Gold Coast in those days, nobody had<br />

anything. You can’t operate in a marketplace where<br />

nobody has any money. I convinced Brian to go to<br />

Brisbane and find a place to set up shop. I offered to work<br />

in it for a while to help out. That’s how I got involved.”<br />

Gail eventually found her brother a shop at Breakfast<br />

Creek - a former butcher’s shop complete with<br />

stainless steel fit-out and all the old remnants<br />

including the butcher’s block and anvil.<br />

“So here I was in this butchers shop with Brian’s<br />

boards. I put a big surfboard out the front to let people<br />

know we were there. Inside I made a nice display of<br />

his boards, sat there and had nothing to do. That was<br />

no good for someone like me.<br />

So I said: ‘You can’t live by surfboards alone. You’ve<br />

got to have something else.’ Nobody in the surfing<br />

industry at that point would have considered such a<br />

thing. Surfboards were surfboards. It was a religion.<br />

“The first thing I did was to introduce skateboards. I<br />

went over to the local rollerskating factory, Gayrad in<br />

Brisbane. I bought wheels and trucks. Then I got bits<br />

of timber and my brother made fibreglass decks.<br />

“At first he was outraged. He wanted nothing to do<br />

with this surf and skateboard thing and warned me<br />

to not dare bring the skateboards down to the Gold<br />

Coast. However, combining surf and skate proved to<br />

be very, very successful.<br />

“Then a friend of Brian’s who had worked with him at<br />

Woosley’s in Newmarket, made canoes. I went and<br />

saw him and said, ‘The river’s right there, I’m on the<br />

river, I want some canoes.’ When my brother came up<br />

from the coast and saw those he was so offended, he<br />

just walked out of the store. He just couldn’t bear to<br />

see this canoe next to his surfboards. I thought, ‘Oh<br />

well, I am not offended by it. It is all part of the fun of<br />

getting out on the water.’<br />

Gail didn’t have the space to display the canoes so<br />

she hung them from the ceiling. “When people came<br />

in, they would ask where the canoe shop was. I would<br />

point up and say, ‘and the stock is out the back.’<br />

“So that was the world I was in. I would be driving<br />

between Brisbane and the Gold Coast, sorting out the<br />

factory, sorting out the shop. It was a neverending,<br />

tremendous amount of work and I was still doing this<br />

all for free.<br />

“From there it was sailboards. In around 1974<br />

Delhunty’s came to see me and I had never seen<br />

a sailboard in my life. They had made their first<br />

sailboard and couldn’t sell it to anyone. They came to<br />

me and I thought, ‘What a good idea.’<br />

“So I got a friend of mine Rosco (Ross Cook) to come<br />

over. We got out a canoe and the sailboard and off I<br />

went sailboarding down the river, while he paddled<br />

after me with the canoe. I got confronted with a ship,<br />

which was a problem, so we had to get the sailboard<br />

into the middle of the canoe and paddle like hell back<br />

to Breakfast Creek. Someone happened to be going<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

43


LATEST: PEOPLE<br />

past and took a photo of these mad people about to be run over by a ship and we<br />

ended up on the front page of the Daily Telegraph. That was the beginning of my<br />

sailboarding business and that was really how the Brisbane shop developed.<br />

“The Gold Coast of course kept that religious surfing theme for a long time. After<br />

a while Brian began to realise there was money to be made by having canoes<br />

and sailboards and skateboards and this idea of the surf shop I wanted to create,<br />

seemed to be a good idea.”<br />

CHALLENGES. THERE HAVE BEEN A FEW<br />

FROM STORE TO STORE<br />

Goodtime moved from Breakfast Creek to Windsor when ownership of the building<br />

changed hands and the new owners wanted to tear it down. Despite a twelvemonth<br />

lease, Gail was forced to find new premises. The building was never torn<br />

down much to Gail’s annoyance.<br />

“I found a place on Lutwyche Road. The building was in the midst of construction,<br />

being built of besser bricks, and I thought now there’s a place they can’t mow<br />

down with a grader.” Gail spoke with the owner and asked him if she could rent it.<br />

“He was very, very cautious because I had a tiny surf shop in Breakfast Creek in a<br />

former butcher’s shop and I didn’t look like I was going to be very successful. I was<br />

in the surf industry, I was a woman, aged thirty and I was yet to have children.<br />

There were numerous reasons why you wouldn’t rent to me, and he didn’t want<br />

to, but in the end I talked him into it. I thought it was great because I could bring<br />

all my surfboards, skateboards, canoes and sailboards in and by that stage, I was<br />

starting to introduce hang-gliders and clothing.”<br />

Four years into her six-year lease, in November 1980, Gail was served with a writ<br />

by the Brisbane City Council. “I just wasn’t asked to leave. The council withdrew<br />

my right to trade because I was using a warehouse as a retail outlet on a busy<br />

road and causing traffic congestion. I was deemed a nuisance.”<br />

Gail’s intention this time was to buy a building. “My aim was not to be controlled<br />

by landlords and the council. That way I could control what happened to me.”<br />

The building she found in November 1981 was the Goodtime store in<br />

Woolongabba, where she still is today.<br />

FIRE<br />

Unfortunately for Gail, it was not all good times ahead. One night in November 1984,<br />

Goodtime Woolongabba burnt to the ground. It would not be fully rebuilt until the<br />

end of the following year, but Gail never went out of business. Not for a single day.<br />

“The very next day I was in business. I sold two paddles out the back out of my<br />

Land Rover. The media asked me to look downcast. I thought to myself I have to<br />

be very clear here and give a positive message. I was asked by the Channel Nine<br />

reporter at the time how I felt and I said, ‘I feel great. I will be in business out the<br />

back. It’s a big day tomorrow – opening day!’<br />

“When I saw the fire from across the road in my Land Rover I admit thinking for a<br />

minute, ‘Well, what do I do now.’ But then without any hesitation, I knew what I<br />

was going to do because this is what I do. I do business and any challenge is just<br />

another challenge. I knew it was going to be hard but then you just have to get on<br />

with it. I remembered someone then saying, ‘What are you going to do now?’ and<br />

I said, ‘Someone get me a broom and a shovel.’ “<br />

Gail slept out the back. She dragged bits of molten steel from the fire, twisted it,<br />

painted it and made stands for the various surf craft that continued to arrive from<br />

her suppliers.<br />

“I had done a lot of work with the Stubbies company through Goodtime and<br />

various contests I organised. A truck of theirs arrived with $2000 worth of goods<br />

and no bill. The note read, ‘Here’s a hand. Just sell it and make some money.’ Rip<br />

Curl never let me down either. It was probably twelve months until I could pay my<br />

bills but they stood by me.”<br />

Dart Surf Skis also continued to supply Gail, full knowing that she would be<br />

in business. Their only question at the time was, ‘Where do you want them<br />

delivered?’ Free Flight Surfboards did the exact same thing.<br />

She got a permit to continue selling on what was then deemed a demolition site<br />

providing she wore a hard-hat and boots. In true Gail style, she went out straight<br />

STEPPING STONES: From the factory (top) to the Gold Coast and Brisbane stores<br />

(middle), through to supporting local surfing events (bottom) Gail immersed<br />

herself in every part of the Goodtime business and the local surfing world.<br />

44 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


away, got what she needed and got back to business with cranes, demountable<br />

sheds and tents making up the new look Goodtime.<br />

As for security, her means of protecting her wares from local villians was to pay<br />

them a visit with her trusty shotgun at the drinking establishments around the<br />

Gabba to inform them of their plight if they dared steal from her after what she had<br />

been through.<br />

No thefts and a few months later, the Goodtime store was back again, better<br />

than ever, but not long after Gail and Brian decided to split the business, with him<br />

retaining the Gold Coast store and factory, and her the Brisbane business.<br />

THE CHARACTERS<br />

Over the years, many notable surf industry identities have made it through the<br />

doors of Goodtime, among them a few future surf company founders.<br />

“When I first met Gordon Merchant at the Gold Coast shop he was working for a<br />

company called Kream. One day he came in selling this marijuana shirt they made. I<br />

suggested he should have a beach pant as well. I provided him with some patterns<br />

for the pant I had sourced from my former business in London. Next minute, Gordon<br />

started Billabong and we became their number one account.<br />

ICONIC GOLD COAST SURF BUSINESS FOR SALE<br />

“We were also the first to stock Quiksilver in Queensland. A little while later a<br />

young man came into my shop who also had a clothing label called Quiksilver. He<br />

came in with these incredible clothes and I said to him, ‘I love your clothes but you<br />

can’t use the name Quiksilver. Someone already owns that name in Melbourne.’<br />

“I ended up phoning Allan Green (one of Quiksilver’s founders) whilst this guy<br />

was in the store. Allan agreed to pay him to re-register his name. That guy drove<br />

back to his home in Taree and on his return saw a tuna boat returning from the<br />

sea and thought ‘Hot Tuna… that’s what I will call my clothing line.<br />

“Another interesting person was Dare (Jennings) from Mambo. I used to go to<br />

Sydney a fair bit and I used to buy the Phantom t-shirts from Dare in Darlinghurst.<br />

One time I went in and he said, ‘Gail I have got these surf clothes I am designing.’ I<br />

saw them and said, ‘Mate this is a winner. Let’s have it.’ I ordered it straight away<br />

but Dare had a bit of trouble selling it to other stores in the beginning. It was at<br />

a time when that sort of clothing wasn’t really acceptable, not just in the fashion<br />

industry but in the surfing industry as well because it was taking to a different level.<br />

“So for me, the growth of the clothing side of the business, was due to the fact I<br />

had an eye for it. I wouldn’t have made any money otherwise.<br />

THE FUTURE<br />

Gail Austen is undeniably a powerhouse and one hell of an amazing woman.<br />

At the age of sixty-six she is still going strong. She is still in charge of what is<br />

reputed to be Australia’s longest running surf store. She has seen thirty-four<br />

competitors come and go, many of whom are still big in the surf industry today.<br />

So what does the future hold? This is best left said by Gail herself.<br />

“Until a year ago I worked seven days a week. I tried five days for around four<br />

months but after I had fixed everything around the home I was bored. I am back<br />

working six days a week now. The excitement of business, the fun I have and the<br />

challenges I face are stimulating and keep me young and on the ball. “<br />

THE MODERN MARKETPLACE<br />

With these 40 years of experience in mind, we were keen to get some of Gail’s<br />

insight into business and the surf industry as it stands today.<br />

GAIL ON BUSINESS<br />

“I have been ridiculed countless times in the surf industry as the iron lady who<br />

runs the supermarket of surfing, I have heard it so many times, I no longer care. I<br />

always thought to myself, ‘We only have a population of this much in South East<br />

Queensland and you want me to restrict my market to just surfboards? Never<br />

gonna happen mate! From a business perspective it is just not possible.’<br />

“Product is the most important thing you can have in any business. The product<br />

is what that customer buys, what he walks down the street with, what he uses.<br />

Everything that happens going forward relies on that product. It’s got to be good,<br />

it’s got to be serviceable, it’s got to be backed up and it has got to do what you<br />

say it’s going to do.<br />

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“Once you have product then its service and price. Price is at the end of the road.<br />

The last thing you sell is price.<br />

“When you look at the development of every aspect of this business, from surfing<br />

to skateboarding and windsurfing and so on… everything I am involved in, I<br />

personally went out and did it.<br />

“We also focus on the beginners in each of the sports. More than any other shop<br />

we welcome beginners. In many Gold Coast stores, if you didn’t know the lingo,<br />

you weren’t made to feel very welcome.”<br />

GAIL ON IMPORTS<br />

“People have to be more welcoming of competition. China is just another<br />

competitor. I have been in business all my life and competition is something I<br />

thrive on, the more competition the better.<br />

“I recognised very early in the piece what was going to happen in relation to<br />

Chinese imports. I thought I have to support a local shaper, produce an Australian<br />

made surfboard but at a price affordable for entry-level surfers. We developed<br />

a surfboard line called Boost Surfboards. It’s not necessarily profitable but it<br />

introduces kids and beginners to surfing.<br />

“Blackrock is our intermediate level and as surfers advance they buy better<br />

equipment and our margins increase. All in all, we produce an Australian<br />

product, hand shaped in a modern style that you can go back to the store if<br />

something is wrong. There is a backup service.<br />

“The reality is, I do an enormous amount of business with people who choose to<br />

buy cheap and inferior products first. China has introduced people to surfing that<br />

never before thought about it. We have to accept there is a stepping process,<br />

that as people become informed and develop their surfing skills, they will be<br />

looking for a superior product.<br />

“We have to accept we are not going to win all the wars. We won’t win all price<br />

wars. People will inevitably learn from what they buy and it is part of the education<br />

process. The worst thing you can do is rubbish the competition. Strength, durability<br />

and performance do not come cheaply. People will inevitably wake up to this fact<br />

just as they have with bikes, canoes, cars, hardware tools…”<br />

HELPING OTHERS<br />

“When I do something, I always look to see if I can help someone else. You might<br />

as well make it worthwhile. I want to see more benefit than just the person<br />

sitting in front of me. That’s why in any event I run, I will make sure a charity<br />

benefits from it. I have learnt that in life from a very young age.<br />

“A person like me will be disliked more than loved because when I run things,<br />

I run them properly. For that fact, I am bound to rub people the wrong way.<br />

Therefore I have always made a point if I am going to do something, someone’s<br />

going to get the benefit from it. It allows me to get past the BS and feel better<br />

within myself. So when someone goes crook at me for the way I ran something, I<br />

can say, well I wasn’t doing it for you, I was doing it for them.”<br />

SHINING MOMENTS<br />

Finally, we asked Gail about what she considered to be her greatest achievements.<br />

“I was instrumental in setting up a number of Brisbane’s skate parks. I<br />

recognised no one was helping set up skate parks for the kids. I was selling<br />

plenty of skateboards so I decided to do something about it.”<br />

“I created the Australian Women’s Surfing Association and went all around the<br />

country getting women to join. Women’s surfing in Australia had gone backwards<br />

since Phyllis O’Donnell was world champion and I decided to do something about<br />

it. I said to Pam Burridge, who was was only twelve at the time but an upcoming<br />

superstar, ‘When Australia has a female world champion I will retire.’ Pam went<br />

on to become the world champion and I didn’t have to run it anymore.<br />

“I started the Brisbane Surf Riders Association to counter all that ‘Brissos go home’<br />

nonsense. I recognised Brisbane surfers had to get better so they would be accepted<br />

when they ventured down to the Gold Coast. We ran our contests on Stradbroke<br />

Island, away from the crowds in those days, so we could get the standard up.<br />

“I also ran the biggest canoeing event in QLD for twenty-five years.<br />

“I did these things because I could see they were needed. That’s my nature. I am<br />

not trying to be a hero. It’s just that if I see a need for something, it’s automatic. I<br />

do something about it. That’s what I enjoy. That’s my life.”<br />

46 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


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47


DEBATE: STAND UP<br />

Photo: Michael Dawes<br />

48 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


STAND UP<br />

FOR YOUR<br />

RIGHTS<br />

Get up, stand up! Stand up for your rights!<br />

Come’on people now!<br />

Oh, if only Bob Marley knew the hardships of the<br />

world today, particularly the plight of SUPs. But are<br />

these ‘street-sweepers-of-the-sea’, as they are so<br />

affectionately referred to by their shortboard brethren,<br />

genuine members of the surf fraternity or not?<br />

WORDS BY DAVE SWAN | PHOTOS BY MICHAEL DAWES<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

49


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DEBATE: STAND UP<br />

There definitely seems to be a<br />

growing acceptance of stand-up<br />

paddle surfing within mainstream<br />

surf culture. No longer is there as<br />

much of an ‘us and them’ mentality.<br />

Master watermen such as Tom<br />

Carroll, Gerry Lopez and Laird<br />

Hamilton have no doubt given the<br />

sport added credibility.<br />

We talk with a number of people<br />

within the industry about the rapid<br />

rise in popularity of SUPs along with<br />

the associated pros and cons. But<br />

first, why this harmonious acceptance<br />

of SUPs? Are they real surfers or just<br />

mopping a spill in aisle seven?<br />

PETER JAPP<br />

Eastcoast Stand Up Paddle,<br />

Barden Ridge<br />

“Well there has always been a bit of a<br />

difference between shortboarders and<br />

longboarders. Now we have the SUPs.<br />

“SUP at this stage are kinda down the food<br />

chain but that is rapidly changing with the<br />

focus on high performance. The boards have<br />

come down in size to near the 8ft mark.<br />

Now you basically have guys who were on<br />

shortboards doing stand-up.”<br />

By which Peter is no doubt referring to<br />

paddling and not comedy, but I guess that<br />

depends on the skill of the rider.<br />

JONATHAN STUBBS<br />

Bluewater Players, Noosa<br />

“Yeah, it’s totally changed. Aside from the<br />

devotees of stand-up there was perhaps<br />

a stigma initially attached to it. Certain<br />

people wouldn’t come into our store<br />

because we only did SUPs. But that’s<br />

changed for one because we don’t get<br />

swell up here on a regular basis. Plus you<br />

have guys getting a little older who aren’t<br />

getting as many waves as they used to.<br />

And once they have had a try and can see<br />

it is not that easy (doing what we do in<br />

the surf) they turn around and say, ‘I have<br />

respect for you guys now.’<br />

Full-on, hardcore surfers such as Tommy<br />

and Nick Carroll have also broken<br />

down the barriers by taking up paddles<br />

themselves and giving it a go.<br />

“BETTER STILL, YOU CAN LEARN ON FLAT<br />

WATER. YOU COULD NEVER DO THAT ON<br />

A NORMAL SURFBOARD.”<br />

LUKE MEYERS<br />

SHQ, Sandringham<br />

“These guys are making it gain acceptance.<br />

When you see Tommy Carrol in a recent shot<br />

pulling into a really nice wave, leaning on his<br />

paddle and getting barreled, I think surfers<br />

can see the performance aspect of the sport.<br />

“It is pretty hardcore surfing with such a large<br />

heavy board, taking off on some of the waves<br />

they choose to. Doing what they are doing on<br />

a wave gives it a lot of credibility.”<br />

Fair point there boys. I have seen some pretty<br />

amazing SUP surfing shots myself and I have<br />

nothing but respect for what some people are<br />

doing on a wave. Check out Haley Fiske at<br />

50 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


Mavericks for those still unimpressed.<br />

So what else is fuelling the rapid rise<br />

in popularity?<br />

TULLY ST JOHN<br />

Noosa Surf Works, Noosa<br />

“I think everyone can now see the<br />

fitness benefits associated with<br />

stand-up, from kids through to the<br />

older crew. Plus it’s a new challenge<br />

for surfers who have been surfing a<br />

long time.”<br />

JONATHAN: “Paddling every day keeps<br />

you fit and helps your core strength,<br />

which in turn is great for your surfing.”<br />

PETER: “The fitness aspect of SUP<br />

is beneficial to your wellbeing plus<br />

it’s a sport that young kids, mothers,<br />

fathers and whole families can do<br />

together.”<br />

TULLY: “Those who haven’t surfed<br />

before, can feel the stoke of getting<br />

onto a wave in a pretty short amount<br />

of time. It’s opening up a new easy<br />

way to enjoy what we surfers have<br />

been enjoying for a long time.”<br />

PETER: “Better still you can learn on<br />

flat water. You could never do that on<br />

a normal surfboard. You would need a<br />

wave. With SUPs you can learn your<br />

basic skills on flat water or small chop.”<br />

I must admit a few of the guys who<br />

have taken up SUPs over the last<br />

few months have certainly dropped<br />

some kgs and have commented how<br />

much fitter they feel and stronger in<br />

the surf.<br />

So SUPing can make you ‘tooyight<br />

like a tin drum’ (apologies for my<br />

lame reference to the Austin Powers<br />

movie Goldmember) but what about<br />

the downside of such a rapid rise in<br />

popularity?<br />

SCOTT PENWARN<br />

Greenline, Mermaid Beach<br />

“It’s a matter of etiquette. I guess<br />

some people get out there, whether it<br />

be on a shortboard, longboard or SUP<br />

and try to take every wave. They’re<br />

not really considering other people.<br />

“If you do that on a SUP, you are going<br />

to cop it because you are so visible.<br />

“Regardless of what craft you are<br />

on, it’s the clown who doesn’t ‘give<br />

a rats’ and drops in or circles around<br />

everyone to snake them, who are the<br />

real problem.”<br />

LUKE: “I think we are starting to<br />

break down the barriers between<br />

SUPs and other surfers but that all<br />

comes back to respect. Where it’s<br />

working is where everyone is obeying<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

51


DEBATE: STAND UP<br />

“WHERE IT’S<br />

WORKING IS<br />

WHERE EVERYONE<br />

IS OBEYING THE<br />

RULES OF THE SURF<br />

REGARDLESS OF<br />

WHAT SURF CRAFT<br />

YOU ARE ON.”<br />

Photo: Michael Dawes<br />

52 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


the rules of the surf regardless of what surf craft<br />

you are on.<br />

“And I do think it’s about sharing when you are out<br />

there. You may come across certain breaks where<br />

you know you could catch every wave on the SUP but<br />

you want to make friends out there and have a chat.<br />

“So it is important to let a few waves go, especially<br />

when you first get out the back to show the other<br />

guys in the water you are not going to hog every<br />

wave. You have to show etiquette. “<br />

JONATHAN: “There are a lot of people out there<br />

who should spend a little bit more time on the flat<br />

water and learn some skills. When I was learning, a<br />

mate said I should do heaps of flat water paddling,<br />

so I did. I learnt my skills and didn’t downsize too<br />

quickly. I went from an 11 ft board down to a 10”2,<br />

to a 9 “8, to a 9”6 and now I am on an 8”6.”<br />

PETER: “Beginners have to find a place to learn and<br />

not just go straight out into the line-up and get in<br />

everyone’s way.”<br />

SCOTT: “SUPs in inexperienced hands in crowded<br />

line-ups are dangerous. A lot of beginners are on 11<br />

and 12 ft boards and they don’t know what they are<br />

doing. Some have never surfed in their life and go<br />

straight into the line-up.<br />

“Even on a small day it is dodgy. You go out on an 11<br />

ft board with a 10 ft leg rope and you have a pretty<br />

wide circumference where you can take people out.<br />

“It is our responsibility to educate people as they<br />

are walking out the door with these boards. What<br />

we don’t want to see is what has happened at a few<br />

Californian beaches were SUPs have designated<br />

‘no-go zones’.<br />

“They have basically been banned from certain<br />

breaks because people have not respected the rules<br />

of the surf.”<br />

With regard to educating riders, all gentlemen<br />

agree on this point and each of their respective<br />

businesses offer lessons, or are affiliated with<br />

coaches who teach the basic skills of stand-up<br />

paddling and surf etiquette.<br />

But how many hours should you clock up in still<br />

water before you tackle the surf?<br />

JONATHAN: “Everyone develops at a different rate<br />

but generally speaking, at least a month of going at<br />

least three days a week.<br />

LUKE: “People in particular need to learn how to<br />

do ‘kick turns’ in the water. Turning and paddle<br />

technique are important. You need to do all that<br />

before you think about venturing into the surf. You<br />

have to know your own ability.”<br />

Kick turns heh? So beware all you shortboarders out<br />

there, the SUPs are now learning Karate.<br />

LUKE: “From there it’s about finding suitable breaks<br />

away from crowds. Sometimes it means a lesser<br />

wave but you are not competing with heaps of other<br />

surfers and are giving yourself time to develop.”<br />

And as for the future?<br />

PETER: “Stand-up paddling is not just for the surf.<br />

You have flat water, rivers, lakes… there are guys<br />

even riding rapids overseas. With surf breaks getting<br />

so crowded more and more people are looking to get<br />

away from it all. I think In Australia we will see a lot<br />

more flat water and open ocean events.”<br />

TULLY: “The open ocean side of things is a whole<br />

other aspect to stand-up paddling. When you are<br />

a kilometre out to sea and beyond the shark nets,<br />

running the swells along the coast and using the<br />

energy of the ocean to generate some speed, there<br />

is nothing like it. You only have to see the Molokai<br />

challenge to get an appreciation for what I am<br />

talking about.”<br />

The 52 kilometre paddleboard crossing of the<br />

Molokai (Ka’iwi) Channel is considered the most<br />

brutal physical and mental challenge in the world<br />

for waterman. The race between Hawaii’s two major<br />

islands starts at Kaluakoi on the west end of Molokai<br />

island, across the Ka’iwi Channel to a finish line at<br />

Oahu’s Maunaloa Bay. The best do it in just under<br />

five hours. The Gold Coast’s Jamie Mitchell has won<br />

the race a staggering nine times straight.<br />

LARGEST<br />

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nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

53<br />

1-3 page shq.indd 1 17/10/10 10:34 PM


DEBATE: STAND UP<br />

Photo: Michael Dawes<br />

“YOU CAN PUT<br />

YOUR SIX-<br />

YEAR OLD KID<br />

ON THE FRONT<br />

OF YOUR<br />

BOARD... OR<br />

YOUR DOG”<br />

LUKE: “The flat water aspect of SUPs is really<br />

the growth area.<br />

“You look at a company like Naish and they<br />

are so heavily focused on the still water side.<br />

In Europe, they’re touring around the canals of<br />

Amsterdam and Venice.<br />

“The people like myself who are riding an<br />

8’6 SUP are pretty small in numbers within<br />

Australia. People are looking for boards they<br />

will predominantly paddle in flat water and<br />

occasionally take out into the surf.<br />

“In many ways it is a lot like windsurfing in the<br />

early eighties. One in every three households<br />

in Europe had a windsurfer and used it for<br />

predominantly still water.<br />

“Now SUPs have the potential to be bigger than<br />

windsurfing was. That will only happen if it is<br />

something the family can do, that you can put<br />

your six-year old kid on the front of your board...<br />

or your dog.” (laughs)<br />

How about future board design?<br />

JONATHAN: “The boards have evolved so<br />

much even in the last 12 months. Simon<br />

Anderson is doing his Fibre Flex board. Tully is<br />

one of the leaders in design and manufacturing<br />

and is producing some amazing boards. “<br />

SCOTT: “Yeah, Simon Anderson’s Fibre Flex and<br />

Chris Garrett’s Step-Deck SUP are ones to note.”<br />

LUKE: “There were a lot of companies on the<br />

market experimenting with different designs.<br />

“What we have found, is it’s now coming back<br />

to what works. We tend to find that about 30<br />

inches wide is a magic number. In the sense it<br />

is a good width for stability but still good for<br />

surfing performance. Anything wider tends not<br />

to have the surfing performance and narrower is<br />

more suited to surfers in the 50 to 60 kg range.<br />

That is a rough indicator.”<br />

54 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


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Finally, at this point I must confess I have not yet ventured to the ‘dark side’.<br />

I am alone in the office for not having tried it.<br />

I have nothing against SUPs, even despite my name-calling throughout this article.<br />

I don’t really mean it, they are purely friendly terms of endearment, like referring to<br />

longboarders as long-planker-wankers or alaias as the ironing-boards of the ocean<br />

- and I ride both anyway.<br />

The fact is, I just haven’t had the opportunity yet. But I am as keen as. The<br />

various appeals of stand-up mentioned in this article, resonate with me.<br />

<strong>Smorgasboarder</strong> is about our love for all manner of surf craft. I love longboards,<br />

shortboards, fishes, alaias… you name it, I’m happy to ride it - different boards<br />

for different conditions. Stand up is just another good reason to get wet.<br />

Long live the janitors-of-the-sea.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

55


LATEST: PEOPLE<br />

Mark Pridmore pushing son Cain onto waves Photo: Supplied<br />

PASS THE TORCH<br />

We’ve been led to believe by stereotype that parents are supposed to get old and<br />

out of touch with their kids, complaining how life was better back in their day,<br />

while teenagers in heavy eyeliner (or guyliner) sulk and disconnect themselves from<br />

anything to do with family life, staying locked up in their room, smoking cigarettes<br />

and listening to satanic heavy metal...<br />

There’s a funny thing about stereotypes though - they fortunately and most certainly<br />

don’t have to be true to life. While some family units may well follow this sitcomlike<br />

path, families with a close connection to the water often seem to do the exact<br />

opposite and form even deeper and more meaningful bonds in the surf.<br />

We talk to four very different fathers and sons about their relationships and find out<br />

how surfing together has influenced their lives.<br />

56 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


“I GET MORE STOKED<br />

WHEN I SEE CAIN GET A<br />

GOOD WAVE THEN I DO,<br />

THAT’S FOR SURE.”<br />

Photo: J.Bitton<br />

MARK & CAIN PRIDMORE<br />

Yamba-based surfboard manufacturer, Mark Pridmore<br />

seems to have passed on his love of surfcraft to the<br />

next generation, with his son Cain getting involved<br />

with the family business from an early age.<br />

Dad started it...<br />

I started shaping when I was about 15, (now 37) but<br />

it was an ‘on again, off again’ thing. I would reshape<br />

foam from old boards and any bits of old foam or<br />

shitty blanks I could get. I’d learn and have fun riding<br />

them. I was also spraying these and skateboard<br />

decks for myself and mates, which led to a job<br />

spraying boards at Wave-Zone Surfboards, who also<br />

sponsored me at the time.<br />

These days, I’m working on my own label - More<br />

Surfboards - and still doing some of the sprays. But<br />

my son Cain (12) is doing a lot of the artwork and<br />

colours on my shapes now. It started when I saw a<br />

few of his sketches about 2½ years ago and thought<br />

that he should put some of that onto one of my<br />

boards. It’s just grown from there.<br />

Art wins awards<br />

Cain recently won the school aged division of a<br />

surfboard art exhibition held by the Gold Coast Surf<br />

World - a really cool event brought together shapers<br />

and artists, a real celebration of creativity and<br />

surfboards.<br />

Are the kids avid surfers?<br />

Yeah, they love the beach and enjoy the waves. I<br />

think it has to be one of the best things: to be able<br />

to share the fun of surfing with your kids. I get more<br />

stoked when I see Cain get a good wave then I do,<br />

thats for sure.<br />

Future plans for Cain’s artwork<br />

Cain can do whatever he wants with his artwork,<br />

I am just supplying him with some opportunities<br />

and hopefully skills for the future. He has plenty of<br />

ability and the more he does, the more that ability<br />

can blossom.<br />

Is he keen to also get involved in shaping?<br />

Cain has shaped 3 or 4 boards with my help, but he<br />

is becoming more and more competent. He has a<br />

good knowledge of design. I doubt there’d be too<br />

many 12-year-olds who know as much.<br />

The reaction so far<br />

Some guys have been requesting Cain do their<br />

artwork, others are wary of a young kid being let<br />

loose with paints and posca pens on their new sled.<br />

And other customers genuinely don’t believe me<br />

when I say my son did that spray, until I show ‘em<br />

some pics.<br />

Kids are so capable and they learn so quickly - just<br />

gotta give ‘em the chance. They have a different<br />

perspective on things and haven’t been corrupted<br />

and polluted by marketing and image. It’s more<br />

innocent and just fun... which suits surfing and what<br />

I am all about.<br />

Above: Cain and sister Sirrah (7) with the start of the ‘Pool<br />

table fish’ that won Cain his art award.<br />

Below: Proud dad with Cain’s artwork on More Surfboards<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

57


LATEST: PEOPLE<br />

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON: DYLAN & JOHN SHARING WAVES AND STYLE IN BALI<br />

58 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

Almost twins: Dylan (left) and John (right)


Trading as Paulownia Surfboard SuPPlieS<br />

Our buoyant, lightweight timber<br />

floats all around the world.<br />

JOHN & DYLAN REID<br />

Now at home on the Northern Beaches of Sydney, the South African-born Reid<br />

boys spend plenty of bonding time in the water along the NSW coastline and<br />

overseas. We got both sides of the story on surfing and spending time together.<br />

Who got you into surfing, and was there any family influence?<br />

John: My mates got me into surfing at Nahoon Reef in East London, South Africa<br />

but no family influence – only bought my first surfboard at 18 years of age.<br />

Dylan: My whole family were born and bred on the coast, so it was only natural<br />

for surfing to fall into the picture. My dad got me into surf lessons with a friend of<br />

ours we called “Lazy Leonard”. He taught me all the ins and outs of surfing.<br />

Do you remember the first time Dylan was on a surfboard?<br />

John: Yip. He was seven years old. I spent hours pushing him onto waves. As<br />

I’m sure many fathers find out, if they fall off at that stage it’s all your fault for<br />

pushing them onto the wrong wave. I’m still pushing him but now it’s out of bed.<br />

Dylan: I initially started out body-boarding at a really young age until dad decided<br />

to send me to surf lessons at seven, which I thoroughly enjoyed. I remember Dad<br />

pushing me onto waves at St Francis Bay for hours and hours.<br />

Do you two get to surf together much; who’s teaching who the tricks?<br />

John: Yes. Mainly weekends, and all holidays are spent at Crescent Head. Tricks?<br />

No one can teach a 17 year old anything, let alone tricks!<br />

Dylan: Dad and I surf together regularly on the weekend, but I am often driving<br />

up the coast with my mate Willis, looking for a good break.<br />

They say you can’t teach an old dog new tricks but you can teach a new dog old<br />

tricks, which is very true, because the old dog is still yet to learn how to duck<br />

dive. Dad is often seen turning turtle on his shortboard!<br />

Do you think that surfing together has strengthened your relationship?<br />

John: Yes, it’s something we are always planning or discussing. Early mornings<br />

are the best, although it is always a battle to get Dylan out of bed.<br />

Dylan: Surfing has somewhat strengthened our relationship, but more so, I think<br />

that it has created a new source of competition and rivalry.<br />

Do you see it as something you’ll continue doing?<br />

John: Yes, and I’m counting, I have 16 summers left until I turn 70 so if I do drop<br />

in on Dylan it’s because I’m running out of time and waves!<br />

Dylan: I think surfing is something I will continually be doing throughout my life<br />

until I become an old sun-bleached prune, but until then I will be enjoying every<br />

second of it.<br />

What is the most special thing about your time together surfing?<br />

John: When Dylan finally admits it was worth getting up early, and then<br />

breakfast and coffee after a good surf.<br />

Dylan: The most special time together surfing with my dad would probably have<br />

to be that moment when I know I’ve just made it under a clean out set and look<br />

back to see my dad turning turtle and copping the grunt of the wave on the head.<br />

Karma always seems to come back and bite me though.<br />

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nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

59


A surf shop with personality.<br />

Memorabilia, clothing, accessories and surfboards.<br />

Photo: Grant Molony<br />

Graeme & Brenda Howard<br />

148 Thompson Ave/PO Box 554, Cowes Phillip Island 3922<br />

Ph/Fax (03) 5995 1659 Mob 0411 701 428<br />

Email pip@waterfront.net.au<br />

For something a little different<br />

Southcoast Surfboards, Gato Heroi, Bing, Dick Van Straalen<br />

and a unique range of surfing memorabilia<br />

RUSS & ZANE MOLONY<br />

One of four brothers, Russ Molony of North Entrance on the NSW Central Coast<br />

is a carpenter by trade and a part time WQS surfer. Having become addicted<br />

to surfing at five years of age, he never looked back. Now he’s enjoying the<br />

opportunity to pass it all on to his five-year-old boy, Zane.<br />

Early days...<br />

My older brothers surfed, so they got me out there on my blue foamy and<br />

pushed me into a few. There was a big crew of grommets that all learned on<br />

the same wave. The Cove at Bateau Bay was learner’s heaven. Equipment<br />

these days for learner’s is so much easier and faster. Great news for beginners.<br />

I went in my first competition when I was 14 in a schoolboys event. I recently<br />

returned home from the European leg of the WQS where I equalled my best pro<br />

result - 5 th place in the 5 Star Relentless Boardmasters in Newquay England. It<br />

still doesn’t compare to coming home and getting pumping waves though. The<br />

last couple of weeks have been all time!<br />

Zane’s introduction to surfing<br />

5/21 Clarence Street, Port Macquarie Ph/Fax (<strong>02</strong>) 6584 1995 or 0416 226 774<br />

More online...<br />

www.sandyfeetsurf.com.au<br />

Zane wanted to surf last summer so I got him out in front of our place. He<br />

actually got up first go and rode it for a few seconds. He surprised me in how<br />

good his balance was for a 4-year-old. He’s actually still learning to swim, so<br />

he wears a life jacket and we find a nice shallow bank. Even when it’s freezing<br />

cold he’s keen to hit the waves so I think he’s hooked. Zane has saltwater in his<br />

veins, so the future’s at his feet.<br />

Passing it on<br />

Spending quality time with Zane teaching him about life and the world is the<br />

most important part of a good father-son relationship. I cherish every second<br />

of our time together. Passing on surfing and the knowledge of the ocean is just<br />

a bonus.<br />

In Zane’s words<br />

I asked Zane if he wanted to add anything. His reply: “I surf heaps better then<br />

my Dad. Tell them that”.<br />

Russ says in parting: “I’d like to thank Rex Marechal at RMS Surfboards for<br />

shaping some sick shred sticks. Filtrate Eyewear for their cool shades and all<br />

the Molony tribe for ruling.”<br />

60 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


LATEST: PEOPLE<br />

Russ doing some close inspection of the face<br />

Photo: Grant Molony<br />

“I SURF HEAPS BETTER THEN MY DAD. TELL THEM THAT” ZANE MOLONY, 5<br />

Photo: Grant Molony<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

61


Photo: Supplied<br />

LATEST: PEOPLE<br />

“HUMILITY AND<br />

RESPECT FOR OTHER<br />

PEOPLE. AND JUST<br />

TO ENJOY LIFE”<br />

Tully St. John on the most important<br />

lesson learned from dad, Mike.<br />

62 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


MIKE & TULLY ST. JOHN<br />

Noosa Surf Works is a well known and well respected business, just as the<br />

St. John name is well respected for the surfboards they produce. In a world<br />

where the average person stays in a job for only a few years, finding someone<br />

continuing on in a family business, and building on the family name and<br />

legacy is truly a rarity.<br />

It all started back in the early 50’s, when Mike’s interest in surfing was ignited<br />

by his father’s water time on a huge cedar board, which led to him becoming<br />

one of the local surf kids in Sydney’s eastern beaches.<br />

“We lived on the beach. It was just part of our lifestyle. It was different in<br />

those days. There wasn’t any surf school, boardriders club or competitions,<br />

nothing like that. Surfing was just something we did in between playing<br />

cricket, football and swimming.”<br />

“We were active kids and surfing was just something that a few people<br />

did. We all knew each other around the area. Us kids used to drag the 16 ft<br />

toothpicks from the surf clubs. When the guys were at work Monday to Friday,<br />

we used to wag school and go down the surf club.”<br />

Being in that environment, it was inevitable one of the mates had to try their<br />

hand at working on the boards.<br />

“For us kids to carry a balsa board around, from Tamarama to Bondi, was a<br />

long, long way, so as the boards started falling apart we would strip them<br />

down, cut them down and reglass them smaller…”<br />

From the early beginnings, Mike found himself following a career in the<br />

surfboard industry, working for various shapers and finally founding his own<br />

business. With the arrival of son, Tully, the stage was set for introducing the<br />

craft and the business to the next generation, despite any reservations Mike<br />

may have had.<br />

“I’ve been around it since I was born, basically.” Tully tells us. “Swept floors,<br />

mucked around in the factory, just waiting for dad to finish work when I was a<br />

little kid. I just watched how the boards got made from early on.”<br />

“When I was about 12 years old I first did some work on a surfboard. It wasn’t<br />

really something I was interested in. It was just what Dad had done.”<br />

But despite learning the ropes in board repair as a teenager, Tully decided<br />

to look outside of the family business, doing an apprenticeship as a chef<br />

from the age of 15. After completing the apprenticeship, Tully got back into<br />

surfboards.<br />

“But you can’t say I encouraged you. Quite the opposite in fact”, says Mike. “I<br />

didn’t want him to do that at all. I thought it’d be a good idea to do something<br />

else. Anything else.”<br />

But who listens to their parent at 18? “Being a young surfer, I always had a<br />

burning ambition to shape a board for myself one day.”<br />

His time as a chef, however, is not something he regrets doing. “That taught<br />

me what it would take to become a good craftsman. To take it step by step<br />

and not just try and jump to the conclusion before you’d learned the basics<br />

and gone back to traditional methods that had been used. It also taught me<br />

organisation and people skills which has helped me in business today.”<br />

“I reckon I did 10 years before I even considered myself to be anywhere near<br />

qualified to shape boards. I did everything from glassing, sanding, finning of<br />

boards, restorations on old boards to get my eye in, and then endless hours of<br />

just watching other shapers hand shaping boards to get a good basis.”<br />

And a good basis it is, with a huge variety of shapes and designs produced by<br />

Tully at the Noosa Surf Works business.<br />

These days, the apprentice has long since become the master and the<br />

handover has allowed Mike to take a back seat. “These days Tully runs it. He’s<br />

the boss, I just do whatever he wants me to do, from vacuuming up to helping<br />

out. I’m just here at the beck and call of the boss (laughs)”<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

63


TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

Photo: RAYCOLLINSPHOTO.COM<br />

64 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


THE<br />

GONG<br />

AND BEYOND<br />

OFTEN MALIGNED AS NOTHING MORE THAN AN INDUSTRIAL CITY,<br />

SUCH MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT WOLLONGONG ARE QUICKLY<br />

DISPELLED WHEN EXPLORING THE STUNNING COASTLINE<br />

STRETCHING FROM STANWELL TOPS DOWN TO SEVEN MILE BEACH<br />

IN GERROA IN SEARCH OF SOME SOUTH COAST MAGIC.<br />

WORDS BY DAVE SWAN<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

65


Shellharbour Photo: Steev S www.flickr.com/eonns<br />

North Beach Photo: Supplied<br />

TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

North Kiosk at North Beach Photo: DS<br />

WELCOME<br />

TO THE ILLAWARRA<br />

Ohhh... The Gong. Gotta go The Gong. The place<br />

sounds so cool. In fact, it is cool. But we are talking<br />

about more than just Wollongong. Our exploration<br />

goes all the way beyond the city and to the outer<br />

limits of the Illawarra.<br />

The region’s beautiful beaches and stunning coastal<br />

scenery have so much to offer. In terms of waves,<br />

there are countless surf spots of varying descriptions<br />

to speak of, right the way along the coast.<br />

Surfing the north around Coal Cliff you will find<br />

yourself sandwiched between the Pacific Ocean<br />

and the cliffs of the Illawarra escarpment, which<br />

drop precipitously to the sea. It is one of the most<br />

dramatic backdrops any surfer could experience.<br />

Then you have the world-class break at Sandon<br />

Point. On its day, it can easily hold 8ft to 15ft plus<br />

and is not for the faint-hearted. It’s a beast of a wave<br />

complete with freefall takeoff and grinding barrels.<br />

If you’re a big-wave maniac, there’s more action<br />

further south at Windang Island in Shellharbour .<br />

For a somewhat cruisier, mellower wave there’s<br />

the famous Killalea State Forest, home to The Farm<br />

and Mystics. And further south in Gerroa, you have<br />

arguably the best learn-to-surf wave on the east<br />

coast at Seven Mile Beach.<br />

Ahh the variety. Ahh the serenity. The Illawarra has<br />

the goods to make any surfer salivate.<br />

The beauty of this job is that you get to see some<br />

absolutely amazing places. But THIS region is just<br />

nothing short of spectacular. I don’t want to sound<br />

like a broken record but it is just incredible. Whilst<br />

here, it’s taken every ounce of strength to get<br />

through my work because all I wanted to do was<br />

pull the car over and get in for a surf. It’s absolutely<br />

stunning. If there were ever a place I would pick<br />

up and move the family from the Sunshine Coast,<br />

this quite possibly would be it. That’s how highly<br />

I rate the place. You’re an hour from Sydney; the<br />

world’s most beautiful city, you have the ocean, the<br />

highlands for hiking, you’re a stones throw from<br />

Kangaroo Valley, further south is Jervis Bay… the<br />

appeal of the place goes on and on.<br />

But truth be told, I will be the first to admit I thought<br />

the place was nothing more than an industrial town.<br />

It’s what a friend had told me many years ago and<br />

as such, I had taken it as gospel. You can imagine<br />

my shock when I eventually ventured there myself. I<br />

didn’t know what he was on about. Maybe time had<br />

changed things? One thing is for sure, in my opinion,<br />

the area is a top east coast surf spot with an endless<br />

array of natural beauty and great surf breaks.<br />

66 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


THE<br />

GONG<br />

AND BEYOND<br />

South Beach Wollongong, looking towards Port Kembla Photo: Richard Higgins www.flickr.com/photos/24364979@N00/<br />

Austinmer Pool Photo: Supplied<br />

Shellharbour morning Photo: Keith LBG<br />

“A TOP<br />

EAST COAST<br />

SURF SPOT<br />

WITH GREAT<br />

WAVES”<br />

Scarborough Hotel Photo: DS<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

67


TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

Kiama sunrise Photo: Kiama Tourism<br />

Looking over seven Mile Beach Photo: DS<br />

Werri Beach Sunrise Photo: Kent Ladkin<br />

Somewhere near Windang Photo: Lainey Brown laineybrown.carbonmade.com<br />

WHERE<br />

IS THE ILLAWARRA EXACTLY?<br />

The Illawarra is a coastal region situated<br />

immediately south of Sydney and north of the<br />

Shoalhaven, known as the NSW South Coast<br />

region. It encompasses the cities of Wollongong<br />

and Shellharbour and the town of Kiama.<br />

Geography is something that defines the region.<br />

To the north, the city of Wollongong is never<br />

more than six kilometers at its widest. The city<br />

is fringed by mountains, which are the eastern<br />

edge of the Southern Highlands plateau, that are<br />

not so much high as steep, and to the east lies<br />

the Pacific Ocean.<br />

Wollongong is only 80 kilometers from Sydney<br />

and around an hour and twenty minutes drive.<br />

Further south the region widens, and the coastal<br />

plain becomes increasingly hillier.<br />

The coastline extends some 100 kilometers from<br />

the southern hills of the Royal National Park in<br />

the north to the Shoalhaven River in the south.<br />

Points and beaches face all matter of directions<br />

and as such you can usually find a wave<br />

somewhere on the coastline whether the swell<br />

direction is coming from the south round to the<br />

north-east.<br />

68 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


PIT STOPS<br />

ALONG THE WAY<br />

FROM THE NORTH<br />

OTFORD PANTRY, THE APPLE PIE SHOP<br />

22 Lady Wakehurst Drive Otford<br />

Sat 9am-5pm, Sun 8am-5pm<br />

The furthest stop north, just pass Stanwell Tops. It’s only<br />

open weekends and public holidays so if you’re lucky<br />

enough to be there on any of these days, go there. A<br />

coffee and some fresh pie… oh yes.<br />

THE SCARBOROUGH HOTEL<br />

383 Lawrence Hargrave Drive, Scarborough<br />

It’s so good the town was named after it. The pub CAN<br />

actually lay claim to this fame. Wollongong’s oldest<br />

premises has been recently renovated and can possibly<br />

boast the best beer garden I have ever seen on the east<br />

coast. The views are amazing, the laid back vibe superb<br />

and it’s family friendly.<br />

THE HEADLANDS HOTEL<br />

Headland Ave, Austinmer<br />

If you like rustic old pubs, with shark teeth above the<br />

bar, positioned right on a point with views of the surf<br />

and a wood fire burning - well this one is a pearler.<br />

Although I highly recommend you have a surf before<br />

venturing into the pub. The size of the shark jaws is a<br />

little off-putting if seen prior to a surf.<br />

IN AND AROUND<br />

WOLLONGONG<br />

NORTH KIOSK<br />

1 Cliff Road North Beach, North Wollongong<br />

7am to 5pm daily<br />

The coffee is incredible, food service prompt and very<br />

affordable. A range of fresh juices and smoothies are<br />

also available. And you are RIGHT on the beach. The<br />

perfect early morning pit stop for surfers on the go.<br />

FIVE ISLANDS BREWING COMPANY<br />

The fact I have stopped here several times on recent<br />

trips to The Gong is testament to my love for this venue<br />

and my love for beer. Is there anything better than a<br />

local brew house with views over the ocean? A late arvo<br />

surf at South Beach next to the lightho use and a pint of<br />

Rust Amber Ale – that’s the best way to finish your day.<br />

GOING SOUTH<br />

OCEAN BEACH HOTEL<br />

2 Addison Street, Shellharbour<br />

A great spot to relax with a beer after a session at<br />

Cowries where you can retell your tales of taking off on<br />

hollow, barreling waves with next to no water below.<br />

The hotel’s seafood restaurant has also won countless<br />

South Coast and state best restaurant awards.<br />

SHORT BLACK<br />

88 Terralong St, Kiama<br />

As far as Kiama goes, I haven’t tried anything else bar<br />

Short Black for breakfast and coffee. When something is<br />

this good, you fear taking the chance on anything else.<br />

Over 45 years experience<br />

handcrafting quality surfboards, short & long<br />

We've been at the forefront of surfing's<br />

evolution since 1963... BUT YOU’RE STILL THE<br />

MOST IMPORTANT PERSON IN OUR BUSINESS<br />

From short through<br />

to long, we have the<br />

perfect board for<br />

your quiver, or can<br />

custom make it to<br />

your requirements<br />

Free<br />

Delivery<br />

in mailand<br />

Australia<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

FACTORY SHOWROOM<br />

24 Flinders St<br />

North Wollongong, NSW 2500<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4228 8878<br />

Fax: <strong>02</strong> 4229 7594<br />

AUSTRALIA<br />

CITY SURF CENTRE<br />

231 Crown Street,<br />

Wollongong City, NSW 2500<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4229 12<strong>02</strong><br />

Fax: <strong>02</strong> 4225 2161<br />

HANDCRAFTED CUSTOM SURFBOARDS<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

69


all the BeSt SuRf GeaR and<br />

SuRfWeaR under one roof...<br />

HISTORY<br />

StockiStS of Baku, Seafolly<br />

Ginja and more great Swimwear<br />

1/16B addiSon St<br />

ShellharBour Village<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4295 3373<br />

The latest surf fashion, surf<br />

hardware and accessories<br />

Only 10 minutes from Wollongong!<br />

206 keira Street,<br />

wollongong<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4227 2777<br />

100 Railway St, Corrimal NSW 2518<br />

(<strong>02</strong>) 4283 7196 www.surfpit.com.au<br />

take PrIDe<br />

Make your dream board with the highest quality<br />

surfboard kits from $620, complete with wood,<br />

epoxies, glass, fittings, manual and more.<br />

So many great surfers and great<br />

shapers have called, and still call, The<br />

Gong and it surrounding regions home.<br />

The list of surfers through the years is<br />

like a roll call of Australia’s best, guys<br />

like Ken Middleton, Kevin Parkinson,<br />

Paul Brooks, Terry Richardson, Robbie<br />

Page, Brian Cregan and the Byrne<br />

Brothers - Phil, Dave and Chris - who<br />

really put Wollongong on the map.<br />

Then there were the ladies such as<br />

Sharon Jackson (nee Holland) and<br />

Sandy Drysden. Later on it was the<br />

likes of Sandon Point’s Chad Ryan and<br />

Jake Spooner who carried the flame.<br />

There’s Mick Lowe of Windang and<br />

big wave charger, Kate Skarratt - one<br />

of the first ladies to tackle Hawaii’s<br />

Pipeline. Today, it’s the new breed<br />

such as Gerringong’s Todd Prestage<br />

and Gerroa’s Dean Bowen and Sally<br />

Fitzgibbons. You also have talented<br />

free-surfers and big wave chargers<br />

such as Michael Hopkins and Dylan<br />

Longbottom.<br />

On the shaping side of things, John<br />

Skipp of Skipp Surfboards was pretty<br />

much the founder of Wollongong’s surf<br />

scene. First working for Cansdell and<br />

Jackson Surfboards, he set up Skipp<br />

Williams Surfboards when Jackson<br />

decided to focus purely on his Cronulla<br />

operation.<br />

As for John, he’s still going strong<br />

and through the years has employed<br />

many great shapers such as the late<br />

Kevin Parkinson and Frank Latta. Also<br />

working with Skipp were the likes of<br />

Paul Nichol, Terry Richardson, Phil<br />

and Dave Byrne, who together with<br />

brother Chris went on to establish the<br />

world renowned Byrne Surfboards.<br />

Byrne have attracted some of the<br />

most notable pro surfers through the<br />

years such as Shaun Thompson, Larry<br />

Bertleman and Tom Carroll along with<br />

up-and-coming sensation Owen Wright.<br />

So you can see, from just this very<br />

brief history, the Illawarra surf scene<br />

was, and still is, alive and kicking.<br />

LOCAL SURFBOARD BRANDS<br />

THROUGH THE YEARS<br />

• Cansdell and Jackson<br />

Surfboards founded 1958,<br />

North Wollongong<br />

• Skipp Surfboards founded 1963,<br />

Wollongong<br />

• South Coast Surfboards<br />

founded 1972, Sandon Point<br />

• Mike Davis Surfboards founded<br />

1975, Kiama<br />

• Byrne Surfboards founded<br />

1977, Wollongong<br />

• Carabine Surfboards founded<br />

1977, Wollongong<br />

• Terry Richardson Surfboards<br />

1978, Wollongong<br />

• Crooked River Surfboards<br />

founded 1978, Gerroa<br />

FAST FACTS<br />

Climate: Warm summers and<br />

mild winters mean that the area’s<br />

wide range of outdoor recreational<br />

activities can be enjoyed all<br />

year round. Maximum average<br />

temperatures range from 26C in<br />

summer to 17C in winter.<br />

Population: The Illawarra region<br />

has a population of just over 410,000.<br />

The city of Wollongong accounts<br />

for almost half of it and is in fact<br />

the tenth largest city in Australia,<br />

the third in New South Wales after<br />

Sydney and Newcastle.<br />

Nearest city: Wollongong is just 82<br />

kilometres south of Sydney<br />

www.caPeboatworks.com.au<br />

37-39 Chapman St, Fairy Meadow NSW 2519 Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4283 1115<br />

Photo: Steev S<br />

70 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


Illawarra waves Photo: Kent Ladkin<br />

THE WAVES<br />

THE<br />

GONG<br />

AND BEYOND<br />

“Wollongong has a huge range of waves but I mainly<br />

surf the northern suburbs on a large north-west swell<br />

and in a northerly wind I go surf Windang Island, which<br />

is possibly one of the best quality waves we have<br />

here when it’s working on the low tide. It breaks really<br />

big on the southside. But it is hard to leave Sandon<br />

(Point) when I can just walk down the road. I have been<br />

surfing here for some forty something years. It’s a pretty<br />

challenging wave and works best in a big southerly<br />

swell. It’s probably best at double overhead and it<br />

breaks though on almost any type of swell. On a north<br />

swell, when it is big, it is nearly a full-on Hawaiian sort<br />

of wave - triple overhead, challenging and very hollow.<br />

Peggies also works in these kind of conditions, which<br />

is a fun Queensland-like wave. I can also surf the left<br />

hand side of Sandon on my funboard. It’s a fat wave.”<br />

Paul Nichol - Paul Nichol Shapes<br />

“Sandon (Point) is a reasonably good wave. It is<br />

probably the best point break in the area. Windang<br />

Island is good when the swell is on. Most of the<br />

good surf spots in this area are reef breaks. The Farm<br />

however is a good place for longboard riders and it’s a<br />

pretty spot.”<br />

Phil Byrne - Byrne Surf & Ski<br />

“Sandon Point and Woonona would be internationally<br />

known. Belambi Point is the most popular spot for mals.<br />

South Beach in Woolongong is crowded but can carry a<br />

good wave. The Farm is one of the most popular places<br />

with good reason. It’s a unique place, where in the<br />

water you can’t see human habitation.”<br />

John Skipp - Skipp Surfboards<br />

“Having surfed nearly every spot from Stanny (Stanwell<br />

Park) to Merimbula, there are so many good waves<br />

around, it would have to be one of the best stretches in<br />

Oz. There are still plenty of secret spots and ones that<br />

are still pretty untouched.<br />

“People in and out of water are unreal. In each area<br />

everyone kind of knows everyone and generally there<br />

is a good vibe. Maybe some people would argue,<br />

especially when I was in the water… hehe… but it’s<br />

all about respect. I’d never hassle the older experienced<br />

crew, therefore the younger crew shouldn’t either. I<br />

hope that attitude carries on.”<br />

Daz Longbottom - Zink Surf<br />

“We have one of the best beginner beaches around<br />

at Gerroa. The bombie off the point is pretty nuts but<br />

definitely not for the faint-hearted (we have also heard<br />

it is one of two major shark breeding grounds on the<br />

South Coast, so beware)<br />

“Then there’s Werri Beach with a point break at the<br />

southern end and the beachies further north are pretty<br />

good as well. In and around the place there are also a<br />

couple of good secret spots as well that people can find<br />

for themselves. I’m not telling you.<br />

“The area’s appealing because there are all different<br />

kinds of waves around and we also have a couple of big<br />

wave spots that hold 8 -10 ft plus.”<br />

Jade Robinson - DSN Shapes<br />

WIN 1 OF 2<br />

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smorgasboader readers a<br />

mid-week tandem skydive to<br />

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email<br />

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and tell us your favourite<br />

south coast surf break.<br />

include your name, email<br />

and phone number for your<br />

chance to win!<br />

competition closes 3 december, <strong>2010</strong>.<br />

winners will be announced in the january edition.<br />

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nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

71


TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

The view form north to south Photo: Jin Han Teng<br />

THE WAVES<br />

From Wollongong heading north towards Sydney the Royal National Park<br />

has over 20 kilometers of coastline. There is plenty to explore for the<br />

adventurous surfer. The most well known spot, Garie Beach, provides<br />

consistent waves all year round breaking on sand and rock and can hold<br />

up to 10ft of swell. Best on a NE-SE swell. NW-SW winds. All tides.<br />

7<br />

8<br />

11<br />

9<br />

10<br />

12<br />

13<br />

Take Note... Not all surf spots are mentioned<br />

here. Our intention is only to provide a basic<br />

guide to known surf breaks. After all, the best<br />

part of surf travel is to get off the beaten track<br />

and find those ‘secret spots’ for yourself. Always<br />

remember to be respectful of local surfers and<br />

leave with happy memories and new friends.<br />

1 2 3 4 5 6 7<br />

STANWELL<br />

PARK<br />

Classic beachies<br />

and classic views of<br />

Stanwell Tops from<br />

the water. Not too<br />

affected by summer<br />

winds. Good on a<br />

southerly swell. NE<br />

swell. NW winds.<br />

All tides.<br />

COAL CLIFF<br />

Great beachies in<br />

small swells. The<br />

southern end has<br />

sandbanks that can<br />

deliver big, hollow<br />

barrels breaks left.<br />

NE-SE swell. SW<br />

winds. Mid-low tide.<br />

SCARBOROUGH<br />

BEACH &<br />

WOMBARRA<br />

Scarborough is<br />

north and Wombarra<br />

south. Both work<br />

best in summer.<br />

Wombarra can be on<br />

in winter if the banks<br />

are established. NE-<br />

SE swell. SW-NW<br />

winds. All tides.<br />

COLEDALE<br />

BEACH<br />

Average at<br />

the beach, but<br />

‘Thommo’s on the<br />

point at Shark Park<br />

can be a nasty wave<br />

that will hurt you,<br />

breaking left over<br />

a rocky bottom.<br />

Prepare to have a<br />

fun paddle. Best in<br />

head high+ swell. NE<br />

swell. NW winds.<br />

Best low tide.<br />

HEADLANDS<br />

Sharkies is up<br />

from the point<br />

off the beach and<br />

Headlands is a heavy<br />

right, breaking on a<br />

bloody shallow reef<br />

bottom. A hell of a<br />

barrel and fast. Don’t<br />

visit the pub before<br />

your surf. That’s<br />

how the spot got its<br />

name. Both breaks<br />

best in mid-tide. E<br />

swell. W wind.<br />

AUSTINMER<br />

BEACH<br />

Gets crowded in<br />

summer. Little Austie<br />

to the north is a<br />

nice but small right.<br />

Further down there<br />

are good beachies.<br />

NE swell. NW- SW<br />

wind. Mid-tide best.<br />

THIRROUL<br />

Peaky beachies.<br />

Good learners beach.<br />

Gets crowded in<br />

summer. Small right<br />

at southern end.<br />

NE-SE swell. NW<br />

wind. Mid to high<br />

tide best.<br />

Sandon Point Photo: Keith LBG<br />

South Gong Photo: Steev S<br />

72 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


THE<br />

GONG<br />

AND BEYOND<br />

SANDON POINT<br />

One of The Gong’s<br />

hotspots, but if you’re not<br />

experienced, then stay well<br />

clear. Not for beginners<br />

or even mediocre surfers.<br />

All you’ll do is piss off the<br />

locals. Can get as big as<br />

8-15 ft. A monster of a<br />

wave when it’s on so pack<br />

your brown boardies. SE<br />

swell. SW wind. Mid to<br />

low tide. Class. Only small<br />

easterly swells are okay for<br />

intermediate surfers.<br />

PEGGY’S &<br />

BANZAI<br />

The northern tip of Bulli<br />

Beach. A ledge extends<br />

out to sea. Right-hander<br />

is Peggy’s. Left-hander<br />

Banzai. Some say a lesser<br />

break and more forgiving<br />

the Sandon. Others<br />

reckon on its day it is for<br />

chargers only. NE Swell.<br />

NW-SW wind. Low tide.<br />

WOONONA<br />

Good consistent beachies<br />

for all surfing standards.<br />

NE swell. NW-SW wind.<br />

Mid-low tide.<br />

BELLAMBI POINT<br />

Good bommie of the<br />

point. Can be steep and<br />

hollow. Bit of a different<br />

suburb. Lock your car,<br />

hide your valuables and<br />

no banjo jokes. SE swell.<br />

SW wind. All tides.<br />

TOWRADGI<br />

Left and right beachies.<br />

Rarely crowded. Best at<br />

low tide. NE-SE swell.<br />

NW-SW wind. All tides.<br />

NORTH &<br />

SOUTH BEACH<br />

Gets crowded but a<br />

personal favourite. Since<br />

first visiting Wollongong<br />

I’ve regularly surfed South<br />

Beach. I like it despite<br />

the fact I had the worst<br />

bluebottle experience<br />

of my life – 15 of the<br />

bastards. Very funny, until<br />

my groin swelled up like a<br />

golf ball and I could hardly<br />

move my leg. NE swell.<br />

SW wind. Mid-low tide.<br />

WINDANG<br />

ISLAND<br />

Near the mouth of Lake<br />

Illawarra so there are<br />

plenty of men in grey<br />

suits around. When it is<br />

on, is an absolute classic<br />

big wave spot. Barreling<br />

long left-hander. NE-SE<br />

swell. W wind. Mid-low<br />

tide.<br />

THe Farm Photo: Steev S<br />

THe Farm Photo: Steev S<br />

Shellharbour spray Photo: Steev S www.flickr.com/<br />

8 9 10 12 13 14<br />

11<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

73


TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

THE WAVES<br />

22<br />

23<br />

21<br />

Kiama Harbour looking South to Gerringong Photo: Kiama Tourism<br />

20<br />

20<br />

15 16 17<br />

19<br />

21<br />

23<br />

COWRIES &<br />

THE POOL<br />

Stay away unless you can<br />

surf like a pro. Handles<br />

loads of swell. You get<br />

to check out the bottom<br />

when you take off – nice!<br />

Cowries is on the NE tip<br />

of the harbour. Pool is off<br />

the… pool, at the southern<br />

end. NE-SE swell. SW-W<br />

wind. All tides.<br />

THE FARM<br />

Protected from NE winds.<br />

Peaky beachies. Right<br />

point at the southern end<br />

is great. Just a magic<br />

spot. Popular longboard<br />

wave. Unfortunately is<br />

becoming quite crowded<br />

and the vibe has suffered<br />

as a consequence. SW<br />

swell. NW winds. Midhigh<br />

tides.<br />

MYSTICS<br />

Further south round<br />

the bay from The Farm.<br />

Holds plenty of swell.<br />

Numerous secret spots.<br />

Find them for yourself.<br />

Not for beginners. SE<br />

swell. NW wind. Low tide.<br />

18<br />

BONEYARD<br />

Just sounds so inviting.<br />

Isolated but beautiful.<br />

Head down the cliffs to<br />

the rocks. By now you<br />

have surely worked out<br />

it is only for really good<br />

surfers. NE-SE swell. SW<br />

wind. Mid tide.<br />

BOMBO BEACH<br />

Just north of Kiama’s<br />

town centre. Picks up a<br />

range of swell. Consistent<br />

beachies. Good for all<br />

surfers but can pack a<br />

punch from time to time.<br />

SE swell. NW-SW wind.<br />

All tides.<br />

20<br />

THE POOL &<br />

THE WEDGE<br />

Rights and lefts either<br />

side of the famous<br />

blowhole. Best when it is<br />

overhead. Serious surfers<br />

only. E swell. SW wind.<br />

All tides.<br />

WERRI BEACH<br />

South end is Werri Point.<br />

Great long right-hander.<br />

Best overhead and above.<br />

Good surfers only. Decent<br />

beachies further north. All<br />

levels. NE swell. NW-SW<br />

winds. Mid tide.<br />

22<br />

BLACK POINT<br />

North of Seven Mile<br />

Beach. The bombie can<br />

go off but for experienced<br />

surfers only. Check out<br />

your surrounds. Nice and<br />

deep around you. Fish<br />

with teeth live there.<br />

SE swell. N-NW wind.<br />

Mid to high tide.<br />

SEVEN<br />

MILE BEACH<br />

Possibly the best learner<br />

beach in the country.<br />

Beautiful gentle rolling<br />

waves and a mecca<br />

for beginners and<br />

backpackers alike. SE<br />

swell. NW winds. Midlow<br />

tide.<br />

74 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


Photo: Lainey Brown<br />

Seven Mile Beach Photo: Kent Ladkin<br />

Bombo Beach Photo: Kiama Tourism<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

75


TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

AFTER SURF<br />

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76 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

When you have finished surfing, there is a load<br />

of other activities to enjoy whilst in the area.<br />

For starters, the Illawarra Escarpment that<br />

fringes Wollongong has so many hiking trails<br />

you could never do the same walk twice. And<br />

if walking is really your thing, further south<br />

near Kiama, you can undertake a magnificent<br />

two-hour hike through spectacular rainforest<br />

to Minnamurra Falls. Go early in the morning.<br />

It’s your best chance to beat the crowds and<br />

see various wildlife including lyre birds and<br />

wombats. It’s $11 entrance to the park.<br />

If a flat track is more your style, you can walk,<br />

run or cycle along Wollongong’s beaches.<br />

An extensive walk/ bike track extends 10<br />

kilometers north from the city centre to<br />

Thirroul, hugging scenic beaches all the way.<br />

The same track also extends 10 kilometers<br />

south to Lake Illawarra and Windang.<br />

To see more beautiful scenery, it’s best to<br />

explore the region by car. Grand Pacific Drive<br />

is sensational. The name says it all. The road<br />

itself stretches from the Royal National Park<br />

in the north to Shoalhaven in the south. It’s<br />

a roller-coaster ride through rainforests and<br />

past seaside villages and amazing coastline. A<br />

highlight is the Sea Cliff Bridge, an engineering<br />

marvel that swerves out from the cliffs over<br />

the ocean.<br />

Be sure to also make your way to the Bulli<br />

Pass Lookout (north of Wollongong and on the<br />

main road to Sydney). Barbecues, picnic tables<br />

and kiosks are available and the lookout is<br />

free. The lookout presents an incredible view<br />

over Wollongong and its beaches.<br />

More great views can be taken in from Mount<br />

Kiera Lookout and from Stanwell Tops, a noted<br />

top hang gliding ‘hangout’ (pardon the pun).<br />

If these intoxicating views aren’t enough and<br />

you want to ‘step it up a notch’, then take a<br />

geezer from 14,000 ft. There are only a handful<br />

of places you can sky dive over the beach in<br />

the country. That’s why, if you are up to it, Sky<br />

Dive the Beach Sydney are the people to talk<br />

to in Wollongong. You only live once and the<br />

chance to see such breathtaking natural beauty<br />

from ‘above it all’ is not to be missed.<br />

Having sky-dived before, I highly recommend


Photo: Steev S<br />

Left: A top way to see the scenery with Skydive the Beach. Top left: Kiama’s<br />

famous blowhole. Top Right: Minnamurra rainforest. Insert: Hangliding is<br />

another popular way to rise above it all. Above: The Sea Cliff Bridge - an<br />

amazingly picturesque drive.<br />

it. The guys at Sky Dive the Beach<br />

run an extremely professional outfit,<br />

so you can rest assured, you are in<br />

good hands.<br />

I was all set to take the jump when<br />

I was last down in The Gong and<br />

was so excited to have a second<br />

opportunity. Unfortunately the gods<br />

of weather weren’t smiling on the<br />

day. We experienced winds over 50<br />

knots and unless I was keen to take<br />

a cheap trip to New Zealand, we<br />

had to reschedule. The guys at Sky<br />

Dive the Beach were great though.<br />

They don’t take any second chances<br />

when it comes people’s personal<br />

safety and were happy to allow me to<br />

reschedule a jump some time in the<br />

next twelve months.<br />

If the surf is flat and you’re still keen<br />

to get out on the water, Canoe and<br />

Kayak Adventures have an extensive<br />

range of guided and unguided sea<br />

kayaking adventures. Popular paddles<br />

include the Royal National Park,<br />

Headlands at Austinmer (they’ll shout<br />

you a beer or soft drink at the pub<br />

afterwards), North and South Beach<br />

and the Five Islands Wollongong.<br />

There are also half-day tours of<br />

the Minnamurra River just south of<br />

Wollongong. Many group bookings<br />

receive a complimentary lunch and<br />

start from $55 per per person.<br />

Finally, a trip to the area is not<br />

complete until you visit Kiama’s famous<br />

Blowhole. In big seas it is at its most<br />

spectacular and can spray a spout of<br />

water up to 25 meters skywards.<br />

NEARBY<br />

If you’re in the area, take the<br />

opportunity to drive a bit further<br />

south to Kangaroo Valley and the<br />

Southern Highlands.<br />

You can visit the quaint towns of<br />

Bowral and Moss Vale and see some<br />

of the most picturesque natural<br />

scenery in the country.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

77


78 56 september nov/dec <strong>2010</strong> <strong>2010</strong>


TOP STAYS<br />

THE<br />

GONG<br />

AND BEYOND<br />

There is perhaps nothing more relaxing than staying at a beachside bungalow with the family or a group<br />

of friends. You have your own space, plenty of room to store the boards and can even relax on your own<br />

deck with a beverage. The beach is walking distance and at night you have your own kitchen facilities to<br />

cook up a feed. The minute you step foot inside the park grounds your blood pressure drops.<br />

As far as holiday parks and cabins go, Kiama Coast’s five holiday parks are possibly the best. Beautifully<br />

positioned and in one of the prettiest stretches of coast on the eastern seaboard.<br />

KENDALLS ON THE BEACH<br />

HOLIDAY PARK<br />

Bonaira St, KIAMA<br />

KIAMA HARBOUR<br />

CABINS<br />

Blowhole Point, KIAMA<br />

WERRI BEACH<br />

HOLIDAY PARK<br />

Pacific Avenue, GERRINGONG<br />

SURF BEACH<br />

HOLIDAY PARK<br />

Bourrool Street, KIAMA<br />

SEVEN MILE BEACH<br />

HOLIDAY PARK<br />

200 Crooked River Rd, GERROA<br />

If absolute beachfront is what<br />

you are looking for then this<br />

is the place for you. Offering<br />

a choice of luxurious one, two<br />

or three bedroom cabins plus<br />

some of the most sought after<br />

camp sites on the east coast,<br />

this holiday park provides<br />

the ultimate fun filled family<br />

holiday or romantic weekend<br />

escape.<br />

Proximity: Right on the<br />

beachfront and minutes away<br />

from Kiama’s CBD.<br />

Patrolled beach.<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4232 1790<br />

E: kendalls@kiamacoast.com.au<br />

www.kiamacoast.com.au<br />

From $50-$320 per night<br />

This award winning holiday<br />

park offers luxurious one, two<br />

and three bedroom cabins and<br />

overlooks the Pacific Ocean and<br />

gorgeous Kiama Harbour, with<br />

a backdrop of the mountains.<br />

It is the ideal location and<br />

accommodation for those<br />

seeking an adventure filled<br />

holiday or a quiet rejuvenating<br />

getaway.<br />

Proximity: Opposite patrolled<br />

beach. Overlooks Kiama<br />

Harbour and the Pacific Ocean<br />

Telephone: <strong>02</strong> 4232 2707<br />

E: blowhole@kiamacoast.com.au<br />

www.kiamacoast.com.au<br />

From $195-$340 per night<br />

Located on a scenic beach<br />

between two rocky headlands,<br />

with rock swimming pools<br />

and a natural lagoon, Werri<br />

is an ideal spot. Surfers and<br />

bodyboarders have some of<br />

the best waves on the South<br />

Coast, while others can<br />

enjoy the new resort style<br />

pool. The park caters for all<br />

types with beachfront cabin<br />

accommodation (some with<br />

spas) as well as powered and<br />

unpowered sites.<br />

Proximity: Opposite patrolled<br />

beach and minutes from<br />

Gerringong CBD<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4234 1285<br />

E: werri@kiamacoast.com.au<br />

www.kiamacoast.com.au<br />

From $115 to $260 per night<br />

On the headland overlooking<br />

Kiama’s main beach, the<br />

holiday park is ideally located<br />

for surfers and fishing fans.<br />

The whole family can enjoy the<br />

park’s resort style swimming<br />

pools, games room and the fully<br />

equipped camp kitchen. There<br />

are a variety of accommodation<br />

choices from powered tent<br />

and caravan sites through to<br />

22 luxury cabins, each with<br />

magnificent ocean views.<br />

Proximity: Opposite patrolled<br />

beach, with restaurants and<br />

shops a short stroll away.<br />

Telephone: <strong>02</strong> 4232 1791<br />

E: surf@kiamacoast.com.au<br />

www.kiamacoast.com.au<br />

From $90 -$135 night<br />

Discover Gerroa’s only beachside<br />

holiday park - an award winning<br />

park with magnificent facilities<br />

and a range of luxury beachside<br />

accommodation. The park<br />

offers first class facilities for all<br />

budgets with cabins, surf shacks,<br />

safari tents, en-suite cabins or<br />

camping. Close to shops and<br />

clubs, the park is a water lover’s<br />

paradise offering canoeing,<br />

fishing and of course, surfing.<br />

Proximity: Opposite patrolled<br />

beach. Right between the<br />

Ocean and Crooked River and<br />

adjacent to the Seven Mile<br />

Beach National Park.<br />

Telephone: <strong>02</strong> 4234 1340<br />

E: sevenmile@kiamacoast.com.au<br />

www.kiamacoast.com.au<br />

From $85 - $285 per night<br />

TV<br />

gym<br />

laundry<br />

kitchen<br />

parking wi-fi pool refrigerator family-friendly pet-friendly spa<br />

bbq<br />

Photo: Kiama Tourism<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

79


IBIS WOLLONGONG<br />

Cnr of Church and Market Street<br />

MEDINA EXECUTIVE WOLLONGONG<br />

19 Market Street, WOLLONGONG<br />

QUEST WOLLONGONG<br />

59-61 Kembla Street, WOLLONGONG<br />

Quest Wollongong is the best located<br />

4.5 star accommodation in the Gong,<br />

available for nightly, weekly or monthly<br />

stays. Free secure onsite undercover car<br />

parking available.<br />

Proximity: 60m to Crown street,<br />

400m to the beach.<br />

Ibis Wollongong is a 3.5 star hotel<br />

located in the heart of Wollongong<br />

restaurant and business district, minutes<br />

from beautiful beaches. Winner of Best<br />

Standard Accommodation on the South<br />

Coast 2008, 2009 & <strong>2010</strong>.<br />

The air conditioned rooms include tea<br />

and coffee facilities as well as mini bar<br />

fridges, complete with flatscreen TV and<br />

internet connectivity. Special Access<br />

rooms and facilities are also available.<br />

Proximity: 10 minute walk to the beach<br />

and WIN Entertainment Centre. On the<br />

doorstep of Crown St Mall<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4223 6000<br />

E: H6377@accor.com<br />

www.accorhotels.com/6377<br />

From $119 per room per night<br />

WOLLONGONG SURF LEISURE RESORT<br />

201 Pioneer Road, FAIRY MEADOW<br />

With direct access to the patrolled<br />

beach, this three-and-a-half star<br />

Fairy Meadow beach resort offers 1,2<br />

bedroom + motel style fully selfcontained<br />

family units from $85 per<br />

night (4 persons) or large campsites<br />

from $25 per night (2 persons). Facilities<br />

include a large heated indoor pool,<br />

steam room, two spas, games room,<br />

tennis, mini golf and Austar.<br />

With 71 spacious rooms embracing the<br />

seaside setting within the contemporary<br />

and stylish Medina design.<br />

All apartments have balconies<br />

with many offering views over the<br />

Wollongong coastline and cityscape.<br />

Proximity: 450m to Wollongong beach<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4250 5000<br />

Email: mewg@medina.com.au<br />

www.medina.com.au<br />

Rate per night (average)<br />

$180 for a studio apartment<br />

$215 for one bedroom apartment<br />

$265 for one bedroom and sofa bed<br />

apartment<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4221 1500<br />

E: questwollongong@questapartments.com.au<br />

www.questwollongong.com.au<br />

From $140 per room per night.<br />

Proximity: On the beach and 5km north<br />

of the CBD<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4283 6999<br />

Email: admin@wslr.com.au<br />

www.wslr.com.au<br />

Mention this listing for 10% off<br />

From $25 per night<br />

FLINDERS MOTEL<br />

19 Flinders St, WOLLONGONG<br />

KIAMA COVE MOTEL<br />

10 Bong Bong St, KIAMA<br />

SOUTHVIEW BULLI<br />

19 Southview StreetBULLI<br />

Southview is a newly renovated bed<br />

& breakfast and self contained holiday<br />

accommodation, nestled between<br />

Sandon Point Beach and Bulli Beach.<br />

Recently rated 4.5 stars by AAA tourism<br />

it is the perfect place to unwind and<br />

perfect for the surfer and their family.<br />

SHELLHARBOUR BEACHSIDE<br />

TOURIST PARK<br />

John Street, SHELLHARBOUR<br />

Wollongong’s newest accommodation<br />

complex, the Motel is centrally<br />

located and offers a wide variety of<br />

accommodation for all situations and<br />

occasions. Flinders Motel guarantees<br />

to make your stay in Wollongong a<br />

pleasurable one, whether you are here for<br />

a holiday, business or just passing through,<br />

we can cater for family getaways, sporting<br />

events and large groups. <br />

Kiama Cove Motel is located in the<br />

heart of Kiama, overlooks Surf Beach<br />

with most rooms having ocean views,<br />

air-conditioning, king sized beds and<br />

all with complimentary continental<br />

breakfasts.<br />

Proximity: Nestled Between Sandon<br />

Point and Bulli Beach<br />

Telephone: <strong>02</strong> 4268 6303<br />

Email: info@southviewbulli.com.au<br />

www.southviewbulli.com.au<br />

From $145 per couple per night<br />

The park is located on a headland near<br />

the charming Shellharbour Village<br />

with cafes, restaurants and shops.<br />

Only a short walk to some of the area’s<br />

fantastic surf breaks. Powered sites or<br />

fully self-contained beachside cottages<br />

are available. Pets are welcome on<br />

powered sites with prior arrangement.<br />

Proximity: 3 minutes drive to the beach<br />

and close to surf stores<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4226 6566<br />

Email: info@flindersmotel.com<br />

www.flindersmotel.com<br />

Rates starting from $135<br />

Proximity: Right on Kiama Beach. Short<br />

walk to the main street of Kiama.<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4232 3000<br />

E:kiamacove@bigpond.com<br />

www.kiamacove.com.au<br />

Proximity: On waterfront. Two minute<br />

walk to the heart of Shellharbour Village<br />

Phone: <strong>02</strong> 4295 1123<br />

E: touristpark@shellharbour.nsw.gov.au<br />

www.shellharbourtouristpark.com.au<br />

From $99-$169 per room per night<br />

Rates starting from $29 per night<br />

TV<br />

gym<br />

laundry<br />

kitchen<br />

parking wi-fi pool refrigerator family-friendly pet-friendly spa<br />

bbq<br />

80 56 september nov/dec <strong>2010</strong> <strong>2010</strong>


FIVE<br />

REASONS<br />

1. Fantastic views of Wollongong<br />

2. The best beers, from our own brewery and more<br />

3. Fabulous food. Really.<br />

4. Family friendly dining and entertainment<br />

5. Did we mention the beers?<br />

All the reasons you<br />

need to visit<br />

Wollongong’s premiere<br />

microbrewery &<br />

restaurant<br />

Five Islands Brewing Company<br />

Phone – <strong>02</strong> 422<strong>02</strong>854<br />

WIN Entertainment Centre<br />

Cnr Crown & Harbour Streets, Wollongong NSW 2500<br />

www.fiveislandsbrewery.com<br />

MONDAY<br />

Happy Hour 5pm<br />

- 7pm (FIBC local<br />

beer) + $1 Pool All<br />

Night!<br />

TUESDAY<br />

Happy Hour 5pm<br />

- 7pm (FIBC local<br />

beer) + $1 Pool All<br />

Night!<br />

WEDNESDAY<br />

Happy Hour 5pm<br />

-7pm (FIBC local<br />

beer) + Trivia<br />

6.30pm. FREE to<br />

play, Great prizes,<br />

$10 Trivia kitchen<br />

special.<br />

THURSDAY<br />

Happy Hour 5pm<br />

-7pm (FIBC local<br />

beer) + $1 Pool Local<br />

Live Bands from<br />

8pm $10 Jugs FIBC<br />

local beer, $10 Pizzas<br />

& $9 Cocktails<br />

from 5pm.<br />

FRIDAY<br />

Happy Hour 5pm<br />

-7pm (FIBC local<br />

beer) + $1 Pool,<br />

All day dining from<br />

12pm until late +<br />

Cocktail Specials<br />

from 5pm.<br />

SATURDAY<br />

All day dining from<br />

12pm until late.<br />

Cocktail Bar open<br />

from 5pm.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

SUNDAY<br />

Brunch from 9am.<br />

Summer Sunday<br />

Sessions - Live<br />

acoustic sets from<br />

1pm.<br />

81


Stay in comfort,<br />

walk to the action<br />

Pool area Photo: Southview<br />

FEEL AT HOME ON SANDON POINT<br />

Cnr Market & Church Street<br />

Wollongong<br />

Tel: <strong>02</strong> 4223 6000<br />

Fax: <strong>02</strong> 4223 6006<br />

Ibis Wollongong is located in the heart<br />

of the city, near entertainment and<br />

shopping and only a five minute walk<br />

to North Beach and Harbour.<br />

From only<br />

$129.00<br />

per night*<br />

*See rates online<br />

www.accorhotels.com/6377<br />

When in The Gong, you have to check out its most famous wave - the legendary<br />

Sandon Point. And if travelling as a couple, there is no better place to stay than<br />

Southview Bed and Breakfast.<br />

When it comes to getting away, it helps to find that special yet affordable ‘home<br />

away from home’. Southview Bed and Breakfast is just that. More to the point, it<br />

is just 200m from either Sandon or Bulli Beach - around a two-minute walk with<br />

your board.<br />

Southview has been recently renovated and consists of two separate, private<br />

fully self-contained units. It has been rated four and half stars by AAA tourism.<br />

Your choice is between a seaview or garden unit. I chose the seaview room and<br />

wasn’t disappointed.<br />

After a long day I made my way up to my room, cracked a complimentary<br />

Southview Lager, made by the blokes from Five Islands Brewery Company, which<br />

was mighty fine, then had another and already started feeling better. I phoned<br />

for some home-delivered Thai from a local restaurant, which I found within the<br />

services folder in my room. I put on the tub (there is a massive spa bath in the very<br />

large bathroom) and then chilled out to the music playing on the home stereo.<br />

“200m FROM EITHER<br />

SANDON OR BULLI BEACH”<br />

The best located 4.5 star<br />

accommodation in the Gong<br />

Why settle for anything less?<br />

After dinner I watched some local surf DVDs (part of a large collection of DVDs<br />

provided by Southview) put together by Clarrie Bouma, which featured classic<br />

footage of Sandon Point through the seasons going several years back. It was<br />

the perfect way to relax.<br />

In the morning, my bed was so unbelievably comfortable I struggled to get up.<br />

Once I saw the view from my balcony though, I was up and about to check out<br />

the local surrounds.<br />

Unfortunately, as rare as it was, the point wasn’t working at all. I seem to have a<br />

knack of bringing flat spells with me when I travel down the east coast. Anyhow,<br />

I checked out the beach, the neighbouring sea pool and walking track that winds<br />

its way alongside the coast all the way to Wollongong’s heart. This really is a<br />

magic part of the world. I will be back for sure and next time I will surf Sandon.<br />

Mention this ad to<br />

receive 10% off the<br />

quoted rate!<br />

59-61 Kembla St<br />

Wollongong<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4221 1500<br />

www.questapartments.com.au<br />

Your view Photo: Southview<br />

82 56 september nov/dec <strong>2010</strong> <strong>2010</strong>


Top and above left: The Five Islands Brewery Company.<br />

Above right: The Fireworks Cafe.<br />

This picture: The Ocean Beach Hotel<br />

THE GO FOR FOOD<br />

LOCAL FAVOURITES<br />

Chris Kelly, Fin Box<br />

• Post surf breaky you can’t beat Fireworks cafe<br />

More Street, Austinmer. Its the quaintest little<br />

eatery around these parts.<br />

• For a tradie’s lunch hit up Flemings cake shop<br />

on the south side of Thirroul. Their Pie with<br />

pea’s and sweet treats are off the hook!<br />

• The Headlands Hotel is an old school pub on the<br />

headland above Little Austinmer Beach. Great<br />

beer, good pub food and a billion dollar view.<br />

• If you have the kids in tow, try Scarborough<br />

Hotel. It has a massive lawn area overlooking<br />

the ocean where the kids can run around<br />

while you enjoy a beverage or meal in one of<br />

the huge cabanas.<br />

Paul Nichol, Paul Nichol Shapes<br />

• Beaches Hotel at Thirroul is great for live<br />

music, a couple of beers and a good feed.<br />

John Skipp, Skipp Surfboards<br />

• Ruby’s in the caravan park at Bulli Beach is<br />

very popular with the surfers<br />

Phil Byrne, Byrne Surfboards<br />

• Saffron’s at Thirroul have good hamburgers.<br />

• For the young crew the North Wollongong<br />

Hotel is the best spot. There’s a surf culture<br />

feel to the place and it is full of uni students.<br />

Phil Pepper, Skipp Surfboards<br />

• A couple of scallops and a couple of<br />

schooners at the Beach Hotel after a surf at<br />

The Farm. That’s the best. It can’t be beaten.<br />

Daz Longbottom, Zink Surf on Kiama<br />

• There are still plenty of good bakeries around.<br />

I grew up going to bakeries after a surf - none<br />

of this latte and foccaccia stuff.<br />

OUR RECOMMENDATIONS<br />

Diggies beside the North Wollongong Surf<br />

Club has beautiful food, super fresh and superb<br />

coffee. A spot I have discovered that I will go<br />

back to again and again. Too many dishes to<br />

recommend but here’s two of the best – Poached<br />

pear & ravensthorpe rumble w/ low-fat yoghurt<br />

& honey or Pumpkin panackalty – smoked bacon<br />

& potato hash w/ roasted pumpkin, topped w/<br />

poached egg, rocket and ciabatta toast.<br />

The North Wollongong pub is a great place for<br />

a super cheap feed and a few beers. Even on a<br />

Wednesday night it is packed to the rafters with<br />

loads of big screen TVs inside and even outside<br />

in the beer garden.<br />

iBistro in the Ibis Hotel Wollongong recently<br />

appointed a new executive chef by the name of<br />

Simon Everett, who was formerly a restaurant<br />

owner himself in Kiama. Well, I ate there and<br />

the food was absolutely unbelievable. Two to<br />

recommend – Garlic & chill prawns w/ baby<br />

spinach, spaghetti & chilli mayonnaise or<br />

Mustard crusted spatchcock w/ dirty rice &<br />

suicide sauce.<br />

Grand Hotel in Kiama. Great local feel and tasty<br />

homemade pizzas.<br />

The Perfect Wave Café in Gerringong. I am a<br />

little bit boring when I am out for breakfast - I<br />

love my bacon & eggs. Perfect Wave is a full-on<br />

vegetarian café – nothing with a face or heart.<br />

The food is sensational. The mushroom, poached<br />

egg and ciabatta toast I had was unbelievable,<br />

huge and filling. I didn’t need lunch later that<br />

day. The coffee’s organic but most importantly,<br />

is very good. There’s some great smoothies and<br />

juices too.<br />

TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

Kent Ladkin, Natural Necessity on Gerroa<br />

• Seahaven Café has great food and coffee.<br />

Now to my favourite topic after surfing...<br />

BEER<br />

Five Islands Brewery Company’s main dish... Great beers.<br />

The Five Islands Brewing Company Bar and<br />

Restaurant is situated along the Wollongong city<br />

foreshore. The views of the ocean are spectacular.<br />

There is a huge lawn out front, so there is plenty<br />

of space for the kids to run around before settling<br />

down to a meal and a few drinks.<br />

The food ranges from burgers and light meals to<br />

homemade pizzas, chargrill steaks and seafood,<br />

then there’s the ‘favourites’ menu including lamb<br />

shanks and traditional fish’n’chips and even platters<br />

to share – namely seafood and Mexican. Oohhh.<br />

There is also a kid’s menu with all the classic fare.<br />

As far as wines go, FIBC has the most extensive<br />

wine list in the whole of Wollongong. You name it;<br />

they have more than likely got it.<br />

Then there’s the beer. Yes, liquid nectar is available<br />

in the tap and bottled variety. Choose from various<br />

Australian boutique beers, popular beers, premium<br />

and imported. BUT what you really are here to try,<br />

and MUST try, are FIBC’s very own brewed lagers<br />

and ales. My mouth salivates as I write this. Brewed<br />

locally it means these very, very special beers are<br />

super fresh, chilled and ready to drink. I have to list<br />

them all, for I have tasted them all, and I indeed<br />

love them all. I am Homer Simpson.<br />

Choose from Dapto Draught, Longboard Pale Ale,<br />

Barbeerian Wit, South Peach, Rust or Bulli Black.<br />

Or don’t choose and get a sampler tray of three<br />

different beers for $6.50. Or two to try the whole lot.<br />

But then you’ll probably want more.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

83


TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

HOME TO<br />

Surf legends? Yes, they’re everywhere.<br />

One of the founding fathers of the<br />

Wollongong surf scene, John Skipp<br />

is always around for a chat if you<br />

can catch him at one of the Skipp<br />

Surfboards locations, and Phil Byrne<br />

of Byrne Surfboards can be found in<br />

Fairy Meadow. For getting a feel for the<br />

locals though, any good day at Sandon<br />

Point will see plenty respected names<br />

paddling out, like Paul Nichol of Nichol<br />

Shapes... And you never know who you’ll<br />

run into at the local pubs. Everyone here<br />

just seems to have surfing in their blood.<br />

There’s no shortage of places to go<br />

shopping, as the Gong through to Gerroa<br />

has an incredibly diverse range of surf<br />

shops - each one worth checking out<br />

while you are in area. In particular and<br />

especially for those more arty surfer<br />

types, make sure to visit the newly<br />

opened Fin Box in Thirroul. It’s one<br />

of the coolest surf shops around and<br />

owner Chris Kelly has done a superb job<br />

bringing together some of the finest and<br />

most exclusive range of threads, sleds<br />

and surf art.<br />

For sheer volume of choice, a visit<br />

to Natural Necessity Surf Shop in<br />

Gerringong is a must. It’s quite possibly<br />

the biggest surf store on the east coast.<br />

And while you’re there you can grab a<br />

coffee and a bite to eat at the Perfect<br />

Wave Cafe, which is a tourist attraction<br />

in itself.<br />

So many beautiful places to see,<br />

interesting people to meet and fantastic<br />

spots to surf for all kinds of surfers.<br />

Thinking of planning a surf trip soon?<br />

This should be it.<br />

“THERE ARE SO MANY GOOD<br />

WAVES AROUND, IT WOULD HAVE<br />

TO BE ONE OF THE BEST STRETCHES<br />

IN OZ.” DAZ LONGBOTTOM, ZINK SURF KIAMA<br />

Somewhere around Gerroa<br />

Photo: Lainey Brown laineybrown.carbonmade.com<br />

84 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


GETTING THERE<br />

THE<br />

GONG<br />

AND BEYOND<br />

The best way to get there is by car. There are no direct flights to Wollongong<br />

and unless you have an unlimited about of patience and time, put a line<br />

through rail and bus transport as well. It’s just too complex for my liking.<br />

If flying from Brisbane, Melbourne or a regional hub, fly to Sydney and then<br />

hire a car. The drive down to the heart of The Gong is about an hour and<br />

twenty minutes. If you take the drive through the Royal National Park and<br />

then on to Grand Pacific Drive, you will lose track of time anyhow (particularly<br />

if you take the time to take in some of our favourite pit-stops).<br />

DRIVE TIMES IN AND AROUND THE AREA<br />

Stanwell Tops to Wollongong city centre 32kms 20-25 mins<br />

Wollongong to Shellharbour 25kms 20-25 mins<br />

Shellharbour to Kiama 15kms 10-15 mins<br />

Kiama to Gerroa 12 kms 12 mins<br />

Stanwell Tops to Gerroa 82kms 1hr<br />

FROM BRISBANE<br />

Brisbane to Wollongong is just over<br />

1000 kilometers and around eleven and<br />

a half hours. It can be done in a day if<br />

you are a machine but is best broken up<br />

with a nights stay just north of Sydney.<br />

Follow the Pacific Highway down to<br />

Sydney and from there, after dodging<br />

the traffic, you will eventually get onto<br />

the Princes Highway that basically takes<br />

you all the way to Wollongong.<br />

On the way down, or back, make sure to<br />

stop off at the Bulli Pass Lookout. The<br />

alternative route also takes in Grand<br />

Pacific Drive which is a must.<br />

FROM MELBOURNE<br />

The drive from Melbourne is a relatively<br />

easy one. It takes around seven and<br />

half hours and covers just over 800<br />

kilometers. You could leave early<br />

morning and be there by the afternoon.<br />

Take the Hume Highway through Albury<br />

and then on through famous towns such<br />

as Gundagai, Yass and Goulburn.<br />

From there, simply head towards the<br />

southern highlands and then down<br />

towards the coast.<br />

If you add around an hour to your<br />

journey you can take in the towns of<br />

Bowral, Moss Vale and the magnificent<br />

Kangaroo Valley. It is definitely worth<br />

the extra effort and time.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

85


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TRAVEL: EXPERIENCE<br />

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Asher Pacey at P-Pass<br />

Photo: World Surfaris


THE APPEAL OF PERFECT, UNCROWDED WAVES, BREAKING IN IRIDESCENT CLEAR WARM WATER IS UNDENIABLE, SHARING SUCH MAGIC<br />

MOMENTS WITH FRIENDS OR FAMILY - UNFORGETTABLE. WE EXAMINE THE OVERSEAS SURF TRAVEL PHENOMENA.<br />

WORDS BY DAVE SWAN<br />

Is it just me or am I the only bloody<br />

person on the planet not to have<br />

surfed a tropical island? Everyone<br />

nowadays seems to have just returned<br />

from surfing perfect waves in the<br />

Maldives or somewhere or another.<br />

So why have surfers gone troppo?<br />

SHAUN LEVINGS - World Surfaris<br />

“It’s the lure of overseas surf travel.<br />

People are getting increasingly frustrated<br />

at their local with crowds and fickle<br />

conditions. When they see exotic images<br />

of perfect Maldives and user-friendly<br />

waves in warm water, they go, ‘Get me<br />

the hell out of here.’ “<br />

LOUIS HARRIS - Liquid Destinations<br />

“Today we are asked to perform the<br />

corporate monkey dance longer and<br />

harder. It’s worth every cent to a desk<br />

bound slave to be freed from their<br />

everyday job. For those who do surf,<br />

there isn’t a lot in life that can top sitting<br />

on a boat with a bunch of mates drinking<br />

beers after a days surfing.”<br />

Hallelujah! But have the number<br />

of surfers travelling OS picked up<br />

dramatically?<br />

IAN LYONS - Atoll Travel<br />

“What’s fuelling surf travel is the sheer<br />

number of surfers and places available<br />

from boat charters to resorts and surf<br />

camps. Prior to the late eighties a lot of<br />

these destinations didn’t exist.”<br />

“Surf trips started in the early to mid<br />

seventies. By the early eighties it really<br />

became popular following movies such<br />

as Morning of the Earth. In those days,<br />

to quote Bruce Raymond, people were<br />

‘time rich and money poor’. People<br />

would travel on a shoe string and spend<br />

months in little villages.”<br />

LOUIS: “We’ve come a long way<br />

from our early pioneers who trudged<br />

through mosquito and tiger infested<br />

jungles in search of their Nirvana. The<br />

biggest problems today are broken air<br />

conditioners and warm beer. What used<br />

to be a month or maybe a year long<br />

scour of the tropics in search paradise is<br />

a set ten-day itinerary.”<br />

SHAUN: “We get a pretty diverse group<br />

of people booking holidays these days.<br />

Sure the majority are males but surfing<br />

is growing rapidly in popularity with the<br />

ladies and this is reflected in the groups<br />

we have going on surf trips.”<br />

“It’s the same with families. This market<br />

has grown substantially now there are<br />

surf resorts in the Maldives and Samoa<br />

that cater for children and partners that<br />

don’t surf.<br />

“It’s great to go to a place where you<br />

can ride the most perfect barrels of your<br />

life, afterwards go snorkeling and sailing<br />

with the family and then kick back and<br />

relax for the remainder of the day. Plus<br />

there is so much culture to take in and<br />

enjoy.”<br />

LOUIS: “For some people they do it at<br />

ten years of age with their dad or for<br />

others they wait until they are fifty or<br />

sixty. It’s everyone’s dream to surf an<br />

exotic uncrowded destination in their<br />

lifetime.”<br />

IAN: “When we started sending people<br />

to the Maldives in the early nineties the<br />

average age was thirty-five to forty. Now<br />

the average age is forty-eight.”<br />

“In the early days the older guys were in<br />

their early thirties. Nowadays you have<br />

people in the sixties going on surf trips<br />

– they’re the same people some thirty<br />

years on.<br />

“There’s no real age for giving up<br />

surfing. It’s not just a sport for the young<br />

kids. Surfing is now for six to sixties.<br />

Surfing is also very mainstream in its<br />

acceptance, whereas in the seventies it<br />

was a counterculture.”<br />

So there are no hell-men left?<br />

SHAUN: “We also run a Stealth Travel<br />

Club. Scardi (David Scard) from our Kirra<br />

Office is an astute follower of swell<br />

conditions worldwide. He prides himself<br />

on being able to call when Speedies<br />

Reef (in Grajagan Bay, East Java, known<br />

as G-Land) will be 6 foot and pumping.<br />

He can get it pretty much bang on.”<br />

“A lot of guys from the surf industry<br />

call upon Scardi to make forecasts to<br />

determine whether to send surfers<br />

such as Mick Fanning or Stef Gilmore<br />

up to the Caroline Islands for a bit of a<br />

mission. So we formalised these ‘spurof–the-moment’<br />

missions. The whole<br />

idea is to form a membership of hardcore<br />

surfers. When the time is right for a<br />

given destination, we send out a stealth<br />

alert. Members get a message on their<br />

mobile that goes, ‘Cloudbreak is going to<br />

be 10 foot next Monday, we have 4 spots<br />

available, do you want to jump on?’ “<br />

So how many of these hardcore<br />

surfers are there out there, aside<br />

from those who surf overhead<br />

Moffat Beach… don’t laugh.<br />

SHAUN: “A couple of hundred. Team<br />

managers love it because if they have<br />

high profile team riders in between<br />

contests, they can get them up to Fiji or<br />

wherever and shoot them in the latest<br />

pair of boardies in 8 foot barrels.”<br />

“We also get guys who are fortunate<br />

enough to have pretty flexible work<br />

arrangements or who run their own<br />

business and are in the position to drop<br />

everything and go, ‘Yep, let’s do it.’”<br />

Families are going, groups of mates<br />

are having the time of their lives<br />

and now there’s even blokes going<br />

every couple of months at the drop<br />

of a hat.<br />

But isn’t anyone concerned about<br />

the shark factor? You know, the men<br />

in grey suits? The Noahs? Aren’t<br />

they in abundance in these far flung<br />

destinations?<br />

SHAUN: “We have never had an<br />

incident in thirteen years of sending<br />

some 3000 surfers every year to far-flung<br />

destinations. They’re too well fed.”<br />

How about if you want to go<br />

somewhere a little different to<br />

everybody else, say Norway? I have<br />

seen those guys in the American<br />

surf mags. That looks cool – real<br />

cooool in fact.<br />

SHAUN: “At this stage there’s no real<br />

interest in the extreme cold water stuff.<br />

We were promoting trips to South Africa<br />

a few years ago and had a tour from<br />

J-Bay to Cape Town surfing the Garden<br />

Route. To be honest, there just wasn’t<br />

the demand for it.”<br />

“There are intrepid dudes out there doing<br />

that stuff. You often see the Molloy<br />

brothers surfing Iceland or Vancouver<br />

Island but the ordinary Joe Blow doesn’t<br />

want to don 6mm of rubber and a hood.<br />

Not at this stage anyhow. Our real<br />

market is the tropics – warm water with<br />

beautiful mechanical reef breaks.”<br />

Soft. Sure all these OS surfers are<br />

hell-men when it comes to tackling<br />

15ft Cloudbreak but ask them to put<br />

on a bit of rubber and they go soft<br />

like a marshmallow. Time to drink a<br />

mugaccino of you know what.<br />

Right, so if cold water is off the<br />

menu, where’s the next frontier?<br />

IAN: “The Maldives are perfect for us.<br />

Around three quarters of our customers<br />

have been booking the same tour, in the<br />

same slot, year in, year out for fourteen<br />

years straight.”<br />

LOUIS: “We have a few new frontiers<br />

planned. Stay tuned.”<br />

SHAUN: “The Caroline Islands are<br />

still, I guess, what you would call a<br />

new frontier. It has really only become<br />

known for the last seven years. P-Pass is<br />

regarded by Kelly Slater and Andy Irons,<br />

as the best right-hander they have ever<br />

surfed. On its day it is just a phenomenal<br />

barrel. It’s ‘the glamour’ wave for surf<br />

photographers.”<br />

“Papua New Guinea is also relatively<br />

new. In our summer months it has<br />

become a really popular destination for<br />

Aussies as it is so close to home. We<br />

opened the Tupira Surf Club in Madang<br />

last year. It’s a classic spot that suits<br />

surfers on a budget who want to get off<br />

the beaten track. There’s a great, userfriendly<br />

right-hander directly out front of<br />

the resort.<br />

“PNG doesn’t have as many heavy<br />

hollow extreme waves as say Indo. It’s<br />

just got user-friendly waves and that is<br />

what we are finding a lot of guys and<br />

girls are looking for. They don’t want to<br />

be charging death pits, just user-friendly,<br />

uncrowded waves.”<br />

LOUIS: “One thing is for certain. The<br />

natural progression in a dedicated<br />

surfer’s life is, at some stage, to go on an<br />

overseas surf mission.”<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

87


TRAVEL: PLANE TRIP<br />

88 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


A QUIET SURF<br />

WITH A FEW GOOD MATES<br />

WORDS BY MARK CHAPMAN<br />

Is this a line-up you’d be keen to paddle into? You would, if you were part of the<br />

annual world record attempt for most surfers on a single wave, staged during the<br />

Earthwave festival held at Muizenberg Beach in Cape Town, on the southernmost tip of<br />

Africa. But never fear... there are plenty more waves to be had the rest of the year.<br />

Photo: Lee Slabber<br />

www.leeslabber.com<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

89


Photos right: Craig Wilson<br />

TRAVEL: PLANE TRIP<br />

“TOURIST KILLED<br />

BY ‘DINOSAUR<br />

SIZED’ SHARK...”<br />

This is not a headline you want to see, about the<br />

place you’re heading to, barely two weeks before<br />

boarding the plane. Fish Hoek, literally one beach<br />

away from Muizenberg in Cape Town, South Africa<br />

was the site of the first fatal shark attack in those<br />

waters in the last five years. An unfortunate ocean<br />

swimmer was taken by a white pointer so huge the<br />

word ‘dinosaur’ shot straight to Twitter, seconds<br />

after the event and was picked up immediately by<br />

news organisations around the world. But despite<br />

the macabre fascination people have for shark<br />

stories, it isn’t quite as exciting when you know<br />

that in a few days time you’ll be suited up to look<br />

like a skinny seal, hopping in for a paddle in that<br />

very same water yourself.<br />

With all the beaches closed, shark-spotters on high<br />

alert and the recent blood in the water, surfing in<br />

Cape Town didn’t seem like such a top idea there<br />

and then. But then again, you only live once. And no<br />

big fish - hungry or not - was keeping me out of the<br />

water in one of South Africa’s most fun beaches.<br />

I arrive to thankfully open beaches. We slip the<br />

wetsuits on and head out right away. Our first surf -<br />

about an hour and a half of gliding fun on mini mals<br />

- is strangely uncrowded. We find out later, talking<br />

to one of the locals, we were out under a white<br />

flag, the Shark Spotters signal for a big, hungrylooking<br />

fish swimming around your area right now.<br />

White? Probably because that’s the colour you turn<br />

if you actually come face to face with one.<br />

Day two. It’s either red flags or black flags – high<br />

shark alert or poor visibility, so who knows... But<br />

we go out anyway and are rewarded with a great<br />

day in the sun, and a few extra-long rides.<br />

By day three, any worries of sharks are long gone,<br />

washed away by the relaxing roll of the Muizenberg<br />

lines and we’re just having pure, unadulterated fun.<br />

It doesn’t get much better than this.<br />

Photo: Timothy van der Venter<br />

flickr.com/photos/anothertimothy<br />

90 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


Photo: Craig Wilson<br />

Nestled on the eastern side of the Cape Peninsula,<br />

Muizenberg is commonly referred to as the birthplace<br />

of surfing in South Africa, and due to its learner-friendly<br />

conditions, it’s most definitely been the birthplace of<br />

many a surfer’s love for the water.<br />

Named after one of the region’s postmasters in the<br />

1700’s – Sergeant Muys – the name roughly translates<br />

to Mouse’s Mountain. These days, the pristine stretch<br />

of beach, surrounded by these majestic mountains<br />

Cape Town is so famous for, still proudly maintains its<br />

reputation in the surfing history books.<br />

With a slow rolling wave and relaxed vibe in the water,<br />

the chilled ride is a mirror to what happens on the shore<br />

around the laidback cafes on the beach. But if you’re<br />

after big-wave-riding, heart-pounding, adrenalinpumping<br />

surf, this is most definitely not the beach you<br />

would be visiting – this is for kicking back and taking it<br />

easy. The Indian Ocean waves here are far gentler here<br />

than some other Cape Town breaks and the water is<br />

a good few degrees warmer than on the Atlantic side<br />

of the Peninsula - Muizenberg gets to around 18-20<br />

in summer while the Atlantic folk enjoy ice-cream<br />

headaches and aching feet pretty much most of the year.<br />

For these reasons and more, all kinds of people<br />

gravitate to its shore - a melting pot of colours, cultures,<br />

languages and backgrounds, locals and visitors, all<br />

brought together by surfing.<br />

Well known as an iconic longboarder’s paradise – the<br />

haunt of woody wagons and giant mals in its day -<br />

Muizenberg has also become popular with the Stand Up<br />

folk in recent times. Does this mean it’s too busy now?<br />

Not at all. The beauty of this sand-bottom beach break<br />

is that it would be incredibly hard to crowd it. With a<br />

rideable wave that extends more than a kilometre up<br />

the beach, party waves are the norm. There doesn’t<br />

really have to be any dropping in – you could easily have<br />

ten people up and riding on the same wave without the<br />

least bit of worry about fighting words or ding repairs in<br />

the near future.<br />

In fact, the area of the wave is so wide, Muizenberg<br />

has been host to a number of Guinness Book record<br />

attempts and during the 2009 Earthwave festival, set the<br />

record at 110 surfers on the same wave (a little like Tea<br />

Tree at Noosa on a big swell without some yelling ‘Oi!’)<br />

all riding for at least five seconds. <strong>2010</strong> saw a valiant<br />

attempt of 93 people, but the record remains untouched.<br />

More important than the record itself though is the way<br />

the event brings like-minded surfers together in the area.<br />

As Paul Botha of organisers Kahuna Promotions says…<br />

“a fantastic effort by Cape Town’s surfing community”<br />

as every man, woman, child and family pet make<br />

their way to the beach every year for a mix of surfing,<br />

entertainment and charitable pursuits.<br />

“MUIZENBERG IS COMMONLY<br />

REFERRED TO AS THE<br />

BIRTHPLACE OF SURFING IN<br />

SOUTH AFRICA”<br />

Local surfers line up, ready for the Earthwave Gunness Book record attempt.<br />

Photo: Lee Slabber leeslabber.com, supplid by Kahuna Promotions<br />

91


TRAVEL: PLANE TRIP<br />

Photo: Craig Wilson<br />

flickr.com/photos/creative666/<br />

CONDITIONS<br />

Bottom: sand<br />

Break: slow, rolling wave<br />

Level: beginner to intermediate<br />

Best conditions: NW wind, incoming tide<br />

Best when: Anytime - on at least half the year<br />

Board: Longer and fatter boards are first choice<br />

Water temps: 20 in summer, 15 in winter.<br />

Crowd factor: Crowded at Surfer’s Corner, but<br />

plenty room down the beach<br />

Hazards: Rips and sharks<br />

Of the surfable area along the front, the most popular<br />

spot is tucked up in the corner of the bay. This is<br />

Surfer’s Corner. Although it’s still friendly and easygoing,<br />

this is definitely the busiest section, so for more<br />

space to yourself and less hassle, just paddle down a<br />

little further down where there are still plenty of waves<br />

to be had. It’s not exclusively a longboarders break. You<br />

see a bit of everything here and despite the fact that it’s<br />

not a powerful wave, you still see plenty of shortboards<br />

around enjoying it just as much.<br />

When it comes to boards and trying a few different<br />

options, Gary’s Surf School is right out front for board<br />

hire, as is the Surf Shack – a surf school and store<br />

with jovial and excited staff full of tales and keen to<br />

talk about boards, designs and what works for the<br />

conditions at their home break, which happens to be<br />

offshore in northeast to northwest winds. When the<br />

southeaster kicks in, there’s sometimes a wave that<br />

forms out further to sea, but there would be a huge<br />

paddle through plenty of whitewater to get to it. And<br />

ladies, make sure to check out Roxy’s – a surf school<br />

dedicated to getting girls started in surfing with some<br />

good gear to browse through.<br />

The bohemian village vibe of this historic seaside<br />

suburb comes complete with antique stores,<br />

secondhand bookshops, a hemp shop and Cape Town’s<br />

oldest surf store – The Corner Surf Shop in Main Road<br />

– where you can ogle over a huge range of surfboards<br />

from local shapers as well as see some historical<br />

surfing gear from the region.<br />

Some other worthwhile stops are the Lifestyle Surf<br />

Shop up front and the Stubbs Surfboards factory, a few<br />

blocks back, where you can chat to longtime Photo: locals Steve and Owen<br />

admire some great surfboard craftsmanship.<br />

Photo: Craig Wilson<br />

Photo: Timothy van der Venter<br />

92 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


Photo: Shark Spotters<br />

Photo: Timothy van der Venter<br />

Locals enjoying the surf despite the big fish. Photo: MC<br />

Photo left: Shark Spotters, photo right: Craig Wilson<br />

“...A MELTING POT OF COLOURS,<br />

CULTURES, LANGUAGES AND<br />

BACKGROUNDS, LOCALS AND VISITORS,<br />

ALL BROUGHT TOGETHER BY SURFING”<br />

SHARK SPOTTERS<br />

Now let me preface this by saying, I<br />

don’t think about sharks much. I’m not<br />

usually checking underneath me or<br />

watching the horizon for any movement,<br />

but Cape Town boast the big beasties<br />

so it’s fantastic to know there’s a group<br />

of individuals high up on the mountain<br />

watching over the bay with polarized<br />

binoculars, keeping a constant lookout<br />

for the men in grey suits, or Great White<br />

suits as it turns out.<br />

In 2004, Greg Bertish kicked off the<br />

program with a few people and a few<br />

mobile phones, keeping a lookout<br />

for sharks in the area. With some<br />

fundraising in the surf community<br />

and sponsorship from local business,<br />

the program was formalized and now<br />

employs a group on a full-time basis,<br />

operating in shifts. Using a system of<br />

coloured flags, the crew on the beach<br />

let swimmers and surfers know what<br />

the spotters on the mountainside are<br />

seeing - with green being the one you<br />

want to see flying as you head in.<br />

But according to the folks at Shark<br />

Spotters, shark bites are rare. Since<br />

the 60’s, there have been less than 30<br />

attacks and only a handful of them fatal.<br />

That being said, Muizenberg does rank<br />

as the highest number of sightings –<br />

371 in the last six years - with Fishoek<br />

coming in second at 145.<br />

But Shark Spotters are far from fearmongering<br />

shark-haters and are extremely<br />

active in conservation of the creatures,<br />

stating that these apex predators are a<br />

naturally occurring species in Cape waters<br />

where they play vital roles in the health of<br />

the marine ecosystems.<br />

Great Whites are a protected species<br />

in South African waters and can’t be<br />

hunted or killed, fished or harmed. Trying<br />

any of that could land you behind bars,<br />

out of pocket around $10,000 or both.<br />

For more information, see the website<br />

www.sharkspotters.org.za<br />

Photo: Mila Zinkova<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

93


Since ‘69<br />

THE HIGHEST<br />

QUALITY, HANDMADE<br />

CUSTOM SURFBOARDS<br />

TRAVEL: PLANE TRIP<br />

Evo 7’0 by Greg Hogan<br />

Turbo Fish 6’7 by Glyndyn Ringrose<br />

Photo top: Timothy van der Venter<br />

Right: Buskers at Kalkies.<br />

Above: breakfast at Knead<br />

Photos: MC<br />

With it’s narrow streets, European buildings and terraced houses,<br />

Muizenberg is a perfect holiday base to check out what else Cape Town<br />

has to offer – and it’s plenty. As a tourist destination, the region is rich<br />

with experiences, from visiting wineries, to catching a cable car up Table<br />

Mountain, watching baboons, bushwalking, checking out art, haggling<br />

with street vendor artists over knocking a few cents off the price of a wire<br />

sculpture, eating the most incredible fish and chips, fresh off the boat at<br />

Kalkies in Kalk Bay (do it – it’s awesome) and having drinks at any number of<br />

fantastic bars and clubs (Cape to Cuba is highly recommended).<br />

“GREAT COFFEE AND FANTASTIC FOOD”<br />

Sandy Ryan<br />

Photo: Jules<br />

147 Thompson Ave, Cowes VIC (03) 5952 2578<br />

cowes@islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

225 Smiths Beach Rd, Smiths Beach VIC (03) 5952 3443<br />

smithsbeach@islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

ISLANDSURFBOARDS.COM.AU<br />

But you don’t have to wander far from the Muizenberg beachfront to get fed.<br />

Knead bakery along the front of Beach Road at Surfer’s Corner is a favourite<br />

after-surf stop. With great coffee and fantastic food, it’s a no brainer when<br />

it comes to breakfast time. The Café De May makes some mean crepes,<br />

with a library of surf magazines to flick through while you kick back with a<br />

quality coffee, and The Big Blue Café is certainly also worth a visit, if only to<br />

check out the classic collection of old surfboards from the 70’s and 80’s lining<br />

the ceiling and walls. If you look closely enough, you’ll see a few newer<br />

ones too, as some of the local locals use it as a place to leave their boards<br />

between surfs.<br />

That in itself epitomises the vibe here - relaxed surfing, great food and<br />

friendly people. Yes, it feels like holidays here, with the locals as colourful as<br />

the rows of brightly painted beach huts that run along the foreshore.<br />

When it comes time to head home, it’s a difficult goodbye, but I’m leaving<br />

with some great memories and enough days of fun in the surf to keep me<br />

smiling for weeks to come. I’ll be back.<br />

94 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


KNOW YOUR BOARD<br />

Floatation! Kind of important if you<br />

intend on surfing. If you’re sinking<br />

down to Davy Jones locker, perhaps<br />

you need to turn up the volume.<br />

So what the hell is volume exactly? A<br />

complex question but here are some<br />

hot tips on determining the ideal<br />

volume you may require.<br />

SIZE DOES MATTER<br />

Whether you’re a 120kg 50-year-old, or a 50kg 15-year-old,<br />

you are going to need width and length in a surfboard to<br />

help you learn to surf. The width gives buoyancy, planing<br />

area and stability. One of the major mistakes developing<br />

surfers make is to decrease that width to extremes too<br />

soon. The blame for this can be levelled at professional<br />

surfers (because they surf so well on little boards), the surf<br />

industry (for making it cool to surf on little boards), and<br />

the developing surfers themselves (for believing the hype<br />

around small boards).<br />

The biggest misconception is that you can’t turn wide<br />

boards. One only needs to take a look at guys like Joel<br />

Tudor and Dave Rastovich to see that myth completely<br />

busted. The fact is, for a developing surfer it’s not the<br />

width of a board that will help them improve their<br />

turns, but their technique. And how do you improve that<br />

technique? By catching plenty of waves. And to catch more<br />

waves you are going to need something to float you. Enter<br />

width, length and thickness into the equation. Plus, surfing<br />

is first and foremost about fun. You can’t have any fun - let<br />

alone develop your surfing - if you’re scratching around on<br />

a 6’2’’x18’’ and missing all the waves.<br />

The last 20 years or so saw the shortboard revolution,<br />

and the pros riding smaller boards in bigger waves - even<br />

Kelly Slater. But remember, you aren’t Kelly Slater! And<br />

this is where surfing differs to most other sports. If you<br />

buy yourself the latest and best tennis racquet, golf clubs<br />

WITH GUEST SHAPER,<br />

GREG HOGAN OF ISLAND SURFBOARDS<br />

or fishing reel used by the pros, it might help you improve<br />

towards that high standard, but not with surfing. You need<br />

the equipment to suit your body size, ability and experience.<br />

Remember, we don’t all wear the same size jeans!<br />

The last few decades made surfing small boards cool and<br />

it has left its legacy on a lot of surfers today. Every time I<br />

surf I see at least one guy (usually more) that needs a way<br />

bigger board than what he’s riding.<br />

Remember, the reason that guy at your local break rips<br />

so much on a small board is not because of the board,<br />

but because he has great technique. As you get better,<br />

you too can refine your boards. It doesn’t matter how cool<br />

your board looks in the car park, it’s how it performs in the<br />

water that matters!<br />

The most important thing is to be completely honest with<br />

your shaper about your ability. They are the ones who should<br />

know what is best for someone of your size and experience<br />

- if they don’t, it’s time to get a new shaper. It just takes you<br />

to swallow the ego and admit where you’re at.<br />

Your surfing will thank you for it!<br />

Greg Hogan has over 35 years shaping experience and<br />

involvement with the team at Island Surfboards. He is also a<br />

judge and coach with Surfing Australia.<br />

For more info visit www.islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

INSIDE...<br />

WHAT IS VOLUME?<br />

Not easily calculated without a<br />

comprehensive understanding of<br />

surfboard design but relates to the<br />

length, width and thickness... but also<br />

takes into consideration surface area<br />

and displacement volume. We’ll stop<br />

there before it becomes too confusing.<br />

In short, it is the key ingredient that<br />

floats you and your board.<br />

WHY LITRES ON BOARD SPECS?<br />

It’s used to measure the volume of the<br />

board. Many shapers now use this<br />

measurement along with the length,<br />

width and thickness of the board.<br />

Please note: EPS/ epoxy boards can<br />

have up to 30% more floatation but the<br />

same volume as a normal PU style board.<br />

CONSIDERATIONS<br />

SURFERS ABILITY LEVEL<br />

If you’re developing as a surfer, the<br />

wider and thicker your board, the<br />

easier it will be to surf<br />

SIZE & WEIGHT OF SURFER<br />

A bigger, heavier surfer needs a board<br />

with more buoyancy<br />

TYPE OF WAVES<br />

On a gutless small wave, most surfers<br />

can control a board with more volume.<br />

The bigger the wave gets, the surfer<br />

still needs enough volume to get onto<br />

the wave, but not too much that it<br />

sends the rider skidding across the<br />

surface of the wave without being<br />

able to dig in a rail to turn.<br />

SURFING STYLE<br />

‘Power surfers’ who are less light on<br />

their feet need more volume for when<br />

they shift their weight on the board<br />

TOO LITTLE OR TOO MUCH?<br />

TOO MUCH VOLUME<br />

Your board will go fast but lack control<br />

TOO LITTLE VOLUME<br />

The rider will be able to sink a rail<br />

but lack speed coming out of the turn,<br />

almost stalling on the wave. Plus the<br />

board will be bloody hard to paddle,<br />

making it a pain-in-the-arse to get out<br />

and hard to get on waves.<br />

NEW OLD SCHOOL P94<br />

DOCCO GOES DOWNHILL P116<br />

BRAND NEW BOARDS P1<strong>02</strong><br />

If it floats, it’s here... All the latest designs in shortboards, fish, eggs, longboards,<br />

SUPs and everything else from shapers along the East Coast.<br />

WHERE TO TURN UP THE VOLUME<br />

Going thicker by 1/8 will deliver up<br />

to 4 times more volume than going<br />

up an inch in length and be almost<br />

equivalent to making the board a ½<br />

inch wider. Buying a board and getting<br />

one just right for you is tricky. That’s<br />

why it’s important to talk with your<br />

local surf store board expert or your<br />

local shaper.<br />

Remember, no one surfboard design<br />

will work in all kinds of waves for all<br />

types of surfers. That’s why you need<br />

a quiver, so get building it! For some<br />

inspiration see our board profiles<br />

starting on page 103.<br />

95


GEAR: SHAPER<br />

He may be only 27<br />

years of age but<br />

he’s got a knack for<br />

creating beautiful<br />

retro boards that<br />

work. Proof to this<br />

claim: He recently<br />

won the National<br />

Log Roll at the<br />

Australian Old<br />

Mal titles on his<br />

own craft. He’s<br />

winning contests<br />

and winning over<br />

surfers who love<br />

that traditional style<br />

of surfing.<br />

96 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


Against the odds, Thomas<br />

Bexon is a young guy who’s<br />

gone old school and is<br />

coming up trumps.<br />

GET YOUR<br />

BEX<br />

ONWORDS BY DAVE SWAN<br />

There’s next to no competitive surfers out there competing on their own<br />

boards nowadays. But that’s Thomas, he likes to do his own thing and is not<br />

too concerned with what everybody else is doing. This individualism carries<br />

through to his surfboard design.<br />

Thomas Surfboards are handmade with no compromise on quality. His boards<br />

are made to order with dimensions changed to suit the individual. Thomas has<br />

honed his board making skills within the competitive arena and regular surf<br />

trips... ahh... product test field trips.<br />

His boards look unbelievable, are incredibly fun to ride and personally make<br />

me toey just looking at them. But enough about my problem... We ask Thomas<br />

how he first got into shaping and his love for traditional logs and noseriders.<br />

“I guess I started shaping because no one else was making what I wanted<br />

at the time. I made my first board in Mum’s garage and she hated it. I was<br />

around fourteen at the time.<br />

“I bought a blank, started shaping and it ended up horrible. One side was an<br />

inch wider then the other and it had no rocker and didn’t work at all. I am so<br />

stoked I still have it though.<br />

“I did a few more in Mum’s garage and then got the chance to shape at school.<br />

Maroochy High had surfing as a subject. At the time, only Maroochy High and<br />

Miami High on the Goldie (Gold Coast) taught surfing as a subject. Brian Weirs’<br />

brother, Peter, was my teacher. We learnt how to shape surfboards, foil fins<br />

and fix dings along with some basic woodwork. We got to go surfing heaps as<br />

well. I got to learn the basics. We did four classes a week on everything that<br />

was surf related including how to judge surf contests and film reviews.”<br />

Thomas developed a love for old boards during this time.<br />

“A mate and I stumbled across a few old surf movies that had a bit of logging<br />

in it and we thought it was epic. We became mates with Brodie Weir through<br />

Brian (Weirs Surf Shop in Maroochydore, who have a range of vintage boards<br />

on display and for sale) and he would let us ride the old mals from the shop.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

97


GEAR: SHAPER<br />

“I guess the appeal of the logs was because they were something<br />

different. You didn’t see anyone else riding them. That’s what made<br />

them interesting. Plus, when we started riding longboards, we didn’t<br />

want to ride oversized short boards (by this Thomas is referring to<br />

performance longboards). The other reason is logs suit the suit the<br />

waves here.<br />

“I grew up surfing the waves of Maroochy to Alex (Alexandra Headland)<br />

- so much board-building history in that part of the Coast. Rooster,<br />

McTavish, Pascoe, Les Purcell and Bob Cooper... Heaps of cats made<br />

boards and Noosa was their testing ground. That’s how I’m looking at<br />

it. No better way to test a log than on perfect waves. Now I surf more<br />

Noosa and Coolum, but still get a dose of Bluff now and again.”<br />

Whilst Thomas enjoyed riding these traditional style surfboards, it<br />

appeared no one at the time was actively shaping them.<br />

“I first started shaping logs ten to twelve years ago because no one<br />

was doing them. You couldn’t get a heavy single fin with a rolled bottom<br />

and round rails anywhere. Longboards were really only starting to come<br />

back and the focus was on performance longboards.<br />

“After high school I did three years of Uni studying a bachelorette of<br />

social work. I did a fair bit during that time with disadvantaged kids and<br />

just continued my shaping as more of a hobby.”<br />

When boardmaking turned from hobby to making a living.<br />

“I was shaping boards for myself. Then I started doing a few for some<br />

friends and that’s how I got started. I was initially glassing the boards,<br />

but they were a bit rough so I ended up getting them glassed by Paul<br />

Carson who owns The Factory in Moffat Beach. Next minute Paul<br />

offered me a job.”<br />

For Thomas it was the perfect opportunity to learn how to glass and<br />

shape from one of the most respected surfboard craftsman on the<br />

Sunshine Coast.<br />

“Paul was, and is, a perfectionist. In a way, that was good. When I first<br />

learned to do some polishes and stuff like that, I would say, ‘Yes, look<br />

how good this is’ and he would come in and say, ‘Fix that, fix this.’ It<br />

would shatter you. I think I was being paid $20 - $30 per polish, but they<br />

took me hours. I did get quicker at it.<br />

“I learnt so much from Paul. I had shaped before but had never had<br />

anyone telling me if I was doing it right or wrong. It was just trial and<br />

error. He gave me tips on numerous things like channels and so forth.”<br />

After four years at The Factory, Thomas took up a shaping bay at<br />

Hayden Surfcraft at Kunda Park. Steeped in history, the Hayden factory<br />

was just the place to further his development.<br />

“To be in a place where George Greenough and Bob McTavish did their<br />

thing is pretty cool. All the old templates are still upstairs. They have<br />

the same band saw they used in 1962. I was cutting out fins the other<br />

day and thinking, ‘Greenough used this same band saw to cut out fins.’<br />

It is pretty amazing.<br />

“Because they (Hayden) are doing everything from surfboards through<br />

to the clubbie stuff you have access to all different types of material.<br />

You can use the coolite foam, epoxy and carbon fibre. “<br />

As to his detractors, who dismiss Thomas because he is so young, he<br />

has already won so many of them over.<br />

“I’ve had a few old guys that have said ‘You can’t make longboards. You<br />

weren’t riding them when they were originally made.’ Of course I wasn’t.<br />

I wasn’t born then. But everyone has to start somewhere and I am just<br />

trying to do my thing. And now I’m winning a lot of the old guys over. I am<br />

shaping boards for them and their friends and their friends and so on... so<br />

I must be doing something right.”<br />

Thomas is incredibly humble. But then again, he can afford to be. His<br />

boards speak for themselves. They are all class.<br />

Photo: Keith Hamlyn fotosinnoosa.com<br />

98 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


SURFERS<br />

GARDEN<br />

Thomas’s surfboards are not only a little out of the ordinary, so is the<br />

way he lives his life. He lives in a surfers’ commune of sorts right<br />

near the beach, not far from Coolum.<br />

Together with a group of mates – Doc (Thomas Bexon), Little-man<br />

(Mark Sharp - Thomas’ key test pilot), surfersgarden (Thom O’Brien)<br />

and Jacob Stuth - live a life reminiscent of movies such as Morning<br />

of the Earth. The group document their every day on their blog site<br />

surfersgarden. Thomas explains their ‘Country Soul’ style of living.<br />

“I slid into it with a friend who already lived there. I was just lucky<br />

enough to move in with him.<br />

“It’s just a bunch of houses, all real close, without a fence in<br />

between. The set up is a group of good surfers living in the same<br />

area and on the same wavelength.<br />

“Out back of one of the houses we have this garden where we grow<br />

all our fresh fruit and veges. We go surfing and talk about the garden<br />

or cooking and stuff like that. Whatever we do, we tend to document<br />

it on our blog.”<br />

We discussed the advantages of living so close to the beach.<br />

“From the back of the house, we can see the water. We just open<br />

the door and there’s the surf. The house is cool but old. When it rains<br />

it leaks. When there’s a strong wind, you can feel the house moving.<br />

That’s ok though because it is such a good spot.“<br />

As a blog, surfersgarden has a great deal more appeal than the norm.<br />

It’s littered with heaps of cool surfing pics, loads of Thomas’s boards<br />

and various other surf craft, along with some great recipes. It takes<br />

you away from the mundane of everyday life, perhaps even providing<br />

you with a chance to step back in time.<br />

Check it out at surfersgarden.blogspot.com<br />

DESIGN<br />

FOCUS In traditional logs<br />

and noseriders, for Thomas it comes down to rolled<br />

bottoms and rails.<br />

“What I am doing is a little bit different to the<br />

traditional longboards. My boards, in particular,<br />

have quite rolled bottoms. I found they work better.<br />

They’re just better for logging, stall-turns, sideslips,<br />

trim and good old-fashioned noseriding.<br />

“I have kept refining what I am doing. I am really<br />

happy with how my longboards perform now. I think<br />

after surfing them for so long and doing so many, I<br />

have worked out what really works when it comes<br />

to a traditional longboard.<br />

“A lot of my ideas are stolen off what they were<br />

doing in the late 60s in California and here in<br />

Australia. There was a pretty crazy progression<br />

in surfing history. A lot of the boards they were<br />

shaping had many great characteristics, but some<br />

aspects of their design don’t necessarily work in our<br />

waves here. They had noseriding wired, but some of<br />

the shapes just don’t cut it in hollower waves.”<br />

But why the love for rolled bottoms?<br />

“They are probably a bit harder at the start to ride.<br />

The board is a bit ‘tippier’. It’s not as stable but<br />

because of the roll, you get so much more control<br />

on the nose. You can stand on the nose and with<br />

your back foot shift your weight and fully change the<br />

direction of the board without having to walk back<br />

off the nose. They are a lot more manouverable.<br />

“With the rolled bottom and round rail, I have the deck<br />

flatter. This means the board sits flatter in the water. I<br />

am purposely slowing the board down so it is easier to<br />

noseride. I don’t want them to go fast. I mean you do,<br />

but just not too fast when you’re perched.<br />

“In addition, concaving the decks at the tail gets rid<br />

of volume and makes the boards a bit easier to turn.<br />

I also do not foil the fins in the traditional way. I am<br />

leaving them quite flat so you go slower. You want<br />

the board to hold when you are noseriding.<br />

“These design elements allow you to noseride in the<br />

critical part of the wave as opposed to out on the<br />

shoulder as you do with a performance longboard.<br />

You can noseride right in the pocket and stay there<br />

longer. It gives you a better feeling.<br />

STEPDECKS<br />

“I have been playing around with stepdecks a lot<br />

lately. They get rid of volume at the front of the board.<br />

This way you have a bit more rocker in the board.<br />

“When you are noseriding, because of the step<br />

and the fact the nose is thinner, the board flattens<br />

down quickly and you obtain trim quicker. Hence,<br />

the board takes off when you are noseriding. It just<br />

flexes more and gives you more control and is more<br />

fun. You can feel the bounce in the board.<br />

“You can run up the nose of the board and push<br />

it down and feel the board flex, flatten and speed<br />

up. That is the idea behind it. I think it works. One<br />

I recently shaped is the best board I have ridden in<br />

little waves.”<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

99


GEAR: SHAPER<br />

The length of boards you are shaping?<br />

“In terms of logs, I am mostly shaping boards<br />

9’4 to 10ft. Even guys who are lighter, say<br />

around 75 kilograms, are requesting boards<br />

9’6 to 9’8 but just a little thinner. Just because<br />

they are logs they don’t necessarily need to<br />

be super fat and chunky. Some are only 2 3/8<br />

thick. In many ways it is not the size of the<br />

board that makes them work but the shape,<br />

particularly with regards to the rolled bottoms<br />

featured in my boards.”<br />

FINS “I am mostly making my<br />

own fins. I am looking at what delivers the<br />

most hold when noseriding. The real straight<br />

hatchet fins are good but they are a bit jerky<br />

through turns, they don’t flow.<br />

“The fins I am creating are…well, big.<br />

They still have rake and curve but with a<br />

real wide base. A real big tip as well. By<br />

having the curve instead of the straighter<br />

traditional hatchet fin, they are just that little<br />

bit smoother through turns. Instead of just<br />

being good for pivot turns you can flow your<br />

turns more. My fins also make you go slower<br />

- I do this purposely for noseriding. There’s<br />

more drag, making the board more stable for<br />

getting out on the nose.<br />

“Glassed-in fins are definately the go for my<br />

boards. I can do boxed fins, but because I<br />

shape the tail of the boards really thin for the<br />

last 6 or so inches, you can’t get the box far<br />

enough back without it popping through the<br />

deck. When I glass the fins, my rule is the tip of<br />

the fin sits in line with the tail of the board so<br />

the base of your fin only ends up about 4 inches<br />

from the back of the board. I find it just works.”<br />

What else are you doing?<br />

“I am shaping quite a fair number of twinnies,<br />

simmons and performance quads, hulls and<br />

eggs, as well as a few alaias, of late.<br />

“Everyone knows that Tom Wegener started<br />

the alaia thing. I was lucky to see a lot of what<br />

Tom was doing whilst working at The Factory.<br />

“When Tom started shaping the alaias, a lot<br />

of people just didn’t want to hear about it.<br />

But because Tom was so stoked and so into<br />

it, and persevered with it, I guess more and<br />

more people were willing to give it a go. I was<br />

one of them. Since then I have started playing<br />

around shaping various styles of alaias.<br />

“Alaias take you back. If you have been<br />

surfing for a few years, you know what you<br />

can do on a surfboard. But when you jump<br />

on an alaia, you start all over again. They<br />

develop your surfing by pushing everything<br />

you know out the window.<br />

“At the moment I am getting some one piece<br />

Paulownia blanks from a local guy in Maleny<br />

(Most blanks are made of several strips of<br />

wood. A one piece blank is very rare). That’s<br />

pretty exciting. I can’t wait to shape a few<br />

and test them out.”<br />

HAND<br />

PLANES “They give<br />

me something to do in summer when we cop the<br />

northerly winds up here. I used to use the scraps<br />

of wood left over from the alaias I shaped. At first<br />

they were just for me and my mates to muck around<br />

with but it’s surprising the amount of interest I have<br />

had with them. They have really taken off. I’m now<br />

having to order wood especially for them.”<br />

“Using Paulownia means you can get a lot of<br />

concave and shape to the hand planes. I have<br />

made varying lengths and even a few with pintails.<br />

It is amazing the difference you can feel with the<br />

various shapes. When the surf is crap, people can<br />

still go out and get stoked on them.<br />

“Take a pair of flippers and boardies and then drop<br />

in on your mates and just have fun. Four of you can<br />

catch one wave, ride on each other’s backs… just<br />

be stupid. It takes you back to being a kid again<br />

and you are all smiles.”<br />

100 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


THE BOARDS<br />

TRADITIONAL LOGS<br />

& NOSERIDERS<br />

Just like yesteryear but with<br />

a twist. Designed specifically<br />

for our conditions and to<br />

allow you to camp out on the<br />

nose all day. These boards<br />

deliver real speed when you<br />

are noseriding in the pocket<br />

and not just on the shoulder<br />

of the wave.<br />

PERFORMANCE<br />

LONGBOARDS<br />

Sort of self-explanatory.<br />

Performance longboards<br />

are suited to the surfer that<br />

wants to be able to combine<br />

tail surfing with noseriding.<br />

Usually glassed light to offer<br />

performance and maximum<br />

freedom from the tail.<br />

MIDLENGTHS & HULLS<br />

Suited to larger, more hollow<br />

waves midlengths feature a<br />

rounded pintail and a ‘two plus<br />

one’ fin setup with a big centre<br />

fin and small side ‘biters’.<br />

Hulls, with a super-flexi finger<br />

fin, slight rolled bottom and<br />

flat rocker haul arse down the<br />

line. Usually in the 7-8ft range<br />

allowing freedom to move up<br />

and down the board, these<br />

suckers are trim and glide<br />

machines that will take lines<br />

nothing else will.<br />

TWIN FIN FISHES<br />

The retro style of the fish<br />

is as popular as the cruiser.<br />

With plenty of area and trim<br />

capabilities, Twinnies are ideal<br />

for points or small to medium<br />

beach breaks. Loose, fun boards<br />

to ride. The more performance<br />

twins love a hollow wave, and<br />

then there’s the Simmons which<br />

will trim to your heart’s content.<br />

QUAD FIN FISHES<br />

Quads are more performance<br />

orientated than the twin<br />

fins, with extra drive and<br />

maneuverability. Quads are best<br />

described as a blend between<br />

a Twinnie and a Thruster,<br />

borrowing elements from both.<br />

Shape design depends on what<br />

type of waves the individual<br />

intends surfing.<br />

Retro, vintage, old-school... Call it what you like, but the design principles, styles and ideas of the past are as relevant today as they were 60 years ago, and modernised or<br />

reworked through the eyes and hands of master craftsmen such as Thomas Bexon guarantee they’ll remain that way for many, many years to come.<br />

“SHAPING IS LIKE SURFING... I’M SO STOKED ON BOTH”<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

101


GEAR: FORUM<br />

“SURFBOARDS<br />

HAVE RISEN<br />

LITTLE<br />

MORE THAN<br />

AROUND $70<br />

IN SEVENTEEN<br />

YEARS”<br />

AUSTRALIAN MADE OR NOT, OR KIND OF...<br />

Our objective at smorgasboarder is to<br />

always encourage our readers to think for<br />

themselves by presenting a fully rounded<br />

perspective on issues that affect us as<br />

surfers.<br />

At present, there is no issue more topical,<br />

or indeed controversial, affecting the<br />

Australian surf industry than imported<br />

surfboards.<br />

The further we delve into the topic,<br />

the more we uncover a whole range of<br />

issues, all of which are intertwined.<br />

These are namely:<br />

ÌÌ<br />

ÌÌ<br />

ÌÌ<br />

ÌÌ<br />

ÌÌ<br />

ÌÌ<br />

ÌÌ<br />

ÌÌ<br />

ÌÌ<br />

ÌÌ<br />

Wholly Australian made boards<br />

vs. Australian shaped boards made<br />

overseas<br />

Traditional PU/ Polyester boards<br />

vs. EPS Foam/ Epoxy Resin boards<br />

Performance<br />

Their suitability to the beginners<br />

market<br />

The commercial viability of local<br />

Australian production<br />

Workplace health and safety issues<br />

Custom shaped boards vs. stock<br />

boards, albeit based on proven<br />

templates<br />

Free world trade vs. protecting<br />

Australian industry<br />

The hypocrisy of demanding cheap<br />

products but insisting they are<br />

Australian made. Is this a reality?<br />

Whether the same rules that apply<br />

to surfboards also apply to clothing?<br />

In investigating these issues we have<br />

determined it is not possible to cover<br />

such a complex subject in one small<br />

page. The issue raises so many questions<br />

for both the consumer and the surf<br />

industry itself.<br />

As a result we would like to open<br />

this discussion to you, our readers -<br />

Australian surfers - and invite comment<br />

from people from within the surf industry.<br />

We plan to publish these comments in an<br />

expanded editorial piece in our January<br />

edition of smorgasboarder.<br />

Firstly, what of the surfboards made<br />

wholly and solely here in Australia?<br />

A vast majority of talented Australian<br />

shapers, manufacturing surfboards in our<br />

country today, are struggling to survive in<br />

a less-than-perfect work environment. To<br />

be frank, many find it hard to make ends<br />

meet, working incredible hours just to<br />

scrape together some sort of a living.<br />

Most Aussie shapers do what they do for<br />

love not money and would be amongst<br />

some of the lowest, if not the lowest,<br />

paid workers in the country.<br />

A basic shortboard retails for between<br />

$650 to $700. The margin per board is<br />

about $200. If those boards are sold<br />

through retail outlets, the margin is close<br />

to $100 or less.<br />

Considering an average shortboard takes<br />

some ten hours to shape, that works out<br />

to be between $10 to $20 per hour the<br />

shaper is being paid for his or her time.<br />

At this point, it is important to bear in<br />

mind a shaper takes at least some ten<br />

years to develop their skill.<br />

Out of that $100 to $200 then comes tax,<br />

staff wages (if the shaper has any staff),<br />

and various other business running costs<br />

such as rent, plant and machinery etc.<br />

Despite this, we as consumers in the<br />

majority, want our boards cheaper. We<br />

want leg-ropes thrown in, deck grips,<br />

cheap board bags… oh, and wax too.<br />

That leaves next to no margin and the<br />

fact surfboards have risen little more than<br />

around $70 in seventeen years highlights<br />

the plight of many in the industry within<br />

Australia. That’s a price increase of less<br />

than 1% per year. Compare that to the<br />

increase in the cost of living and various<br />

products and services, particularly in<br />

relation to skilled trade services e.g. think<br />

of a plumber for instance.<br />

Then there are various types of imported<br />

boards, adding further pressure to an<br />

already price sensitive market.<br />

Australian designed surfboards<br />

manufactured overseas<br />

Overseas production has proved lucrative<br />

to some Australian shapers and delivered<br />

fitting reward for their years of service to<br />

the industry and product development.<br />

Are they not entitled to reap some return<br />

for all their hard work and innovation?<br />

Shapers such as Bob McTavish, Wayne<br />

Lynch, Mark Richards, Bill Tolhurst, Greg<br />

Webber and Phil Byrne and are now<br />

involved in the successful export of Tuflite<br />

surfboards to the Northern Hemisphere<br />

bringing in valuable export revenue into<br />

the Australian economy. Nev Hyman of<br />

Firewire Surfboards is also doing the<br />

same with new technology employed in<br />

the construction of his surfboards.<br />

One of the apparent reasons for the<br />

pursuit of offshore production is the<br />

transition from traditional Polyester<br />

Resin/ PU surfboards to EPS Foam/ Epoxy<br />

Resin construction. People in favour of<br />

offshore production would maintain it<br />

is not economically viable to produce<br />

surfboards utlising this new technology<br />

here in Australia. Proponents of this<br />

new technology would also argue Tuflite<br />

surfboards are far superior in their<br />

performance. That in itself is another<br />

point of contention.<br />

As with everything, there are always two<br />

sides to any story. We’re keen to hear<br />

yours. But please always remember, the<br />

beauty of surfing is that everyone has<br />

differing points of view; whether it be the<br />

type of board you ride, what it is made of<br />

or where it comes from.<br />

Send your thoughts and comments to<br />

letters@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

1<strong>02</strong> nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

The King<br />

by Zak Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Zak Koniaras<br />

Dimensions:<br />

7’6” x 22” x 3 ¼”<br />

Ideal conditions: Summer<br />

slop to point breaks<br />

Ability level: Novice to<br />

intermediate<br />

Suits: 90kg+<br />

Description: This big<br />

boys’ hybrid has plenty<br />

of volume over the chest,<br />

flat into vee bottom and<br />

double flyers to give<br />

you tanks a surfboard<br />

with plenty of float<br />

without compromising<br />

manoeurability.<br />

Construction: PU foam,<br />

polyster resin, 6oz bottom,<br />

10oz deck<br />

Fins: 5-fin setup<br />

Shaper comment: We<br />

are always playing with<br />

templates for the big boys<br />

and this shape has been<br />

a good seller over the last<br />

few years. It’s always hard<br />

to offer plenty of volume in<br />

a board and still keep the<br />

freedom of a shortboard<br />

without going to EPS.<br />

The Pea<br />

by Chaos<br />

Shaper: Jon McLeay<br />

Dimensions: Examples:<br />

5’6” x 19 ¼ x 2 3 /8<br />

5’10” x 20 1 /8 x 2 5 /8<br />

Ideal conditions: 1 - 5ft.<br />

Extremely versatile<br />

Ability level: Fun for all<br />

Description: Deep<br />

concaves under the chest<br />

keep it responsive and<br />

free under the front foot.<br />

Drivey as a quad and so<br />

smooth as a rounded pin.<br />

Great as a thruster in<br />

the bigger stuff if you’re<br />

willing. To be ridden about<br />

5 - 6 inches smaller than<br />

your shortboard and about<br />

1 /16 thicker , ¾ wider<br />

Construction: Stick with<br />

whats best works for you,<br />

and your pocket - PU<br />

Fins: Quad with the<br />

choice as a thruster<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

We’re experimenting and<br />

playing with our foam<br />

more than ever, creating<br />

you exciting new sticks.<br />

Support and believe in the<br />

art of hand shaping before<br />

it’s lost! Enjoy a pea today.<br />

King George Fish<br />

by Island<br />

Shaper: Greg Hogan<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’5”x 20 ¾”x 2 ¼”<br />

(from 5’10’’ to 7’6’’)<br />

Ideal conditions: Small<br />

to medium, flatter and<br />

less than ideal waves<br />

Ability level: All levels<br />

outside of rank beginner,<br />

great progression board for<br />

beginner, must-have for the<br />

competent surfer to make<br />

the most of a surf when<br />

the waves are lacking.<br />

Description: A fish<br />

in a shortboard’s body.<br />

Pulled in swallow tail and<br />

relatively narrower nose<br />

than other fish allows high<br />

performance in better<br />

waves, but width around<br />

chest area gives paddle<br />

and planing ability.<br />

Construction: PU, glassed<br />

in combination 6oz and 4oz<br />

Fins: Tri or quad fin setup,<br />

Futures or FCS<br />

Shaper comment: Wave<br />

range, wave range, wave<br />

range. To perform when<br />

the waves aren’t, but if it<br />

gets a little testing, you<br />

can rely on this to get you<br />

in the spot you want to be.<br />

Blues Buster<br />

by COD<br />

Shaper: Paul Uscinski<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’2” x 19 13 /16 ” x 2 9 /16 ”<br />

or customized to suit<br />

Ideal conditions: 1 - 6ft<br />

Ability level: Beg to adv<br />

Description: Heaps<br />

of drive and stability.<br />

Very maneuverable due<br />

to slightly more tail lift<br />

and responsive using a<br />

combination of a smooth<br />

rocker entry with single<br />

concave, flowing to double<br />

concave to vee in the tail.<br />

Extra drive and release of<br />

double flyers and swallow<br />

tail. Balanced thickness<br />

and accurate foil for a high<br />

performance feel.<br />

Construction: Hand shaped<br />

PU foam and polyester<br />

resins, 6 or 4 oz glass.<br />

Fins: 5-fin FCS system for<br />

quad, thruster or 5 fin setup<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Well balanced board for<br />

confidence in a wide<br />

range of surf conditions.<br />

Get up and plane quickly<br />

so you can catch heaps of<br />

waves. Supa fun!! 100%<br />

satisfaction guaranteed.<br />

Shortboard<br />

by Lee Cheyne<br />

Shaper: Lee Cheyne<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’2” x 19 ¼” x 2 7 /16”<br />

Ideal conditions: 1 - 3ft<br />

Ability level:<br />

Novice to advanced<br />

Suits: 80+kg<br />

Description: This is a<br />

step down board with a<br />

deep concave under the<br />

front foot, into vee double<br />

concave through the tail,<br />

full curve outline with<br />

wide point 4” further back.<br />

The perfect board for<br />

those smaller days.<br />

Construction: Burford<br />

foam, Surf 9 4oz glass and<br />

Silmar resin.<br />

Fins: FCS 5-fin setup for<br />

the best of both worlds<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

This style of board has<br />

awesome speed and<br />

it feels really light and<br />

responsive off the back<br />

foot. Available in most tail<br />

shapes!<br />

ZAK SURFBOARDS<br />

307 Victoria Road<br />

Thornbury VIC 3071<br />

Ph: 03 9416 7384<br />

Mobile: 0438 416 738<br />

zak@zaksurfboards.com<br />

zaksurfboards.com<br />

CHAOS SURFBOARDS<br />

1/236 Harbord Road<br />

Brookvale NSW<br />

Ph: <strong>02</strong> 9907 2769<br />

M: 0410 707 079<br />

E: jon@chaossurfboards.com<br />

chaossurfboards.com<br />

ISLAND SURFBOARDS<br />

147 Thompson Ave,<br />

Cowes, Phillip Island VIC<br />

Ph: 03 5952 2578<br />

E: cowes@<br />

islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

COD SURFBOARDS<br />

25 Kestrel Court<br />

Victoria Point, QLD 4165<br />

Ph: 0415 722 891<br />

paul@codsurfing.com.au<br />

www.codsurfing.com.au<br />

LEE CHEYNE DESIGNS<br />

19/48 Machinery Dr,<br />

Tweed Heads South<br />

NSW 2486<br />

Ph: 07 5523 3237<br />

lcdboards@gmail.com<br />

myspace.com/454626994<br />

tradewindsurf.com.au<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

103


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

Flextail<br />

by Bushrat<br />

Shaper: Jed Done<br />

Ideal conditions: An allrounder<br />

to work from 1’ to 6’.<br />

Ability: Int to adv<br />

Suits: Custom-built for a<br />

good surfer about 6’3” and<br />

85kg, but can be built for<br />

any age, weight and size<br />

Description: A transition<br />

board for a conventional<br />

surfer making the<br />

progression to flextails.<br />

Construction: Single<br />

stringer PU blank, glassed<br />

in polyester resin with 7”<br />

flex tail glassed in carbon<br />

fibre and vinylester resin<br />

Fins: 4-Way Fin System for<br />

fine tuning the surfboard<br />

for rider after it’s built, with<br />

Z-fins for the extra flow<br />

and release off the top<br />

Shaper comment: These<br />

flextails have a negative<br />

tail rocker, which increases<br />

down-the-line speed and<br />

drive. Once tail is loaded<br />

in a turn it flexes to suit<br />

the arc in which you’re<br />

travelling, then springs back<br />

to a negative position at the<br />

apex of the turn giving the<br />

board continuous stored<br />

energy, which equals top<br />

end speed.<br />

BUSHRAT SURFBOARDS<br />

Merimbula NSW<br />

Ph: 0409 813 431<br />

E: jed@bushrat.com<br />

www.bushrat.com<br />

Blunt<br />

by Primitive Surf<br />

Shaper: Craig Rees<br />

Dimensions: (Above)<br />

6” x 19 ½” x 2 3 /16”<br />

Ability level:<br />

Intermediate and up<br />

Suits: Different sizes<br />

Description: The Blunt<br />

was born when a long<br />

term customer came to<br />

me asking for me to make<br />

him a board similar to<br />

what Dane Reynolds had<br />

been riding. When it was<br />

finished it looked and felt<br />

insane. I realised that it<br />

was similar in the back to<br />

our Punt model... the Nose<br />

was wider and the rocker<br />

slightly different, but<br />

basically it was a tweaked<br />

Punt, hence: The Blunt.<br />

Construction: PU foam<br />

with polyester resin,<br />

vacuum bagged with<br />

carbon fibre rails.<br />

Fins: Thruster or quad<br />

Shaper comment: This<br />

board should be about<br />

2-3 inches shorter than<br />

your standard shortboard,<br />

the same thickness and<br />

an inch wider.<br />

PRIMITIVE SURF<br />

601 Nudgee Rd,<br />

Nundah, Qld 4012<br />

Ph: 07 3266 1001<br />

E: info@primitivesurf.com<br />

www.primitivesurf.com<br />

Flying Fish<br />

by Skipp Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Chad Ryan<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’0”x 19 1 /8”x 2 5 /16”<br />

Ideal conditions: 1 - 5ft.<br />

Incredibly versatile<br />

Ability level:<br />

Intermediate to advanced<br />

Description: Concave<br />

under the chest makes it<br />

responsive on the front<br />

foot, to double through<br />

the fins for extra squirt.<br />

Super-fast and loose,<br />

yet responsive in the<br />

small stuff. Extra width<br />

throughout board for good<br />

float. To be ridden 2-4<br />

inches smaller than your<br />

shortboard.<br />

Construction: Polyester<br />

construction, Standard or<br />

team glassing.<br />

Fins: Thruster, quad, or<br />

have it plugged for both.<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Experimentation is the<br />

go with my shapes at<br />

the moment - to create<br />

the most radical, yet<br />

functional surfboards.<br />

SKIPP SURFBOARDS<br />

FACTORY SHOWROOM<br />

24 Flinders St<br />

North Wollongong, NSW<br />

Ph: <strong>02</strong> 4228 8878<br />

CITY SURF CENTRE<br />

231 Crown Street<br />

Wollongong City, NSW<br />

Ph: <strong>02</strong> 4229 12<strong>02</strong><br />

E: factory@skippsurfboards.com.au<br />

skippsurfboards.com.au<br />

The Munter<br />

by Zak Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Zak Koniaras<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’4” x 20 ¼” x 2 5 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions: 2 - 5ft<br />

Ability level: Intermediate<br />

Description: An old<br />

80’s template revamped,<br />

this board flys! Single<br />

into double concave, low<br />

entry rocker, low to mid<br />

rails, single flyer swallow,<br />

everything to make this<br />

board handle sucky<br />

beachies to long point<br />

breaks. Plenty of volume<br />

over the chest makes<br />

paddling super easy.<br />

Construction: PU glassed<br />

with 6oz bottom, 10oz deck<br />

Fins: FCS or Futures -<br />

whatever you prefer<br />

Shaper comment: Super<br />

easy and super fast board<br />

to ride with plenty of float.<br />

Loves tight arc turns and<br />

and gives you plenty of<br />

release.<br />

ZAK SURFBOARDS<br />

307 Victoria Road<br />

Thornbury VIC 3071<br />

Ph: 03 9416 7384<br />

Mobile: 0438 416 738<br />

zak@zaksurfboards.com<br />

zaksurfboards.com<br />

Cuttlefish<br />

by Shotgun<br />

Shaper: Tully St.John<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’7” x 19 ¾” x 2 ½”<br />

Ideal conditions: 2 - 5 ft<br />

Ability level:<br />

Novice to pro<br />

Suits: All weights<br />

Description: This is<br />

the ultimate small wave<br />

weapon. Surfs really well<br />

on both beach breaks and<br />

points. We can customise<br />

to the person’s height<br />

weight and surfing ability.<br />

Construction:<br />

Stringerless or stringered,<br />

PU or epoxy<br />

Fin set-up: Thruster or quad<br />

Shaper comment: This<br />

board has a deep single<br />

concave and super loose<br />

plan shape. It also comes<br />

in a swallow tail or square.<br />

NOOSA SURFWORKS<br />

11 Bartlett St,<br />

Noosaville QLD<br />

Ph: 07 5474 4567<br />

E: info@noosasurfworks.com.au<br />

noosasurfworks.com.au<br />

104 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

Dynocore TM WD<br />

by Diverse<br />

Shaper: Dave Verrall<br />

Dimensions: Custom only!<br />

Ideal conditions: Smaller<br />

to average size days<br />

Suits: A performance<br />

surfer who wants a<br />

strong, user-friendly board<br />

Description: Made with<br />

DYNOCORE technology,<br />

incorporating a high tech<br />

fusion of fibres and foam.<br />

Construction: A fusion<br />

of four specialty fabrics<br />

combined in the right<br />

place to launch you out<br />

of turns and off lips,<br />

while remaining steady<br />

underfoot. The core is a<br />

tight beaded EPS foam<br />

without a stringer, opening<br />

the door to flex tuning<br />

with shape and fabric.<br />

Glassed with some of the<br />

most technicaly correct<br />

surfboard epoxy resin.<br />

Fins: Fin Solutions 3-in-1<br />

plug for strength and drive<br />

Shaper comment: A<br />

lightweight, durable<br />

custom surfboard with<br />

engineered flex return -<br />

creating it to feel just like<br />

a specially made pro’s<br />

board, but lasting like a<br />

surfboard should.<br />

Sweet, sweet music<br />

“I seemed to be able to generate speed and drive<br />

on this board without even trying. The board felt<br />

like it had what I would describe as good bounce<br />

or spring... a real lively feel. I could drive through a<br />

drawn out top turn or hook without losing momentum<br />

and without getting stuck in the lip. It had great<br />

release and it had more flex than other boards I’ve<br />

ridden, but in a good way. All in all, the board was<br />

extremely enjoyable to ride and I couldn’t fault it.”<br />

Isaac Paddon<br />

DIVERSE SURFBOARDS<br />

476 Gold Coast Hwy,<br />

Tugun, QLD 4224<br />

Ph: 07 5598 4848<br />

dave@diversesurf.com.au<br />

diversesurf.com.au<br />

Diverse Team rider and muso, Isaac’s seen here putting the Dynocore TM through its paces. If you’re lucky enough<br />

to be at the Kirra SurfStock Festival this year, you’ll also catch him headlining the entertainment bill on Saturday.<br />

Check out his music at www.isaacpaddon.com and for more on the festival, see www.kirrasurfstock.com.au<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

105


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

The Slapper 2<br />

Frizzle<br />

by Islantis<br />

The Native<br />

Shaper: Grem<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’2” x 21’’ x 2 ¾’’<br />

Ideal conditions: 2 - 6ft<br />

beaches/reefs/pointbreaks.<br />

Ability: Novice to pro.<br />

Suits: All -available in<br />

custom from 5 - 7ft.<br />

Description: A blend of<br />

what works in a shortboard<br />

and in a fish to cater for<br />

the world class beach<br />

and reef breaks on Phillip<br />

Island. A performance fish<br />

style board with volume,<br />

and a little more flip in the<br />

rocker than Slapper 1.<br />

Construction: Ocean<br />

Foam hardcore blanks, FGI<br />

resins and Airilite cloth<br />

Fins: 3 or 5 fin, with 5 fin<br />

FCS/Futures most popular.<br />

Change your setup to surf as<br />

a Twinny/Thruster or Quad.<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Developed by demand!<br />

The original slapper was<br />

so popular that guys have<br />

been hassling us to create<br />

a quiver based on the<br />

original.Custom orders<br />

about 2-weeks. Demos<br />

available from shop.<br />

by Primitive Surf<br />

Shaper: Craig Rees<br />

Dimensions: (Above)<br />

5’10” x 19 ¼” x 2 3 /16”<br />

Ability level:<br />

Intermediate and up<br />

Suits: Different sizes<br />

Description: Inspired by<br />

a need for our ding guy<br />

Frizzle to get a better<br />

performance fish type<br />

board that would go good<br />

in a variety of waves.<br />

It has a fish planshape<br />

with a wide round tail,<br />

best when kept thin with<br />

boxy rails.<br />

Construction: PU foam<br />

with polyester resin,<br />

vacuum bagged with<br />

carbon fibre rails.<br />

Fins: Thruster or quad<br />

Shaper comment: Our<br />

Shop Manager Dale just<br />

came back from 2 weeks<br />

at Ulus and was raving<br />

about how it went in 4ft<br />

sucky waves. This board<br />

is now his go-to board for<br />

1 - 4ft waves.<br />

by Riley<br />

Shaper: Mark Riley<br />

Dimensions: 5’2’’- 6’8’’ x<br />

18 ½’’- 20’’ x 2 ½ - 3’’<br />

Ideal conditions: ½ - 6 ft<br />

Ability level: Beginners<br />

to mature<br />

Description: A balsa<br />

skinned EPS foam core<br />

shortboard. The recycled<br />

EPS foam and the absence<br />

of a stringer create a<br />

significant reduction in<br />

weight bringing The Native<br />

to merely 3kg (excluding<br />

fins). The result is a high<br />

performance surfboard with<br />

far greater strength and<br />

durability than your regular<br />

polyurethane board.<br />

Construction: Balsa with<br />

EPS foam core<br />

Fins: Thruster or quad<br />

Shaper comment: For<br />

summer and its small<br />

waves, The Native is a<br />

thruster thrasher for the<br />

larger or older generation<br />

who don’t want to go to a<br />

longboard or a fish – this is<br />

in between these.<br />

Fat Bat<br />

by More Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Mark Pridmore<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’2” x 20 ½” x 2 ½”<br />

Ideal conditions: Typical<br />

Aussie beachies and points<br />

(tiny to a bit overhead)<br />

Suits: Everyone from<br />

older guys wanting a good<br />

paddler to less skilled<br />

surfers wanting stability,<br />

to rippers wanting a high<br />

performance semi-fish<br />

for small waves. Custom<br />

shaped to suit individual<br />

needs.<br />

Description: A semi-fish<br />

that can be surfed hard<br />

like a shorty but with all<br />

the speed and glide of a<br />

fish. The Fat-Bat comes<br />

from years of feedback<br />

and development - a very<br />

FUNctional and easy to<br />

ride board that makes<br />

surfing average waves<br />

extremely fun.<br />

Construction: PU - PE<br />

Fins: Quad FCS<br />

Shaper comment: Try<br />

one. You’ll see...<br />

Retro Fun Board<br />

by Paul Nichol<br />

Shaper: Paul Nichol<br />

Dimensions:<br />

Above - 7’ x 21”x 2 5 /8<br />

All sizes available<br />

Ideal conditions: 1-5ft<br />

Ability level:<br />

Novice to experienced<br />

Description: A retro of a<br />

board I had as a teenager,<br />

just when shortboards<br />

were starting to happen.<br />

Stringerless semi-mal<br />

shape, flexible and<br />

more float, with a single<br />

concave which is quite<br />

deep. I always remember<br />

how great the original<br />

board was.<br />

Construction: PU foam,<br />

4oz glass, stringerless<br />

Fins: Thruster shown, but<br />

available in any setup<br />

Shaper comment: Super<br />

fun board on waves you<br />

would not usually surf on<br />

a short board.<br />

ISLANTIS SURFBOARDS<br />

10-12 Phillip Island Tourist<br />

Rd, Phillip Island, Vic 3925<br />

Ph: 03 5956 7553<br />

info@islantis.com.au<br />

www.islantis.com.au<br />

PRIMITIVE SURF<br />

601 Nudgee Rd,<br />

Nundah, Qld 4012<br />

Ph: 07 3266 1001<br />

E: info@primitivesurf.com<br />

www.primitivesurf.com<br />

RILEY SURFBOARDS<br />

Ph: 0412 376 464<br />

E: mark@riley.com.au<br />

balsasurfboardsriley.<br />

com.au<br />

MORE SURFBOARDS<br />

Angourie Rd<br />

Yamba NSW 2464<br />

Ph: 0405 475 <strong>02</strong>6<br />

moresurfboards.com<br />

PAUL NICHOL<br />

Sandon Point<br />

Bulli NSW<br />

Mobile: 0414 814 332<br />

acesolar@y7mail.com<br />

106 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

LB Fish<br />

by Grown<br />

Shaper: Andrew Wells<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’10 x 21 ½ x 2 3 /8<br />

Ideal conditions: Small<br />

to medium waves. Great<br />

for summer days.<br />

Ability level: Int to adv.<br />

Suits: People who love to<br />

surf with style.<br />

Description: Plenty of<br />

width under the chest<br />

gives paddle power, and<br />

once up and running, it<br />

flies. With plenty of float,<br />

it easily skips over fat<br />

sections, maintaining<br />

speed and drive. Extra<br />

weight gives smooth flow<br />

in the water, letting you<br />

carve with pure style.<br />

Construction: Hollow<br />

timber construction from<br />

Paulownia and Cedar.<br />

Fins: Twins, keels or quads<br />

Shaper comment: A<br />

great small wave board,<br />

and one of my personal<br />

favourites. Individually<br />

hand crafted, these boards<br />

not only look great, they<br />

surf great and will give<br />

you years of enjoyment.<br />

Semi-hull<br />

by Thomas<br />

Shaper: Thomas Bexon<br />

Dimensions:<br />

7’2 x 21 ¾ “ x 2 ¾”<br />

Ideal conditions: Waist to<br />

a bit overhead<br />

Ability level: Anyone<br />

with an idea about trim.<br />

Suits: Competent surfers<br />

after alternative feel or<br />

just looking to cruise.<br />

Description: A semi-hull<br />

combining elements of<br />

displacement hulls, eggs<br />

and performance bottoms.<br />

Construction: Foam and<br />

fibreglass. Resin colours.<br />

Fins: Little side biters<br />

and flexi Greenoughinspired<br />

number in the<br />

middle.<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Combines trim and glide<br />

of displacement hulls but<br />

performance-inspired<br />

bottom shape in the back<br />

gives drive. Super fun<br />

in most waves. A little<br />

more friendly to those not<br />

up for the full hull deal<br />

Stroke in easy, move up<br />

and down the board and<br />

pull out smiling.<br />

Mini Simmons<br />

by Black Apache Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Jesse Watson<br />

Dimensions: 5’4’’ x 21<br />

¼”x 2 5 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions: 1-5ft<br />

beachies and points<br />

Ability level: Int to pro.<br />

It takes an understanding<br />

of flow to ride these<br />

boards well<br />

Description: A hull style<br />

entry that rolls into a flat<br />

through the middle with<br />

a deepish slot concave<br />

from the midpoint through<br />

to the tail. Long turns and<br />

super fast lines off the<br />

top are the norm. These<br />

boards epitomise speed<br />

Construction: This one<br />

is PU and polyester resin<br />

tint - brown pigment with<br />

a caramel nose dip. Also<br />

available in epoxy and<br />

carbon fibre.<br />

Fins: Custom, hand made<br />

simmons keels<br />

Shaper comment: This is<br />

THE board for the summer,<br />

everyone in the know is<br />

riding one. I guarantee<br />

your surfing will never be<br />

the same again. Seriously<br />

addictive.<br />

Aragorn #3<br />

by Underground<br />

Shaper:<br />

Steve ‘Zorro’ Goddard<br />

formerly of Aragorn<br />

Surfboards 1974-77<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’3” x 20” x 2 ½”<br />

Ideal conditions: 2ft<br />

beachies to 5ft points<br />

Ability level:<br />

Intermediate to semi-pro<br />

Suits: 30-80kg<br />

Description: A<br />

handcrafted modern<br />

version of the 80’s twin-fin<br />

that’s fast and loose. A<br />

good all-rounder, great<br />

for small to mid-range<br />

waves. Mid rails, V<br />

bottom with trailer.<br />

Available in 5”6 to 6”10.<br />

Construction: PU foam.<br />

Fins: FCS<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

This board is designed<br />

to be surfed on the rail,<br />

responsive for those fast<br />

directional changes.<br />

The Tug Boat<br />

by Chris Garrett<br />

Shaper: Chris Garrett<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’8’’ x 19 ¼”x 2 3 /8“<br />

Ideal conditions: 1-5ft<br />

beachies and points<br />

Suits: Everyone... I’ll<br />

customise to suit you<br />

Description: Shorter,<br />

wider-assed and fullernosed.<br />

Slightly flatter<br />

rockered with a deepish<br />

single to double concave,<br />

exhausting with a hefty<br />

vee. Fuller tail gives plenty<br />

planing area between your<br />

feet, with the reactive rails<br />

make this work a treat.<br />

Plenty of spark off the mark<br />

and heaps of giggles.<br />

Construction: Polyester<br />

resin and fibreglass. 4oz<br />

bottom and 4x4 deck. PU<br />

Burford blanks.<br />

Fins: Best as a thruster.<br />

Choice of set or system<br />

Shaper comment: Super<br />

fast and loose with plenty<br />

of rotation in the turns.<br />

Surprisingly versatile<br />

with a wide sweet spot<br />

makes this board your<br />

new favourite... and<br />

you’ve gotta love that!!<br />

GROWN SURFBOARDS<br />

Lennox Head<br />

PO Box 801, Ballina NSW 2478<br />

Ph: 0407889049<br />

sales@grownsurfboards.com.au<br />

grownsurfboards.com.au<br />

THOMAS SURFBOARDS<br />

PO Box 234<br />

Maroochydore Qld 4558<br />

Ph: <strong>02</strong> 6584 1995<br />

Mob: 0412 131 491<br />

thomas_bexon@hotmail.com<br />

thomassurfboards.com<br />

black apache surfboards<br />

BLACK APACHE<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

Ph: 0410 419 791<br />

E: blackapachesurfboards@<br />

live.com.au<br />

blackapachesurfboards.com<br />

UNDERGROUND SURF<br />

3/31 McLean St,<br />

Coolangatta QLD 4225<br />

Ph: 07 5599 1040<br />

kirra@undergroundsurf.com.au<br />

undergroundsurf.com.au<br />

CHRIS GARRETT/<br />

PHANTOM SURFBOARDS<br />

Ph: 0424 450 690<br />

E: blabla@<br />

chrisgarrettshapes.com.au<br />

chrisgarrettshapes.com.au<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

107


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

““Noseriding to roundhouses and<br />

rock ‘n roll floaters... it loves<br />

to do them all and more.”<br />

Paul Woodbry enjoying the fruit of his<br />

labour in Currimundi cream. Photo: DS<br />

THE WOODY’S MEGAFISH... HOW DOES IT GO?<br />

WORDS DAVE SWAN<br />

It’s easy to paddle. Can nose ride. Is as<br />

loose as a goose ... I mean really, really<br />

loose and goes like the absolute clappers.<br />

Few boards are so loose and so fast. I<br />

lined up a few sections and thought to<br />

myself, “I will never make it.” And before<br />

that thought had left my head, I was<br />

across the face and out on the shoulder. It<br />

is unbelievably, bloody quick! Especially<br />

for a board of its dimensions. Really, really<br />

quick and so easy to turn.<br />

The Megafish as it is now known, was<br />

initially called the ‘What the’ and the<br />

‘Bitzer’ and fittingly so. It’s only 6’6, has<br />

an extra, extra wide nose and a tail so<br />

narrow, it is less than 12 inches where<br />

you place your back foot. It resembles a<br />

massive tear drop. Now sure, there may be<br />

boards with a similar plan shape but not to<br />

this extreme. It’s like your widest noserider<br />

combined with a gun. It works like a<br />

shortboard but has longboard capabilities.<br />

Monkey magic. Photo: MC<br />

Confused? Well it works.<br />

For average surfers, such as myself, it’s so<br />

exciting when a board makes you feel so<br />

much better than you really are. I actually<br />

felt like I could surf on this thing. It’s a<br />

hell of a lot of fun and is superb for surf<br />

slop, the kind of conditions that plague<br />

the Sunshine Coast at this time of year. It<br />

generates such a lot of speed in ordinary<br />

conditions.<br />

By comparison, I took out another board in<br />

similar conditions, a 5’10 fish, and couldn’t<br />

get it going. I dropped off the back of the<br />

waves. On a 9’4 longboard the conditions<br />

were too choppy. The Megafish was the<br />

deal. And whilst it loves slop, it also<br />

handled a dumping 5ft beach break later<br />

that week.<br />

After testing it in a variety of conditions<br />

over the last month it is probably time to<br />

give it back. Fat chance!<br />

Megafish<br />

by Woody’s Surf<br />

Shaper: Paul Woodbry<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’6”x 22 5 /8” x 2 5 /8“<br />

Ideal conditions: ½ - 6 ft<br />

Suits: Beginner to Pro<br />

Description: If you have<br />

a longboard but would<br />

like to ride something<br />

shorter with the same<br />

ability to flow, or you’re a<br />

shortboarder who wants a<br />

“never miss a surf” board.<br />

Single concave running to<br />

flat near tail, mid rails with<br />

a 2 + 1 fin set up.<br />

Construction: Polyester<br />

resin and good old PU blank<br />

Fins: Finbox + FCS<br />

Shaper comment: This<br />

was created to fill the void<br />

when the surf was too<br />

small for a shortboard,<br />

but if the waves picked up<br />

you didn’t need to change<br />

boards to accommodate. It<br />

fits in the car so you don’t<br />

have a storage problem if<br />

surfing another board. Just<br />

a whole lot of fun wrapped<br />

in fibreglass.<br />

WOODY’S SURF<br />

6 Arilla Street<br />

Wurtulla QLD<br />

Ph: 0408 763 541<br />

Email: woodyssurfdesigns<br />

@hotmail.com<br />

108 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

Stealth<br />

by Laguna Bay<br />

Shaper: Tully St.John<br />

Dimensions: 7ft to11ft.<br />

Ideal conditions: 1 - 10ft<br />

Ability level:<br />

Beginner to pro<br />

Suits: All shapes and sizes<br />

Description: This<br />

is a great all round<br />

paddleboard, deck<br />

concave gives it a great<br />

amount of stability and<br />

entry concave and nose<br />

area makes it easy to<br />

paddle out through the<br />

break.<br />

This board is the all in<br />

one, turns out of the tail<br />

well and is great for nose<br />

riding, it’s an easy board<br />

to surf.<br />

Construction: Epoxy<br />

construction, comes in full<br />

carbon or all over pigment.<br />

Fin set-up: 2t1 or 4t1<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Procrastination is the<br />

thief of time get one on<br />

order today, you won’t be<br />

disappointed!<br />

Stepdeck<br />

by Thomas<br />

Shaper: Thomas Bexon<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’8” x 23 ¼”x 3”<br />

Ideal conditions: Logging<br />

waves, anything under<br />

head high, ideally peeling<br />

points or clean beachies<br />

Ability level:<br />

Intermediate to advanced<br />

logger. Anyone after fun.<br />

Suits: Around 75 - 85kg.<br />

All boards made to measure<br />

Description: Stepdeck<br />

noserider, with step to<br />

reduce volume, increase flex.<br />

Construction: Layer of<br />

6oz and a layer of 7 ½ oz<br />

both sides, this is built to<br />

last. All colours done in<br />

resin. Glassed on fin.<br />

Fins: One big red one<br />

fixed right on the back<br />

Shaper comment: a full<br />

blown trim and noseride<br />

machine, these are tried<br />

and tested in some of<br />

the best logging waves<br />

around. An experiment in<br />

design where they left off<br />

when Bob and co started<br />

sawing noses off and not<br />

standing on them.<br />

Super Tuna<br />

by Wegener<br />

Shaper: Tom Wegener<br />

Dimensions:<br />

8’ x 20” x 2.5”<br />

Ideal conditions: Small to<br />

medium waves<br />

Ability level:<br />

Intermediate to advanced<br />

Suits: Adventurous spirits<br />

after a different glide<br />

Description: The<br />

Super Tuna is a limited<br />

edition board of 10 only,<br />

beautifully handcrafted by<br />

Tom Wegener. The boards<br />

are $2000, and there are<br />

only a few left.<br />

Construction: Hollow,<br />

Paulownia wood with<br />

red cedar rails and 2mm<br />

plywood overlay on deck.<br />

Shaper comment: The<br />

ultimate introduction to<br />

finless surfing for the<br />

mature surfer. Fun and<br />

easy to ride in small to<br />

medium surf.<br />

Performance Mal<br />

by Island<br />

Shaper: Glyndyn Ringrose<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’1”x 23 ¼”x 2 7 /8”<br />

(From 7’6” up)<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

All round conditions<br />

Ability level:<br />

Intermediate to advanced,<br />

can be tweaked to suit<br />

beginners.<br />

Description: Extra<br />

tail flip, lower rails and<br />

heavy single into double<br />

concave gives run into<br />

the flats, but allows high<br />

response in the turn<br />

when back on the tail.<br />

Construction: PU,<br />

glassed combination of<br />

6oz and 4oz to customer’s<br />

preference.<br />

Fins: Glass centre box<br />

fin, optional stabilisers<br />

(FCS or Futures)<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

The model ridden by<br />

Sandy Ryan in his three<br />

consecutive Victorian<br />

Mal Championships and<br />

also when he’s tackling<br />

some of Victoria’s<br />

heaviest reef breaks.<br />

High Performance Log<br />

by High Tide<br />

Shaper: Jordie Brown<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’2 x 22 ¼” x 17 ¾” x 14” x 2 ¾”<br />

Ideal conditions: Waist<br />

high to well overhead.<br />

Suits: The logger<br />

wanting something a<br />

little more progressive<br />

without compromising on<br />

momentum and glide.<br />

Description: Based<br />

around a subtle threephase<br />

rocker, combined<br />

with a single concave in<br />

the nose running thru to<br />

a rolled vee bottom, this<br />

board noserides, trims and<br />

performs off the tail.<br />

Construction: Slightly<br />

weightier 6-oz glass<br />

job than your average<br />

performance longboard.<br />

Available with a full polish<br />

or a wet rub finish.<br />

Fins: Works great as a<br />

single fin or with a 2+1<br />

Shaper comment: The<br />

perfect stick for the surfer<br />

chasing a longboard to<br />

make the most of a variety<br />

of different waves and<br />

conditions without losing<br />

the style and flow of a<br />

traditional board.<br />

NOOSA SURFWORKS<br />

11 Bartlett St,<br />

Noosaville QLD<br />

Ph: 07 5474 4567<br />

E: info@noosasurfworks.com.au<br />

noosasurfworks.com.au<br />

THOMAS SURFBOARDS<br />

PO Box 234<br />

Maroochydore Qld 4558<br />

Ph: <strong>02</strong> 6584 1995<br />

Mob: 0412 131 491<br />

thomas_bexon@hotmail.com<br />

thomassurfboards.com<br />

TOM WEGENER<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

108 Cooroy, QLD 4563<br />

Ph: 0401 257 479<br />

info@tomwegenersurfboards.com<br />

tomwegenersurfboards.com<br />

ISLAND SURFBOARDS<br />

147 Thompson Ave,<br />

Cowes, Phillip Island VIC<br />

Ph: 03 5952 2578<br />

E: cowes@<br />

islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

HIGH TIDE<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

Skenes Creek, Vic 3233<br />

Ph: 0401 437 392<br />

hightidesurfboards@hotmail.com<br />

hightidesurfboards.com<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

109


MARK PRIDMORE<br />

JORDIE BROWN<br />

CHRIS GARRETT<br />

STUART CAMPBELL<br />

CRAIG HEATH<br />

TONY DEMPSEY<br />

DAVE VERALL<br />

JON MCLEAY<br />

CRAIG REES<br />

PHIL BYRNE<br />

MARK RILEY<br />

JESSE WATSON<br />

DAVID EVANS<br />

PAUL NICHOL<br />

JOHN “ROBBO” ROBERTSON<br />

THESE HANDS HAVE SHAPED<br />

TULLY ST. JOHN<br />

CHAD RYAN<br />

JED DONE<br />

THOMAS BEXON<br />

ADAM “SPARROW” FLETCHER<br />

NOW THE FUTURE RESTS IN YOURS.<br />

110 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


GREG HOGAN<br />

LEE CHEYNE<br />

PAUL USCINSKI<br />

RODNEY DAHLBERG<br />

ANDREW WELLS<br />

PHIL PEPPER<br />

MICK CARRABINE<br />

STUART D’ARCY<br />

GLYNDYN RINGROSE<br />

WAYNE LOWEN<br />

JOHN SKIPP<br />

MARCUS GRAY<br />

SAM PARSONS<br />

MICHAEL DI SCIASCIO<br />

JADE ROBINSON<br />

OUR SURFBOARD INDUSTRY.<br />

PAUL CARSON<br />

YASU NAGAMI RALPH RIDDELL PAUL WOODBRY<br />

MAURICIO GILL<br />

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL SHAPER<br />

These images represent only a handful of the dedicated craftsmen working as<br />

shapers in the local surfboard industry, and they represent years of experience<br />

and knowledge. Before you buy your next board, make sure you talk to your local<br />

surf shop or shaper about what is right for you.<br />

PROUDLY SUPPORTING THE PEOPLE KEEPING US IN THE WATER<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

111


GEAR: PROJECT<br />

FINLESS FRONTIER<br />

Although the idea of finless boards is far from a new<br />

concept, the acceptance and willingness to give these<br />

ideas a go, using modern surfboard manufacturing<br />

technology, has really grown in recent times. With<br />

one of the most prominent proponents of finless craft,<br />

Tom Wegener, just launching his Seaglass - a foam<br />

version of the traditional Alaia - interest in finless<br />

boards has never been more intense.<br />

When we dropped in for a visit at Richard Harvey’s<br />

gallery and surf shop in Miami on the Gold Coast,<br />

we were keen to hear about his experiments in the<br />

same arena.<br />

“PEOPLE HAVE BEEN RIDING<br />

MY BOARDS FOR TWENTY<br />

YEARS AND HAVEN’T<br />

NOTICED, BECAUSE IT ALWAYS<br />

LOOKS RIGHT WHICHEVER<br />

WAY IT’S AROUND”<br />

ENTER THE DOUBLE ENDER...<br />

Inspired by weight-distribution concepts Richard<br />

learnt in snowboarding, he began experimenting<br />

with the idea of a finless board that would be a little<br />

easier to paddle than a traditional Alaia, and would<br />

also be easy to ride in either direction, off either foot.<br />

At only 5’5”, the Double Ender features a nose and<br />

tail rocker, and a centre concave.<br />

“The idea is that when you’re riding it backwards,<br />

it has a bit of rocker in the tail, so it’s not going to<br />

push… If boards are square across the back, they<br />

push water. You can spin them around, but you can’t<br />

ride them backwards. “<br />

But with the Double Ender’s symmetrical design,<br />

you may as well forget about which way’s front and<br />

which way’s back.<br />

“It matches my logo...” says Richard. (If you haven’t<br />

picked it up, the Harvey logo reads the same, any way<br />

you look at at it... Sneaky.) “People have been riding my<br />

boards for twenty years and haven’t noticed, because it<br />

always looks right whichever way it’s around.”<br />

Another interesting aspect of the board is it doesn’t<br />

need waxing, thanks to a process of creating grip<br />

borrowed from the 70’s.<br />

“It’s like an hexagonal fabric. We lay it in, and then<br />

peel it off. Then when you foot gets wet, your skin<br />

goes soft and it grips. It’s really solid”<br />

So, the all important $700-or-so question... Does it<br />

work? Check out our we-test-as-many-things-as-wecan<br />

edition, due out in January, when we take it for<br />

a little ride.<br />

For more on Richard and his work, see his website -<br />

www.harveysurf.com - or visit the gallery in person at<br />

3/10 Pacific Avenue, Miami.<br />

The Harvey Double Ender<br />

5’5 x 20 ½ x 2 ¼ centre, 2 ¾ rails<br />

Centre concave is 7 /8” deep<br />

Bio-kentic non-wax deck<br />

112 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


Why<br />

STRAIGHTBOARD...<br />

...when you can<br />

carve like a surfer?!<br />

THE PENNY DROPS<br />

Well, well... for those of you who haven’t spotted<br />

them back on the shelves yet, this little plastic<br />

moulded beauty is a blast from the past, for sure!<br />

The Penny is an extremely cool re-issue of the<br />

original 1970’s style plastic boards, and in all the<br />

bright colours you may remember.<br />

Personally, I had a lumo-lime green one, back in the<br />

day when having a colour TV at home made you the<br />

coolest friend to hang out with and only one of your<br />

parents had to work. I still have no idea how I never<br />

ended up in hospital doing downhill runs on this<br />

glorified rollerskate...<br />

Anyway, for nostalgia sake, or for a compact board,<br />

or just to look retro and arty-cool, check out the<br />

Penny. It’s like Barbie Girl fantastic.<br />

See your local shop or for pics and info see<br />

www.absolute-distributors.com/penny/<br />

Designed for<br />

surfing, the<br />

SmoothStar<br />

Thruster system<br />

allows the front truck<br />

to move horizontally<br />

and vertically,<br />

transforming the<br />

way a skateboard<br />

handles...<br />

Improve your<br />

surfing and stay stoked<br />

between surfs!<br />

SMOOTHSTAR IN ACTION<br />

Smoothstar have just released a brand new video on<br />

their YouTube channel, featuring young team riders and<br />

junior surf champs Laura Enever and Jordan Lawler.<br />

The video is worth watching to get a good idea of how<br />

the boards work and how these two feel it improves<br />

their surfing - which most of us would like to do!<br />

Check out this clip as well as a good few others on:<br />

www.youtube.com/user/SmoothStarSurf<br />

TURN EASIER<br />

You can control your<br />

speed by carving<br />

from side to side.<br />

SKATE SAFETY FIRST<br />

Early Skateboards have just released a new safety<br />

pack they’re calling the Gnarkit. Now before you<br />

poo-poo the idea of pads and gloves, remember that<br />

Early make skateboards specifically for ridiculously<br />

fast downhill racing, so when you’re sliding around<br />

corners at speeds of 80km/h, every bit of padding<br />

helps if you and the board part ways.<br />

We’re super-excited to be road-testing the Arift in our<br />

next edition, so get the band-aids and Dettol ready.<br />

Early Skateboards are known on a pro-level for high<br />

quality and performance but are also very good<br />

for beginners who want to try the sport out at an<br />

affordable price. More information? See the website:<br />

www.earlyskateboards.com<br />

TURN TIGHTER<br />

than any normal<br />

skateboard and<br />

work speed into<br />

the board without<br />

pushing.<br />

SmoothStar is<br />

available in 3 sizes,<br />

for a different ride<br />

and for different<br />

sized riders.<br />

The Gnarkit (above) retails for just over<br />

$150 and the Arift board (right) goes<br />

for less the $300 as a complete board.<br />

SKATEBOARDS DESIGNED FOR SURFERS<br />

For more information, call 0407 405 390<br />

or visit www.smoothstar.com.au<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

113


TM<br />

TEAM RIDERS<br />

Owen Wright<br />

Tyler Wright<br />

Bede Durbidge<br />

AUSTRALIAN DESIGNED & TESTED<br />

ELECTRICDIVISION<br />

FIIKSKATEBOARDS.COM


FUTUREISINKNOWLEDGE<br />

LITHIUMPOWER • ABSREGENERATIVE • WIRELESSREMOTE<br />

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$ 799<br />

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LEAD ACID LITHIUM<br />

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$ 400<br />

LEAD ACID<br />

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STREET SURFER<br />

800w<br />

LEAD ACID LITHIUM<br />

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PIPE MASTER<br />

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BIG DADDY<br />

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Stockist Enquiries - 1300 344 575<br />

QLD Stockists<br />

Beach Beat - Alexandra Heads 07 5443 2777<br />

Beach Beat - Caloundra 07 5491 4711<br />

Beach Beat - Dicky Beach 07 5491 8215<br />

Darkside Skateboards - Miami 07 5570 1526<br />

Goodtime Surf - Woolloongabba 07 3391 8588<br />

Hurley Burleigh - Southport 07 5531 0013<br />

KTM Action Motorcycles - Nerang 07 5596 6622<br />

KTM - Brisbane 07 3386 0977<br />

Local Knowledge - Noosa 07 5474 1222<br />

Local Knowledge - Nobby Beach 07 5526 6377<br />

Primitive Surf - Nundah 07 3266 1001<br />

Roar Industries - Currumbin 07 5525 7003<br />

Surf Connect - Brisbane Nth 07 3137 0500<br />

NSW Stockists<br />

Aloha Manly - Style Manly <strong>02</strong> 9977 3777<br />

Bay Action - Byron Bay <strong>02</strong> 6685 7819<br />

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SKATE: MOVIE<br />

IT’S ALL DOWNHILL FROM HERE<br />

Passion, pain and pads - for your knees and elbows that is. Skate Australia is a locally produced documentary DVD<br />

on the Australian longboard skating scene - a less publicised but extremely exciting offshoot of the wheeled board<br />

family. But the making of this film exacted a high price. WORDS MARK CHAPMAN<br />

The 35 minute “Longboard Road Trip of Discovery”<br />

produced by Dampling Productions in Byron Bay<br />

started as an exciting project amongst friends<br />

in Brisbane that was to chronicle a trip through<br />

Australia, showcasing longboard skating and<br />

covering all aspects of the emerging sport,<br />

including slalom, sliding, dancing and of course the<br />

big event - downhill.<br />

Unfortunately, tragedy struck the production when<br />

in August 2009 Anthony Fricker, the originater of<br />

the idea and director of Skate Australia, died due<br />

to a head injury he received in a skateboarding<br />

accident during the filming of this documentary.<br />

At only 22, the unexpected death of the enthusiastic<br />

young filmmaker sent shockwaves through the<br />

skating community and stunned family and friends.<br />

News of the event spread quickly across the internet<br />

as tributes appeared on skating websites such as<br />

the Australian Skateboard Racing Association.<br />

Swedish twin brothers Jonatan and Sebastian<br />

Lundmark had been working with Anthony on<br />

the project and committed to completing the<br />

documentary with the footage they had available.<br />

A year of production time later, the tribute to their<br />

late friend is complete and gives a fascinating<br />

insight into the culture, people and environment of<br />

extreme skating in Australia.<br />

We asked Sebastian about the production...<br />

“A MAD-DOG ADVENTURE TO SKATE<br />

THE CLIFFS, HILLS, TOWNS AND BIG<br />

CITIES OF AUSTRALIA'S EAST COAST”<br />

How do you feel, with the project completed?<br />

“It is a big relief since it has been such a personal and<br />

emotional production. Really excited to get it out to<br />

the public, spread the good times and stoke that was<br />

captured on film during the six month road trip.”<br />

Has Anthony’s accident affected how you see<br />

skating as a sport and/or hobby?<br />

“There are always dangers involved with action<br />

sports, you get out there to do something you love<br />

in the safest possible way. Longboard skating<br />

is a fairly safe sport, it has a lot less accidents<br />

then normal short board skating. Anthony is one<br />

of a handful of people that have passed away<br />

while downhill skateboarding, the first person<br />

in Australia. I still get as much joy and fun from<br />

skating as I used too.<br />

Anthony’s death was a real eye opener for me. Life<br />

is precious - too short not to live it to the fullest<br />

and make the most out of it.”<br />

Are there more movies planned for the future?<br />

“Travelling, action sport and filmmaking are the<br />

biggest passions in my life, so combining them all<br />

is a pretty good recipe. Byron Bay will be my base<br />

for the coming years where I have just started my<br />

new production company Rest Your Eyes.<br />

“We have two new documentaries in the pipeline<br />

that are in pre-production right now. We will also<br />

continue doing music videos and commercials.<br />

Where is the movie available from?<br />

“Skate Australia is for sale at our website www.<br />

skateaustralia.com.au and there will be several<br />

screenings down the east coast of NSW. On<br />

November 26 there is a screening at the Newtons<br />

Nation festival in Bathurst, where there will also<br />

be a downhill skateboard competition on the Mt<br />

Panorama racetrack with riders hitting over 100km<br />

down the track! It will be an awesome weekend!”<br />

SKATE AUSTRALIA DVD<br />

Travelling from the beach to the bush<br />

down the Australian east coast, the<br />

film is packed with amazing footage of<br />

leather-clad and helmeted skaters reaching speeds<br />

of up to 100km an hour, but it also goes further<br />

into the friendships formed and the fun of being on<br />

the road with good mates.<br />

Set to a great soundtrack, there are fun scenes of<br />

parking lot runs, coverage of the Beat The Beast<br />

charity event in North Queensland... And what<br />

skate movie would be complete without being told<br />

off by the police at least once?<br />

Focused not on loss, but rather on the enjoyment<br />

and fun of skating, the movie has been finished in<br />

the spirit it was started - with a whole lot of love<br />

and excitement for boards on wheels.<br />

A seven-minute tribute to Anthony - Steep Descent<br />

- is also included as a special feature.<br />

As an introduction to a style of skating you may<br />

not be familiar with, or just as a feelgood skate<br />

movie, this just needs to be seen.<br />

For more info, see the website:<br />

www.skateaustralia.com.au<br />

116 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


History...<br />

A little bit of<br />

CLOSEOUT: HISTORY<br />

CHINA GILBERT R.I.P.<br />

SOUTHERN SURF LEGEND PASSES AWAY<br />

Victorian surfing recently lost one of its greatest characters<br />

with the passing of Rex “China” Gilbert at age 86 on<br />

September 28, <strong>2010</strong>.<br />

China was Victorian board champion from 1948 to 1951,<br />

with he and Vic Tantau dominating the board competitions<br />

in the decade following the second World War.<br />

First joining in 1947, China was the longest serving<br />

member of the Torquay Surf Life Saving Club, his<br />

enthusiasm and creativity coming to the fore with off beat<br />

activities such as the “Galah Awards”. He also acted as<br />

caretaker for 20 years from 1980-2000.<br />

China was part of the notorious “Boot Hill” mob and the<br />

“D’s” who’s parties and shenanigans have become part of<br />

Torquay folklore. Over the years China’s life has become<br />

woven into the complex surfing tale of Torquay, and his<br />

character integrated into the cultural fabric of the town.<br />

A public memorial for China was held at the Torquay Surf Life<br />

Saving Club on Saturday the 6th of November at 2.00pm.<br />

Craig Baird, Torquay Surf World<br />

Terry Fitzgerald,1970 World Surfing Titles<br />

EXPERIENCE<br />

THE REVOLUTION<br />

Simon Buttonshaw<br />

If you happen to be in Torquay, make some time to check out Revolution,<br />

which opened in September. Running through until March, the exhibition<br />

showcases the surfers and the stories from the 1970 World Surfing<br />

Championships held at Bells Beach and features spectacular images,<br />

vintage surfboards and rare and previously unseen footage of 70’s surfing<br />

at Bells Beach and Johanna Beach.<br />

Well worth a look around for this, and the many other permanent exhibits.<br />

Open daily from 9am-5pm at the Surf World Museum, Beach Road,<br />

Torquay. For more about the museum, visit www.surfworld.org.au<br />

Above: The smiling China Gilbert as<br />

he’ll be remembered by his mates.<br />

Right: Long boards at attention on<br />

Torquay Beach, 1947. From left:<br />

Unknown, John Allan, Barry Patten,<br />

Ken Harris, BiU Bennett, Peter<br />

Bennett, Reg Gray, Dick Garrard,<br />

Keith Putt, Frank Inness, unknown,<br />

unknown, “China” Gilbert and<br />

Eric Knight.<br />

60’S LEGEND BOBBY BROWN<br />

HONOURED ON GOLD COAST<br />

Surf World Gold Coast in Tomewin Street, Currumbin opens a special<br />

exhibition dedicated to surfing legend Bobby Brown on November 11, <strong>2010</strong>.<br />

Timed to coincide with the Kirra Surfstock Festival, the<br />

exhibition will celebrate the life of a surfing enigma and his<br />

significant contribution to the classic sixties era of surfing.<br />

Ranked alongside Midget Farrelly, Nat Young and<br />

Peter Drouyn as one of the best surfers of the<br />

1960’s, Brown was only 17 when he qualified for<br />

the final of the first World Surfing titles in 1964<br />

won by Midget Farrelly.<br />

His short but impressive surfing life featured in<br />

movies like Bob Evans’ 1963 “Young Wave Hunters”<br />

and Paul Witzig’s 1967 groundbreaking movie “Hot<br />

Generation”, both of which will feature in the exhibition<br />

alongside timeless surfing photos of Brown and others<br />

from the 1960s, archival movie footage, surfboards,<br />

clothing, surf magazines and newspaper clippings.<br />

The exhibition will also feature the impressive Perpetual<br />

Trophy, modeled on Jack Eden’s classic photo of Brown’s<br />

famous “soul arch” bottom turn at Sandon Point.<br />

The official opening night of the exhibition on November<br />

11 from 6.30pm is open to the public. Tickets are $15 and<br />

available at the door, or by phone (07) 5525 6380.<br />

See www.surfworldgoldcoast.com for more.<br />

117


GEAR:FASHION<br />

Seafolly Cyber Surfer seperates<br />

Photo: Supplied - Seafolly<br />

www.seafolly.com.au<br />

118 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


Baku Guam Photo: Supplied - Baku www.baku.com.au<br />

PERFECT FIT<br />

How do you go about choosing the perfect swimsuit<br />

that will be practical and sensible in the surf, but not<br />

make you feel like you’ve raided your nanna’s drawers.<br />

We asked Kent Ladkin of Natural Necessity Surf Shop<br />

in Geringong to give us his expert input.<br />

The dreaded time of year to buy your<br />

new cossies has arrived again. If you<br />

been blessed with the perfect body,<br />

then this will be relatively easy, but if,<br />

like most of us, when you look in the<br />

mirror, the voice doesn’t say,” You are<br />

the fairest of them all’, then this article<br />

may help.<br />

If the effects of gravity have not yet<br />

struck, and you are the same size<br />

top and bottom, then you may fit a<br />

regular bikini in your size. Otherwise,<br />

you will need to be fitted with a<br />

separate cossie.<br />

The beauty of separates is that there is<br />

that you can mix and match to create<br />

the perfect cossie for every woman’s<br />

needs. You have the opportunity to get<br />

exactly the right size in both bottom<br />

and top and in a shape which is<br />

tailored to your unique contours.<br />

If you are self conscious about your<br />

hips and thighs, then a boy-leg short or<br />

flattering, feminine swim skirt will do<br />

the trick. A smaller bust will be greatly<br />

enhanced by a moulded booster triangle<br />

top. If your tummy is not as flat as you<br />

would like, try a singlet with a floaty,<br />

flared body with power mesh under<br />

to hold you in. There are swimwear<br />

solutions to remedy every concern.<br />

Every woman is self-conscious about<br />

something, but in your quest to find the<br />

perfect cossie, you will need to accept<br />

and embrace the individual features<br />

that make your body special.<br />

For example: you have a DD bust. If<br />

you can accept that it might be more<br />

at home in a banded halter top with<br />

hidden underwire support, rather than<br />

a sliding string triangle, you are more<br />

likely to achieve success.<br />

That is not to say that your practical<br />

choice has to look any less sexy. On the<br />

contrary, when paired with a cute frilly<br />

pant or tie-side hipster, you will find<br />

yourself looking and feeling better than<br />

ever. You’ll be confident in the knowledge<br />

that your ample bust will be unable to<br />

escape when the first wave hits.<br />

Swimsuits designers have recognised<br />

the the growing popularity of surfing<br />

amongst women. Many designs today<br />

are both functional and fashionable<br />

featuring t-back, cross-back or action<br />

backs tops designed to provide support<br />

and stay in place whilst you surf.<br />

There are now so many styles to<br />

choose from. It’s just a case of talking<br />

to a trained professional who can<br />

identify what style is best suited to<br />

your body shape.<br />

Natural Necessity Surf Shop stocks 90<br />

ladies swimwear labels and up to 4,000<br />

separates, 4,000 bikini sets and 600 one<br />

pieces through the summer season and<br />

has swimwear staff trained to assist you<br />

find the perfect swimsuit.<br />

Baku Chinchilla<br />

Photo: Supplied - Baku<br />

www.baku.com.au<br />

Ginja Isla Coco Photo: Supplied - Ginja www.ginja.com.au<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

119


We just can’t help giving stuff away, so...<br />

GET YOURSELF A FREE<br />

dEcK GRIP!<br />

If you can’t get to a surf shop that stocks smorgasboarder, you’re<br />

worried that all the copies may be gone before you get there, or<br />

you’d just rather stay on the couch and wait for the mag to arrive in<br />

the mail, you can subscribe for the measly cost of just $18 for six<br />

editions. The mag is still free, but Australia Post like to get paid.<br />

To subscribe, simply go to www.smorgasboarder.com.au, click the<br />

button and go and wait by your mailbox.<br />

The firsT 10 people To subscribe<br />

each get a free smorgasboarder deck grip supplied by<br />

the friendly folks at Crosslink Traction in Byron Bay!<br />

www.SmORGASbOARdER.cOm.AU<br />

120 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

VALUEd AT<br />

$40<br />

For more information on<br />

Crosslink Traction and to<br />

check out their cool range<br />

of tailpads, visit<br />

www.deckgrips.com<br />

FILM<br />

SIPPING JETSTREAMS<br />

VAS ENTERTAINMENT (2009)<br />

<br />

Not a new movie, but we finally<br />

picked it up on our last trip and<br />

figured if we hadn’t seen it, there<br />

were plenty more who hadn’t either.<br />

Surf filmaker Taylor Steele’s latest<br />

offering opens up with the quote<br />

that encapsulates the movie within<br />

a few words: “The world is a book.<br />

Those who don’t travel read only<br />

one page.”<br />

With exotic scenes of snakecharmers<br />

and desert landscapes,<br />

the movie kicks off with a session<br />

of beautiful barrels in Morocco<br />

set to Massive Attack’s Angel and<br />

continues on to explore other less<br />

surf-exposed corners of the globe<br />

including Hong Kong, Italy Egypt,<br />

Barbados and more.<br />

Although there’s no shortage of<br />

incredible surfing, an all-star cast<br />

of surfers and amazing waves on<br />

display, this is far more than just a<br />

surf movie. Sipping Jetstreams is<br />

a beautifully produced travel diary,<br />

full of rich and colourful snapshots<br />

of the people and places the movie<br />

is set in. Context. We love context.<br />

Rather than just seeing beaches and<br />

boards, you really get a great feel for<br />

the countries visited and the great<br />

contrasts between life in the vast<br />

open spaces and cities on show.<br />

It’s always great to see some<br />

smorgasboarding in there with some<br />

fun skate scenes in Cuba...<br />

And even the SUPs get a quick look<br />

in, with the worlds most famous,<br />

original European stand up paddlers<br />

- the gondoliers of Venice - showing<br />

up in the Italian segment.<br />

Standout scenes? Chapter Four’s<br />

aerial shots give a different and very<br />

interesting perspective while dreads,<br />

palm trees, awesome waves with<br />

Kelly Slater and island tunes make<br />

the Barbados segment hard to top.<br />

Bonus features include a photo<br />

gallery of some of the incredible<br />

photography of the trip and a short<br />

film on the Bantul Kindergarten<br />

Project set in Jakarta after the<br />

Indonesian earthquake of 2006.<br />

There’s just enough of a taste of the<br />

world in here to have you reaching<br />

for you passport.<br />

“I’m just trying to read the whole<br />

book.”<br />

A limited version was<br />

released with a 300 page<br />

book full of great pics<br />

and handwritten journals.<br />

Worth checking out.<br />

MUSIC<br />

PROMISES<br />

Hopeless Sons<br />

PEE RECORDS<br />

<br />

Five tracks of raw and angry<br />

Queensland hardcore, featuring<br />

ex-members of Gold Coast<br />

metalcore boys Vices for Virtues<br />

and the drumming talents of<br />

Nic Lalot of southsiders Driven<br />

Fear. The combo guarantees<br />

you a heartfelt 15 minutes or so<br />

of detuned guitars, rock solid<br />

drumming, great gang vocals<br />

and frontman Zacca’s trademark<br />

throat-tearing.<br />

Regardless is a standout track,<br />

kicking off with Sick Of It All-like<br />

bassline and a great New York<br />

style two-step midsection.<br />

If you like your music heavy, this<br />

is perfect for a pre-surf hype-up<br />

in the car. Give it a spin. All gold.<br />

www.peerecords.com<br />

THE JEZABELS<br />

Dark Storm<br />

PHANTOM DOMESTIC<br />

<br />

Dramatic indie pop rock from<br />

Melbourne, the Jezabels mix a<br />

wide range of influences into<br />

this little EP which just hit #1<br />

on the local iTunes charts. The<br />

moody and beautiful vocals are<br />

reminiscent of Kate Bush and<br />

Tori Amos, layed over textured<br />

guitar and piano backing set to<br />

pretty enthusiastic drumming.<br />

Arty background tunes to class<br />

up your collection. Catch them<br />

on tour this November on their<br />

return from the USA.<br />

www.thejezabels.com


MUSIC<br />

BOOKS<br />

CLOSEOUT: RELAX<br />

JOHN BUTLER TRIO<br />

THESE ARE THE DAYS: THE MAKING OF APRIL UPRISING<br />

JARRAH RECORDS<br />

<br />

A year in the making, this DVD is an open and unique look at the life<br />

of the boys in the John Butler Trio, as well as an intimate, behindthe-scenes<br />

insight into the making of the <strong>2010</strong> April Uprising album,<br />

which achieved platinum status this September.<br />

A mix of music, interviews, horsing around and serious moments of<br />

reflection, the hour-long production takes you on a trip through John<br />

Butler’s Fremantle: the markets where it all began for him as a busker,<br />

through to his studio where the April Uprising was recorded.<br />

But it’s not called a trio for nothing. Drummer Nicky Bomba and<br />

bass player Byron Luiters also get their time on film, which between<br />

all the interviews and candid material truly conveys a sense of how<br />

the close-knit unit create such incredible and unforgettable tunes.<br />

A little bit of skateboarding footage brings some board cred to the<br />

disc and also shows that Mr Butler has talent in his feet as well as<br />

his vocal chords and fingers.<br />

If you’re a JBT fan, this movie would have to be part of your<br />

collection. If you’re not a fan yet, watching this DVD might very well<br />

sway you into becoming one.<br />

The only complaint... what’s with the cheap-arse packaging? But<br />

never mind - you don’t watch the box. And I guess it might be<br />

forgiven considering how cool the April Uprising CD’s package is.<br />

Good stuff. Get it. Watch it. Love it.<br />

PLANET SURF<br />

RYAN A. SMITH<br />

CAMERON HOUSE<br />

<br />

Travel. We love it. And this 176-page paperback book is all about it. Planet Surf is<br />

essentially a primer for pretty much most surf spots around the world. It touches<br />

lightly on each destination, giving select tips and highlights. Add in a few great<br />

photographs of barrels in destinations far beyond and it’s just enough to get your<br />

blood pumping and your passport itching to go. However, because the book - as the<br />

name suggests - covers the entire planet, deciding on where exactly to go on your<br />

next international surf trip will be the hardest choice.<br />

The section on Australia covers all the usual suspects and big-name breaks, as you<br />

would expect given the massive volume of surf spots to cover, but it’s also nice to see<br />

that lesser known - or at least less popular - international surfing destinations get a<br />

run too. Africa, Europe, America, Asia and beyond… it’s all in there.<br />

The travel sections are broken up nicely with extra segments of info on everything<br />

from surf history to surf-mobiles to boardshorts to big-wave riding, which keeps the<br />

book fresh and interesting throughout.<br />

Planet surf is neatly done with plenty of bitsy information for pick-up-put-down<br />

reading, and enough visual material to keep you flicking through for images alone.<br />

A good coffee table book for the aspiring surf traveller, or couch surfer.<br />

TRUNK JUNK #1<br />

TRUNK JUNK QUARTERLY PUBLISHING<br />

<br />

The first edition of new publication<br />

Trunk Junk Quarterly is a 100 page<br />

snapshot of some great quality art and<br />

photography, some surf, skate and<br />

music – with one of our favourite’s<br />

Isaac Paddon and The Tides album<br />

even making an appearance. The well<br />

designed, well printed mishmash of<br />

board culture in general with free<br />

stickers and a pull-out poster is<br />

delivered in a box – an overall package<br />

totally justifying the $15 price tag. (Hey,<br />

if you’re going to pay for a mag, you<br />

may as well get your money’s worth!)<br />

This will definitely appeal to fans of<br />

mags like Juxtapoz and people with an<br />

interest in art and design, but will also<br />

have a few gems for skaters and<br />

surfers. Good job.<br />

Oh and if you order it online,<br />

you get a free 46 page zine<br />

and what looks like some cool<br />

coasters. Stiffed. I didn’t get<br />

those…<br />

We’re looking forward to seeing the<br />

next quarter roll around already!<br />

trunkjunkquarterly.com<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

121


25 years later...<br />

still flying high<br />

Cooper Griffin<br />

CLOSEOUT: FIRST AID<br />

IA<br />

SECRET SPOTS<br />

THAT YOU WANT TO AVOID<br />

Let’s not make this too scary. Surely a lifetime of the most<br />

sublime of pastimes is worth a few scars. But I’ll share a<br />

few tips to keep the scars small and the surfer surfing.<br />

We’ve been around long enough to know that the<br />

best boards mean the best performance, from beginner to advanced,<br />

from softboards to SUPs. That’s why we only stock the best.<br />

STOCKING ALL MAJOR LABELS<br />

Fullcircle, JS, Firewire, Chilli, Rusty, Hayden, Emery, DHD, Santa Cruz,<br />

Webber, Simon Anderson, McTavish, Superbrand, Stacey, Tokoro,<br />

Hot Buttered, GSI, Fibreflex & much more<br />

www.fullcirclesurf.com.au<br />

4-5 Vista Place<br />

Cape Woolamai VIC 3925<br />

03 5956 7453<br />

www.liquidgetaway.com.au<br />

115 Marine Parade<br />

San Remo VIC 3925<br />

03 5678 5873<br />

Surf SafariS Snorkelling tourS<br />

whale watChing SCeniC adventureS<br />

Pre Bookings essential 07 5326 1700<br />

Parkyn Parade, Mooloolaba, Sunshine Coast, qld, australia<br />

WORDS BY DR. PETE KIRKHAM<br />

I have a regular clientele of seasoned<br />

surfers in my skin cancer clinic here on<br />

the Sunshine Coast. One thing that’s<br />

always interested me is that during a<br />

skin check, both my patient and I often<br />

focus on the same spots. I’ve had a fair<br />

bit of training and experience so it’s<br />

somewhat disconcerting that someone<br />

with no experience can manage this.<br />

It’s probably similar when a group are<br />

picking the best surfing spot for the<br />

day, sometimes you just sort of know.<br />

Whatever your level of expertise.<br />

It’s all about the one that catches the<br />

eye. Gut feeling. That doesn’t take any<br />

special training, just a good eye and that<br />

sixth sense.<br />

A melanoma doesn’t always look like<br />

what you’d expect a melanoma to look<br />

like but it does often look ‘dodgy’. Much<br />

more common skin cancers like basal<br />

and squamous cell cancers also often<br />

look and feel different.<br />

Everyone’s well versed in the change in<br />

shape, size and bleeding etc. as potential<br />

warning signs too.<br />

Areas I tend to check carefully in surfers<br />

are the lower legs, shoulders and the<br />

face, as these seem to be particularly<br />

vulnerable areas for basal and squamous<br />

cell skin cancers.<br />

Melanomas are often found in relatively<br />

non sun exposed areas. The number and<br />

type of moles and ‘big hits’ of sun early<br />

in life are both probably important risk<br />

factors for melanoma.<br />

Early diagnosis keeps everybody happy.<br />

A dedicated annual skin check does<br />

really help. In the meantime slip, slap,<br />

slop and get out there.<br />

Detecting melanoma.<br />

From top to bottom:<br />

melanomas showing 1.<br />

asymmetry, 2. a border<br />

that is uneven, ragged,<br />

or notched, 3. displaying<br />

coloring of different<br />

shades of brown, black,<br />

or tan and 4. diameter<br />

that had changed in size<br />

Photo: National Cancer<br />

Institute/Skin Cancer Foundation<br />

Dr. Pete Kirkham is a general<br />

practitioner at Nambour<br />

Medical Centre.<br />

www.skinclearclinic.com.au<br />

122 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


TENDON TO<br />

BE A PAIN<br />

YES, IT’S SURFER’S ELBOW<br />

WORDS BY JOHN HART<br />

CLOSEOUT: FITNESS<br />

John Hart is a qualified<br />

fitness instructor and<br />

personal trainer with a<br />

Masters in education who<br />

also writes books, trains and<br />

rehabiliates people, takes<br />

photos, directs movies and<br />

is always happy to share<br />

what he’s learned.<br />

It seems all sports like to claim Lateral<br />

Epicondylitis as their own specific sport<br />

injury, better known in the world of surfing<br />

as “Surfer’s Elbow.” However, you may also<br />

have heard this more commonly referred to<br />

as “Tennis Elbow.”<br />

So what is Lateral Epicondylitis (Surfer’s<br />

Elbow) and how can we prevent, cure or<br />

just plain fix it?<br />

Surfer’s Elbow is an overuse injury<br />

involving the extensor muscles that<br />

originate on the Lateral Epicondylar region<br />

of the Distal Humerus (Funny bone). It is<br />

more properly termed a tendinosis that<br />

specifically involves the origin of the<br />

Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis muscle.<br />

Basically speaking, it is an overuse or<br />

inflammation injury.<br />

Whilst this injury plagues many sports<br />

people, about 40-50% of the surfing<br />

fraternity will suffer this type of aliment<br />

during their surfing years. It predominately<br />

inflicts overzealous, mad surfers who stay<br />

in the water for literally hours at a time.<br />

This ailment also affects tennis players<br />

and golf players. It is in fact a common<br />

problem. The injury involves inflammation<br />

of the Radial Humeral Bursa, Synovium,<br />

Periosteum and the ligament (connective<br />

tissue). There may also be some tearing<br />

of tissue. However, this would be rare in<br />

relation to those involved in surfing.<br />

If you have this injury you would present<br />

with lateral elbow and forearm pain<br />

exacerbated by paddling. The pain will also<br />

extend down the forearm and often occurs<br />

in recreational surfers between the ages<br />

of 30-50 years young. Other symptoms<br />

may include pain about 1-2cm down from<br />

the bony area at the outside of the elbow.<br />

Symptoms may include reduced strength<br />

in the wrist, (when trying to open the twist<br />

top of a beer after that long surf in the<br />

sun!) pains on the elbow itself and your<br />

fingers feeling stiff when you try and open<br />

your hand.<br />

To confirm whether you have Surfer’s Elbow,<br />

try the chair raise test. Stand behind a chair<br />

and attempt to raise it by putting your hands<br />

on the top of the chair back and then lifting<br />

it. If pain results over the lateral elbow,<br />

chances are that you have Surfers Elbow.<br />

About 95% of patients with the condition<br />

will respond to conservative treatments<br />

and will not require any surgical<br />

procedures. Surfers whose condition is<br />

unresponsive after 6 months of therapy<br />

(including steroid injections) may need to<br />

seek a surgeon’s opinion.<br />

MANAGEMENT<br />

& TREATMENT<br />

When the injury occurs, apply ice or coldtherapy<br />

to the pain region (the elbow) for 15<br />

minutes at a time. Repeat this 7 to 8 times<br />

a day. This will help to reduce the pain and<br />

any inflammation that may be present.<br />

Rest is also extremely important in the<br />

healing process. Rest is not something<br />

surfers like to do, however no rest will<br />

increase the problem and it will be present<br />

for a much longer period of time.<br />

You can also wear a support-brace to protect<br />

the tendon whilst healing and strengthening<br />

it, particularly when you return to surfing.<br />

These can be purchased from your local<br />

chemist shop or Sports Physiotherapist,<br />

whom can also advise on the best treatment<br />

for you. The brace should not be put on the<br />

painful area but placed approximately 10cm<br />

down the forearm.<br />

As with all soft-tissue injuries a<br />

comprehensive rehabilitation program<br />

should be carried out by your favourite<br />

Exercise Scientist or Physio.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

123


Jervis Bay Stand Up Paddle<br />

Lessons, Tours, Board Hire<br />

www.jervisbaystanduppaddle.com.au<br />

0403 354 716<br />

CLOSEOUT: LEARNERS<br />

FUN, NOT FIGHTS<br />

AVOID THE RAGE.<br />

IT’S REALLY NOT WORTH IT<br />

As Noosa’s Israel Kani - our feature interview on Page 26 will<br />

tell you from experience, it’s much more enjoyable to be in the<br />

surf without the hassle. So if you’re new to it all, here are some<br />

survival tips from Nigel Potts, Director of the Academy of Surfing<br />

Instructors to help keep you out of trouble.<br />

As surfing becomes more popular, the<br />

number of beginners continues to rise.<br />

More bodies and more surfboards means<br />

waves are more crowded and these<br />

conditions create the ideal breeding<br />

ground for “surf rage”.<br />

Inexperienced surfers often take waves<br />

without being aware of the “dropping in”<br />

rule. This rule governs who has priority<br />

on the wave. The surfer closest to the<br />

curl of the wave has the priority.<br />

Experienced surfers can catch a wave<br />

just as it starts to break and be up on<br />

their feet and riding quick as a flash.<br />

The inexperienced surfer, further along<br />

the wave, will then be in the way. Not<br />

only does this ruin the ride for the surfer<br />

riding on the wave, but it can also cause<br />

a collision to happen.<br />

The result could be serious injury and/<br />

or board damage. This is definitely the<br />

biggest cause of a surf rage incident.<br />

But “dropping in” is not the only<br />

potential source of surf rage.<br />

Inexperienced surfers usually have little<br />

“ocean sense”. Rips and currents can<br />

easily drag a surfer out into the larger<br />

waves and in the way of experienced<br />

surfers.<br />

Beginners may also not understand<br />

the paddling etiquette rule and paddle<br />

straight into an experienced surfer’s path.<br />

Understanding more about surfing and<br />

the ocean is definitely required before<br />

getting out on a surfboard. Most sports<br />

need some level of theory before delving<br />

into the sport. Scuba diving, for example,<br />

requires people to understand something<br />

about their equipment and safety issues<br />

before going into the water. The same is<br />

true for surfing.<br />

Unfortunately, many people think they<br />

can just jump on a surfboard and do it.<br />

Because they have not bothered to learn<br />

more about their equipment, the ocean,<br />

surfing etiquette and safety, they become<br />

a potential danger in the water.<br />

Surfing is a great sport and surf rage can<br />

be avoided if everyone is a little more<br />

“surf educated”.<br />

We have three copies of the ASI Learn to Surf for<br />

Beginners manual and DVD to give away thanks to<br />

ASI. Tell us about your learning experience, or send<br />

us a photo at letters@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

Academy of Surfing Instructors (ASI) is the world’s leading education and accreditation<br />

organisation in the surf industry, specialising in surfing, stand up paddle and bodyboarding.<br />

Instructional manuals and DVDs available for purchase. www.academyofsurfing.com<br />

124 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


BOOK REVIEW<br />

Dropping in, snaking, just being inconsiderate in general... it makes people cranky. Photo: Phil Burnham/Exposed Monkey www.exposedmonkey.com.au<br />

SPORTS WISDOM REVEALED:<br />

THE COACHES<br />

DAVID BECKER & SCOTT HILL (<strong>2010</strong>)<br />

<br />

To cut to the chase, there are a lot of books out<br />

there, particularly in relation to the field of sport, so<br />

why buy this one? It has differing points of view.<br />

Instead of some author’s all-knowing view on sports<br />

psychology, the book is a compilation of personal<br />

stories and success philosophies from twelve of<br />

Australia’s finest coaches.<br />

Phil McNamara, coach of two-time ASP world<br />

champion Mick Fanning, is one of the contributors.<br />

Readers will find his insights extremely interesting.<br />

It is essential reading for anyone involved in the<br />

development of junior surfing from coaches to<br />

parents of budding surf stars.<br />

Phil shares his views on a range of topics from<br />

his coaching philosophy, the attributes and<br />

pathways to success, incorporating technology in<br />

training, preparation, handling setbacks and sports<br />

parenting.<br />

Aside from Phil, there are many interesting<br />

perspectives from coaches in other fields of sport.<br />

Many speak of the importance of not “living life<br />

in a vacuum” and how important it is to take key<br />

learnings from various sports and apply them<br />

accordingly.<br />

Phil cites Tony Roche and Wayne Bennett as two<br />

influential coaches he has observed who have made<br />

an impact upon how he coaches his athletes.<br />

Some of the other coaches featured in the book<br />

include Ron Barassi, Laurie Lawrence, Norma<br />

Plummer, Lindsay Gaze and Johnny Lewis.<br />

Sports Wisdom Revealed: The Coaches is easy<br />

to digest and incredibly well structured, making<br />

regular reference a cinch - perfect for a book of<br />

this nature. The book is available as a printed<br />

paperback, or an e-book. For more information, see<br />

the website www.sportswisdomrevealed.com.au<br />

The authors of Sports Wisdom Revealed: The<br />

Coaches are highly respected physiotherapist<br />

David Becker, who for fifteen years worked<br />

alongside many of the world’s top coaches and<br />

athletes, and Scott Hill, former rugby league star for<br />

the Melbourne Storm and Kangaroo International.<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

125


SURF DIRECTORY Pick<br />

QLD CENTRAL COAST<br />

REEF 2 BEACH SURF SHOP<br />

07 4974 9072<br />

Shop 1, 10 Round Hill Road<br />

Agnes Water/1770<br />

www.reef2beachsurf.com<br />

SUNSHINE COAST<br />

NOOSA SURF WORKS<br />

07 5474 4567<br />

1/11 Bartlett St<br />

Noosaville<br />

www.shotgunsurf.com<br />

www.lagunabaysurf.com<br />

WATERLINE<br />

07 5474 1010<br />

2/15 Venture Dr<br />

Noosaville<br />

www.zeewetsuits.com<br />

CLASSIC MALIBU AUSTRALIA<br />

07 5474 3122<br />

Cnr Gibson and Eumundi Rds.<br />

Noosaville<br />

www.classicmalibu.com<br />

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE<br />

07 5474 1222<br />

3 Gibson Rd, Noosaville<br />

ON SURFARI<br />

07 5474 2162<br />

197 Gympie Terrace<br />

Noosaville<br />

www.onsurfari.com.au<br />

GOLDEN BREED<br />

07 5455 3722<br />

15 Noosa Drive<br />

Noosa Heads<br />

www.goldenbreed.com.au<br />

IMPACT SURF<br />

07 5474 9198<br />

75 Noosa Drive & 1-7 Sunshine<br />

Beach Rd<br />

Noosa Heads<br />

BLUEWATER PLAYERS<br />

07 5473 5079<br />

Shop 3A 11 Sunshine Beach Rd<br />

Noosa Heads<br />

www.bluewaterplayers.com.au<br />

BACK BEACH<br />

07 5473 5676<br />

Cnr Lanyana Way/Arcadia Walk<br />

Noosa Junction<br />

www.backbeach.net.au<br />

SOLACE<br />

07 5455 4826<br />

20 Duke Street<br />

Sunshine Beach<br />

solacestore.blogspot.com<br />

WIPEOUT SURF & SKATE<br />

07 5448 0899<br />

3/28 Duke St<br />

Sunshine Beach<br />

SURF AND STREET SHOP<br />

07 5471 3489<br />

224 David Low Way<br />

Peregian Beach<br />

www.surf-shop.org<br />

COOLUM SURF<br />

07 5351 1742<br />

Shop 14, 8-26 Birtwill St<br />

Coolum Beach<br />

www.alexsurfshop.com.au<br />

BLUE LINES<br />

07 5351 1986<br />

Shops 17 & 18 -<br />

1776 The Esplanade<br />

Coolum Beach<br />

WIPEOUT SURF & SKATE<br />

07 5450 7272<br />

1/938 David Low Way<br />

Marcoola Beach<br />

OLD WOMAN SURF SHOP<br />

07 5448 7<strong>02</strong>5<br />

Santorini Shop 6,<br />

15 Mudjimba Esp<br />

Mudjimba<br />

DA BOMB<br />

07 5451 0620<br />

3/25 Plaza Pde<br />

Maroochydore<br />

www.dabombsurf.com.au<br />

OCEAN ADDICTS<br />

07 5309 6624<br />

103-105 Aerodrome Rd<br />

Maroochydore<br />

www.oceanaddicts.com.au<br />

ALTERNATIVE SURF<br />

07 5475 4811<br />

Shop 11 Aquarius Resort 140<br />

Alexandra Pde<br />

Alexandra Headland<br />

BEACH BEAT<br />

07 5443 2777<br />

164 Alexandra Pde<br />

Alexandra Headlands<br />

www.beachbeat.com.au<br />

ALEX SURF<br />

07 5452 6276<br />

188 Alexandra Pde<br />

Alexandra Headlands<br />

www.alexsurf.com.au<br />

WORLD SURFARIS<br />

1800 611 163<br />

2/174 Brisbane Rd<br />

Mooloolaba<br />

www.worldsurfaris.com<br />

SURF PLANET<br />

07 5476 6200<br />

Shop 5, Buderim Marketplace<br />

Buderim<br />

www.surfplanet.com.au<br />

SUBURBAN SURF<br />

07 5493 7411<br />

224 Nicklin Way, Warana<br />

www.suburbansurf.com.au<br />

up the next edition of smorgasboarder at any of these fine businesses - out in January<br />

DA BOMB<br />

(07) 5437 9201<br />

7/12 Thunderbird Dr<br />

Bokarina<br />

www.dabombsurf.com.au<br />

BEACH BEAT<br />

07 5491 8215<br />

Shop 2&3 4-6 Beerburrum St<br />

Dicky Beach<br />

www.beachbeat.com.au<br />

THE FACTORY<br />

07 5492 5838<br />

15 Allen St<br />

Caloundra QLD 4551<br />

SURFWARE AUSTRALIA<br />

07 5491 3620<br />

2 Bulcock St<br />

Caloundra<br />

BEACH BEAT<br />

07 5491 4711<br />

119 Bulcock Rd<br />

Caloundra<br />

www.beachbeat.com.au<br />

BRISBANE<br />

PRIMITIVE SURF<br />

07 3266 1001<br />

601 Nudgee Rd<br />

Nundah<br />

www.primitivesurf.com<br />

GOODTIME<br />

07 3391 8588<br />

29 Ipswich Rd<br />

Wooloongabba<br />

www.goodtime.com.au<br />

GOLD COAST<br />

SURF FX<br />

07 5531 3199<br />

127 Ferry Road<br />

Southport<br />

www.surf-fx.com<br />

SURF FX<br />

07 5538 0008<br />

3191 Surfers Paradise Bvld<br />

Surfers Paradise<br />

www.surf-fx.com<br />

SIDEWAYS<br />

07 5592 3849<br />

3012 Surfers Blvd<br />

Surfers Paradise<br />

sidewaysboardsports.com.au<br />

DUKE’S LONGBOARDS<br />

07 5572 0477<br />

2578 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.dukeslongboards.com<br />

STUART SURF DESIGN<br />

07 5572 0098<br />

2576 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.stuartsurf.com.au<br />

GANGSTA SURF<br />

07 5526 6969<br />

Shop 1/ 2558 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.gangstasurf.com<br />

GREENLINE<br />

0412 398 585<br />

2544 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.greenlinepaddlesurf.com<br />

BOARD CULTURE<br />

07 5572 9866<br />

2438 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.boardculture.com.au<br />

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE<br />

07 5526 6377<br />

2251 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Nobby Beach<br />

THE BOARDROOM<br />

07 5527 7877<br />

2084 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Miami<br />

LOWEN 88<br />

07 5526 5161<br />

2a/2172 Gold Coast Highway<br />

Miami<br />

www.lowen88.com<br />

HARVEY SURF GALLERY<br />

0414 557 62<br />

Unit 3, 10 Pacific Ave <br />

Miami<br />

www.harveysurf.com<br />

MT WOODGEE<br />

07 5535 <strong>02</strong>88<br />

1730 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Burleigh Heads<br />

www.mtwoodgee.com.au<br />

SEAN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

07 5520 2774<br />

Old Burleigh Theatre Arcade,<br />

Shop 10, Goodwin Tce<br />

Burleigh Heads<br />

seanscottphotography.com.au<br />

DALE CHAPMAN<br />

07 5593 8411<br />

Unit 3/48 Junction Road<br />

Burleigh Heads<br />

www.chapmansurfboards.com<br />

MY PHOTO EXPERT<br />

07 5535 2763<br />

3/71 Township Drive<br />

Burleigh Heads<br />

www.myphotoexpert.com.au<br />

GOLD COAST SURF WORLD<br />

07 5525 6380<br />

Tomewin Street, Currumbin<br />

www.surfworldgoldcoast.com<br />

FIREWIRE SURFBOARDS<br />

07 5587 7700<br />

1/49 Currumbin Creek Rd<br />

Currumbin<br />

www.firewiresurfboards.com<br />

DMS<br />

07 5559 5949<br />

3/56 Currumbin Creek Rd<br />

Currumbin<br />

www.dmshapes.com<br />

D’ARCY HANDSHAPES<br />

07 5559 5866<br />

1/8 Hawker St<br />

Currumbin<br />

www.darcysurfboards.com<br />

SHAPERS<br />

07 5534 4228<br />

9/7 Traders Way, Currumbin<br />

www.shapers.com.au<br />

MT WOODGEE<br />

07 5598 2188<br />

2 Stewart Rd<br />

Currumbin<br />

www.mtwoodgee.com.au<br />

DIVERSE<br />

07 5598 4848<br />

476 Gold Coast Highway<br />

Tugun<br />

www.diversesurf.com.au<br />

DORRINGTON SURFBOARDS<br />

07 5599 4030<br />

16 Musgrave Street<br />

Kirra<br />

www.dorringtonsurfboards.com<br />

BOARD CULTURE<br />

07 5536 5866<br />

Gold Coast Hwy(outside airport)<br />

Coolangatta<br />

www.boardculture.com.au<br />

KIRRA SURF/WORLD SURFARIS<br />

07 5536 3922<br />

Shop 6, 8 Creek St<br />

Bilinga<br />

www.kirrasurf.com.au<br />

UNDERGROUND SURF<br />

07 5599 1040<br />

Shop 3/31 McLean St.<br />

Coolangatta<br />

www.undergroundsurf.com.au<br />

MT WOODGEE<br />

07 5536 5937<br />

122 Griffith St<br />

Coolangatta<br />

www.mtwoodgee.com.au<br />

COOLANGATTA BOARD STORE<br />

07 5536 7850<br />

152 Griffith St, Coolangatta<br />

www.cbsboardstore.com<br />

SEAN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

07 5599 1150<br />

Shop 3, 110 Marine Pde,<br />

Coolangatta<br />

seanscottphotography.com.au<br />

BASE SURFBOARDS<br />

07 5536 1470<br />

Cnr Dutton St & Marine Pde<br />

Coolangatta<br />

www.basesurfboards.com<br />

126 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


NSW NORTH COAST<br />

SIDEWAYS<br />

07 5524 6699<br />

2/13-21 Greenway Dr<br />

Tweed Heads<br />

sidewaysboardsports.com.au<br />

FULL FORCE<br />

07 5524 2933<br />

Factory 18 / 48 Machinery Drive<br />

Tweed Heads<br />

SURF XCESS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6674 5350<br />

88 Marine Parade<br />

Kingscliff<br />

CABARITA SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6676 3151<br />

1/38 Tweed Coast Rd<br />

Cabarita Beach<br />

BRUNSWICK SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 1283<br />

1/12 The Terrace<br />

Brunswick Heads<br />

www.brunswicksurf.com.au<br />

MCTAVISH<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6680 8807<br />

91 Centenial Circuit<br />

Byron Bay<br />

www.mctavish.com.au<br />

MADDOG SURF CENTRES<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 6395<br />

91 Jonson St<br />

Byron Bay<br />

www.maddog.com.au<br />

MC SURF DESIGNS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 8778<br />

3 Banksia Drive<br />

Byron Bay<br />

www.mcsurf.com.au<br />

NORTH COAST SURFBOARDS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 6896<br />

1/29 Acacia St<br />

Byron Bay<br />

www.bearsurfboards.com.au<br />

MUNROE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 6211<br />

29 Acacia St<br />

Byron Bay<br />

www.munroesurfboards.com.au<br />

T&C SURF DESIGN / MCCOY<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 7485<br />

10 Acacia Street<br />

Byron Bay<br />

BYRON BAY LONGBOARDS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 5244<br />

Shop 1 - 89 Jonson St<br />

Byron Bay<br />

HO’OKUPU<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 8861<br />

2/9 Lawson St<br />

Byron Bay<br />

hookupusurf.com<br />

UNPLUGGED<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 7441<br />

Shop 1/ 2 Lawson Street<br />

Byron Bay<br />

www.unpluggedbyronbay.com<br />

ALL ABOVE BOARD<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6687 7522<br />

68 Ballina St<br />

Lennox Head<br />

MADDOG SURF CENTRES<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6685 6094<br />

45 River St, Ballina<br />

www.maddog.com.au<br />

TRIPLE X WETSUITS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6686 3939<br />

10 Piper Drive, Ballina<br />

www.triple-x.com.au<br />

THE PLANK SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6645 8362<br />

Top of the Hill, Yamba<br />

SOUND LOUNGE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6646 3909<br />

16 Yamba St, Yamba<br />

MORE SURFBOARDS<br />

0405 475 <strong>02</strong>6<br />

Angourie Rd, Yamba<br />

www.moresurfboards.com<br />

NSW MID NORTH COAST<br />

XS SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6654 1049<br />

76 Beach Street, Woolgoolga<br />

www.xssurf.com<br />

COOPERS SURF CENTRES<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6654 0033<br />

56D Beach St, Woolgoolga<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6652 8146<br />

28 Orlando St<br />

Coffs Harbour<br />

www.cooperssurf.com.au<br />

WATER SURF+ART+CAFE<br />

Distinctively relaxed<br />

atmosphere, exceptional<br />

food, coffee and tea, great<br />

service, photographic<br />

art from Australia’s best<br />

photographers, exquisite<br />

gifts and select surfwear and<br />

boards.<br />

(<strong>02</strong>) 6651 4500<br />

370 Harbour Drive, Coffs<br />

Harbour Jetty<br />

www.watersurfartcafe.com<br />

THE LOG SHACK<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6658<strong>02</strong>23<br />

392 Harbour Drive,<br />

The Jetty Strip<br />

Coffs Harbour<br />

www.thelogshack.com.au<br />

SUNPATCH SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6653 1965<br />

49 First Ave<br />

Sawtell<br />

www.sunpatchsurf.com.au<br />

VALLA SURFBOARDS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6568 8909<br />

8 Monro St, Nambucca Heads<br />

www.vallasurfboards.com.au<br />

COASTAL CURVES<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6568 69<strong>02</strong><br />

Ridge St, Nambucca Heads<br />

www.coastalcurves.com<br />

SCOTTS HEAD SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6569 8344<br />

Scotts Head NSW 2447<br />

scottsheadsurfschool.blogspot.com<br />

WAVE WEAR<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6566 5177<br />

1/15 Livingstone St<br />

South West Rocks<br />

CRESCENT HEAD SURF CO.<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6562 8306<br />

33 Smith St<br />

Kempsey<br />

CRESCENT HEAD SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6566 0550<br />

1 Crescent Head Tavern<br />

Crescent Head<br />

INNER VISION SURF ‘N’ SKATE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6583 7790<br />

80 William St<br />

Port Macquarie<br />

SALTWATER WINE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6584 4877<br />

1/125 Gordon St<br />

Port Macquarie<br />

www.saltwaterwine.com.au<br />

SANDY FEET<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6584 1995<br />

5/21 Clarence Street<br />

Port Macquarie<br />

www.sandyfeetsurf.com.au<br />

JUNGLE SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6555 8556<br />

4/25 Manning Street<br />

Tuncurry<br />

www.junglesurf.com.au<br />

SALTWATER WINE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6554 7979<br />

5 Wharf St , Forster<br />

www.saltwaterwine.com.au<br />

BOOMERANG BEACH SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6554 0351<br />

Shop 4, Boomerang Drive<br />

Pacific Palms<br />

NEWCASTLE<br />

SURF FACTORY<br />

16 Maitland Rd<br />

Islington<br />

www.thesurffactory.com.au<br />

MARK RICHARDS SURFSHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4961 3088<br />

755 Hunter St<br />

Newcastle<br />

markrichardssurfboards.com<br />

SURFHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

61 Hunter Street<br />

Newcastle<br />

surfhousephotography.com<br />

PACIFIC DREAMS SURFSHOPS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4926 3355<br />

7 Darby St<br />

Newcastle<br />

www.pacificdreams.com.au<br />

SANBAH<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4962 2420<br />

Shop 27, The Junction Fair<br />

Union Street<br />

Newcastle<br />

www.sanbah.com.au<br />

BREAKAWAY SURF CO<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4943 2699<br />

181 Pacific Hwy<br />

Charlestown<br />

EGANS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4945 8055<br />

575 Pacific Hwy<br />

Belmont<br />

THE SURF SHACK<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4945 8965<br />

703 Pacific Hwy<br />

Belmont South<br />

SWANSEA SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4971 4422<br />

164 Pacific Hwy<br />

Swansea<br />

www.swanseasurf.com.au<br />

CENTRAL COAST<br />

BEACHIN SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 43 96 5159<br />

262 Main Rd<br />

Toukley<br />

www.surfinfo.com.au/nsw/<br />

beachinsurf<br />

ADRIFT SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4332 8355<br />

133 The Entrance Road<br />

The Entrance<br />

www.adriftsurf.com.au<br />

BOARDERLINE SURF SKATE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4332 7175<br />

421 The Entrance Rd<br />

Long Jetty<br />

www.boarderlinesurfskate.com<br />

SURFERS CHOICE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4334 6532<br />

473 The Entrance Rd<br />

Long Jetty<br />

www.surferschoice.com.au<br />

BATEAU BAY SURF N SPORT<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4332 1157<br />

101a Bateau Bay Road<br />

Bateau Bay<br />

ONE EIGHTY SURF COMPANY<br />

Shop 2, 82a Ocean View Drive<br />

Wamberal<br />

www.180surfco.com.au<br />

SLIMES<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4365 5511<br />

1/203 The Entrance Rd<br />

Erina<br />

ESS BOARDSTORE<br />

251 The Entrance Rd<br />

Erina<br />

www.essboardstore.com.au<br />

THREE POINTS SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4382 1541<br />

170 Avoca Drive<br />

Avoca Beach<br />

www.avocasurfscholl.com.au<br />

STS THE BOARD CENTRE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4342 2555<br />

326 West St<br />

Umina<br />

NORTHERN BEACHES<br />

BEACH WITHOUT SAND<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9918 2763<br />

1a Nth Avalon Rd<br />

Avalon<br />

RAISED BY WOLVES<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9918 8861<br />

U 2/40 Old Barrenjoey Rd<br />

Avalon<br />

www.raisedbywolves.com.au<br />

LITTLE DRAGON<br />

0403 974 967<br />

1 Bramley Lane<br />

Newport Beach<br />

DIVISION SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9979 5334<br />

Cnr Bungan and Waratah Sts<br />

Mona Vale<br />

www.divisionsurf.com.au<br />

RAISED BY WOLVES<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9997 4838<br />

9b Waratah St<br />

Mona Vale<br />

www.raisedbywolves.com.au<br />

SUGARMILL SURF EMPORIUM<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9913 3332<br />

2/1329 Pittwater Rd<br />

Narrabeen<br />

www.sugarmillsurf.com<br />

nov/dec <strong>2010</strong><br />

127


SURF DIRECTORY CONTINUED<br />

POWERLINEZ<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9913 2128<br />

16a Waterloo St<br />

Narrabeen<br />

www.powerlinez.com.au<br />

WICKS SURF CENTRE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9971 0760<br />

1103 Pittwater Road<br />

Collaroy Beach<br />

LONG REEF SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9982 4829<br />

1012 Pittwater Rd<br />

Collaroy<br />

www.longreefsurf.com.au<br />

WIND SURF ’N’ SNOW<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9971 0999<br />

17 Anzac Ave<br />

Collaroy<br />

www.windsurfnsnow.com.au<br />

LINE UP SURF AUSTRALIA<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9971 8624<br />

12b The Strand<br />

Dee Why<br />

www.lineup.com.au<br />

THE PERFECT WAVE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9939 0890<br />

Suite 38, 42-46 Wattle Rd<br />

Brookvale<br />

www.theperfectwave.com.au<br />

CHAOS SURFBOARDS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9907 2769<br />

Unit 1/236 Harbord Road<br />

Brookvale<br />

www.chaossurfboards.com<br />

BENNETT SURFBOARDS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9905 5157<br />

180 Harbord Rd<br />

Brookvale<br />

DRIPPING WET SURF CO<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9977 3549<br />

398 Pittwater Rd<br />

Mona Vale<br />

www.dripwetsurf.com<br />

SUNSHINE SURFING<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9977 4399<br />

89 Pittwater Rd<br />

Manly<br />

www.sunshinesurfing.com.au<br />

DRIPPING WET SURF CO<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9977 3549<br />

93 North Steyne<br />

Manly<br />

www.dripwetsurf.com<br />

BASE SURFBOARDS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9976 0591<br />

46 North Steyne Rd<br />

Manly<br />

www.basesurfboards.com<br />

MANLY LONGBOARD CO.<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9977 0093<br />

39 Belgrave Street<br />

Manly<br />

www.manlylongboard.com<br />

128 september <strong>2010</strong><br />

SURFECTION<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9977 6955<br />

110 The Corso<br />

Manly<br />

www.surfectionmosman.com<br />

HERITAGE SURF AUSTRALIA<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9977 7623<br />

24 Darley Rd, Manly<br />

www.heritagesurfaustralia.com<br />

SURFECTION<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9969 1011<br />

522 Military Rd<br />

Mosman<br />

www.surfectionmosman.com<br />

SUPER SWELL<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9144 3229<br />

166 Mona Vale Rd<br />

St Ives<br />

SYDNEY SOUTH<br />

SURFECTION<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9387 1413<br />

308 Oxford St<br />

Bondi Junction<br />

BONDI UNDERGROUND<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9365 0870<br />

2/72 Campbell Pde<br />

Bondi Beach<br />

DRIPPING WET SURF CO<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9300 0055<br />

180-186 Campbell Parade<br />

Bondi Beach<br />

www.drippingwetsurf.com<br />

SURF CULTURE / SIX OUNCE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 93895477<br />

40 Bronte Road<br />

Bondi Junction<br />

www.surfculture.com.au<br />

www.sixounceboardstore.com<br />

CRONULLA<br />

JACKSON SURFBOARDS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9524 2700<br />

57 Captain Cook Drive<br />

Caringbah<br />

www.jacksonsurfboards.com.au<br />

TRIPLE BULL<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9524 4822<br />

41 Captain Cook Dr<br />

Caringbah<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9544 0354<br />

23 Kingsway<br />

Cronulla<br />

www.triplebullsurf.com<br />

CRONULLA SURF DESIGN<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9544 0433<br />

8 Cronulla St<br />

Cronulla<br />

cronullasurfdesign.com.au<br />

Pick up the next edition of smorgasboarder at any of these fine businesses - out in January<br />

EASTCOAST STAND UP PADDLE<br />

Dedicated to SUP - Sydney’s<br />

original Stand Up Paddle<br />

outlet. Performance,<br />

flatwater, race, and distance<br />

boards – we have a board to<br />

suit all skill levels.<br />

0413 456009<br />

0418 294854<br />

27 Throsby Close<br />

Barden Ridge<br />

eastcoaststanduppaddle.com.au<br />

WOOLONGONG<br />

FINBOX BOARDSTORE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4268 2050<br />

1/ 269 Lawrence Hargrave Drive<br />

Thirroul<br />

thefinbox.blogspot.com<br />

SURF PIT<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4283 7196<br />

2/100 Railway St, Corrimal<br />

www.surfpit.com.au<br />

BYRNE SURF AND SKI<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4226 1122<br />

115 Princes Highway<br />

Fairy Meadow<br />

byrnesurfboardsaustralia.com<br />

SKIPP SURFBOARDS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4228 8878<br />

24 Flinders St, Wollongong<br />

www.skippsurfboards.com.au<br />

CARABINE SURF DESIGNS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4229 9462<br />

36 Flinders St, Wollongong<br />

EXTREME SNOW, SKATE & SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4226 3145<br />

80 Market St<br />

Wollongong<br />

SKIPP SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4229 12<strong>02</strong><br />

231 Crown Street<br />

Wollongong<br />

www.skippsurfboards.com.au<br />

BOARDOM<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4227 2777<br />

206 Keira Street,<br />

Wollongong<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4295 3373<br />

1/16b Addison St<br />

Shellharbour Village<br />

ZINK SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4233 1189<br />

136 Terralong St.<br />

Kiama<br />

www.zinksurf.com.au<br />

NATURAL NECESSITY SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4234 1636<br />

115 Fern St<br />

Gerringong<br />

www.nnss.com.au<br />

AQUATIQUE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4464 1881<br />

123a Queen Street<br />

Berry<br />

www.aquatique.com.au<br />

AQUATIQUE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4421 8159<br />

125-127 Junction St<br />

Nowra<br />

www.aquatique.com.au<br />

CORE SURF STORE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4421 4108<br />

148 Junction Street<br />

Nowra<br />

www.corestore.com.au<br />

AQUATIQUE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4441 5530<br />

55 Owen St, Huskisson<br />

www.aquatique.com.au<br />

SUN & SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4441 1938<br />

Shop 1, 168 Jacobs Drive<br />

Sussex Inlet<br />

AKWA SURF<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4454 5222<br />

Shop 1, Mellick’s Corner,<br />

Princess Highway, Milton<br />

www.akwasurf.com.au<br />

SOUTHERN MAN SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4454 0343<br />

138 Princes Hwy<br />

Ulladulla<br />

www.southernman.com.au<br />

SALTWATER DREAM<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4472 3811<br />

2 Bay Central<br />

Batemans Bay<br />

OFFSHORE SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4474 4350<br />

66 Vulcan St, Moruya<br />

www.offshoresurf.com.au<br />

NAROOMA SURF & SKATE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4476 1422<br />

30 Princes Hwy<br />

Narooma<br />

DSC SURFBOARDS<br />

0424 867 962<br />

Midtown Arcade<br />

Narooma<br />

BERMAGUI SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6493 4849<br />

4/28 Lamont St<br />

Bermagui<br />

RAW SURFBOARDS<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6494 4466<br />

Lot 1291 Tathra Road<br />

Kalaru<br />

www.rawsurfboards.com.au<br />

MERIMBULA SURF SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6495 1515<br />

Merimbula Drive<br />

Merimbula<br />

SALTWATER DREAM<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6495 1600<br />

39 Market St<br />

Merimbula<br />

CORE SURF SKATE AND KITE<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6494 3374<br />

49 Toalla St<br />

Pambula Village<br />

www.pambulasurfshop.com.au<br />

COUNTRY VIC<br />

SURF SHACK<br />

03 5155 4933<br />

507 Esplanade<br />

Lakes Entrance<br />

ATOLL TRAVEL<br />

1800 622 310<br />

4 Bridge Street<br />

Foster<br />

www.atolltravel.com<br />

SERIOUS SURF STUFF<br />

03 5674 2540<br />

1 Williams Street<br />

Inverloch<br />

www.strapper.com.au<br />

VORTEX SURF & SKATE<br />

03 5672 4112<br />

54 McBride Ave<br />

Wonthaggi<br />

www.strapper.com.au<br />

PHILLIP ISLAND<br />

OUTEREEF<br />

03 5678 5677<br />

73 Phillip Island Rd, San Remo<br />

www.outereef.com.au<br />

FULLCIRCLE SURF<br />

03 5678 5873<br />

115 Marine Pde, San Remo<br />

www.fullcirclesurf.com.au<br />

ISLANTIS<br />

03 5956 7553<br />

10-12 Phillip Island Rd<br />

Newhaven<br />

www.islantis.com.au<br />

FULLCIRCLE SURF<br />

03 5956 7453<br />

4-5 Vista Pl, Cape Woolamai<br />

www.fullcirclesurf.com.au<br />

ISLAND SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5952 2578<br />

147 Thompson Ave<br />

Cowes<br />

www.islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

ISLAND SURF SHACK<br />

03 5952 1659<br />

148 Thompson Ave<br />

Cowes


DING REPAIRS<br />

ISLAND SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5952 3443<br />

65 Smiths Beach Rd<br />

Smiths Beach<br />

www.islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

MELBOURNE<br />

ZAK SURFBOARDS<br />

03 9416 7384<br />

319 Victoria Rd<br />

Thornbury<br />

www.zaksurfboards.com<br />

TRIGGER BROS SURF & SAIL<br />

03 9537 3222<br />

Shop 2, 1 St Kilda Rd<br />

St Kilda<br />

www.triggerbros.com.au<br />

REPEAT PERFORMANCE SURF<br />

(THE BOARD STORE)<br />

03 9525 6475<br />

87 Ormond Rd<br />

Elwood<br />

www.rpstheboardstore.com<br />

BRIGHTON SURF CO.<br />

03 9593 2211<br />

43 Church St<br />

Brighton<br />

SHQ BOARDSPORTS<br />

03 9598 2867<br />

81 Beach Road<br />

Sandringham<br />

www.shq.com.au<br />

MORDY SURF CENTRE<br />

03 9580 1716<br />

628 Main St<br />

Mordialloc<br />

www.mordysurf.com.au<br />

PAULOWNIA SURFBOARD<br />

SUPPLIES<br />

03 9588 2533<br />

45 Governor Road<br />

Mordialloc<br />

paulowniaparadise.com.au<br />

OKE SURFBOARDS<br />

03 9587 3553.<br />

Factory 1 1-7 Canterbury Rd,<br />

Braeside<br />

www.okesurfboards.com<br />

TRIGGER BROS SURF & SAIL<br />

03 9770 2223<br />

7 Rossmith St<br />

Frankston<br />

www.triggerbros.com.au<br />

PENINSULA SURF CENTRE<br />

03 9783 3811<br />

40 Wells St<br />

Frankston<br />

www.peninsulasurf.com.au<br />

PENINSULA SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5975 9608<br />

78 Main St<br />

Mornington<br />

www.peninsulasurf.com.au<br />

PENINSULA SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5975 1800<br />

835 Nepean Hwy<br />

Mornington<br />

www.peninsulasurf.com.au<br />

TRIGGER BROS SURF & SAIL<br />

03 5989 84<strong>02</strong><br />

Point Leo Rd, Point Leo<br />

www.triggerbros.com.au<br />

PENINSULA SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5985 4637<br />

2137 Pt Nepean Hwy<br />

Rye<br />

www.peninsulasurf.com.au<br />

TRIGGER BROS SURF & SAIL<br />

03 5984 5670<br />

46 Ocean Beach Rd<br />

Sorrento<br />

www.triggerbros.com.au<br />

BEAN SURFING<br />

03 5984 5199<br />

4 Ocean Beach Rd<br />

Sorrento<br />

OZMOSIS<br />

03 5984 0360<br />

4 Ocean Beach Rd<br />

Sorrento<br />

www.ozmosis.com.au<br />

VIC SURF COAST<br />

MURFS LONGBOARDS<br />

03 5255 5525<br />

82 The Terrace<br />

Ocean Grove<br />

www.murfslongboards.com.au<br />

STRAPPER SURF<br />

03 5255 2666<br />

67b The Terrace<br />

Ocean Grove<br />

www.strapper.com.au<br />

GREEN ROOM SURF SHOP<br />

03 5256 2996<br />

64 The Terrace, Ocean Grove<br />

www.greenroom.com.au<br />

RASTA’S EARTH & SURF SHOP<br />

03 5254 3255<br />

51 Hitchcock Ave<br />

Barwon Heads<br />

www.rastasurfboards.com.au<br />

TONIK SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5254 1470<br />

60/62 Hitchcock Ave<br />

Barwon Heads<br />

www.tonik.com.au<br />

STONKER TORQUAY<br />

03 5261 6077<br />

1a Baines Court, Torquay<br />

www.stonker.com.au<br />

SOUTH COAST SURFBOARDS<br />

03 5261 2670<br />

1C Baines Court<br />

Torquay<br />

www.southcoastlongboards.com.au<br />

BLUNT<br />

03 5261 7590<br />

Shop 2, Surf City Plaza<br />

Torquay<br />

www.strapper.com.au<br />

TORQUAY SURF WORLD<br />

03 5261 4606<br />

Surf City Plaza<br />

Torquay<br />

www.surfworld.org.au<br />

BASE SURFBOARDS<br />

03 5261 5666<br />

3/108 Surfcoast Hwy, Torquay<br />

www.basesurfboards.com<br />

STRAPPER<br />

03 5261 3508<br />

96 Surfcoast Hwy, Torquay<br />

03 5261 2312<br />

106 Surfcoast Hwy, Torquay<br />

www.strapper.com.au<br />

TORQUAY SURFING ACADEMY<br />

03 5261 2<strong>02</strong>2<br />

34A Bell St<br />

Torquay<br />

www.torquaysurf.com.au<br />

TIGERFISH<br />

03 5264 7271<br />

12/15 Bell St, Torquay<br />

www.tigerfish.com.au<br />

ANGLESEA SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5263 1530<br />

111 Great Ocean Rd<br />

Anglesea<br />

www.secondhandsurfboards.com.au<br />

LORNE SURF SHOP<br />

03 5289 1673<br />

130 Mountjoy Pde<br />

Lorne<br />

SHARKY’S<br />

03 5289 2421<br />

Mountjoy Pde<br />

Lorne<br />

HODGY’S SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5237 7883<br />

143 Great Ocean Road<br />

Apollo Bay<br />

www.hodgys.com<br />

SHIPWRECK COAST<br />

PORT CAMPBELL TRADING CO<br />

03 5598 6444<br />

27 Lord Street<br />

Port Campbell<br />

TAYLORS SURFODESY<br />

03 5562 5681<br />

132 Liebig Street, Warrnambool<br />

SOUTHERN GUNS<br />

03 5562 0928<br />

176 Liebig Street<br />

Warrnambool<br />

AGNES WATER/1770<br />

REEF 2 BEACH<br />

(Mon – Sat, 9-5pm, Sun,10-4pm)<br />

07 4974 9072<br />

SUNSHINE COAST<br />

DA BOMB<br />

(Mon – Sat, 9-5pm, Sun,10-4pm)<br />

07 5451 0620 - Maroochydore<br />

07 5437 9201 - Bokarina<br />

BRISBANE<br />

PRIMITIVE SURF<br />

(Mon-Fri, 8:30-5:30pm, Thurs<br />

8:30am-8pm, Sat, 8:30-4pm,<br />

Sun, 10-4pm)<br />

07 3266 1001<br />

TUGUN<br />

DIVERSE<br />

(M-F,8:30-5:30pm, Sat and<br />

Sun, 9-4pm)<br />

07 5598 4848<br />

COOLANGATTA<br />

UNDERGROUND SURF<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

07 5599 1040<br />

YAMBA<br />

THE PLANK SHOP<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6645 8362<br />

TOMBSTONE SURFBOARDS<br />

(Tues-Fri, 9-4pm, Sat, 9-12pm)<br />

0432 330 826<br />

COFFS HARBOUR<br />

THE LOG SHACK<br />

(M-F, 10-5pm, Sat & Sun<br />

10-2:30pm)<br />

<strong>02</strong> 6658 <strong>02</strong>23<br />

SYDNEY NORTH<br />

CHAOS SURFBOARDS<br />

(M-F,9-6pm, Sat & Sun<br />

8:30-6pm)<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9907 2769<br />

BONDI JUNCTION<br />

SIX OUNCE –<br />

INSIDE SURF CULTURE<br />

(7 days , 9:30-6:30pm)<br />

<strong>02</strong> 9389 5477<br />

WOOLONGONG<br />

SKIPP SURFBOARDS<br />

M-F,9-5:30, Thurs 9-7:30pm,<br />

Sat 9-4, Sun 10-4)<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4228 8878<br />

JERVIS BAY<br />

INNER FEELING SURFBOARDS<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

<strong>02</strong> 4441 6756<br />

NAROOMA<br />

DSC SURFBOARDS<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

0424 867 962<br />

THORNBURY<br />

ZAK SURFBOARDS<br />

(Mon-Fri,10-6pm; Sat 10-5pm)<br />

03 9416 7384<br />

TORQUAY<br />

STONKER TORQUAY<br />

(Mon – Fri, 9-5pm)<br />

03 5261 6077<br />

PHILLIP ISLAND<br />

ISLANTIS<br />

(7 days , 9-5pm)<br />

03 5956 7553<br />

ISLAND SURF SHOP - COWES<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

03 5952 2578<br />

FULLCIRCLE SURF<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

03 5956 7453<br />

FIX BROKEN BOARDS?<br />

Promote your ding repair<br />

business for $15 an edition.<br />

Call 0401 345 201<br />

CLASSIFIEDS<br />

BUSINESS FOR SALE: LIFESTYLE PACKAGE<br />

Work from home selling/trading surfboards,<br />

kayaks and surf skis. Large variety of stock<br />

from vintage to near new short/long boards<br />

+ accessories and memorabilia.<br />

Full range of boards/accessories to be sold<br />

in one transaction.<br />

POA for serious enquiries, picture is only<br />

small part of collection.<br />

Sunshine Coast. Contact 0403 465 083<br />

september <strong>2010</strong><br />

129


3.<br />

CLOSEOUT: RELAX<br />

ALL ON<br />

BOARD<br />

1.<br />

A little wet weather didn’t<br />

dampen the spirits or affect the<br />

turnout for the opening bash of<br />

Ocean Addicts, a brand new<br />

board store in Maroochydore on<br />

the Sunshine Coast.<br />

Cold drinks and a sausage sizzle<br />

kept the attendees fed and watered<br />

as they browsed through the SUP,<br />

kite, wake and surf gear on offer,<br />

while the littlies enjoyed a round of<br />

face painting.<br />

4.<br />

2.<br />

PHOTOS:<br />

1. Jayne and Andrew checking out<br />

some huge boards<br />

2. Deb Mitchell enjoying the day<br />

3. Co-owners Hayden and Ruth<br />

4. Lorraine loves smorgasboarder<br />

5. The red carpet was rolled out for<br />

young and old<br />

6. Liz and Murray cook up some<br />

mean snags<br />

7. Glen, Steve, Glenn<br />

8. Scandanavian students Didde,<br />

Marthe and Randi experienced<br />

some Sunshine Coast hospitality<br />

9. Ocean addict and co-owner Luke<br />

snapped here with Greg and Bec<br />

For more on the store, see:<br />

www.oceanaddicts.com.au<br />

6.<br />

8.<br />

5.<br />

7.<br />

9.<br />

Photos: Mark Chapman<br />

LET US KNOW ABOUT<br />

YOUR EVENT<br />

If you have something on the go,<br />

let us know. Email us on:<br />

editorial@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

ART OF<br />

SURFING<br />

The Gold Coast competition<br />

attracted hoards of spectators<br />

and after a tense afternoon<br />

judging session, the winners<br />

were allotted their dues at a<br />

great opening party, complete<br />

with band and BBQ.<br />

The competition attracted over<br />

60 original works from local<br />

and interstate designers and<br />

artists. Surf World Gold Coast<br />

Chairman Mal Sutherland said<br />

that surfboards had long been<br />

an outlet for artistic expression<br />

and the competition highlights<br />

the tremendous creativity in<br />

surfboard art.<br />

Winners from left: Dick Van Straalen, Simon Skerry, Rodney Hopper, Ralph Riddell, Christian Chapman and<br />

(front) Cain Pridmore. Photo and words, Deb Perry<br />

130 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>


WE TEST<br />

EVERYTHING<br />

In our January edition, along<br />

with the usual travel, people<br />

and gear, we’re also testing<br />

as many things as we can<br />

in one edition. From wax to<br />

boards of any description to<br />

any random gear we can find<br />

- we’ll check it out and give<br />

it a run.<br />

NEXT EDITION<br />

WHERE TO<br />

GET THE MAG<br />

SMORGASBOARDER<br />

IS FREE...<br />

...so pick up your copy at your<br />

local surf shop along the east<br />

coast from Agnes Water to<br />

Warrnambool. If they don’t stock<br />

it, ask them why not.<br />

Shower time Photo: Richard Higgins flickr.com/photos/24364979@N00/sets/<br />

SUBSCRIBE & GET IT DELIVERED<br />

If you’re not fortunate enough<br />

to have a local surf shop with<br />

copies of smorgasboarder, you<br />

can subscribe to have it delivered<br />

to your door. The mag is still free,<br />

but Australia Post likes to get paid<br />

for delivering it. For only $18, you<br />

get six editions - hot off the press<br />

- delivered to your door. Send a<br />

cheque or money order to<br />

PO Box 501, Moffat Beach,<br />

QLD 4551, Paypal to money@<br />

hugecmedia.com.au, or ring<br />

0401 345 201 to pay by credit card.<br />

Cheques/Money orders to be made<br />

out to Huge C Media PTY LTD.<br />

READ THE MAGAZINE ONLINE<br />

Save money, save trees... The<br />

entire mag is there for your<br />

reading pleasure at:<br />

WWW.SMORGASBOARDER.COM.AU


132 nov/dec <strong>2010</strong>