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“THE CURE FOR ANYTHING IS SALT WATER: SWEAT, TEARS OR THE SEA.” ISAK DINESEN<br />

EVERYDAY<br />

SURFERS...<br />

...this issue is all you. P31<br />

UP THE CREEK<br />

WITH A PADDLE ...P35<br />

PASS THE SALT?<br />

THE DESAL DEBATE ...P50<br />

WETTIES<br />

NOT ALL THE SAME ...P1<strong>05</strong><br />

THE MAGAZINE FOR THOSE WHO LOVE TO SURF<br />

ISSUE #5 MAY/JUN <strong>2011</strong>


“is what surfing is all about”<br />

www.goodtime.com.au<br />

Since 1971<br />

Come and see Gail and<br />

the Goodtime team at<br />

the Gabba<br />

Photo courtesy of Dick Hoole


WETSUITS!<br />

Get the right fit<br />

at the right price.<br />

Talk to the<br />

specialists<br />

Stocking Rip Curl, O’Neill,<br />

West, Excel, Roxy, Quicksilver,<br />

Billabong, Peak<br />

Goodtime Surf & Sail<br />

29 Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba, Brisbane<br />

07 3391 8588<br />

WE SURF...


DETAILS<br />

& THINGS<br />

SMORGASBOARDER IS FOR ALL OF US THAT<br />

LOVE SURFING, WHETHER IT’S TO RELAX,<br />

UNWIND, GET IN A HEALTHY BIT OF EXERCISE OR<br />

TO CATCH UP WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY.<br />

WHERE TO PICK US UP<br />

Quality surf stores, shapers and cool cafes within 10kms of the<br />

coast through Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and<br />

South Australia. For a full list of distributors, visit the directory<br />

in the back of the mag or just get to your local surf shop and<br />

talk to some real people, in the flesh. If you see a local store<br />

advertising, they’re sure to have the lion’s share of mags in<br />

your area. smorgasboarder is published six times a year -<br />

September, November, January, March, <strong>May</strong>, July.<br />

CAN’T GET THERE? SUBSCRIBE<br />

If you can’t get to a store, have smorgasboarder delivered to<br />

your door by becoming a home subscriber. The mag is free, but<br />

Australia Post need to get paid. $18 in Australia gets you six<br />

editions. Sign up at www.smorgasboarder.com.au and wait<br />

by your mailbox. It’ll arrive every two months. Backissues are<br />

available for $5 per copy. We only have a few copies of our first<br />

four left... Be quick.<br />

THANK YOU<br />

Thank you to all our creative contributing writers, fantastic<br />

photographers and excellent people who made this edition<br />

possible. A special mention of thanks to Gus Brown, Megan<br />

Slade, Helen Chapman and Katie Swan for their extra miles<br />

and to all the grassroots surfers who contributed to this edition.<br />

THE TEAM<br />

SALES, EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION:<br />

Dave Swan dave@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

0401 345 201<br />

Mark Chapman mark@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

0400 875 884<br />

FEATURE SALES<br />

Garry Palmer<br />

Phil Pfeifer<br />

garry@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

0418 745 227<br />

phil@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

0450 391 517<br />

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN DISTRIBUTION & SALES<br />

James Ellis trade@ljdistribution.com.au<br />

0412 194 383<br />

CONTRIBUTORS<br />

WRITING TALENT & PHOTOGRAPHIC GENIUS<br />

Talented geniuses they are - make sure you check out the<br />

credits on each photo and story and take the time to tell them<br />

how much they rock. If you would like to contribute to the<br />

mag, we’d love to hear from you and include you...<br />

Ideas & submissions: editorial@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

Distribution: mags@hugecmedia.com.au<br />

WWW.SMORGASBOARDER.COM.AU<br />

smorgasboarder is published by Huge C Media Pty Ltd<br />

ABN 30944673<strong>05</strong>5. All information is correct at time of going to<br />

press. The publishers cannot accept responsibility for errors in<br />

articles or advertisements, or unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or<br />

illustrations. The opinions and words of the authors do not necessarily<br />

represent those of the publisher. All rights reserved. Reproduction in<br />

part or whole is strictly prohibited without prior permission.<br />

4 jan/feb <strong>2011</strong><br />

We print with Pep<br />

Central and Craft<br />

Inprint Group, an<br />

environmentally aware<br />

and committed printer<br />

whose business is<br />

founded upon the<br />

principles of minimising<br />

waste and maximising<br />

recycling. Nice work.


jan/feb <strong>2011</strong><br />

5


Mick Mackie Photo: Hiroyuki Yamada<br />

THREE<br />

STORES,<br />

MANLY<br />

Shop 2,<br />

93-95 North Steyne,<br />

Manly<br />

(02) 9977 3549<br />

Three times the choice<br />

We have the most unbelievable range of boards of any surf store on the Australian<br />

East Coast. We doubt there’s a travelling surfer who hasn’t visited Dripping Wet.<br />

BONDI<br />

2/180-186 Campbell Pde<br />

Bondi<br />

(02) 9300 0<strong>05</strong>5<br />

NORTH MANLY<br />

398 Pittwater Road<br />

North Manly<br />

(02) 9907 2911<br />

(SUP SUPERSTORE)<br />

Tolhurst<br />

Mick Mackie<br />

Rusty<br />

Eric Arakawa<br />

McCoy<br />

Byrne<br />

Yater<br />

McTavish<br />

Wayne Lynch<br />

Simon Anderson<br />

Southpoint<br />

Takayama<br />

Mark Martinson<br />

Kym Thompson<br />

John Carper<br />

Mark Richards<br />

Dahlberg<br />

Xanadu<br />

Vampirate<br />

Lost<br />

Pearson Arrow<br />

Wegener Seaglass<br />

Webber<br />

Superbrand<br />

Robert August<br />

Surftech<br />

DHD<br />

El Nino softboards<br />

Plus accessories,<br />

clothing and skate...<br />

FCS, Fluid Foils, Reef,<br />

O’Neil, Excel, Peak,<br />

West, Quiksilver, Rip<br />

Curl, Sanuk, Hive<br />

Swimwear, Ocean<br />

Zone, Aztec Rose,<br />

Old Blokes Rule, Tools,<br />

DC, Globe, Analog,<br />

Seacured, Sector 9.....<br />

6 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


INSIDE THIS ISSUE<br />

24<br />

86<br />

1<strong>05</strong><br />

Tons of<br />

boards...<br />

Page 94<br />

ALL THE<br />

USUAL BITS<br />

THE LATEST<br />

Feedback P15<br />

News P16<br />

And greatest P18<br />

Community P22<br />

BIG WAVE<br />

GUIDERS<br />

The pilot boat crew<br />

surf much more that<br />

your average waves<br />

THE CANDYMAN<br />

COMETH<br />

We chat to Dave Verrall<br />

of Diverse Surfboards<br />

about his art and craft<br />

RUBBER UP, IT’S<br />

WETSUIT TIME<br />

The cold has arrived...<br />

We check out some<br />

alternative wetties<br />

TRAVEL<br />

Discover the kingdom P58<br />

This is New Ireland P72<br />

GEAR<br />

Latest surfboard designs P94<br />

Surfboard restoration P102<br />

Test everything P118<br />

<br />

CLOSEOUT<br />

One-of-a-kind surf store P120<br />

Fitness P122<br />

People out and about P129<br />

LAGUNA<br />

BAY<br />

We have to apologise. Sorry Pat, this<br />

sequence is just too good not to print.<br />

Feast your eyes on one of our intrepid<br />

contributors - a fountain of surf history<br />

knowlege otherwise known as Pat<br />

“Helmet” Quirk, having a disagreement<br />

with a wave in Noosa. Photo: Ben Vos<br />

For more hometown heros, see Page 31<br />

LAGUNA BAY<br />

8’6, 9’1, 10’2 & 11’2<br />

SURFTECH AUSTRALIA<br />

www.surftechaustralia.com.au<br />

mar/apr 02 <strong>2011</strong>4226 1322 7


When it’s so XXX-ing<br />

cold, you’ll wish you<br />

had a Triple X Wetsuit<br />

Australia’s #1 titanium-lined wetsuit.<br />

Keeping wind out and warmth in.<br />

10 Piper Drive, Ballina NSW 2478 | 1300 483 634 | +61 2 66190469 | Skype: triple-x-wetsuits<br />

WWW.TRIPLE-X.COM.AU<br />

8 may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

SOLD ONLINE!<br />

FREE DELIVERY<br />

MASSIVE TIDE<br />

WATCH GIVEAWAY!<br />

Spend $250 or more &<br />

receive a $100 Tide watch.<br />

Be quick - available only<br />

while stocks last.


YOU, YOU & YOU<br />

When I was growing up, the<br />

importantance of being yourself and<br />

being comfortable in your own skin<br />

was ingrained into me by my parents.<br />

Forty years on, I am bald, have a head<br />

like a robber’s dog and my surfing is<br />

not that flash either - even though I<br />

refer to myself as the “Count of Carve.”<br />

There’s no kidding yourself or those<br />

around you. It’s important to be downto-earth.<br />

There’s no point pretending to<br />

be something you are not. That’s much<br />

the same with our mag.<br />

<strong>Smorgasboarder</strong> is not about the<br />

world’s best surfers. We’re just about<br />

everyday surfers like you and like me –<br />

the grassroots of it all, so to speak.<br />

From the outset we have gone about<br />

creating a surf magazine that is a healthy<br />

alternative for surfers who just love<br />

surfing, surf gear and travel... not hype.<br />

We hope in some small way we have<br />

achieved this feat.<br />

Thankfully we have received a lot<br />

of great feedback from readers and<br />

so we have decided to dedicate this<br />

edition to them - that means you. This<br />

is your mag and it’s all about you, or<br />

the guy or girl you know from your<br />

local break.<br />

Dave<br />

THIS EDITION<br />

If we were into the marketing lingo,<br />

we could brand this edition our ‘green<br />

edition’. There’s plenty in here on<br />

grassroots surfers. Our debate piece<br />

is on the environmental concerns<br />

surrounding desalination plants and<br />

we have a superb international travel<br />

tale on surf trips to the wild frontiers of<br />

Papua New Guinea.<br />

But we’ve also got a lot of the usual<br />

favourites in here too. For something<br />

diverse, we feature Gold Coast shaper<br />

Dave Verrall. We turn up the heat<br />

in our quest to find quality wetsuit<br />

manufacturers outside the big brands<br />

and take a trip to Newcastle, land of<br />

the brave.<br />

There sure is a hell of a lot to read. Sit<br />

back and enjoy. It’s our biggest one yet.<br />

SIMON<br />

ANDERSON<br />

DK ULTRAFLX<br />

5’10, 5’11 & 6’0<br />

MOLLUSC<br />

6’0, 6’4 &<br />

6’10 Swallow Tail<br />

Also Available<br />

XFC Ultraflx 6’0, 6’1, 6’2 & 6’3<br />

XFC 6’2, 6’4 & 6’6<br />

Surfing the unspoiled, uncrowded waves of Papua New Guinea. Photo: The Perfect Wave<br />

SURFTECH AUSTRALIA<br />

www.surftechaustralia.com.au<br />

may/jun 02 <strong>2011</strong>4226 1322 9


LATEST: LOCALS<br />

For more local<br />

faces, see P31<br />

NAME: Ashleigh Browne<br />

HOME BREAK: Manly<br />

10 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


BIG BOARD<br />

MORNINGS<br />

Q&A WITH ASHLEIGH BROWNE INTERVIEW: MARK CHAPMAN<br />

PHOTO: JOEL COLEMAN, SALTMOTION GALLERY SALTMOTION.COM<br />

BOB<br />

MCTAVISH<br />

CAN YOU GIVE US A QUICK BACKGROUND -<br />

BORN WHERE, GREW UP, NOW?<br />

Born and bred in Manly, and still here. Only spend<br />

most of the time at the other end (Queeny)<br />

WHO STARTED YOU OFF SURFING AND WHEN?<br />

Ah, my dad got me on a board when I was about 7,<br />

but I’d only really be keen in summer. I really started<br />

getting stoked on it about 2 years ago and my dad was<br />

real encouraging then too.<br />

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE SURF SPOT?<br />

Crescent Head. No question (A little cheer goes off in<br />

the office)<br />

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST SURFBOARD AND<br />

WHAT ARE YOU RIDING NOW?<br />

Ah, other then just foamies when I first started<br />

it woulda been a 9’1 O’Donnell and now I’m<br />

predominantly on a 9’4 Gato Heroi.<br />

WHAT’S MOST IMPORTANT IN YOUR LIFE AT<br />

THE MOMENT AND HOW DOES SURFING FIT<br />

INTO IT?<br />

Surfing probably is the most important thing in my<br />

life... I have just finished school and am now just<br />

hanging out and surfing as much as I can. When I’m<br />

not down the beach or in the water, I’m wondering<br />

what the surf’s doing and when I can get down next...<br />

Living and breathing it at the moment, I guess...<br />

IF YOU DIDN’T SURF...?<br />

I think surfing has been my saving grace in a lot of<br />

situations and if I didn’t surf, I have no idea how I’d<br />

live... It’s just everything to me.<br />

ANY MESSAGES, COMMENTS OR ANYTHING<br />

ELSE TO ADD?<br />

Stay Stoked...<br />

Photo: Joel Coleman<br />

www.saltmotion.com<br />

CARVER<br />

7’6 & 8’0<br />

FIREBALL<br />

9’1 & 9’6<br />

SURFTECH AUSTRALIA<br />

www.surftechaustralia.com.au<br />

may/jun 02 <strong>2011</strong>4226 1322 11


Some things just<br />

shouldn’t get wet.<br />

WASP Bags are completely water<br />

and sand proof. Noticed how if<br />

you get the tiniest bit of sand<br />

or water in your phone, iPod<br />

or camera they are never quite<br />

the same again? Thanks to their<br />

unique seal, WASP Bags ensure<br />

that the things that should stay<br />

dry, stay dry.<br />

Noseriding style<br />

Phil ‘Pup’ Bender<br />

Buy online or ask your friendly surf shop...<br />

waspbags.com.au<br />

Ben Considine<br />

reverse kick<br />

Lee Considine<br />

READERS PHOTOS<br />

Thanks to all the readers that sent in photographs for this edition. There were<br />

so many good ones it took us ages to finally decide which ones to use, but<br />

congrats to the people on these pages - you all score a sweet set of WASP<br />

waterproof bags! Got good snaps? Send your photos in to<br />

letters@smorgasboarder.com.au for the next edition.<br />

For more on WASP bags, see www.waspbags.com.au<br />

Off the top at<br />

Little Cove<br />

Steve Chapman<br />

12 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


LATEST: PHOTOS<br />

Morning stretch<br />

Paul Greene<br />

Abstract<br />

cover up<br />

Toby Manson<br />

THE WINNING SHOT<br />

Congrats to Simon Sheppard for nailing this awesome shot of local surfer Danny Cougle making the most of the swell as<br />

the NSW Mid North Coast is going off. Simon also snags himself the cover shot with another cracker of Danny.<br />

Sneaky barrel<br />

Jarrod Slatter<br />

Somewhere in The Gong<br />

Stella Crick<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

13


14 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


JOIN IN THE CONVERSATION:<br />

Email all your innermost thoughts, letters, stories, photos,<br />

praise, rants to letters@smorgasboarder.com.au or send<br />

other contribution ideas, surf photography or fantastic ideas<br />

for stories to editor@smorgasboarder.com.au.<br />

Join us on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/<br />

<strong>Smorgasboarder</strong>-Surf-Magazine/133229320<strong>05</strong>4947 (or easier,<br />

just search for smorgasboarder)<br />

LATEST: FEEDBACK<br />

HARD WORK AND REWARDS<br />

I am new to surfing and I want to tell you about the first<br />

day I paddled out the back .<br />

It was when we arrived down at Alexandra Headland.<br />

I was a bit scared but my dad kept encouraging me. He<br />

said “come on it will be fine.”<br />

“If I’m too scared out there I’ll want to go back into<br />

shore.”I replied.<br />

When dad and I were paddling out, we got to about half<br />

way, where there was a bit of a trench with no waves<br />

breaking. I said “Is this how far we have to paddle?”<br />

“No mate just keep paddling, just keep paddling.”<br />

I moaned back in anger.<br />

My arms started to get sore from all the paddling. But it<br />

was all right because when you get to the point when<br />

there are no waves breaking you can get a rest. We kept<br />

going to where all the waves started to break because<br />

there was a sand bank.<br />

I kept on trying to get past all the white wash. Every<br />

time I went under a wave and got back up to the<br />

surface, another wave came and hammered me.<br />

I said to Dad “How long do we have to do this for?”<br />

Finally we got out the back and I was still a bit scared<br />

but I got used to the feeling. It was a hard paddle, but<br />

I was glad I got out there and said: “Man, that was a<br />

hard fight but we eventually did it.”<br />

Suddenly a big set came rolling in and Dad was saying<br />

to me: “Catch it Neddy, catch it.”<br />

“All right!”<br />

I went for it. I was paddling as hard as I could and there<br />

it was, my first wave out the back. It felt like I was<br />

surfing a twenty foot wave because of the steep face.<br />

I stood up and turned a bit to the right and dived into<br />

the white water because dad said not to go too far in.<br />

All because of that wave, I want to go surfing every day<br />

now and talk about surfing. I even go surfing with my<br />

friend, Aden who lives across the road from me.<br />

My dad has bought me a 6’4” Hairy Goat shortboard.<br />

Ned, Buderim<br />

Congrats Ned - you win yourself<br />

this Tools Deck Grip. Thanks for<br />

sharing your story with us. Never<br />

forget that first-wave feeling!<br />

KIND WORDS FOR US<br />

Finally, a surf magazine that is designed for<br />

those that love surfing. No fuss, no talking<br />

crap, no childish “surfie” lingo - just articles<br />

that you want to read.<br />

I love the board and location reviews. I also<br />

love the fact I now own a pair on Terrence<br />

Towelling pants due to spotting an advert in<br />

the last mag, and I’ve found a shaper (Goran<br />

Peko) to shape my next board.<br />

The only pity is that I have to wait two<br />

months till next publication. Keep up the<br />

great work smorgasboarder team!<br />

Mick, Paddington<br />

I’ve found the mag to be a good source<br />

of info from the stories to the ads. I like<br />

the classifieds as it gives me access to<br />

information not readily available in SA,<br />

keeping me up to date with board building<br />

and alternative trends rather than just the<br />

mainstream sh#te.<br />

Tony, Adelaide<br />

AN EARLY STARTER<br />

This is seven-year-old Ethan Hartnett on his<br />

second wave at Spookies, Yamba, riding<br />

a 5’2 Woody Jack thruster. A lifetime of<br />

barrels ahead! (Photo - M Roebuck.)<br />

Megan, Yamba<br />

Wow... Ethan’s looks to be a better<br />

surfer than anyone in our office. And<br />

he’s only seven.<br />

*Letters may have<br />

been edited for<br />

length and clarity<br />

GIVEAWAY<br />

Send in your letters and thoughts to be in line for<br />

freebies! More Surfboards t-shirts up for grabs.<br />

Email us on letters@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

15


LATEST: NEWS<br />

CONGRATS!<br />

We’d like to extend our<br />

congratulations to Rahn<br />

Goddard in winning the<br />

Old Mal Division, which<br />

smorgasboarder sponsored,<br />

at the recent Noosa Festival<br />

of Surfing. It was a good final<br />

and incredibly refreshing to<br />

see the event open to both<br />

sexes.<br />

We thought Isabelle Braly was<br />

a class act and more than held<br />

her own. We would also like<br />

to sincerely thank Phil Jarratt<br />

and the team for enabling<br />

us to be involved in a great<br />

week. For more on the festival<br />

check out our social pages on<br />

Page 129.<br />

BIG RESULT<br />

At the eleventh annual<br />

Billabong XXL Global Big<br />

Wave Awards held on April 30<br />

in Anaheim, California, David<br />

Scard of Caloundra was runner<br />

up in the Ride of the Year<br />

Award. His monster wave at<br />

Cloudbreak on Sept 20, 2010<br />

has made his work colleagues<br />

at World Surfaris as proud<br />

as punch. Regarded as the<br />

Oscars of big wave surfing,<br />

the awards also recognised<br />

the biggest wave, largest<br />

paddle-in wave, biggest tube,<br />

the nastiest wipeout, best<br />

overall performance and best<br />

ladies performance. To check<br />

out some of the action go to<br />

www.billabongxxl.com<br />

SANBAH FORMS OFF MEREWHETHER<br />

No, our spelling isn’t that bad, we would just like to inform you the<br />

Sanbah Surf Shop in Newcastle has undergone an unbelievable<br />

transformation. The new store is very swish with a huge range of boards,<br />

skate decks and gear as well as the latest and greatest in fashion.<br />

Shop 27, The Junction Fair, 204 Union St, The Junction (02) 49622 420<br />

ONE<br />

LITTLE<br />

INDIAN<br />

Jesse Watson of Black Apache Surfboards and his wonderful wife have<br />

welcomed into the world their new little apache <strong>May</strong>a Mavis, who<br />

weighed in at 7lbs 9oz. Congratulations guys. Enjoy the sleepless nights<br />

and many wonderful years ahead.<br />

CORRECTION<br />

In our March edition we noted the great work being done in Samoa to help<br />

communities get back on their feet following the 2009 Tsunami.<br />

We erroneously credited The Perfect Wave Surf Travel company for relief<br />

efforts where we should have mentioned The Surf Travel Co. instead, who<br />

has worked extensively on projects with not-for-profit charity Groundswell<br />

and the Randwick TAFE.<br />

16 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


Here Dan talks with Jenson about why<br />

surfing is so much better than Formula One.<br />

DMS SHIFTS INTO TOP GEAR<br />

Currumbin shaper Dan MacDonald won the opportunity to replace the<br />

Vodafone logo on the Vodafone McLaren Mercedes Formula One cars -<br />

driven by the youngest ever ex-World Champion Lewis Hamilton and fellow<br />

driver Jenson Button - with his very own DMS company logo. He was<br />

suitably stoked that both drivers came in 2 nd and 4 th at the recent Grand Prix<br />

in Melbourne. Dan said it was a “dream opportunity for any business. We<br />

saw this not only as a chance to promote the DMS label but to represent the<br />

local Australian surfboard manufacturers.”<br />

For more on DMS, check out www.dmshapes.com<br />

QUICKIES<br />

WELL I’LL BE FIIKED<br />

The boys have a new showroom<br />

at Unit 2, 3366 Pacific Highway,<br />

Springwood to show off their<br />

electronic skateboard range.<br />

AUSSIES GET HIGH IN FIJI<br />

Surfing Australia’s High Performance<br />

Centre is stoked to offer surfers access<br />

to coaching in some of the world’s<br />

best waves in their inaugural Fiji Surf<br />

Camp. Participants will be introduced<br />

to famous breaks such as Cloudbreak,<br />

Swimming Pools and Namotu.<br />

See www.surfingaustralia.com<br />

40 YEARS ON...<br />

And still going strong! Not too many<br />

surfboard manufacturers could<br />

lay claim to that fame. The board<br />

building game is a tough, tough gig<br />

and often a thankless job and notfor-profit<br />

business venture, so it goes<br />

without saying that Town & Country<br />

should be congratulated on reaching<br />

their 40 th anniversary in business.<br />

Founded in an old barbershop in<br />

Pearl City Hawaii in 1971, they are<br />

truly a worldwide surf industry icon.<br />

20 YEARS ON<br />

Whilst we are on the subject of<br />

anniversaries, <strong>2011</strong> apparently<br />

marks the 20th year since Bert Berg<br />

from Sunova started crafting the<br />

parabolic rail. We hope to talk with<br />

Bert sometime in the near future<br />

about his board-building prowess.<br />

Goran Peko<br />

KOMA ON THE MOVE<br />

Goran Peko of Koma Surfboards<br />

on the Gold Coast has packed<br />

up his gear and moved to a new<br />

factory in Southport at Unit 4/39<br />

Bailey Crescent. He’ll still be doing<br />

his great range of custom boards,<br />

restorations and ding repairs.<br />

For a chat and to check out his new<br />

digs, drop in for a visit.<br />

GOOD WORD ON GOOD WOOD<br />

For something fresh, check out<br />

Andrew Wells’ new Grown<br />

Surfboards website. It’s sure to get<br />

you pining for a bit of timber beneath<br />

your feet. Check it out on<br />

www.grownsurfboards.com.au<br />

MAY DAY<br />

The month of <strong>May</strong> is looming as a<br />

big one for the Hydrophilic Board<br />

Store in Baines Crescent, Torquay<br />

with both Tyler Hatzikian and<br />

Thomas Bexon scheduled to visit for<br />

a little bit of shaping and such.<br />

For more info visit<br />

hydrophilicboardstore.tumblr.com<br />

Surf Fitness Training<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

THE ORIGINAL AND STILL THE BEST<br />

RUSTPROOF<br />

SOLID METAL<br />

A safe and secure place to store your car keys or<br />

immobiliser while enjoying a surf.<br />

Available at selected surf stores and online<br />

WWW.SURFLOCK.COM.AU<br />

Surf-specific workouts<br />

you can do at home<br />

Get fitter, stronger and<br />

enhance your surfing<br />

performance<br />

Catch more waves,<br />

Get more barrels<br />

Surf better and have<br />

more fun<br />

To get started with your free surf-specific workout, visit...<br />

www.TOTALSURFINGFITNESS.COM/freeworkout<br />

Surf with your kids!<br />

from 3 years of age.<br />

Share the stoke<br />

Only<br />

$39.95<br />

Available in all good surf shops or online at<br />

www.learn2surfstrap.com<br />

www.surfbabysurf.com<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

17


LATEST: & GREATEST<br />

DON’T SHARE<br />

Surfers rash, particularly in the groin area is<br />

a pretty annoying afflication. SURFGEL to the<br />

rescue. We’re told it’s an effective fix, so apply<br />

liberally. Both a preventitive and a cure, but<br />

after you’ve had a rub around the bits, try not<br />

to share it with your mates...<br />

Check your local retailer, or buy online<br />

from www.boardstore.com.au<br />

WHAT A BAG...<br />

A decent size backpack. Opens as one large<br />

compartment. It’s waterproof with a nifty<br />

drawstring top and a buckle-over flap.<br />

Tools have come up with a very sturdy bag for<br />

keeping your gear dry that looks great too.<br />

www.toolssurfaustralia.com.au<br />

SMOOTH<br />

LIKE A FISH<br />

Check out Smoothstar’s great new artwork and<br />

logo! With the same great quality Smoothstar<br />

swivel-truck system, these sweet new decks<br />

of artwork just have to be ridden.<br />

www.smoothstar.com.au<br />

BOARDER PATROL<br />

Wally’s Water Gallery is a treasure trove of unique<br />

gear. These surf photos, taken by Wally Johnson<br />

are proudly displayed in amazing recycled timber<br />

frames, made by dad, Phil Johnson. The perfect<br />

decoration for any beachy shack<br />

Call Wally on 07 5448 8560 or visit the store<br />

in Marcoola to get one for yourself.<br />

IS THAT A GUN IN<br />

YOUR PANTS?<br />

NOWAX...<br />

Don’t want wax? Try Newax. These<br />

hexagonal-shaped pads come in a<br />

transparent adhesive sheet, in a range of<br />

colours. It’s designed to stick you to your<br />

board, good and proper.<br />

www.newaxoz.com<br />

Why yes, A FreeGun in fact. Keep an eye out<br />

at your local surf shop for the fastest growing<br />

fashion label in Europe. Having sold over 2<br />

million boxers last year alone, it’s now here<br />

in Australia.<br />

Boxers, boardies, rash shirts, thongs and<br />

shoes are printed with all kinds of crazy<br />

sh*t, with a new range of designs every<br />

two months. Ladies apparel also available<br />

including the sexiest, sauciest underwear.<br />

The first concept store will open in Noosa<br />

this <strong>May</strong>, and they are currently on the<br />

lookout for national stockists.<br />

See www.website?<br />

Trade enquiries, call 07 5449 0362<br />

18 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


STICK IT<br />

WHERE IT SHINES<br />

That’s right! A skate wax that shines.. or should<br />

I say glows.<br />

Now I hear you say, “Skate wax?” I said the<br />

same thing. Riding a rail on your skateboard<br />

takes skill, balance and minimal friction. That’s<br />

why, apparently, skaters wax rails, curbs and<br />

ledges before they slide.<br />

Stickit Skate Wax applies the right amount of<br />

slick to the surface and stick for your board<br />

to track. And as we said, it glows, so it looks<br />

pretty cool at night.<br />

OILS AIN’T OILS<br />

Stickit designed<br />

a board wax as<br />

black as night to<br />

send<br />

the Oil barons a<br />

clear message.<br />

Make your stand.<br />

FOR THE LADIES<br />

Stickit have also specifically designed a wax for<br />

surfing wahines. It’s easier to apply, great for<br />

all year round, in any water temp and smells<br />

like watermelon.<br />

www.stickitgroup.com<br />

Scott of Greenline<br />

reckons the C4 Waterman<br />

inflatable is the most fun<br />

blow-up toy he owns.<br />

BLOW<br />

UP A SUP<br />

SOME HAVE THREATENED TO, AND NOW YOU CAN...<br />

Well with a pump anyway. Fold it up into a backpack, or<br />

inflate for water fun. A range of cool new inflatable SUPS are<br />

available from Zak Surfboards in Melbourne, Greenline on<br />

the Gold Coast and Illusions Noosa.<br />

The Illusions SUP can even double as a kayak, complete with<br />

removable seat, footrest and paddle.<br />

For more information, check out the websites:<br />

www.greenlinepaddlesurf.com<br />

www.illusionsnoosa.com.au | www.zaksurfboards.com<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

19


20 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


SLIDING JETSTREAMS<br />

LIKE WAVES, IT’S ALL ABOUT CONSTANT CHANGE. WHENEVER GRIZZLED DIE-HARDS DECLARE THAT WE’VE<br />

REACHED THE PINNACLE AND THERE’S NOWHERE ELSE TO GO... SURPRISE, SURPRISE, IT ALL CHANGES AGAIN.<br />

WELCOME THE SURFING EQUIVALENT OF A PERSONAL JAMES BOND JETPACK. WORDS: MARK CHAPMAN PHOTOS: WAVEJET<br />

LATEST: & GREATEST<br />

Fearless tow-in surfer and big wave charger<br />

Garrett McNamara enjoys an easier ride<br />

for a change on WaveJet SUP. For more on<br />

him, see: www.garrettmcnamara.com<br />

We love surfing as much as new gear and ideas.<br />

So, having heard about US company WaveJet<br />

Technologies’ series of Personal Water Propulsion<br />

(PWP) surfboards, SUPs and rescue boards, we were<br />

very excited to find out more.<br />

WaveJet is essentially a mini jet engine built into<br />

your surfboard, SUP or the like. Similar to our<br />

beloved FiiK electric skateboards, this runs on a twinlithium<br />

ion battery pack activated through a wireless<br />

wrist controller. With twin drives and recharging on<br />

a standard wall socket, the WaveJet has about 30<br />

minutes in it a pop. And the WaveJet folks reckon it’s<br />

up to five times faster than paddling.<br />

”Surfers catch more waves, lifeguards reach<br />

swimmers and boats faster and kayakers can cruise<br />

against strong current and wind,” said Mike Railey,<br />

CEO of WaveJet. “It really allows you to break free<br />

from traditional limitations.”<br />

The series of new boards - which could be hitting<br />

Australian shores later this year - has been designed<br />

in conjunction with Steve Walden, of Walden<br />

Surfboards fame. He seems to be quite excited about<br />

the possibilities as well.<br />

“WaveJet’s propulsion drive will dramatically<br />

enhance when, where and how we surf due to<br />

conditions and location”, he says. “Think of PWP as<br />

a power pack for your ride.”<br />

We are very excited about checking this out when it<br />

hits Australia and will have a full test and rundown<br />

on how they go as soon as we can.<br />

For more information, pics and video, check<br />

out the website on wavejet.com.<br />

What do you think? Excited to give a WaveJet<br />

powered board a go? Drop us a line and let us know<br />

your thoughts - letters@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

21


Factory-riding<br />

groms...<br />

But where’s<br />

Harry?<br />

CHARITABLE SPIRIT LIVES<br />

ON IN CANETOAD COUNTRY<br />

Thanks to the support of so many businesses associated with<br />

smorgasboarder we managed to raise over $6300 for the Premier’s Disaster<br />

Relief Appeal.<br />

Primitive Surf in Brisbane<br />

also did their bit for the<br />

Appeal holding their<br />

own charity fundraising<br />

night on Tuesday 12th<br />

of April and raised over<br />

$7500 for the victims<br />

of Queensland’s recent<br />

disasters.<br />

ALL SHAPES, ALL SIZES<br />

NO PRECONCEIVED IDEAS OR OFF-THE-SHELF<br />

MODELS. JUST HAND-CRAFTED SURFBOARDS,<br />

SPECIALLY MADE TO SUIT YOU.<br />

15 ALLEN ST, CALOUNDRA • 07 5492 5838 • THEFACTORYSURFBOARDS.COM.AU<br />

More boards than<br />

you can poke a log at.<br />

392 Harbour Drive, The Jetty Strip, Coffs Harbour NSW<br />

Phone: 02 6658 0223 www.thelogshack.com.au<br />

GET SOME<br />

SOUL UNDER<br />

YOUR SOLE<br />

LASTS UP TO FOUR TIMES LONGER THAN OTHER WAXES<br />

southernsoulsurfboards.com.au<br />

0417 340 357<br />

THE DREADS ARE OFF<br />

After reportedly being “very<br />

overwhelmed, freakin’ nervous but<br />

always positive” Leanne Gilkes’<br />

dreadies are gone. Better known<br />

as Bluey, manager of Coolum Surf,<br />

Leanne’s new look helped raise over<br />

$16000 for the Qld Cancer Council.<br />

ROYAL EFFORT<br />

Royal 70, a non-profit organisation formed by Sydney Northern Beaches surfer,<br />

Blair Cording and his partner Krishna Mathrubutham are partnering with<br />

Cuban organizations, Havanasurf and the Cuban Surfriders Association to<br />

launch an assault on Cuba’s coastline in August <strong>2011</strong>.<br />

They plan cycling Cuba’s coastline to help create awareness for the Recycle<br />

Reuse Revolution educating people on how unwanted, unloved and unused<br />

surf, skate and musical equipment can bring smiles to the island’s kids. Their<br />

inspiring journey will be documented in both film and stills. To find out more<br />

and follow their progress visit www.royal70.net<br />

GOLD COAST TO JOIN THE RESERVES<br />

The declaration of the Gold Coast National Surfing Reserve looks set to<br />

proceed for January 2012.<br />

The 3 sites proposed to be recognised are Burleigh Heads, Currumbin (Alley)<br />

and the southern points comprising one site being: Kirra, Coolangatta,<br />

Greenmount, Rainbow Bay and Snapper Rocks. For more information see<br />

www.surfingreserves.org<br />

SURFING PIONEERS’ NIGHT<br />

Joe Larkin<br />

Mark 28th <strong>May</strong> on your calendar<br />

when Joe Larkin, Gordon Woods,<br />

Scott Dillon and Bill Wallace,<br />

four of our pioneering board<br />

manufacturers, get together to<br />

talk about the birth of the Malibu<br />

and modern surfing in Australia.<br />

www.surfworldgoldcoast.com<br />

22 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


SURF ART MURAL RESTORED<br />

LATEST: COMMUNITY<br />

If you’ve ever driven past Coolum on the Sunshine Coast Motorway, you’ll<br />

have seen the giant wave mural of Old Woman Island on the shed owned by<br />

the Savimaki family. The original artist, Owen Cavanagh - who spends much<br />

of his time in Italy painting artwork and murals across Europe has just been<br />

back to give the 10-year-old piece of art a bit of a touch-up. Shed owner Hans<br />

Savimaki is delighted with the restoration works.<br />

To see more of his, and other artists works check out the Surf Art Expo from<br />

Friday 13 th to Sunday 15 th <strong>May</strong> at the Alex Surf Club in Alexandra Headland.<br />

STUFF UP FOR GRABS!<br />

YOU DON’T HAVE TO PAY FOR YOUR EDITION OF SMORGASBOARDER AND<br />

WE’RE EVEN GIVING YOU THE CHANCE TO WIN HEAPS OF STUFF AS WELL<br />

MAKING A SURFBOARD?<br />

RESTORATION OR REPAIR?<br />

LEARNING ABOUT THE INDUSTRY?<br />

MAKING BLANKS MAKING FINS?<br />

416 pages of the most valuable<br />

information you might ever read,<br />

the SURFER’S TEXTBOOK<br />

is a must have for any aspiring<br />

surfboard maker.<br />

Years of board manufacturing<br />

research, development<br />

and understanding in one<br />

comprehensive volume,<br />

with over 1000 photographs,<br />

illustrations, diagrams and<br />

surfboard templates.<br />

THIS IS yOUR<br />

UlTIMATE GUIDE<br />

BUy ONlINE TODAy and start your journey!<br />

Order before <strong>June</strong> <strong>2011</strong> for a FREE copy of the<br />

Bare Bones -Making and Repairing a Surfboard CD.<br />

WWW.SURFERSTEXTBOOK.COM.AU<br />

DO YOU HAVE AN OLD, STINKING,<br />

ROTTEN WETSUIT?<br />

We want to see it. If we judge it to be the worst<br />

we have seen, you will win a fantastic new wetsuit<br />

from C-Skins. Send your photo in with your name<br />

and contact details to<br />

letters@smorgasboarder.com.au The winner will be<br />

drawn in our July edition and their photo published<br />

alongside other finalists.<br />

WIN!<br />

*Suit shown for illustration purposes only. For terms and conditions, see the smorgasboarder website<br />

.<br />

READERS PHOTO COMPETITION<br />

Each edition our reader’s<br />

surf photos keep pouring in,<br />

getting better and better. Now<br />

there is even more reason to<br />

get your prized surf pics in.<br />

Next edition’s winner will be<br />

provided with a great surf<br />

prize pack from Primitive<br />

Surf and bragging rights over<br />

your mates for being front in<br />

centre in smorgasboarder.<br />

The new<br />

Symba<br />

We’ve moved!<br />

presents: the surfing solution...<br />

Carver<br />

Surf rack<br />

+ +<br />

16 Rene Street, Noosaville Qld 4566 Phone: 07 5455 5249<br />

www.scooterstyle.com.au<br />

Board<br />

= FUN<br />

10% off<br />

Carver Surf Racks<br />

with this ad<br />

Photo: Toby Manson<br />

Send your photo submissions to<br />

letters@smorgasboarder.com.au<br />

*For terms and conditions, see the<br />

smorgasboarder website.<br />

If you have any news and events that should be in these pages, please feel<br />

free to drop us a line at editorial@smorgasboarder.com.au.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

23


LATEST: LOCALS<br />

IG WAVE<br />

Kicking off the working week by climbing a rope ladder, five<br />

storeys up the side of a ship in cyclonic conditions might not<br />

appeal to those of us accustomed to a hot cuppa and some office<br />

banter. But to a bunch of keen old surfers who boast Moreton Bay<br />

as their office, it is part of a work day routine that can randomly<br />

throw up all the excitement of a high seas adventure.<br />

WORDS AND PHOTOS:<br />

MEGAN SLADE - MEGANSLADE.COM<br />

24 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


GUIDERS<br />

If you’ve ever surfed Cartwrights (Off Point<br />

Cartwright in Mooloolaba on the Sunshine<br />

Coast) you will be familiar with a little yellow<br />

Pilot boat.<br />

On a fine day, she chugs serenely around the<br />

rock wall into a turquoise Mooloolaba Bay.<br />

In cyclonic conditions, she slams and pitches<br />

through the breakwater, dodging surfers,<br />

stand up paddle boarders and jet skis, all<br />

vying for prime position among the sets. She<br />

will disappear in explosions of sea spray and<br />

down into the troughs of mountainous waves<br />

before rounding the point and into the fickle<br />

hands of the Coral Sea.<br />

Onboard there is a Coxswain, Deckhand and<br />

Marine Pilot. Their mission is to rendezvous<br />

with a ship waiting five nautical miles<br />

offshore and dispatch a Pilot who will assist<br />

with the vessel’s safe passage into the Port of<br />

Brisbane.<br />

This routine is carried out several times, every<br />

day and night in almost any conditions Mother<br />

Nature can serve up. So to the untrained eye<br />

these mariners appear to be taking incredible<br />

risks. In a country where people can sue for<br />

tripping over a pencil in their office, these<br />

guys casually wrestle 60,000 tonne ships atop<br />

five metre seas in a contest they cheerfully<br />

describe as a ‘contact sport.’<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

25


“THE GOLDEN<br />

RULE IS<br />

DON’T PANIC”<br />

The view from<br />

the office<br />

Coxswain Mark Lennard<br />

Different big wave riders passing by<br />

Getting ready to board<br />

Staring up at a sixty thousand<br />

tonne ocean liner from the<br />

relative safety of a thirteen<br />

metre speed boat throws your<br />

balance. The sheer enormity<br />

of these cities on water is<br />

overwhelming. The little yellow<br />

boat and gigantic metal tanker<br />

grapple above a surging ocean<br />

as the Coxswain guides her to<br />

the leeward side of ship.<br />

‘We often joke that it’s a contact<br />

sport,’ says Coxswain Mark<br />

Lennard. ‘On normal boats you<br />

try to avoid collision, but we<br />

come together with the ships.<br />

We try to make it as gentle as<br />

possible, but quite often it’s just<br />

the nature of it, with the huge<br />

swells and the movement of both<br />

vessels. We hit really hard.’<br />

The Pilot and Deckhand exit the<br />

cabin. A rope ladder is crudely<br />

flung from the heavens by the<br />

ship’s crew whilst the rise and<br />

fall between tanker and Pilot<br />

boat begin to synchronise. The<br />

Pilot picks his moment and<br />

rides the surge onto the ladder.<br />

In seconds he has scampered<br />

up the monstrous vessel and<br />

is waving from the heavens<br />

alongside his new crew. On<br />

a clear day it’s an exciting<br />

spectacle. During a cyclone<br />

swell and forty knot winds it’s<br />

maniacal.<br />

‘I’d be lying if I said that I didn’t<br />

get scared in rough conditions’<br />

admits Marine Pilot, Captain<br />

Steve Anthony. ‘Your pulse rate<br />

goes up but they organise the<br />

ship to get the best possible lee<br />

and the least possible rolling.<br />

Then you go for it. You’ve got to<br />

be really quick to get up there,<br />

and quick to get down too. You<br />

can’t linger on that Pilot ladder.’<br />

‘It’s only half a second between<br />

leaving the pilot boat and<br />

getting onto the ladder,’ explains<br />

Captain Nic Fischer. ‘It’s<br />

all about control. If I am not<br />

comfortable or the Coxswains<br />

not comfortable, we just pull<br />

the pin. Although it looks big<br />

and graphic for those couple<br />

of seconds that you transfer<br />

between the Pilot boat and the<br />

ship everything is relatively<br />

stable. It’s about timing and<br />

respecting the elements and the<br />

environment. I know it seems<br />

really archaic having a rope<br />

ladder to climb up, but nothing<br />

can go wrong. It’s so simple. All<br />

of the timing is in my legs and my<br />

arms and I choose when I go. It’s<br />

a bit like when you are surfing<br />

you choose the wave you paddle<br />

in to’ says Nic.<br />

RESCUE<br />

On a moonless night, minutes after<br />

collecting a Pilot from an oil tanker,<br />

Coxswain Mark Lennard received<br />

a call from the Captain of the ship<br />

reporting a man overboard. Whilst<br />

de-rigging the pilot ladder a crew<br />

member had fallen eight metres<br />

from the ship into the cold dark<br />

ocean. He had no lights attached,<br />

could speak little English and<br />

couldn’t swim. Fortunately he was<br />

wearing a life jacket.<br />

‘You go into training mode;<br />

there is a real heightening of the<br />

adrenalin. It’s firing through you<br />

because you know someone’s<br />

life is on the line. The golden<br />

rule is don’t panic, you’ve got<br />

to react the way you have been<br />

trained to’ says Mark.<br />

Mark swung the launch boat<br />

around and headed upwind at<br />

full speed. The crew onboard<br />

the tanker had desperately flung<br />

lifejackets and rings into the<br />

gloomy ocean below for their<br />

missing mate.<br />

‘I had marked a track on the<br />

GPS which records our position,<br />

so I was able to go back on the<br />

exact path. We started a pattern<br />

26 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


NO TIME TO<br />

MUCK ABOUT<br />

Time is of the essence<br />

to make it safely up the<br />

ladder, especially in<br />

rough seas.<br />

search up wind in the direction<br />

the ship was going. One of our<br />

crew members heard this fellow<br />

screaming, so we honed in on the<br />

voice. If we had approached from<br />

upwind we probably wouldn’t have<br />

heard him. I doubt we would have<br />

found him because it was pitch black.<br />

‘We got him out of the water and<br />

took him to shore. The ambulance<br />

met us on the wharf, checked him<br />

out and we took him back out to the<br />

ship. He was terrified and in shock,<br />

but just so grateful. The crew were<br />

so happy to get him back on board.<br />

They were all hugging him and he<br />

was crying.’<br />

JOINING IN<br />

Mark explains that surfing on the<br />

job is almost compulsory. ‘You<br />

need an easterly swell particularly<br />

with a north east aspect to get a<br />

really nice break at Cartwrights.<br />

When you are out in deep water<br />

on the Pilot boat the waves are too<br />

fast, they overtake you. But as you<br />

start to come around the point it<br />

starts to get shallower. The wave<br />

actually slows down and builds up<br />

in height and steepness.<br />

‘When it’s big all surf crafts in<br />

creation are out there. We blast<br />

the horn about two or three hundred<br />

metres out and everybody will turn<br />

around and once they see the pilot<br />

boat coming they part to make a<br />

path for us to come through. When<br />

I see a big set coming I pull the<br />

power off and wait for it to catch<br />

up. Then we gun it, slot in and<br />

slide across the face of the wave<br />

surfing it right into the entrance of<br />

the river mouth. Oh, it’s great, we<br />

all do it!’<br />

IN THE SURF<br />

On his time off Mark tries to surf at<br />

least once or twice a day at Moffats<br />

or at his local beach breaks. ‘I often<br />

surf a fish with a quad set up but<br />

this one here is my favourite board’<br />

he says pointing to a big wooden<br />

mal. ‘I bought the board in about<br />

2001. It handles waves up to about<br />

two meters and it goes really well.<br />

It was designed by Lauran Yater<br />

in Santa Barbara. It’s epoxy with a<br />

wood veneer. It’s really strong and<br />

looks really good but I did manage<br />

to snap it!<br />

Your one stop for<br />

STAND UP PADDLE SURF<br />

Sales, Hire, Accessories<br />

& the best advice<br />

RIDE IT BEFORE<br />

YOU BUY IT!<br />

The only way to find out<br />

which board is right for you!<br />

Talk to Scott and his expert staff.<br />

They’ll get you on the right board!<br />

Understand first-hand what you need<br />

and what you get for your money.<br />

2544 GOLD COAST HIGHWAY, MERMAID BEACH<br />

scott@greenlinepaddlesurf.com<br />

0412 398 585<br />

WWW.GREENLINEPADDLESURF.COM<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

27


THE CREW: Left - Coxswain Mark Lennard and his 9ft friend, Yater; Top right - Captain Nic<br />

Fischer; Bottom right - Captain Steve Anthony<br />

‘I was out surfing at Currimundi. The swell<br />

was building over a period of an hour or so<br />

and then a really big set came through. I was<br />

on the inside just paddling and paddling trying<br />

to get out the back. I got through the first two<br />

waves and then the third one of the set, being<br />

a bomb, just guillotined the board.<br />

‘It had folded it, but when you folded it back<br />

it didn’t appear to be broken. I couldn’t bear<br />

to throw it away so it became a feature on<br />

the wall at home for about six years. One<br />

day a mate of mine popped around and said<br />

he’d be able to repair it. It took him about<br />

three months but when I got it back it was<br />

just brilliant. It’s as good as I’d remembered<br />

it was.’<br />

Most of the Pilots and Launch crew are surfers,<br />

so seven years ago they decided to embark on<br />

a surf trip together. Now they go at least twice<br />

a year. ‘We were out at Crescent Head. The<br />

main break was really crowded, so we went<br />

around to the south of Crescent. There was<br />

a lovely little point break which we had all to<br />

ourselves’ recalls Mark. ‘Out with just your<br />

mates. It’s great fun. Everyone was dropping<br />

in on each other.’<br />

Out of work time it seems that caution is all but<br />

forgotten and it’s on for young and old. ‘One<br />

of the pilots called out ‘Jehovah’ once on a<br />

trip and it stuck. It relates to our friends who<br />

occasionally drop in uninvited,’ says Mark.<br />

‘We do it to each other. A couple of the pilots<br />

are notorious for it! There’s been contact made<br />

with the boards on a few occasions and some<br />

guys have had stitches but it’s all in good fun.’<br />

Mark claims that although they call him the<br />

‘Silver fox’ at age 59, Steve is possibly the<br />

most agile Pilot he has seen. Steve is about<br />

to head to the Maldives on a separate surf<br />

trip because he just can’t seem to get enough<br />

ocean time. He was enquiring, somewhat<br />

cheekily, about where he could get his hands<br />

on a massive boulder so he could begin some<br />

hard core training at the pool.<br />

‘None of us are really gun surfers, let’s put it<br />

that way,’ says Steve. ‘But we have a fantastic<br />

relationship. We have an absolute ball on the<br />

trips, its older blokes behaving badly. ‘I live in<br />

Brisbane so I usually surf Rainbow, Snapper<br />

or Currumbin. When we have a surfing safari<br />

we go away for a week but now the guys can’t<br />

wait twelve months so we have an interim trip,<br />

usually to Byron.’<br />

Nic moved his family up to the Sunshine Coast<br />

from Adelaide after he and his wife drew<br />

up a spreadsheet incorporating all that was<br />

important to them in work and play. Now<br />

he surfs with his daughters most days at<br />

Yaroomba, their local break.<br />

‘My youngest daughter is right into surfing and<br />

triathlons and my eldest daughter just loves<br />

surfing too. She is nineteen and she won’t<br />

get up before 10am unless it’s for university<br />

lectures or surfing. I just love that. It’s really<br />

beautiful when you can enjoy surfing with your<br />

kids.’ says Nic.<br />

‘You meet a lot of nice people, a lot of really<br />

interesting people in the water, I like that.’<br />

28 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


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may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

29


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Photo: Simon Sheppard<br />

LATEST: LOCALS<br />

Photo: Simon Kettle<br />

Photo: Lee Considine<br />

Photo: Jarrod Slatter<br />

Photo: Joel Heidke-Skinner<br />

Photo: Joel Coleman/Saltmotion<br />

THIS IS<br />

ALL YOU<br />

For the last month or so we have marveled<br />

at the feats of surfing’s elite with the recent<br />

running of the Quicky Pro on the Gold Coast,<br />

the Festival of Surfing in Noosa and the<br />

50th Annual Rip Curl Pro at Torquay. With<br />

that said, we thought now is the perfect<br />

time to get back to giving the grassroots<br />

surfers a spot in the limelight... Back to what<br />

smorgasboarder is all about.<br />

What takes centre stage in this edition is the<br />

men, women and children who will do just<br />

about anything to get their saltwater fix. They<br />

don’t surf for trophies or for glory. Sometimes<br />

they surf with their mates but often they’ll<br />

surf alone, simply because of how carving the<br />

face of a wave makes them feel.<br />

These are some of their stories.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

31


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to slow down, take things<br />

as they come and to live<br />

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NAME: Suzie Sanguinetti<br />

NICKNAME: The Ox<br />

WHERE: Noosa, Queensland, Australia<br />

32 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


MEET<br />

THE OX<br />

PHOTOS & INTERVIEW CONTRIBUTED BY:<br />

SIMON R KETTLE<br />

SIMONKETTLE@LIVE.COM.AU<br />

AT WHAT AGE WERE YOU SAVED BY SURFING<br />

AND WHO SHOWED YOU THE LIGHT?<br />

I started surfing around the age of 22, that’s 13 years<br />

ago. My best friend got into surfing at around the same<br />

time. He took me out, and once I got my first wave I<br />

was addicted!<br />

HOW HAS SURFING CHANGED YOU AND THE<br />

SENTIENT LIFE FORMS CLOSE TO YOU?<br />

Surfing has been an outlet, a source of great enjoyment<br />

and passage of meditation for me. It is more than a<br />

sport or art, it’s a lifestyle. People in my life understand<br />

how important surfing is to me and are genuinely<br />

interested and happy that it brings such joy. Many<br />

express enthusiasm to share that joy and often come<br />

along for the ride.<br />

IF YOU COULD SURF ANYWHERE ON PLANET<br />

EARTH WITH ANOTHER SURFER DEAD OR ALIVE<br />

WHO, WHERE AND WHY WOULD IT BE SO?<br />

I would dearly love to surf Hawaii with my best friend.<br />

We have surfed many places in Australia together and<br />

have often discussed how amazing it would be to surf<br />

the breaks made famous by those who come before us.<br />

SURFBOARD... WHAT DOES THIS CONCEPT MEAN<br />

TO YOU?<br />

‘Surfboard’ is a craft or vessel for those who wish to<br />

experience a ride, not like any theme park ride, but<br />

a ride that brings a rush of adrenaline, puts a huge<br />

smile on your face and makes every stress in your life<br />

dissolve.<br />

TAKING A WIZ IN YOUR WETSUIT IS A GUILTY<br />

PLEASURE? DISCUSS.<br />

I have to admit, I have done this on occasion. On those<br />

cold winter days, particularly in Victoria, that warm rush<br />

goes a long way.<br />

IT’S FLAT FOR THE THIRD WEEK IN A ROW. WHAT<br />

SURFING VIDEO ALWAYS SAVES YOU FROM<br />

HAVING A KOOKED-UP, LANDLOCKED WIPEOUT?<br />

Single Fin Yellow is a brilliant concept and fantastic DVD.<br />

YOU’RE DRIVING DOWN THE COAST IN YOUR<br />

PANEL VAN, UTE, KOMBI OR STATION WAGON.<br />

WHAT MUSIC IS PUMPING AND SPREADING THE<br />

VIBE?<br />

The Smiths - No matter where you go or what you are<br />

doing, Morrissey’s lyrics are always relevant, witty and<br />

thoughtful. I love 80’s music too... the daggier the better.<br />

THE ‘COFFIN RIDE, HEAD DIP AND QUASIMOTO’<br />

ARE TRADITIONAL MOVES THAT HAVE NOT<br />

RE-EMERGED WITH MODERN LONGBOARDING.<br />

WHICH ONE WILL YOU HELP ME POPULARISE BY<br />

2015 AND WHY?<br />

I choose the ‘Coffin Ride’ because that’s the only one I<br />

know, and it’s pretty easy to do.<br />

ANY CLOSE ENCOUNTERS WITH A ‘NOAH’S ARK’?<br />

I think I’ve seen a couple, but they could have been<br />

dolphins….well at least that was what I was counting<br />

on! I only paddled in once at Point Leo in Victoria<br />

because the ‘dolphin’ seemed a bit large<br />

WORST SURFING INJURY YOU’VE ENDURED OR<br />

SEEN WITH YOU OWN EYES?<br />

I got a compound fracture of my finger surfing Noosa<br />

a couple of years ago. Even though the bone was<br />

virtually sticking out of my finger, I thought to myself<br />

‘maybe I could get just a few more waves?’ because<br />

the surf was perfect that day. When my finger suddenly<br />

became the size of a large zucchini I paddled in.<br />

WHAT WISDOM HAS SURFING TAUGHT<br />

YOU THAT YOU CAN PASS ON TO FUTURE<br />

GENERATIONS OF HOMOSAPIENS READING<br />

THIS VIA A HOLOGRAPHIC CEREBRAL IMPLANT<br />

HUNDREDS OF YEARS INTO THE FUTURE?<br />

Surfing has taught me to slow down, take things as they<br />

come and to live a balanced life. People get caught up<br />

in their worlds e.g. work, family, events, etc., and often<br />

forget to just take time out to simply have fun.<br />

IF A GOVERNMENT AGENCY HAS SET UP A<br />

COVERT OPERATION TO SPY ON AND REPORT<br />

SURFERS WHO TAKE ‘SICKIES’ VIA OUR<br />

COUNTRIES MANY ‘SURF CAMS’, WHAT SHOULD<br />

WE SURFERS DO ABOUT IT?<br />

Black out all the cameras with spray paint! Big brother<br />

can suck it!<br />

HAVE YOU EVER EXPERIENCED PREJUDICE<br />

BEING A GIRL SURFER?<br />

Not really, most people think that it’s pretty cool to<br />

be a girl surfer. In fact, since I started surfing 13<br />

years ago, the number of girls out there has increased<br />

dramatically.<br />

MOST EMBARRASSING MOMENT WHEN<br />

SURFING?<br />

I’ve almost lost my bathers a couple of times... I’m sure<br />

that I would’ve scared the small children swimming<br />

nearby.<br />

WHAT’S THE STICK IN YOUR QUIVER YOU<br />

WILL NEVER PART WITH AND YOU KEEP<br />

COMING BACK TO LIKE AN OLD FRIEND?<br />

I love my Takayama Model T. I have four boards<br />

but I ride that one 99% of the time. It rides like a<br />

dream.<br />

SURFING IS AN ART OR A SPORT?<br />

As a longboarder I believe surfing is an art. It is<br />

graceful, creative and beautiful.<br />

TELL ME ABOUT YOUR MOST SACRED SURF<br />

TRIP?<br />

I have had many wonderful surf trips, all with my best<br />

friend. Surfing Noosa on an evening where the sun was<br />

setting, the sky was pink and orange and the waves<br />

were perfectly clean 3+ foot is my most treasured surf<br />

memory.<br />

WHEN WILL, IF EVER, ‘FREE SURFING’ PREVAIL<br />

AND WHAT WILL BRING ABOUT A SHIFT IN<br />

CONSCIOUSNESS IN ALL SURFERS?<br />

Realistically, I believe there will always be surf<br />

competitions because humans are competitive by<br />

nature. I know that I will never take part in one though,<br />

it would take the fun out of it for me.<br />

HAVE YOU EVER BEEN ‘NIGHT SURFING’?<br />

Yes, those evening surfs at Noosa I was speaking<br />

of before would often lead into night surfing. I’ve<br />

caught waves by the light of the moon and gone out in<br />

complete darkness. It was beautiful.<br />

LATEST: LOCALS<br />

YOU’RE DRIVING HOME FROM A MEMORABLE<br />

SURF AND FEELING AT PEACE WITH THE WORLD<br />

WHEN YOU SUDDENLY HEAR AND FEEL THE<br />

SOUND OF YOUR STOMACH RUMBLE. WHAT<br />

FOOD IS GOING TO SATISFY THAT NEED?<br />

Potato cakes.. I always feel like those warm, salty,<br />

greasy pieces of bliss after a good (or bad) surf.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

33


LATEST: LOCALS<br />

RAY OF SUNSHINE<br />

SUNNY OLIVER-BENNETTS. INTERVIEW: MARK CHAPMAN PHOTOS: SUPPLIED<br />

WHO STARTED YOU OFF SURFING<br />

AND WHEN?<br />

I grew up in the bush hippy town of St.<br />

Andrews which is out near Kinglake<br />

where the fires were in February, 2009.<br />

As a family we were always heading<br />

down to the beach, whether to Sandy<br />

Point, Wilson’s Prom or Torquay.<br />

My dad started me off surfing when I<br />

was 8 at Wilson’s Prom. I remember<br />

pretty clearly the first time I stood up<br />

riding the whitewash. I was pretty<br />

pleased with myself. I still surf with<br />

dad and he taught me most of what he<br />

knows, he loves a good longboard wave!<br />

board, until I reached the Bells carpark.<br />

By the time I’d walked up through the<br />

bush to the South Side carpark with<br />

bleeding legs and hands, Trav was just<br />

calling the cops. He’d seen me go under<br />

and that was it.<br />

BEST SURFING MOMENT?<br />

At Tallows Beach in Byron Bay, surfing<br />

with some friends at dusk on a speedy<br />

black quad and watching dolphins play<br />

in the waves around us. Equally as good<br />

was surfing at Winki with only my friend<br />

and I out - again with dolphins.<br />

NAME: Sunshine <strong>June</strong> Oliver-Bennetts<br />

KNOWN AS: Sunny<br />

BORN: Melbourne, Australia<br />

LOCAL BEACH: Torquay/Anglesea<br />

FAVOURITE BREAK: Gerupuk, Lombok<br />

QUIVER: Single fin shaped in Torquay,<br />

twinny from Cali and bright<br />

green thruster<br />

Left: Sunny spreading<br />

the love of surfing with<br />

Desert2Surf<br />

Below: Early days with<br />

Sunny surfing at ten<br />

years old.<br />

YOUR FAVOURITE SURF SPOT?<br />

My favourite surf spot would have to<br />

be Gerupuk in Lombok just out from<br />

Kuta Lombok. My partner and I spent a<br />

week surfing there earlier this year and<br />

loved every second of it. The wave at<br />

Insides was fun, cruisy and, with the<br />

views of the Rinjani volcano, it’s a pretty<br />

powerful place!<br />

SCARIEST SURFING MOMENT?<br />

It was at Bells Beach a few years ago.<br />

I had been at a party the night before,<br />

worked all day in Swell Café and<br />

headed out at dusk with a mate. The<br />

swell was pretty big and I’d never seen<br />

so many dudes out at Bells before. I was<br />

frothing for a wave and it was a stinking<br />

hot summer’s day so my mate Trav and<br />

I paddled out at South Side. We got<br />

greedy after not too long and paddled<br />

over to Centre Side.<br />

I was chatting to a fella I knew out there<br />

and didn’t pay attention to the fact that<br />

I was sitting in the centre of the crew,<br />

the heart of the action. After hearing lots<br />

of the dudes swearing at the next set<br />

coming in I found myself paddling like a<br />

mad woman with the guys to get the hell<br />

over these waves. Hearing Bells blokes<br />

swearing at a set is pretty unsettling.<br />

With my arms doing little for me, I was<br />

taken under by the biggest wave I’ve<br />

ever encountered. After a long time of<br />

climbing the ladder I came up throwing<br />

up water and the next three waves hit<br />

me in quick succession. At one point I<br />

had to do some serious self talk not to<br />

panic, otherwise it could have all been<br />

over. I can now see how it happens.<br />

I ended up having to walk along the<br />

bottom of the cliff face on broken rocks<br />

with waves crashing into me and my<br />

TELL US ABOUT DESERT2SURF AND<br />

HOW YOU GOT INVOLVED.<br />

Desert2Surf is a not-for-profit<br />

organisation that I established with<br />

my folks and a few friends to create<br />

opportunities for indigenous kids from<br />

remote communities to be able to<br />

surf. These communities have very<br />

few resources for the kids to do stuff<br />

locally, let alone opportunities to travel<br />

interstate and go surfing.<br />

Surfing is such a beautiful sport<br />

that teaches people so much about<br />

themselves and helps to build selfconfidence.<br />

It’s the perfect pursuit for<br />

kids from disadvantaged communities<br />

and I love being able to share that!<br />

ANY FAVOURITE MOMENTS FROM<br />

THE DESERT2SURF TRIPS?<br />

Watching twelve year old Rebecca<br />

Dennis (the first person from the remote<br />

community of Minyerri, NT to see<br />

breaking waves) to stand up on her first<br />

wave... Seeing her huge grin, I thought,<br />

“Yeah this is it, this is Desert2Surf.”<br />

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN<br />

YOUR LIFE AT THE MOMENT?<br />

The most important thing in my life...<br />

Wow, where do I start? Family, friends,<br />

health, surfing, Desert2Surf, my new job<br />

with Engineers Without Borders... okay<br />

the most important thing – balance.<br />

SURFING IDOL?<br />

Lane Beachley for sure. All power to her.<br />

She has championed women in surfing<br />

all around the world and is continuing<br />

to invest her time and energy into the<br />

community in a really down to earth and<br />

incredible way. Desert2Surf would love<br />

her as an ambassador!<br />

34 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


SURF SUSTAINABLY...<br />

SURF BAMBOO!<br />

STRONG, LIGHT & ECO-FRIENDLY<br />

UP THE CREEK...<br />

BUT WITH A PADDLE<br />

WHAT TO DO WITH A 30 KNOT ONSHORE? IT’S SIMPLE: GET OUT OF THE WIND. IT<br />

DOESN’T MATTER WHERE YOU LIVE - I’LL BET THERE’S SOME WATER NEAR YOU.<br />

I’VE BEEN OUT DURING A 30 KNOT ONSHORE TO FIND GLASSY CONDITIONS IN THE<br />

CREEK OUT THE BACK OF MY HOUSE. WORDS: KARL DE WET PHOTO: SIMON LYALL<br />

we send it<br />

everywhere<br />

FREIGHT<br />

SPECIALISTS!<br />

AUSTRALIA-WIDE<br />

for kite • wake<br />

• sup • surf<br />

A few tips though...<br />

1. If you want to remain friends with the local<br />

farmer don’t scare the cows. Seriously, for a<br />

farmer, he would rather you harass his children<br />

than his cattle.<br />

2. Don’t drive on a farmers land without<br />

announcing yourself/asking permission, it’s<br />

rude. Find some public access.<br />

3. Taking a phone in a waterproof pouch is not<br />

a bad idea.<br />

4. Brown snakes love bare feet.<br />

5. Stay out of flooded waters. SUPs are not<br />

made for fast flowing creeks. Trust me, when<br />

you hit a strainer (where water stains through<br />

fallen trees) the water easily catches your rail<br />

and flips the board upside-down. Before you<br />

know it you are waist-deep in fast-flowing<br />

water amongst loose trees and 12’ of SUP<br />

wedged up against you - possibly in an<br />

uncomfortable part of your anatomy if you’re<br />

really unlucky. Be careful.<br />

6. If you’re not returning to the same spot<br />

then give yourself heaps of extra time. I’ve<br />

been dropped off in the bush to make my way<br />

home before. Knowing the creek, I guessed<br />

it would take three or four hours to get back<br />

home. Seven hours later, I finally got to my<br />

front door... The water level changes and it’s<br />

different every time.<br />

7. Night paddling is also fun. It helps to know<br />

the area you are paddling in though and you<br />

only pack a headlight as backup. It’s better to<br />

let your eyes adjust to the stars and moonlight<br />

- you’ll be surprised how well you can see.<br />

8. Carrying supplies... Apart from all the cool<br />

waterproof bags available, 10l and 20l plastic<br />

paint containers are the go. I’ve carried ice,<br />

beers, firewood fishing tackle - no problem.<br />

Just put the container on the nose and if it<br />

falls off, it should float and stay dry. Just pick<br />

it up out of the water and you’re on your way.<br />

I’ve been a surfer for years, and I’m always<br />

up to try something new. New boards, new<br />

ideas... Having an option to get out and have<br />

some fun regardless of wind conditions got me<br />

into exploring the creeks and riverways around<br />

my area on my SUP. Why sit on the couch<br />

when you can be up and about? I have fun, I<br />

stay fit, I see so much wildlife. In a five minute<br />

paddle, I can feel like I’m a million miles away<br />

from civilisation, all on my own, not hassling<br />

in the crowds for a wave, or fighting onshores.<br />

It beats the couch on a windy day, or any day.<br />

NAME: Karl De Wet<br />

BORN: Durban, South Africa<br />

LOCAL BEACH: Warana<br />

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Mals, shortboards, fun eggs... All<br />

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may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

35


BRISSO BOY<br />

Not near the water, but still surfing...<br />

RAY BISSCHOP<br />

NAME: Ray Bisschop<br />

NICKNAMES, IF ANY: Razor<br />

HOME BREAK: North Pine Dam<br />

FAVOURITE SURF SPOT: Yamba Area<br />

QUIVER: 6’2” Primitive Punt, 6’0” Primitive Blunt.<br />

Double Island Point<br />

Photo: Ray Bisschop<br />

Moffat Headland<br />

Photo: Ray Bisschop<br />

Ray & Darryl, Brisvegas Lads<br />

“Living in Brisbane and having a passion for surfing can be<br />

frustrating at times. Super early mornings, long drives to<br />

the coast (when you get the chance). Having said that, the<br />

advantage of being in the middle of the two coasts is the<br />

flexibilty, depending on the conditions depends on which way<br />

you head your chariot. The option of surfing a wide variety of<br />

breaks is certainly a plus and can keep you frothing.”<br />

Brisvegas designer and photographer Ray Bisschop - owner/<br />

operator of Mondo Images - knows this all too well, having<br />

been a Brisbane-based surfer for all his life. His love of surfing<br />

landed him his first job working for Shazam Advertising on the<br />

Goodtime Surf and Sail account for three years.<br />

Ray‘s always been proud of being involved with Brisbane<br />

surf shops and 25 years later he is now doing the design,<br />

photography and video work for Primitive Surf.<br />

“I’ve only ever really surfed Brissy sticks including my very<br />

first board - an old 60’s Cowely which was handed down to<br />

me by my uncle. My current board is a Primitive Punt and it<br />

goes unreal”. Ray says it feels like he has come full circle<br />

back to working on what he loves most - surfing, design and<br />

surf photography.<br />

“What I love about working with Primitive is that they are<br />

a proud Brisbane surf shop and also know the difficulty of<br />

hitting the water. The other thing I really appreciate is their<br />

Brisso-Only surf comp called the ‘Postcode Challenge’, which<br />

I think evens out the field. It is an anomaly having a surf<br />

comp for an area that has no surf, which in itself makes it<br />

cool. The crew put alot of effort into making it a great event.<br />

“They had Occy there last year and Craig reckons this year<br />

will be better again. This year is my first ever comp and I<br />

think it will be a blast. I’ve played plenty of social sport and<br />

making the finals is what you aim for (here’s hoping) and<br />

sometimes competition itself can be alot of fun. The comp is<br />

on mid-<strong>May</strong> and I’m really looking forward to it.”<br />

For more of Ray’s work, check out<br />

www.mondoimages.com.au and for event details on the<br />

Postcode Challenge, go to www.primitivesurf.com.<br />

Kings Beach<br />

Photo: Ray Bisschop<br />

36 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


We first got to know Polek Rybczynski thanks to the great photos he<br />

submitted for our March edition, sparking our interest at the weird handplane-type<br />

board he was using. Turns out, not only can the man take cool<br />

pics and ride interesting craft, but he can also write! He was kind enough<br />

to submit this piece inspired by an icy trip to Vancouver Island, Canada.<br />

EMPTY FOCUS<br />

A personal travel moment. WORDS & PHOTOS: POLEK RYBCZYNSKI<br />

LATEST: LOCALS<br />

I’m stroking hard. The peak has shifted twenty meters to the left so I have to<br />

move a little quicker to get on. A long left is shaping up; it is around the three foot<br />

mark and lining into a gully, which is separating the two dominant banks of this<br />

beach. This nine foot McTavish is taking a little more effort to swing around than<br />

any board in my quiver, which has been laying dormant for four months thousands<br />

of miles away, but it glides me right into position. Three more strokes and I’m on.<br />

Up. Lean. Turn. Shift. Crouch. Enjoy.<br />

Back at the house which lays amongst mature native fir, comes a little realisation<br />

and humility. I step outside barefoot to take the recycling to the bins and within<br />

four steps both of my feet are numb. I look left onto the lawn where Nine Foot<br />

rests and there is frost on her wax... its 2pm. Now these two things kindly remind<br />

me of where I am, and how fortunate I am in being able to taste these fine west<br />

coast Canadian waves. I’m fortunate, I mean by having access to a 5/4/3mm fully<br />

sealed and blind stitched steamer, hoodie attached, with the accompaniment of<br />

4mm gloves and booties. Without this modern-day technology of wetsuit rubber<br />

and design, it would make for a daunting and short-lived task to surf these frigid<br />

6 degree Celsius waters, let alone the 5 hour sessions I am enjoying. The task<br />

would hold about the same ambition as trying to bodysurf Tahiti’s notorious<br />

Teahupo’o at 10 feet. Now you can try it and perhaps do it but chances of survival<br />

are as close to 0% as one can get. I focus back on the recycling in hand and<br />

quickstep it to the bins, which have me stumped for a minute with their bear proof<br />

handles. The feet are screeming at me to get back to the warmth of the humble<br />

abode. Mental note: just because it is a surf trip does not mean I can walk bare<br />

foot everywhere.<br />

8am: I’m trying to get my mind away from seeing the beach’s amenities toilet<br />

water frozen to the bowl, and think on where to paddle out. As duckdiving Nine<br />

Foot is somewhat difficult, and not being in a particular mood of rolling her over<br />

to get through the incoming waves too many times, I focus on the ocean. A gentle<br />

meditative conversation takes place soon after.<br />

Mind: “This bank of yours to the right, how consistent is it?”<br />

Ocean: “Five wave sets about every four to five minutes I believe.”<br />

“Is that a rip next to it?” asks Mind.<br />

“No, just a shifting channel.” Ocean offers.<br />

Hmmm...<br />

Mind, “What about just there, next to your left, will it break any wider?”<br />

Ocean: “No, not until the tide drops a bit more anyways.”<br />

Hmmm...<br />

Heart: “Thank you.”<br />

I wait for the next set to break, I walk, jump and put in some long strokes. Looks<br />

like the gentle conversation was well understood, only one roll. Just enough<br />

NAME: Polek Rybczynski<br />

KNOWN AS: Lipton, Wind-pipe, Mojo<br />

BORN: Wroclaw, Poland. 1982<br />

LOCAL BEACH: Bulli, NSW<br />

LOCAL MOUNTAIN: Whistler, BC<br />

FAVOURITE BREAK: Crescent Head backbeaches or Peggies<br />

Bombie (W’gong)<br />

QUIVER: These are self made - 2 x 5’11’’ fish hybrids, 6’1’’<br />

biscuit w/flyers hybrid, 6’6’’ concave alaia, 3’6’’ wood<br />

paipo. These i purchased - 42’’ Morey Bullet, 22’’<br />

Mark Richardson Fish Kickboard, 5’6’’ Mike Manns<br />

circa 1870 Paipo/Alaia.<br />

to wash the sleep from the eyes and wake me up just that much more to the<br />

appreciation of this humble but assertive coastline. I sit on Nine Foot and for<br />

some reason am drawn to paying my full attention to her character. The buoyancy,<br />

shape, rails, width, her keels. This makes me listen attentively over the following<br />

ridden waves.<br />

Then, a transition of awareness: Nine Foot’s rails are cutting into the waves<br />

glassy face. I feel the fins doing their work holding edge whilst whistling<br />

along. Water rushing by. Then nothing. Just a serene moment of.... well… that<br />

something. I’m not sure of how to exactly phrase it but I am sure that the majority<br />

of surfers know of its taste. It’s in-between the split second after you flick off a<br />

wave and the split second before your first thought after flicking off a wave: an<br />

emptiness. Not an emptiness that drains but rather fills. Mystically it fills. Wave<br />

after wave it fills. No matter the size or shape of wave, it fills.<br />

I paddle back to the left peak, marveling at how easily my shoulders move in this<br />

suit. I sit there waiting and watching the horizon. A few thoughts come, but as I<br />

observe, they soon go. Focus drifts to that emptiness again. I turn and paddle.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

37


ONE<br />

CRUISY<br />

CAT<br />

PHOTOS & INTERVIEW CONTRIBUTED BY:<br />

SIMON R KETTLE<br />

SIMONKETTLE@LIVE.COM.AU<br />

NAME: Paul Corbett<br />

AKA: ‘Pauly’<br />

WHERE: Cat Bay, Phillip Island, Victoria.<br />

AT WHAT AGE WERE YOU<br />

SAVED BY SURFING?<br />

I would have been 49. I<br />

was living in Melbourne and<br />

some friends of mine had a<br />

caravan down here at Phillip<br />

Island and said they were<br />

going surfing.<br />

I’m originally from Western<br />

Australia and surfed<br />

between the age of fifteen<br />

and twenty four but hadn’t<br />

surfed for a number of years.<br />

I said ‘can you surf down at<br />

Phillip Island?’ I didn’t know<br />

anything about the place but<br />

I came down and fell in love<br />

with it. I hired a board and<br />

a wetsuit and that was the<br />

start of me getting back into<br />

surfing again.<br />

HOW HAS SURFING<br />

CHANGED YOU AND THE<br />

SENTIENT LIFE FORMS<br />

CLOSE TO YOU?<br />

Well, it’s helped keep me<br />

focused on being healthy, fit<br />

and enjoying myself. Surfing<br />

is a great sport for all those<br />

things and it’s something<br />

that once you get involved<br />

with it and you get that<br />

buzz out of a ride, well,<br />

there’s nothing else like<br />

it. Now, my wife and the<br />

girls are involved so it’s just<br />

fantastic!<br />

IF YOU COULD SURF<br />

ANYWHERE ON PLANET<br />

EARTH WITH ANOTHER<br />

SURFER DEAD OR ALIVE,<br />

WHO, WHERE AND WHY?<br />

Well, it would have be at the<br />

birth place of surfing, Hawaii<br />

and surfing with either<br />

Donald Takayama or Joel<br />

Tudor at a mellow wave like<br />

Waikiki or Diamond Head<br />

and just be there where its<br />

all happened.<br />

SURFBOARD... WHAT<br />

DOES THIS CONCEPT<br />

MEAN TO YOU?<br />

It’s the ultimate machine.<br />

There are so many variations<br />

and so many styles of<br />

surfboards. There’s one type<br />

of board for every person<br />

on the planet, longboarding,<br />

shortboarding, well, you<br />

name it! My preferred style<br />

is longboarding.<br />

TAKING A WIZ IN YOUR<br />

WETSUIT IS A GUILTY<br />

PLEASURE? DISCUSS.<br />

It is? (Laughs) Let’s face it,<br />

in the cold weather down<br />

here in Victoria if you say<br />

you haven’t done it, then<br />

you’re lying.<br />

IT’S FLAT FOR THE THIRD<br />

WEEK IN A ROW. WHAT<br />

SURFING VIDEO ALWAYS<br />

SAVES YOU FROM<br />

HAVING A KOOKED-UP,<br />

LANDLOCKED WIPEOUT?<br />

Something like ‘Ten Years<br />

After’ or ‘One California Day’<br />

are fantastic to watch over<br />

and over. They’re both just<br />

great!<br />

YOU’RE DRIVING DOWN<br />

THE COAST IN YOUR<br />

PANEL VAN, UTE,<br />

KOMBI OR STATION<br />

WAGON. WHAT MUSIC<br />

IS PUMPING AND<br />

SPREADING THE VIBE?<br />

Oh, it’s got to be a CD by<br />

Bert Wills called Pavones<br />

Sunset. If you haven’t heard<br />

it, get it! It’s some of the<br />

best surf music you’d want<br />

to here. I read about it on<br />

the net and it sounded good<br />

so I just bought it. It’s great!<br />

THE ‘COFFIN RIDE’,’HEAD<br />

DIP’ AND ‘QUASIMOTO’<br />

ARE TRADITIONAL<br />

MOVES THAT HAVE NOT<br />

RE-EMERGED. WHICH<br />

ONE WILL YOU HELP ME<br />

POPULARISE BY 2015<br />

AND WHY?<br />

Well it’s got to be the ‘head<br />

dip’ because it’s cooler! The<br />

Quasimoto doesn’t look too<br />

good, does it?<br />

ANY CLOSE<br />

ENCOUNTERS WITH A<br />

‘NOAH’S ARK’?<br />

There’s been a couple I can<br />

recall. Both were here at Cat<br />

Bay. The first one was at<br />

First Point and I was out with<br />

about eight guys and one<br />

yells out ‘shark’. I thought<br />

‘sure, sure’ but I turned and<br />

could see the dorsal fin out<br />

of the water. It would’ve<br />

been about 8-10 foot and<br />

maybe a tiger shark, so a<br />

fair size. So, we all got back<br />

in to shore as quick as we<br />

could which luckily wasn’t<br />

far away. The other time<br />

was about two years ago<br />

at the main break here, at<br />

‘Shelley’s’ and this shark, a<br />

‘seven gill’ was having a go<br />

at a guys board. The guy just<br />

tried to keep kicking it away<br />

with his foot!<br />

WORST SURFING INJURY<br />

YOU’VE ENDURED OR<br />

SEEN WITH YOU OWN<br />

EYES?<br />

Probably, it’s my wife. When<br />

I was teaching her to surf in<br />

Perth and I said ‘Honey, don’t<br />

go for that wave or you’ll be<br />

in a lot of trouble’. She did,<br />

and the next thing you know<br />

she came up with blood<br />

everywhere and a broken<br />

nose. That was a pretty bad<br />

one!<br />

DO YOU BELIEVE IN<br />

THE ‘XMAS SWELL’<br />

PHENOMENON?<br />

Absolutely! It always seems<br />

to come through at Phillip<br />

Island around that time of<br />

the year. For some unknown<br />

reason the swell always<br />

seems to come through when<br />

you get the south westerly<br />

swell and south easterly<br />

wind. The weather always<br />

changes around Christmas<br />

time, and it picks up.<br />

WHAT WISDOM HAS<br />

SURFING TAUGHT<br />

YOU THAT YOU CAN<br />

PASS ON TO FUTURE<br />

GENERATIONS OF<br />

HOMOSAPIENS<br />

READING THIS VIA<br />

A HOLOGRAPHIC<br />

CEREBRAL IMPLANT<br />

HUNDREDS OF YEARS<br />

INTO THE FUTURE?<br />

It’s great way to instil<br />

friendship and mateship.<br />

There are so many good<br />

people that surf. You learn a<br />

lot from those people about<br />

life, living and what it’s all<br />

about. You also get to enjoy<br />

the waves and nature.<br />

38 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


NAME: Vincent Passamier<br />

WHERE: St Kilda, Victoria<br />

OUI LOVE<br />

SUP-ING!<br />

EVER SAT AT YOUR DESK DAYDREAMING OUT THE<br />

WINDOW AT THE BEAUTIFUL BLUE SKY WISHING<br />

YOU COULD BE OUTSIDE ON A BOARD? EVEN<br />

BETTER - HAVE A JOB WORKING AT THE BEACH? ONE<br />

FRENCHMAN GOT PAST DAYDREAMING AND DID<br />

EXACTLY THAT. WORDS: CARINA SLAVIC<br />

Wet or dry... if you’re having fun, you’re doing alright.<br />

Three years ago, 24 year old Advertising<br />

Sales Executive Vincent Passemier packed<br />

his bags and went travelling the world. In<br />

Dublin he met a girl and followed her to<br />

Melbourne. Today Vincent is a Stand Up<br />

Paddleboard instructor working summers<br />

in St Kilda and winters up north.<br />

I wasn’t into sports back home and never<br />

tried any type of board sports until I came<br />

to Australia. I love the relaxed, healthy<br />

lifestyle here. People are active and happy.<br />

I wanted to be like that too. Living here<br />

inspired me to have a go.<br />

After taking up kiteboarding, Vincent<br />

was addicted and ended up doing a stint<br />

as a kite surfing instructor. Thanks to<br />

some crossovers between kite and SUP<br />

schools, he soon discovered the Stand Up<br />

Paddleboard.<br />

“I gave it a go for the first time in<br />

December 2009 in 40° heat, 25 knot wind<br />

and no instruction. I fell in 10 times in row<br />

and pretty much gave up!”<br />

But a month later, after an actual lesson,<br />

he was up and riding, soon finding himself<br />

so involved that he was managing the SUP<br />

school. To complement his paddle training,<br />

Vincent slowly started getting into Street<br />

SUP as well.<br />

“Skating, especially longboarding is huge<br />

back home in France. But it wasn’t for<br />

me. My friends tried to encourage me but<br />

I didn’t think I had the body balance. The<br />

St Kilda Stand Up Paddle Bus hire Street<br />

SUPs – so when no-one was watching I<br />

had a try.“<br />

“I had been looking for a fun way to<br />

exercise in between giving SUP lessons<br />

and still stay near the beach. Street SUP<br />

has been ideal. It’s accessible to do it<br />

every day, and is more interesting than<br />

being in the gym. It’s been great training<br />

for my SUP. I ride up to 15 km a day and it<br />

doesn’t even feel like I’m exercising.<br />

“Street SUP has been the best activity<br />

for my overall fitness. And it’s cool that<br />

anyone who tries it can do it. I’m glad<br />

I gave it a go. When I visit home later<br />

this year, I’ll be taking my longboard and<br />

Kahuna Big Stick with me and joining the<br />

French skating scene.<br />

Vinny gets<br />

paddling in the<br />

street too.<br />

sixounceboardstore.com.au<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

39


“Tom Myers, Freshwater NSW.<br />

This photograph is taken by hanging off a cliff with<br />

a massive drop onto rocks. The locals know about<br />

this semi-secret vantage spot. It makes for a pretty<br />

amazing view. Tommy is the new king of Freshy -<br />

an amazing surfer and a really humble kid.”<br />

40 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


LATEST: IMAGES<br />

A CRUMPET’S VIEW<br />

REFRESHING. IT’S A WORD THAT’S BANDIED ABOUT A BIT. BUT IN THE CASE OF MARK<br />

TAYLOR – ALSO KNOWN AS SURF PHOTOGRAPHER, CRUMPET – IT MOST PERFECTLY<br />

DESCRIBES NOT ONLY HIS VIBRANT AND VARIED WORK, BUT ALSO HIS OUTLOOK ON<br />

LIFE AND THE SURF COMMUNITY. WORDS MARK CHAPMAN, PHOTOS MARK TAYLOR - CRUMPET PRODUCTIONS<br />

No industry politics. No in-crowd ego. No hype and most certainly no bullshit. Just the most amazing imagery<br />

telling incredible stories, capturing magical moments and making you want to surf all day long.<br />

You’ll have seen the name Crumpet across awe-inspiring photos in many a surf mag, from this little community<br />

publication to the likes of Surfing World, Waves, Tracks and international biggies like Transworld Surf. At 36<br />

years of age, Crumpet has most certainly left an impression on the eyeballs of surfers around the world, but<br />

personally, we think it’s his humble and happy approach to it all that will leave the most lasting impression of all.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

41


LATEST: IMAGES<br />

“Gavin Beschen, Rocky Point, Hawaii.<br />

Funny story about this photo. This was my second<br />

attempt at shooting water photos this day. Half an<br />

hour earlier I jumped in after doing all my usual<br />

checks to see if all the seals on the water housing<br />

were okay, but a couple of minutes in I noticed a<br />

small amount of water had got in!<br />

“I swam in holding the housing above my head,<br />

which must of looked great from the shore. I dried<br />

it out and thought I would try it again to see if it<br />

leaked, but in my rush to get out, I didn’t check<br />

which lens I had put on. I thought I had my 85mm,<br />

but when Gavin flew centimetres from my head, I<br />

realised I actually had my 20mm lens on.<br />

“Some of my best water photos have come from my<br />

disastrous days in the water.”<br />

42 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


It all started for Mark as a young lad when his family moved to<br />

Australia. Dad taking him and his brother bodysurfing on the<br />

weekends got him hooked on the ocean. In England, Mark was used<br />

to the ocean being flat. With the tides, sometimes he would have to<br />

walk half a kilometre to touch the water. But here there were waves<br />

to swim around in! Inevitably, in his early teens the surfing bug bit,<br />

and hard. With a good group of surfing mates, Mark’s mum had no<br />

chance of getting him out of the water, convinced he would develop<br />

skin cancer by 16. Fortunately, he didn’t.<br />

At age 15, however, what did develop was his interest in photography<br />

while doing work experience at a photographic company. Being<br />

around photographers telling their stories got him intrigued and<br />

planted the seed for his future career.<br />

With surfing and photography as pastimes and passions, it was just<br />

a matter of time before the two met, thanks to a push from a young<br />

company finding its feet - Volcom.<br />

“I was studying photography and was shooting a bit of skateboarding<br />

for my portfolio,” Mark tells us. “Volcom was in it’s extremely early<br />

days and was keen to see if I had any photographs of their skaters<br />

and a relationship started from there.<br />

“They asked if I took surf photos. I had stupidly been avoiding shooting<br />

surfing, even though I loved surf photos and bought all the magazines.<br />

So I went out and bought a secondhand manual focus 600mm lens and<br />

started shooting the Volcom surf team and it grew from there.”<br />

From these early days with a secondhand lens, Mark has grown his<br />

passion into a life of travel and incredible experiences, shooting<br />

everything from local sessions with mates on the Northern Beaches<br />

to high-profile international events abroad.<br />

“IT HAS TAKEN ME TO SO<br />

MANY PLACES IN THE WORLD,<br />

AND I WOULDN’T REPLACE<br />

THOSE MEMORIES FOR MONEY.”<br />

Mark says a standout memory of his experiences doing surf<br />

photography has to be in 2009 at The Eddie – the annual big wave<br />

invitational event in Hawaii.<br />

“It was the closest thing to an arena-like sporting event. After so many<br />

close calls everyone knew it was going to go off. So on the morning<br />

of the contest the roads were packed at 5.30am… It was like the<br />

anticipation before kick off in the opening State of Origin game.<br />

“I climbed up a cliff at 6.00am to get my vantage point. From the top<br />

of the cliff you could see nothing, but hear everything. At 7.00am<br />

the contest director announced “It’s on!” The whole Waimea valley<br />

erupted in screams of joy. It sent a chill down my spine. The whole<br />

day was amazing and I’ll never forget the emotion of it all.”<br />

But Mark doesn’t always shoot from cliff tops. A major part of this job<br />

is to get in the thick of it all and swim for your supper.<br />

“I find water shooting so exciting. It can make up for sometimes<br />

missing the best surfing conditions for myself to surf in.<br />

“The most stressful part of it is trying not to flood my water-housing,<br />

because I have flooded a camera and had so many close calls.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

43


LATEST: IMAGES<br />

“THE WHOLE WAIMEA<br />

VALLEY ERUPTED IN<br />

SCREAMS OF JOY. IT<br />

SENT A CHILL DOWN<br />

MY SPINE.” MARK ON THE EDDIE<br />

“When it comes to water photos I try to do a bit of<br />

water training especially in the lead up to Hawaii. That<br />

can involve swimming laps of Queenscliff Beach or<br />

bodysurfing.<br />

“I have had a few close calls especially once in WA<br />

where I was seeing stars, but I have been lucky<br />

compared to others I know.<br />

Despite the physical dangers, Mark says the biggest<br />

challenge for an aspiring surf photographer is making a<br />

financial success of the career.<br />

“But my advice to aspiring photographers is just do it!”<br />

he says. “It has taken me to so many places in the world,<br />

and I would not replace those memories for money.”<br />

With a trunkload of great memories and a portfolio that<br />

most surf photographers would kill for, what does the<br />

future hold – what will an 80-year-old Mark Crumpet<br />

Taylor be up to one day in the distant future?<br />

“I am moving a bit more into abstract photography and<br />

producing gallery prints. And maybe owning my own<br />

gallery space.<br />

“You will never get me out of the water. Even if I can’t<br />

ride a board later in life I want to be like the 70-80 old<br />

guys who bodysurf Queeny corner every morning.”<br />

And we can’t wait to see what Mark’s camera captures<br />

for all those years to come.<br />

Watch out for much more of Mark’s work in future<br />

editions of smorgasboarder. He’s also in the process<br />

of setting up a website to show you even more, but<br />

in the meantime you can contact him for prints at<br />

crumpetproductions@yahoo.com.<br />

“Kelly Slater, Waimea Bay, Hawaii.<br />

This is the Eddie contest, taken from a<br />

cliff above Waimea Valley. King Kelly<br />

on a bomb, I think he got a perfect<br />

score of a 100 on this one.<br />

“The greatest surfer EVER. Master of<br />

any size wave.”<br />

44 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

45


LATEST: IMAGES<br />

“Sam Page, Queenscliff, NSW. I was driving past on the<br />

way to drop off my girlfriend to the ferry when I noticed<br />

Sam ripping on these tiny waves. I raced back, thinking I<br />

could grab a few before work, but by the time I got back the<br />

ocean went flat. Then this set came along...<br />

“Sam took off out the back, racing along looking for a<br />

section. This guy dropped in on him, creating an area for<br />

Sam to launch off. Sam completed his air and the guy in<br />

front had no idea what was going on above his head.<br />

“It was the only photo I took this day but it was worth it.”<br />

NAME: Mark Taylor<br />

AGE: 36<br />

BORN: Manchester, England<br />

LIVE: Freshwater, NSW<br />

LOVE: Being in the ocean whether on a board or swimming in it<br />

(such stress relief) and my partner Lauren<br />

Supermark... Holding up boulders<br />

in the Northern Territory


One website - heaps of<br />

shapers and surf shops shirts...


lucas muro photographer<br />

“Tom Myers, Freshwater NSW.<br />

This photograph is taken by hanging off a cliff with<br />

a massive drop onto rocks. The locals know about<br />

this semi-secret vantage spot. It makes for a pretty<br />

amazing view. Tommy is the new king of Freshy -<br />

an amazing surfer and a really humble kid.”<br />

0424 089 770 www.lucasmuro.com.au<br />

Photo: Megan Slade<br />

Celebrating<br />

4<br />

years<br />

02 6685 7485<br />

10 Acacia St,<br />

Byron Bay NSW<br />

www.tcsurf.com.au<br />

“HE SAID IF YOU HAVE<br />

A MATE YOU DON’T<br />

DO THEM WRONG.”<br />

FLOYD SMITH ON BOBBY BROWN<br />

THE EXHIBITION<br />

The Bobby Brown Exhibition will finish up in Bobby’s old<br />

stomping ground of Cronulla at Jackson Surfboards, Caringbah<br />

from September 10-18.<br />

There is also a paddle out being organised for Bobby a week<br />

later on September 24 at Sandon Point Surf Club in Wollongong,<br />

for friends, fans and lovers of surfing.<br />

For details, go to www.bobbybrownsurfinglegend.com or contact<br />

exhibition co-ordinator Andrew McKinnon on 0412 754 974.<br />

48 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


Bobby Brown Photo: Barrie Sutherland<br />

LATEST: LEGENDS<br />

At the Bobby Brown exhibition in Noosa, held during the <strong>2011</strong> Noosa Festival of Surfing, I had the good fortune of bumping into Floyd Smith,<br />

co-founder of Gordon and Smith Surfboards. He had celebrated his seventy-first birthday surfing at Noosa and was about to head south with old<br />

friend Dave Wilson to surf Green Island - for him, the best left in the entire world. He kindly stopped for a chat about Bobby Brown and recalled a<br />

man who was not only a magnificent surfer, but a great mate. WORDS: MEGAN SLADE<br />

A SIMPLE MATTER OF MATESHIP<br />

Floyd: ‘It’s always nice to get to Noosa under any<br />

circumstances but it was really nice to come here<br />

because they were having a tribute to Bobby Brown. He<br />

was one of Australia’s best surfers from the early sixties<br />

to when he died in 1967. In fact, the month before he<br />

died he was the best surfer in the world.<br />

‘He had been a kid in the 64’ World Titles, just 17 years<br />

old. If you look at films or movies of that (event) he had<br />

the worst surfboard I had ever seen. It was all beat up<br />

and patched up.<br />

‘It was an attraction for me when I came to Australia to<br />

see if Bobby Brown was actually that good. I did...and he<br />

was. So I offered him a job. I had a surfboard factory and<br />

he could ride the boards and we could teach him how to<br />

make them.<br />

‘Bobby explained to me a bit about Australian mateship.<br />

He said if you have a mate you don’t do them wrong. The<br />

guy who’s surfboard he was riding was a mate of his so<br />

it wasn’t going to be possible for him to take the job. I<br />

was real surprised that he turned it down - it was a real<br />

lucrative offer, but we became friends anyway, stayed in<br />

contact and surfed together often.<br />

‘ He was an apprentice carpenter and he was going to<br />

school, working forty hours a week and he just wasn’t<br />

getting the surfing time that he was going to need to put<br />

him over the top.<br />

‘For a casual surfer there just wasn’t anyone like him.<br />

He was really agile and real aggressive. Often the guys<br />

that are really aggressive aren’t good people. They are<br />

little butts - that is what they are! Bobby wasn’t like that<br />

though. In person he was real quiet and common. You<br />

would never pick him out in a crowd.<br />

‘So a year later he asked me for a job. The catch was that<br />

I had to hire his best friend as well who was also named<br />

Bob Brown. They both wanted to be shapers. This was a<br />

big deal, but I did it anyhow. It worked out great because<br />

we’d get him out in the water, we’d get him to travel, go<br />

to different spots and when we did we’d get tonnes of<br />

people wanting his boards. Luckily his best friend Bob<br />

Brown could shape them and it worked out real, real<br />

good... just great.<br />

‘I had notified everybody back in the States how good this<br />

kid was and we were going to get him some exposure.<br />

We were going to send him to Hawaii and he was going<br />

to tour the mainland. He was on fire, just absolutely on<br />

fire! Every week he was better and more startling. They<br />

were just starting to take photographs of him and film<br />

him for movies.<br />

‘(Then) he was in a pub across the street and there was a<br />

little bit of an argument, not that bad of an argument. The<br />

guy went to throw a glass of beer in his (Bobby’s) face<br />

and the glass hit his jawbone and slit his throat and he<br />

died. It was tragic.<br />

‘I was surprised that he never really got the recognition,<br />

and I realise now that we never really had many<br />

photographs of him or much film, but the guys that were<br />

there, they knew what was going on. If you talk to any<br />

of the top guys at the time like Midget Farrelly or Nat<br />

Young, they’ll tell you that yep, he was the best.’<br />

Bobby Brown cutback photo courtesy of Barrie<br />

Sutherland, WaterMarks Photo Gallery.<br />

www.watermarksphotogallery.com.au<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

49


LATEST: DEBATE<br />

50 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


Eastern Australia’s recent ‘hundred year drought’ has<br />

seen construction for desalination plants becoming a part<br />

of the landscape on more than one beautiful surf beach.<br />

Desalination, hailed as the “silver bullet” solution to<br />

guarantee our cities drinking water, could be coming to a<br />

surf break near you. Bizarrely, the idea of surfing glassy<br />

faces while weaving through the pylons of a desalination<br />

plant construction platform seems strangely romantic. The<br />

reality, however, is more likely to be a miserable slop session<br />

weaving through dead fish in a toxic slurry of salty brine.<br />

IT’S TIME TO PUT THE DESALINATION ISSUE<br />

ON THE SHAPER’S TABLE, ANALYSE THE<br />

LINES, AND ASK WHY OUR POLITICIANS’<br />

STOMACHS ARE MORE INCLINED TOWARDS<br />

A GLASS OF TREATED SEA WATER THAN A<br />

SPARKLING GLASS OF FRESH RAINWATER.<br />

WORDS BY MICK LINTHORNE.<br />

For Eastern Australia’s long-suffering farmers, the<br />

unpredictable cycles of wet seasons, dry seasons, droughts<br />

and floods offer a rollercoaster life of dramatic contrasts.<br />

Our climate cycles can produce bountiful harvests or<br />

spectacularly dusty crop failures; hard-earned wealth or<br />

heart-breaking farm debt; even life and death for our flora<br />

and fauna.<br />

But there are cycles. The rains will come … eventually. It<br />

can sometimes be a case of just hanging on, if you can.<br />

And the rains have come; in very large and sadly, tragic<br />

proportions. In recent months, most of eastern Australia’s<br />

‘hundred year drought’ has been brutally extinguished by<br />

a relentless series of deluges. The dams of South East<br />

Queensland went from dangerously low levels of around 15<br />

percent to the devastating floods and inland torrents that<br />

appalled and mesmerised a nation.<br />

Drilling platform for the Wonthaggi<br />

desalination plant at Powlett River, Victoria<br />

Photo: Jeff Tull<br />

It appears the ‘La Nina’ weather cycle has finally parked<br />

herself on our East Coast weather radars, while her crusty old<br />

brother, ‘El Nino’, has been banished to our distant memories.<br />

Few of us usually give a second thought to Southern<br />

Oscillation, Indian Ocean Dipole or even La Nina, but these<br />

phenomena are not just for the weather geeks. These rare<br />

gems generate the cyclonic swells and stormy low pressure<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

51


YWYS was active in the fight against Wonthaggi<br />

Powlett River, before - untouched. Photo: Jules Elliott<br />

systems that can make even the most<br />

laconic soul-surfer froth like a warm<br />

beer in a soapy glass.<br />

Inland and coastal regions of<br />

Queensland, Victoria and New South<br />

Wales have been brutalised in recent<br />

months by torrential rains. The<br />

previously-barren Coopers Creek,<br />

Barcoo, Thompson and Diamantina<br />

Anti-Wonthaggi<br />

protestor.<br />

Photo: Takvur<br />

Rivers are once again mighty<br />

causeways, draining our nation’s<br />

flooded interior and replenishing<br />

life on their journey to inundate the<br />

parched salt flats of Lake Eyre.<br />

Drought-breaking rains are unleashing<br />

a mesmerising flourish of life and<br />

ecological rejuvenation, rhythmically<br />

pulsing through our continent’s heart;<br />

just as they have for millennia.<br />

In the meantime, our state politicians<br />

are spending billions to ‘drought-proof’<br />

our thirsty cities. Inexplicably, the<br />

natural ebb and flow of weather and<br />

climate are deemed insufficient to<br />

quench our urban lust for water. It<br />

seems that five minute showers, lush<br />

green lawns and endless car washes<br />

are considered too important to trust<br />

to the vagaries of weather and climate<br />

cycles.<br />

According to many of our elected<br />

officials, desalination is the ‘silver<br />

bullet’ solution to our water needs.<br />

Who needs dams when we can drink<br />

from our oceans? After all, “our home<br />

is girt by sea”.<br />

Salty seawater can now be converted<br />

into pure drinking water by a process<br />

known as seawater reverse osmosis<br />

(SWRO). This is basically how SWRO<br />

works…<br />

• Water is piped ashore to a<br />

processing plant from a giant<br />

platform constructed a few<br />

hundred metres off the beach.<br />

• After pre-treatment, high<br />

pressures are used to filter<br />

the seawater through<br />

semipermeable membrane coils.<br />

This is done at pressures of 800<br />

to 1180 psi (or 6-8 MPa), which<br />

requires phenomenal amounts<br />

of energy.<br />

• The extracted salt and other<br />

contaminants are then pumped<br />

back out to sea to the offshore<br />

platform, where they are<br />

expelled into the ocean as a<br />

slurry of warm, salty brine.<br />

• Clean drinking water is then<br />

pumped underground to the<br />

urban water grid.<br />

Ridiculous energy consumption is<br />

one of the main causes for alarm<br />

about desalination. In 2008, the<br />

Water Services Association of<br />

Australia modeled several water<br />

supply scenarios and determined that<br />

sourcing water by desalination was<br />

by far the most energy-intensive. They<br />

predicted that if desalination became<br />

the primary source of supplying around<br />

300 litres per person per day, energy<br />

usage would rise by 400% above<br />

today’s levels.<br />

But do we really need 300 litres of<br />

drinking water per person; drinking<br />

water that too often is used for hosing<br />

down our driveways? Shouldn’t every<br />

roof in Australia be collecting and<br />

storing our personal water needs in<br />

household tanks?<br />

In the chambers of our state<br />

parliaments, water policy is being<br />

Illustration: Gus Brown<br />

52 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


decided right now. Believe it or not,<br />

public debate and popular opinion<br />

can be the driving forces in today’s<br />

democracy. After all, don’t politicians’<br />

jobs depend on keeping us - the<br />

voters - happy?<br />

Currently however, despite the hard<br />

work and protest action of dedicated<br />

people in the community, political<br />

wins have been slim. Water policy is<br />

like a giant, headless scorpion. It has<br />

no idea where it is going, but still has<br />

a deadly sting in its tail.<br />

Too often best practice and policy<br />

are often usurped by politically<br />

safe expediency. And, inevitably,<br />

the safest political solution to<br />

water security seems to be to<br />

spend truckloads of money building<br />

something BIG.<br />

By building desalination plants, do<br />

our governments hope to insulate<br />

themselves from criticisms of poor<br />

planning and inaction the next time<br />

our dams start running low? Treated<br />

seawater will flow, butts will be<br />

covered and jobs will be safe. But<br />

is the safest solution for the pollies<br />

the right solution for us and our<br />

environment?<br />

Sadly, it appears that too few us<br />

are motivated enough to tackle such<br />

questions. Ironically, the need for a<br />

constructive debate about water is<br />

drowning in a pool of apathy.<br />

Meanwhile, monstrous desalination<br />

plants are popping up along our<br />

pristine coastline. A $4 billion<br />

desalination facility is under<br />

construction in Wonthaggi, on<br />

Victoria’s Bass Coast. Sydney’s $1.89<br />

billion plant at Kurnell on Botany Bay<br />

became operational in January 2010,<br />

overcoming sustained and passionate<br />

protesting. Adelaide’s plant at Port<br />

Stanvac is under way, also despite<br />

community protest. The Gold Coast’s<br />

Tugun plant is in the midst of an<br />

operational debacle that would<br />

surely prompt a re-think from the<br />

Queensland Government.<br />

On the contrary, the Queensland<br />

Water Commission had received<br />

the go-ahead for a network of<br />

desalination plants on Queensland’s<br />

Gold and Sunshine Coast beaches<br />

including another plant located in the<br />

surfing community of Marcoola on the<br />

Sunshine Coast.<br />

When everyone’s grass is lush and<br />

green, and people are blissfully<br />

hosing the lawn clippings off their<br />

driveways, precious few of us seem<br />

LATEST: DEBATE<br />

Powlett River, during the drilling. Photo: Jeff Tull<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

53


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to care less about water supply. It seems the<br />

worst thing that happened to the debate about<br />

our great water crisis, was a deluge of water.<br />

Complacency is winning the day.<br />

Despite the rains and overflowing dams, the<br />

concept of desalination is fast-becoming a<br />

nightmarish reality. Wonthaggi. Kurnell. Tugun.<br />

Port Stanvac. Each is now blighted by one of these<br />

environmental monstrosities.<br />

Your Water Your Say (YWYS), a Victorian<br />

organisation vehemently opposed to the<br />

Wonthaggi desalination plant, fought and lost a<br />

bitter legal battle with the Victorian government.<br />

With court costs awarded against this community<br />

group, YWYS were forced to disband; blown out<br />

of the water by the government big guns. In a<br />

written statement, YWYS claimed that actions by<br />

the Victorian government “can only be interpreted<br />

as an attempt to further avoid community scrutiny<br />

of this project”.<br />

Victoria’s Wonthaggi desalination plant is<br />

scheduled to come online in late <strong>2011</strong>. It will be<br />

the second largest reverse osmosis desalination<br />

plant in the world, second only to Saudi Arabia’s<br />

Jabail plant.<br />

In a press release issued by the Bass Coast<br />

Boardriders Club, club president John Gemmill<br />

quotes Flinders University oceanography expert,<br />

Dr Jochen Kaempf:<br />

“… (the plant) will spew out a cocktail of toxic<br />

effluent that will not disperse as the government<br />

initially predicted and may well cause upwellings<br />

of toxic muck into the shallows, an area in which<br />

marine life, surfers and other lovers of the sea<br />

frequent”.<br />

Others, such as Will Shea of Island Surfboards on<br />

Phillip Island also question the logic of pushing<br />

desalination in general.<br />

“We shouldn’t even be having the argument of<br />

where a desal plant should go yet, because it was<br />

just not a measure required. Desal in this country,<br />

especially down here, is more of a last resort idea,<br />

and the way we use water, and could use water,<br />

means the last resort should be a long way off.”<br />

“We pump out more than enough water to cover<br />

our population, yet people don’t want to know<br />

about it, even though it’s cleaner than our tap<br />

water by the time it’s been de-contaminated.<br />

“Everyone’s always good at screaming about what<br />

they don’t want and they don’t like, but I didn’t<br />

hear much screaming about what we should be<br />

doing”.<br />

Take a quick look at these desalination plant<br />

numbers:<br />

• $4 billion - Wonthaggi’s price tag; which<br />

could alternatively pay for water tank<br />

systems and pumps for 600 000 households,<br />

supplying the same amount of water.<br />

• 160MWh - the daily energy consumption of<br />

water tank systems for 600 000 homes.<br />

• 2,160MWh – the daily energy consumption<br />

of the Wonthaggi plant (15 times the energy<br />

required for the water tank option.)<br />

• 945 000 – the tonnes of global warming<br />

CO 2 produced each year by the Kurnell plant<br />

(equal to an extra 22 000 cars on our roads.)<br />

• 120 000 – the number of homes that could<br />

be run with the daily energy consumption<br />

of Kurnell.<br />

• 25 years - the expected life of most<br />

desalination plants (what then?)<br />

Gold Coast surfer Jeff Boschma, an outspoken<br />

critic of desalination, has seen the problems of the<br />

desalination process first hand in Tugun.<br />

“Firstly, the Tugun desalination plant simply<br />

doesn’t work”, claims Jeff. For beleaguered<br />

Queensland Premier, Anna Bligh, her desalination<br />

flagship at Tugun has been widely described<br />

as a money-hungry, white elephant. Since its<br />

installation, the Tugun plant has been beset by<br />

rusting pipes, cracking concrete, faulty valves and<br />

even land subsidence. Repairs and upgrades have<br />

reportedly cost millions of dollars, and plant shut<br />

downs have totalled several months.<br />

“Secondly”, adds Jeff, “it’s an eyesore. We have<br />

this monstrous, rusting platform sitting just a few<br />

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Will, who holds a degree in Environmental Science<br />

focused on water and resource sustainability and<br />

alternative energies, believes there are many, far<br />

better roads to travel down.<br />

“The alternatives were endless: I’d say greywater<br />

and run-off capture, especially around Melbourne,<br />

would have had to be top of my list, and of course<br />

sewage treatment.<br />

hundred metres off our beautiful beach. It can’t<br />

be good for our struggling tourism industry”.<br />

So we asked Danish backpacker (and first-time<br />

surfer), Frederik, for his thoughts.<br />

“I’m not sure what it is; an oil rig or something<br />

like this. It is not beautiful, but oh well. We have<br />

wind farms and things like this near Copenhagen.<br />

But I don’t think we would build one on a beach<br />

54 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


LATEST: DEBATE<br />

Waves at Powlett River. Photo: Jules Elliott<br />

http://southern-times-messenger.whereilive.com.au/news/<br />

story/port-stanvac-desalination-forum-gets-heated/<br />

Photo: Bob Tyler - www.rdtyler.com.au<br />

Port Stanvac, SA. Photo: Wikimedia<br />

Sandy Ryan, Powlett River. Photo: Jules Elliott<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

55


LATEST: DEBATE<br />

Southern Right Whale breaching. Photo: Watershed Australia<br />

Powlett River. Photo: Jules Elliott<br />

that is so beautiful like this one”.<br />

According to most marine biologists,<br />

there are many questions yet to be<br />

answered about the environmental<br />

impact of the desalination slurry<br />

outlets. A plant the size of<br />

Wonthaggi releases a highlyconcentrated<br />

outflow which has up<br />

to 25 times the salt content of the<br />

surrounding seawater.<br />

Despite scientists around the world<br />

measuring outflows and monitoring<br />

the effects on marine ecosystems,<br />

definitive results are unlikely to be<br />

published within the next 5 years.<br />

The environmental impacts are<br />

currently anyone’s guess.<br />

Victorian anti-desalination<br />

organisation Watershed Victoria<br />

have been concerned that<br />

environmental impact studies around<br />

Wonthaggi have been exactly that<br />

- a guess.<br />

‘Winter Whale Watch’ was initiated<br />

in <strong>May</strong> 2010 to test the assertion<br />

by the Department of Sustainability<br />

and Environment that the Bass Coast<br />

was not an important habitat for<br />

whales.<br />

Up until the end of August 2010,<br />

community members reported<br />

approximately 200 whale sightings<br />

between Phillip Island and<br />

Waratah Bay.<br />

Whale Watch data shows that, in<br />

fact, the area of coastline is very<br />

important habitat for protected<br />

Southern right and Humpback<br />

whales and that construction<br />

activities at the desalination plant<br />

may be having negative impacts.<br />

Similar concerns are held for marine<br />

life around the Port Stanvac plant<br />

in South Australia, where blue<br />

swimmer crabs and other creatures<br />

such as seahorses and pipefish are<br />

thought to be under threat from<br />

heightend salinity in the water.<br />

Some opponents of desalination<br />

plants have been criticised for<br />

taking a NIMBY stance (not in my<br />

back yard). Debbie Johnson, from<br />

the Queensland-based organisation<br />

Communities against Desalination<br />

rejects such claims. Debbie says<br />

that her organisation’s members<br />

reject the whole concept of<br />

desalination outright.<br />

“You’re right. We don’t want<br />

desalination in our backyards. We<br />

don’t want desalination in Marcoola,<br />

in Tugun, Wonthaggi, or anywhere<br />

for that matter. Desalination is<br />

environmentally and economically<br />

unsustainable.”<br />

“We believe that desalination is a<br />

clumsy, heavy-handed reaction to<br />

the issue of water security” says<br />

Debbie. “It seems better suited to<br />

a bygone era; when big engineering<br />

solutions were the answer to<br />

everything. Desalination costs a<br />

fortune and wreaks havoc on our<br />

environment.”<br />

Will of Island Surfboards agrees:<br />

“I won’t buy into this ‘not in my<br />

backyard’ mentality that was getting<br />

around. If it had to happen, it had to<br />

happen somewhere. Problem was<br />

this didn’t have to happen yet”.<br />

Surfers have a well-established<br />

tradition of taking on the ‘big<br />

boys’ when it comes to protecting<br />

the oceans in which we surf.<br />

Europe’s Surfers Against Sewage<br />

organisation has fought passionately<br />

and very effectively to clean up<br />

some of Europe’s most polluted surf<br />

breaks.<br />

In the late 1990’s, Surfers Against<br />

Sewage (SAS) successfully halted<br />

the construction and operation of<br />

several sewage outlets in Southwest<br />

England and on the West coast of<br />

France. Administrators were forced<br />

to rethink waste management,<br />

resulting in the development of<br />

land-based, environmental sewage<br />

treatment systems.<br />

There can be no doubt that<br />

government moves toward<br />

desalination have thrust Aussie<br />

surfers into the environmental<br />

spotlight once again. Perhaps this<br />

is our ‘inconvenient truth’. <strong>May</strong>be<br />

desalination is our generation’s<br />

‘Franklin River Dam’. It may be time<br />

for surfers to stand behind some<br />

protest banners and force legislators<br />

56 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


Will Shea<br />

to carve a radical cutback on this path of environmental short-sightedness.<br />

So when our state governments present proposals in our parliaments, asking,<br />

“All those in favour of desalination say aye”, how will surfers respond? What<br />

are surfers prepared to do?<br />

Will there be a silent murmur of discontent? Are we prepared to carry on<br />

paddling around in the salt-saturated slurry? Or shall we stand up, take the<br />

drop, and charge the section screaming protests at the bureaucrats who<br />

threaten our idyllic, coastal lifestyle?<br />

Surely, it’s attitudes that must change, not our surf beaches.<br />

If you would like to find out more or get involved, here are some<br />

interesting links to get you started:<br />

A brief youtube anti-desalination advertisement featuring top Aussie surfers:<br />

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GA-ZWJbhqHg&feature=related<br />

An interesting youtube clip from Aljazeera TV describing the Arabian Gulf<br />

experience of desalination:<br />

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZ5ut_4zKug&NR=1&feature=fvwp<br />

Victorian Government website proclaiming the positive aspects of the<br />

Wonthaggi Desalination Plant:<br />

http://www.ourwater.vic.gov.au/programs/desalination<br />

Victorian anti-desalination organisation that opposes the Wonthaggi plant:<br />

http://www.watershedvictoria.org.au/<br />

South Australian organisation opposed to South Australian desalination:<br />

http://www.saveourgulf.org.au<br />

The Victorian view. Photo: Dave Swan<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

57


TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

Newcastl<br />

Surfer image: Chuan En Eric Lam http://www.flickr.com/people/bluemonkey08/<br />

58 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


e<br />

king·dom (kngdm) n.<br />

1. A realm or sphere in which one thing is dominant.<br />

FROM THE OCEAN THE CITY LOOMS LIKE A GIANT FORTRESS. IT APPEARS LIKE A MAJESTIC<br />

KINGDOM SITTING ATOP A HILL BORDERING THE PACIFIC OCEAN. WELCOME TO NEWCASTLE<br />

- A KINGDOM OF SURFERS. WORDS: DAVE SWAN<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

59


TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

Welcome to Newcastle<br />

THE NEWCASTLE COAT OF ARMS<br />

Every Kingdom needs a Coat of Arms.<br />

In 1961 these nifty bearings were<br />

granted to the City.<br />

The shield, rising from golden sands,<br />

represents a port with blue water and<br />

green land. Wealth and fertility is<br />

emphasised by the border of gold while<br />

the galley represents maritime trade.<br />

The fleece is in reference to the rural<br />

pursuits of the region flanked by a<br />

lozenge and a wheel, representing coal<br />

and industry.<br />

The Nobby’s Head lighthouse stands<br />

proudly on top of the main crown,<br />

while two cheeky seagulls have both<br />

mistaken a crown for an onion ring.<br />

Enterprise stands for the progress of<br />

commerce, industry and culture and<br />

symbolises the community spirit of the<br />

citizens of the City of Newcastle.<br />

If one thing<br />

defines Newcastle,<br />

it’s surfing.<br />

The city’s most famous sons and<br />

daughters are all keen surfers no<br />

matter what their field of interest.<br />

The guys from the rock band<br />

Silverchair are all mad surfers. The<br />

Johns brothers, Andrew and Matthew,<br />

rugby league royalty and former<br />

patriarchs of one of Australia’s most<br />

famous sporting teams the Newcastle<br />

Knights, are also mad surfers.<br />

Then there is four-time world<br />

champion surfer, Mark Richards,<br />

and Nicky Woods, the youngest<br />

person in history to win a World Tour<br />

event taking out the Rip Curl Pro at<br />

Bells Beach when he was just 16.<br />

There is also a whole host of other<br />

talented surfers through the years<br />

to the present day who all hail from<br />

Newcastle from Ted Harvey, Robbie<br />

Woods, Bob Lynch, Roger Clements,<br />

Steve Butterworth, Col Smith, Peter<br />

McCabe, Luke Egan, Simon Law,<br />

Matt Hoy, Marty McMillan, Josh<br />

Ferris, Jye Byrnes, Matt Kay, Belinda<br />

Baggs, Travis Lynch, Mitchell Ross<br />

and Rhys Smith. It is like a roll call of<br />

surfing’s elite.<br />

If this doesn’t say something about<br />

Newcastle’s lineage as a premier<br />

surf destination, I don’t know what<br />

will. Just visit the city in winter and<br />

you will soon see why surfing is such<br />

a part of its social fabric.<br />

Aside from the city itself, there are<br />

countless surf spots within an hour<br />

of ‘Newy’, many revered and just as<br />

closely guarded by local surfers from<br />

outsiders.<br />

In years past, Newcastle was often<br />

unfairly maligned as an industrial<br />

city. Nowadays there’s an urban cool<br />

and sophistication about the place<br />

without any pretentiousness. Newy<br />

still remains true to its down-to-earth<br />

blue-collar heritage.<br />

And if you are unaware, Newcastle<br />

is also the hometown of Jennifer<br />

Hawkins, the lovely lady crowned<br />

Miss Universe some years back.<br />

So you see, it does have an air of<br />

royalty about the place. Now if only I<br />

was king...<br />

60 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


The jump-off at Newcastle Ocean Baths<br />

Photo: Christine - http://www.flickr.com/people/38015621@N08/<br />

Photos 1-4: Chuan En Eric Lam<br />

http://www.flickr.com/people/bluemonkey08/<br />

1. 2.<br />

3.<br />

4.<br />

“Dude, I’m on a<br />

Coat of Arms. What<br />

have you done?”<br />

Newcastle foreshore<br />

Photo: Wikimedia<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

61


TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

As a visitor, I can confidently<br />

say that Newcastle is one<br />

of my favourite spots to visit<br />

on the Australian east coast<br />

when we’re on the road with<br />

smorgasboarder. There is<br />

always a wave on, there are<br />

plenty of good spots for breaky,<br />

lunch and dinner... and heaps<br />

of good bars. Mark and I have<br />

always had a good night there.<br />

And being a coffee addict,<br />

Newcastle is home to possibly<br />

the best baristas outside of<br />

Melbourne.<br />

As far as the waves go,<br />

Newcastle is incredibly<br />

consistent. We have managed<br />

to snare a quality wave there<br />

every time we have visited and<br />

we are there on a regular basis.<br />

It’s hard to chose a favourite,<br />

but probably Newcastle<br />

Beach because it is the most<br />

familiar to me and just holds<br />

a really nice swell that packs<br />

punch without turning your<br />

boardshorts to brown.<br />

My favourite spot for a drink?<br />

Straight out of a morning<br />

surf at Newcastle Beach and<br />

into Estabar for a coffee and<br />

perhaps some breaky or a<br />

gelati. A great spot with great<br />

views. The mere fact I have<br />

chosen an unlicensed premise<br />

that doesn’t sell beer says how<br />

special it is.<br />

My favourite spot for breaky or<br />

a bite is 23 Hundred Café on<br />

Hunter. Why? I like the people<br />

who run the joint and love their<br />

coffee and their food. I always<br />

make a point of stopping by<br />

when in Newcastle. Peter<br />

Johnston, the owner, is a keen<br />

surfer and always makes you<br />

feel welcome. Aside from that,<br />

anywhere on Darby Street.<br />

There are so many quality cafes<br />

and restaurants to choose from<br />

you can take your pick.<br />

But why not let the locals<br />

let us in on what they think<br />

of their home and what they<br />

recommend to visiting surf<br />

family...<br />

MARK RICHARDS, 4 TIME WORLD CHAMPION (THAT’S RIGHT, ONLY THE<br />

BEST FOR OUR SMORGASBOARDER READERS... TIPS FROM THE TOP)<br />

On Newcastle<br />

I was born and bred in Newcastle. I guess<br />

home is always home. Not many people leave<br />

home. They may because of a work related<br />

thing or a relationship but the place where<br />

your family and friends live is where you want<br />

to be, close to them.<br />

We have such a great lifestyle here.<br />

Newcastle has all the benefits of a city<br />

without all the craziness of a capital city<br />

like Sydney or Melbourne. If you want to do<br />

something here, traffic issues aren’t really a<br />

consideration.<br />

We have the most incredible beaches right<br />

around the city. If you go inland you have<br />

the Hunter Valley vineyards. We have Lake<br />

Macquarie nearby; Nelson Bay… there is a<br />

lot to choose from depending on what you<br />

want to do.<br />

Merewether’s n doubt your<br />

favourite beach?<br />

Yeah but it is too bloody crowded now. We<br />

have actually got a photo in the shop from the<br />

late eighties. It is a perfect winter’s day and<br />

it is probably six foot, as good a wave as you<br />

will ever see. I am going left and Mick (Mick<br />

Adams who works in the MR store) is going<br />

right. We are on the same wave splitting the<br />

peak and there are only two other people<br />

in the background. If we had a day like that<br />

now, there would be over one hundred people<br />

in the water.<br />

For guys like Mick and I who have been<br />

around a long time, it has gone from a place<br />

where we used to go out and know everyone,<br />

taking it in turns for waves, to a place where<br />

there is just people everywhere. It’s like a<br />

warzone.<br />

On that point, what is the<br />

surf etiquette like?<br />

It is the same as any other popular surf area.<br />

It is pretty much dog eat dog. The days of<br />

being able to take it in turns and having a<br />

level of respect where you may see a guy<br />

who has been waiting for a wave, even<br />

though he is on the inside, and you call him<br />

onto a wave because its’ his turn... those<br />

days are gone.<br />

All that stuff is unfortunately out the window.<br />

People are feral in the surf now. That’s why<br />

these days I prefer to go surfing when it is 3 foot<br />

shit and onshore. You don’t have to deal with all<br />

the lunatics like when it’s perfect and offshore.<br />

What’s the biggest you<br />

have surfed Merewether?<br />

The biggest would probably be 12 to 15 feet.<br />

At least double overhead or perhaps a little<br />

bigger. It hasn’t been that big for a while.<br />

We get pretty amazing swells. It would be an<br />

equivalent to any big wave you would surf<br />

anywhere except for JBay… or something<br />

super perfect. When it gets big it breaks right<br />

62 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


Photo: Alex Thompson,<br />

Surfhouse Photography<br />

ww.surfhousephotography.com<br />

out on a place everyone calls<br />

Third Reef. It has a Waimea<br />

style take-off. It comes out of<br />

deep water and just fully pitches,<br />

sucking up on take-off then<br />

forming a big wall. It is amazing<br />

when it is big.<br />

What’s the best place<br />

for a bite?<br />

A good buddy who I went to<br />

school with is Neil Slater and<br />

he has a restaurant called<br />

Scratchleys on the Wharf,<br />

which is down on the harbour<br />

foreshore. He serves up some<br />

really good food there.<br />

And for a beer?<br />

Well… ahhh… I can’t really<br />

lie here… this is going to<br />

sound like a very un-Australian<br />

thing to say but I never really<br />

developed a taste for beer.<br />

(Right there and then in the<br />

middle of the interview I<br />

dropped my stubbie aghast in<br />

horror.) I drink one occasionally,<br />

but I can take it or leave it.<br />

That said, I think one of the<br />

most epic places in Newcastle<br />

to have a beer would have<br />

to be the Merewether Beach<br />

Hotel where the beergarden<br />

and bistro is right in front of<br />

the hotel looking out over<br />

Merewether beach. You get a<br />

panorama from Merewether<br />

to Dixon Park right up to Bar<br />

Beach at the other end - a front<br />

row spot where you can sink a<br />

schooner and watch everyone<br />

surfing.<br />

JYE & MICK BYRNES: THIS FATHER & SON TEAM ARE THE<br />

FRIENDLY FACES BEHIND THE SURF FACTORY IN ISLINGTON<br />

On Newcastle<br />

Mick: Good place to live. Good<br />

surf. People are good.<br />

Jye: I have travelled my whole<br />

life and the first thing I do when<br />

I get back home is drive around<br />

the beaches cause they are pretty<br />

special. It’s your home and where I<br />

have grown up.<br />

It’s a hardcore surf town. People<br />

love the surf. It’s very shortboard<br />

orientated.<br />

It’s only the last few years that<br />

people have started to branch out<br />

to new boards like fishes and that.<br />

Breaks<br />

Mick: My favourite was Nobby’s<br />

Reef before the bulk carrier Pasha<br />

Bulka ran aground. Now it’s<br />

probably Newcastle Beach.<br />

Jye: We have a lot of variety but<br />

it is hard to go past Newcastle<br />

Beach. It is a powerful wave and<br />

being a goofy footer, there are<br />

more left handers there. It gets<br />

some size too.<br />

I love the big stuff.<br />

Food & Drinks<br />

Mick: Suspension and Good<br />

Brothers at the top of town are the<br />

best for coffee, they’re run by the<br />

same people. Suspension is good<br />

for breaky too.<br />

Jye: For a beer - The Mary Ellen<br />

and The Prince in town or the Bar<br />

Beach Bowling Club because it has<br />

greens and is pretty kid friendly.<br />

Monday to Saturday, Al Gators.<br />

has nice healthy food, homemade<br />

style. If you want a good surfers<br />

feed you can’t beat that place.<br />

Board choice<br />

Jye: I’m a multi-tasker. I<br />

shortboarded my whole life<br />

because I grew up surfing on<br />

one of the heaviest beaches but<br />

then I got an opportunity to ride<br />

longboards and got paid to do it.<br />

Ultimately though, ride what you<br />

want to ride. Just have fun and<br />

try not to go stale on that one<br />

surfboard.<br />

Crowds<br />

Jye: Everyone is competing in the<br />

water nowadays. There are guys<br />

inside you, outside you. For me I<br />

don’t worry about it so much. I get<br />

dropped in on. I drop in. What’s<br />

the worst thing that can happen. If<br />

I do it you say sorry. If it happens<br />

to you, just catch the next wave.<br />

On Stockton Beach<br />

Over there you have a great white<br />

breeding ground so it is pretty…<br />

Jye also runs the iSurf<br />

Newcastle Surf School.<br />

“We only have a one to four<br />

ratio and as such are quite<br />

mobile,” he says. “That way<br />

the people you are teaching<br />

get a chance to learn a little<br />

more. It’s not just about<br />

getting them to stand up and<br />

taking their money.”<br />

SAM EGAN: NEWY LOCAL<br />

FROM BIRTH, SAM BEGAN HIS<br />

ILLUSTRIOUS CAREER MAKING<br />

PLYWOOD TOOTHPICKS IN HIS<br />

BELOVED HOME TOWN.<br />

What do you love<br />

about Newcastle?<br />

If I tell you that everyone will<br />

move here. (laughs)<br />

It’s just a great place. It’s getting<br />

big now, but over the years it has<br />

been just the right size.<br />

Favourite surf spot<br />

Growing up I was in Cook’s Hill<br />

Surf Club and at the time I used to<br />

paddle foam malibus. It was about<br />

1958 and we surfed the reef at<br />

Bar Beach.<br />

We surfed it because there was<br />

a little dungeon in the club where<br />

we could store the boards – you<br />

didn’t want to be dragging those<br />

things around. They were too<br />

bloody heavy.<br />

Best spot for a beer<br />

The Beach Hotel at Merewhether<br />

or the Burwood because the<br />

Newcastle Knights (Newcastle’s<br />

rugby league team in the NRL)<br />

went there.<br />

Favourite coffee spot<br />

The best place for a coffee is<br />

just down on the corner from my<br />

factory. It is called Suspensions.<br />

Best coffee in Newcastle... in the<br />

world probably.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

63


30 YEARS<br />

OF SURFBOARD<br />

MANUFACTURING<br />

EXPERIENCE.<br />

PACIFIC<br />

DREAMS<br />

FOREVER<br />

A PROUD PART OF THE<br />

NEWCASTLE SURFING<br />

COMMUNITY.<br />

PACIFIC<br />

DREAMS<br />

7 Darby Street,<br />

Newcastle NSW 2300<br />

(02) 4926 3355<br />

Ye Olde Local Knowledge<br />

CHRIS TOLA: COASTAL CONSERVATION CHAMPION<br />

INVOLVED IN EVERYTHING FROM UNIVERSITY SURFING TO<br />

COASTCARE, CHRIS TOLA IS HUNTER BRANCH PRESIDENT<br />

FOR SURFRIDER FOUNDATION AUSTRALIA AND MEMBER OF<br />

NATIONAL SURFING RESERVES TO MENTION ONLY A FEW OF<br />

HIS CHOSEN DUTIES. WWW.SURFINGRESERVES.ORG<br />

“Newcastle is a really interesting city because there is<br />

a diversity of cultures and backgrounds. We have many<br />

communities and precincts within Newcastle. There is a<br />

real vibrance to the place.<br />

“Many talented artists live here such as Rod Bathgate<br />

and John Earl who create great beachscapes,<br />

photographers such as Conor Ashleigh and Tim<br />

Silverwood. A lot of people who now lead science and<br />

technology around the world come from Newcastle.<br />

There is such a real mix of people here. Novacastrians<br />

have dispensed with the chip on their shoulder that they<br />

somehow weren’t good enough. It is an exciting time for<br />

Newcastle.<br />

“Recently the Lonely Planet Traveller’s Guide nominated<br />

Newcastle in the top ten cities to visit.<br />

“The region is also noted for its marine life and so<br />

forth. The rock platform between the Cowrie Hole<br />

and Newcastle Beach is rated as one of the most<br />

diverse habitats for marine plants and animals. We get<br />

loggerhead turtles frequenting the region, dolphins,<br />

whales and penguins.<br />

The area behind Stockton Beach is a recognized Ramsar<br />

site for shorebird nesting (Ramsar is an international<br />

treaty that embodies the commitments of its member<br />

countries to maintain the ecological character of their<br />

Wetlands). Birds from as far away as Russia come here<br />

to roost.<br />

Stockton is also a known breeding ground for great<br />

whites. It goes from shallow to deep really quickly. A<br />

recent survey along the east coast identified Stockton as<br />

a café, where great whites breed and feed.”<br />

AUSTRALIAN OWNED<br />

& OPERATED<br />

WWW.PACIFICDREAMS.COM.AU<br />

Photo: Alex Thompson,<br />

Surfhouse Photography<br />

ww.surfhousephotography.com<br />

64 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


On the surf<br />

“Because it is so<br />

condensed, in the east<br />

end alone there is 23<br />

different surf breaks<br />

within 10 minutes walking<br />

distance, anything from 1<br />

ft to 12ft +. The surf isn’t<br />

always huge but there is<br />

a consistency. That is one<br />

of Newcastle’s greatest<br />

assets.<br />

“Newcastle Beach is one<br />

minute from the central<br />

business district so you will<br />

often see lawyers running<br />

back to their practices in<br />

their wetsuits with a board<br />

under their arm.<br />

“The Cowrie Hole is my<br />

favourite spot though,<br />

in the world in fact. It is<br />

rather shallow. You learn<br />

how to do the spread<br />

eagle star dives and don’t<br />

go diving for lobsters<br />

that’s for sure.<br />

The Pasha<br />

Bulka<br />

“There is a lot of<br />

anecdotal evidence<br />

that the ship did in fact<br />

damage the reef at<br />

Nobby’s and changed the<br />

way the bank worked. It<br />

is commonly held that it<br />

is not as good as it used<br />

to be.<br />

“As part of the<br />

International Surfing<br />

Day, which is a Surfrider<br />

Foundation celebration on<br />

<strong>June</strong> 20, we are holding a<br />

workshop where we hope<br />

to formalise some of this<br />

evidence and, if it did,<br />

conduct further research<br />

to seek remediation.”<br />

“It’s a beautiful, clean city since they<br />

shut the steelworks. We have plenty of<br />

waves. The people in general have a<br />

good work ethic.”<br />

John Scollay Newcastle Surf Designs<br />

“Lived here my whole life. A lot of good<br />

surf spots, all close by. I first paddled<br />

out at Nobby’s in the winter of ’65 and<br />

am still surfing everyday.”<br />

Peter McCabe Peter McCabe Surfboards<br />

“It’s big enough to have something going<br />

on and small enough to be quiet.”<br />

Mick Adams Mark Richards Surfboards<br />

“Grew up here. It’s got that country feel<br />

but it is a big enough city with the people<br />

to sustain it. There are plenty of things to<br />

do and I love the beaches and the waves.<br />

There is always a wave.”<br />

Jamie Lambert Breakaway Surf<br />

“The beaches. The people. Merewether<br />

Beach is national surfing reserve. We have<br />

great skate parks. We have everything.”<br />

Rhys Smith Sanbah Surf Shop<br />

50 years of handshaping<br />

experience - modern<br />

technology & materials<br />

High performance<br />

shortboards, classic<br />

and performance<br />

longboards, retro fish<br />

and single fins...all<br />

masterfully handshaped.<br />

28 Maitland Road<br />

Islington NSW 2296<br />

(02) 4969 7299<br />

www.samegan.com.au<br />

THE CLOSEST SURF SHOP TO<br />

NEWCASTLE BEACH<br />

Just 600 metres to the beach<br />

with all the leading brands &<br />

friendly, helpful staff.<br />

SHOP 6, HUNTER STREET MALL , NEWCASTLE<br />

CALL 02 4929 1144<br />

Hunter Street mall, just 600<br />

metres to the beach. All the<br />

leading brands. Friendly, helpful<br />

staff.<br />

• Learn to surf<br />

• Private Tuition<br />

• Improve your surfing<br />

• Stand up paddle lessons<br />

• Schools/corporate<br />

“When you go away and come back you<br />

appreciate the water quality here. It is so<br />

crystal clear you can see fish beneath you. ”<br />

Graeme Gairns California Surf Imports<br />

Contact Jye Byrnes:<br />

Mobile 0409 227 407 or email jyebyrnes@hotmail.com<br />

www.isurfnewcastlesurfschool.com.au<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

65


Photo: Chuan En Eric Lam<br />

Stockton Beach<br />

North of Newcastle Harbour, it<br />

stretches 32 km north-east from<br />

Stockton to Anna Bay. There are<br />

varied beach breaks.<br />

Closeouts are common as swell<br />

size builds. The beach is open, has<br />

many rips, somewhat isolated, a<br />

little too sharky for my liking.<br />

Best in NW swell. Good spot when<br />

S swell closes out other beaches.<br />

The Harbour<br />

Unless you’re a gun or insane, stay<br />

away. Know this spot well to surf<br />

it. It works in cyclonic NE swell<br />

or huge southerly swell when all<br />

other beaches are closing out.<br />

During World War II many of the<br />

beaches around the Newcastle<br />

area had large concrete tank traps<br />

placed on the foreshore to hamper<br />

any possible landing of Japanese<br />

tanks ashore.<br />

Following the war the traps were<br />

dumped into Newcastle Harbour,<br />

straight off the breakwall. So today<br />

there is heaving right hand barrell<br />

that breaks over 60 year old twisted<br />

concrete and metal. Stay away.<br />

The Wedge<br />

Along the sandspit off Nobby’s<br />

head. Powerful wave, breaking<br />

left. Works when the swell is on.<br />

NE-SE swell. NW-W wind.<br />

All tides.<br />

The Spit<br />

Just south of the Wedge, right<br />

next to Big Ben Rock. On a NE<br />

swell, if the sand is right, you can<br />

get 300m rides.<br />

The Spot<br />

Only gets good a few times a year,<br />

but can be an indo-style wave<br />

when it’s on. Pretty fickle.<br />

Nobby’s Reef<br />

Currents prove a hazard. Difficult<br />

to hold your position in the break,<br />

which works left and right.<br />

Holds large swells but is<br />

unpredictable. By all reports, the<br />

Pasha Bulker screwed it.<br />

S-SE swell. NW wind. Mid tide<br />

best.<br />

Cowrie Hole<br />

To surf this spot takes precision<br />

and guts. Just off the northern end<br />

of the Ocean Baths. Basically a gap<br />

in the rocks where an awesome right<br />

breaks over a shallow ledge. Good<br />

for fish or logs.<br />

Best near high tide in S-SE swell.<br />

If Cowrie Hole doesn’t psyche you<br />

out, the outer break is called...<br />

Flat Rock<br />

Heavy local spot. A surge rock with<br />

a few little steps and bumps.<br />

Newcastle Beach<br />

Right in the heart of Newcastle<br />

city, it looks like an amphitheatre<br />

for surfing. The jewel in the city’s<br />

crown, especially in a nor’easter.<br />

Handles swell up to 3-4m.<br />

Off the point peels 200m rides.<br />

Great for goofy-footers. Occasional<br />

peaky right.<br />

66 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


The Crown<br />

Jewels...<br />

TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

South Newcastle<br />

Basically the same bloody beach. It’s<br />

just that a small group of rocks at<br />

the water’s edge, referred to as the<br />

divider splits the beach. Rarely gets<br />

crowded. Underrated beach breaks.<br />

Graveyard is off the rocks - a great<br />

right-hander in front of the bogie-hole.<br />

Bar Beach<br />

& Dixon Park<br />

Heavy lefts and rights forming<br />

on the outside banks. Best up to<br />

8ft. The wave also reforms on the<br />

inside banks allowing various levels<br />

of surfers to enjoy the break. Can<br />

get very crowded.<br />

Handles most swell and wind<br />

directions.<br />

Merewether<br />

Personally holds legendary status<br />

in my family with Dad taking out a<br />

1960 national surf lifesaving paddle<br />

board title - the only surfcraft to<br />

finish the race in monstrous surf.<br />

Great surf spot, but quite frankly<br />

scares the pants off me when it<br />

gets big... and I mean BIG. Holds<br />

up to 15ft and is very powerful.<br />

Generally a heavy right breaking off<br />

The Ladies’ reef. It is where most<br />

of the talented surfers rip so steer<br />

clear if you are not up to it (So what<br />

the hell were you doing there I hear<br />

you ask. Fair point.)<br />

SE-E swell. NW wind. Mid tide.<br />

The beach break suits various levels<br />

of surfers.<br />

THE KINGDOM CAN BE BRUTAL. THE<br />

WAVES ARE HEAVY, THE LOCALS ARE<br />

HEAVY, THE CURRENTS STRONG AND THE<br />

THE MEN IN GREY SUITS ARE OUT AND<br />

ABOUT. DESPITE ALL OF THAT, IT’S MOST<br />

DEFINITELY A ‘MUST VISIT’ AUSTRALIAN<br />

SURF DESTINATION.<br />

Newcastle has awesome waves and is<br />

the very reason why the area is home to<br />

a number of world-class surfers. You just<br />

have to have your wits about you when<br />

you decide to take it on. Winter is when<br />

Newcastle’s swells are at their best.<br />

All around mid-tide is the best. Low tides<br />

generally mean closeouts.<br />

Take note:<br />

Newcastle is not an ‘out-of-the-way’<br />

surf destination. It is well known.<br />

As such, the city’s beaches don’t<br />

hold any secret surf spots and even<br />

if there were some, we wouldn’t<br />

speak of them. But, as always, show<br />

respect when surfing someone else’s<br />

home break. The majority of guys<br />

and gals who surf Newcastle really<br />

have the place wired. So play nice.<br />

FLAT<br />

ROCK<br />

MEREWETHER<br />

GRAVEYARD<br />

SOUTH NEWCASTLE<br />

NEWCASTLE BEACH<br />

COWRIE<br />

HOLE<br />

DIXON PARK<br />

BAR BEACH<br />

Photo: Wolf Cocklin<br />

NOBBYS REEF<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

67


VISITING NEWCASTLE? HAVE AN ADVENTURE!<br />

From<br />

3 years old<br />

Royal<br />

attractions<br />

IF YOU’RE ALL SURFED OUT, THE SURF IS JUST TOO SCARY OR<br />

ON THE VERY OFF-CHANCE THAT THE SURF IS FLAT, THERE’S<br />

PLENTY OF OTHER ATTRACTIONS TO KEEP YOU ENTERTAINED.<br />

100<br />

CHALLENGES!<br />

2-3 HOURS<br />

OF THRILLING<br />

FUN!<br />

Walk! There are plenty options.<br />

The Foreshore promenade from<br />

the Honeysuckle development<br />

precinct complete with marina,<br />

parks and cafes to Nobbys is a<br />

great vantage point to take in the<br />

city of Newcastle and view one of<br />

Australia’s busiest ports in action.<br />

The walk along the breakwater to<br />

the lighthouse at Nobys provides<br />

more stunning scenery of the city<br />

skyline and ocean. Nobbys, named<br />

because of its nob-like shape,<br />

was originally an island until<br />

convicts risked their lives to build<br />

a breakwall to it to protect the<br />

harbour.<br />

Just nearby is the Fort Scratchley<br />

Historic Site. The Fortress has<br />

a long and interesting military<br />

history and overlooks the Hunter<br />

River, Nobbys Beach and the<br />

lighthouse.<br />

Further south is the Art Deco<br />

Newcastle Ocean Baths or Soldiers<br />

Baths as they are are known to<br />

some (opened in 1922) and the<br />

adjoining Canoe Pool, built in the<br />

late 1930s for young swimmers.<br />

The base of the pool once<br />

featured a map of the world, with<br />

the various continents jutting out<br />

of the water like islands.<br />

Next around is King Edward Park<br />

with its stunning views of the<br />

ocean and city skyline. The Obelisk<br />

nearby is yet another prominent<br />

feature on Newcastle’s skyline. It<br />

was originally a stone flour mill<br />

and a guiding landmark for ships<br />

approaching the port of Newcastle.<br />

At the bottom of the cliffs heading<br />

south towards Bar Beach are<br />

the rock pool baths known as<br />

the Bogey Hole. Apparently built<br />

by convicts around 1820 for the<br />

personal use of Commandant<br />

James T. Morriset, the baths are<br />

The foreshore promenade<br />

PH: 02 4026 7617<br />

WWW.TREETOPADVENTUREPARK.COM.AU<br />

68 may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

Photo: CareCat Cruising


located beneath a rocky prominence<br />

and get battered during heavy seas.<br />

Thrill seekers hang onto the chain<br />

fence in decent swells but we don’t<br />

recommend this unless you want to<br />

end up as shark food.<br />

Further south are the Merewether<br />

Ocean Baths, the largest in the<br />

southern hemisphere.<br />

The entire walk known as<br />

Bathers Way, stretches from the<br />

Merewether Baths to Nobbys<br />

Headland and is five kilometres.<br />

When first exploring Newcastle, it<br />

is a great way to get your bearings<br />

and a decent bit of exercise.<br />

Finally, our other suggested mustsee<br />

is the Christ Church Cathedral.<br />

A survivor of the Japanese<br />

submarine attack of WWII and<br />

the 1989 Newcastle Earthquake,<br />

Christ Church Cathedral is now a<br />

fully restored masterpiece. It is the<br />

unofficial castle of the Kingdom of<br />

Newcastle.<br />

Monkey Business<br />

Just 15 minutes from the CBD<br />

is Tree Top Adventure Park, a<br />

ropes course within the beautiful<br />

Blue Gums Regional Park. There<br />

are challenges to take on where<br />

participants can slide down flying<br />

foxes, transverse suspension<br />

bridges and enjoy other activities up<br />

to 15 metres above the forest floor.<br />

A course for 3-10 year-olds is built<br />

with a unique safety system so kids<br />

can concentrate on the fun.<br />

All courses have limited spaces so<br />

bookings are recommended. Entry<br />

starts from $20.<br />

Whale watching<br />

N’Joy is a luxurious 50ft sailing<br />

catamaran with an interior like<br />

an opulent waterfront penthouse.<br />

Relax in comfort and take in the<br />

sights of Newcastle and the playful<br />

antics of Humpback whales on their<br />

annual migration past the Hunter<br />

coastline.<br />

These amazing creatures migrate<br />

north from <strong>May</strong> through to August<br />

to breed and return in October and<br />

November, often with their calves<br />

alongside them. It’s a humbling and<br />

awe-inspiring experience to see these<br />

huge marine mammals up close.<br />

The 3 hour cruises departs from the<br />

Crowne Plaza Hotel Boat Dock. $66<br />

per person.<br />

Nearby...<br />

The Hunter Valley is renowned<br />

for its full-bodied white wines,<br />

‘medium weight reds’ and some<br />

excellent ports. Think of Pepper<br />

Tree, Bimbadgen Estate, Audrey<br />

Wilkinson Vineyard, Lindemans,<br />

McWilliams, Rothbury, Wyndham<br />

Estate and McGuigan... Not to<br />

mention others like Tyrells and<br />

Draytons, who are all very old<br />

family concerns. The Hunter is ripe<br />

for a little tasting of the vino and<br />

some stock for your home cellar.<br />

In fact, the range of wines in the<br />

Hunter Valley is endless.<br />

The majority of wineries are open<br />

daily. Visitors are provided with<br />

tasting glasses and given a small<br />

taste of each wine in the maker’s<br />

range of current vintages with an<br />

explanation about the wines.<br />

N’Joy a three hour<br />

luxury harbour cruise<br />

Take in the sights of<br />

Newcastle<br />

See these majestic<br />

animals up close<br />

A truly memorable<br />

experience with nature<br />

Sat: 9.30am and 1.00pm<br />

Sun: 9.30am and 1.00pm<br />

School holidays, Mon-Fri: 10am<br />

Call to book today:<br />

02 4959 5600<br />

www.carecat.com.au<br />

Christ Church Cathedral Photo: TreeTop Adventure Park<br />

“Regardless of your needs, whether it’s a<br />

shortboard or a mal, I’m confident I can<br />

make you a board which will improve and<br />

increase your enjoyment of your surfing.”<br />

Mark Richards<br />

755 Hunter Street, Newcastle West, NSW Australia 2300<br />

Ph: +61 2 4961 3088 | Fax: +61 2 4961 6872<br />

www.markrichardssurfboards.com<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

69


A BIRDS EYE VIEW<br />

OF THE<br />

LINEUP<br />

Getting<br />

here<br />

NEWCASTLE<br />

IS EASILY<br />

ACCESSIBLE. THE EASIEST AND<br />

MOST AFFORDABLE MEANS OF<br />

TRANSPORT ARE AIR OR CAR.<br />

You can fly directly into Newcastle from Adelaide,<br />

Melbourne, Brisbane and the Gold Coast. Virgin<br />

Blue flys out of all cities with Jetstar flying out of<br />

all bar Adelaide. Drive-wise, Newcastle is two<br />

hours drive north of Sydney.<br />

TRAVEL: ROAD TRIP<br />

Beach yourself at Newcastle’s<br />

only beachfront Accommodation,<br />

Restaurant & Bar.<br />

Packages available…<br />

Cnr Shortland Esp & Zaara St Newcastle P. 4929 5181<br />

visit noahsonthebeach.com.au<br />

4½ Star Boutique Bed & Breakfast, perfectly located<br />

just 600m to Merewether beach - home to surfing legends<br />

Mark Richards, Mat Hoy and Luke Egan.<br />

Christine Feeney & Bob Comyns | 1 Rowan Crescent Merewether NSW 2291<br />

+61 2 4963 3812 | 0414 633 066 | stay@brezzabella.com.au<br />

www.brezzabella.com.au<br />

From Brisbane<br />

10.5 to 11 hours drive and just<br />

under 800kms along the Pacific<br />

Highway will get you there.<br />

An alternative route to consider<br />

if traffic looks heavy on the<br />

Pacific Highway is out west via<br />

Warwick and Armidale along<br />

the New England Highway and<br />

down Thunderbolts Way (gotta<br />

love the name) past the towns<br />

of Gloucester and Stroud. The<br />

distance is relatively the same but<br />

the drive takes around 15 hours.<br />

It sounds like a lot more driving<br />

but isn’t if traffic is heavy and<br />

you frustrate easily sitting behind<br />

morons travelling 20kms under<br />

the speed limit. After much<br />

insistence from my dad I did the<br />

drive just prior to Christmas and<br />

wasn’t disappointed. It is one of<br />

the most amazing drives I have<br />

ever undertaken – mountain<br />

top views, undulating hills and<br />

babbling brooks are par for<br />

the course. Words can’t really<br />

describe the scenery. You just<br />

have to take the drive.<br />

From Melbourne<br />

Just over 1000kms and 10 hours<br />

drive, take the Hume Highway<br />

through Albury, Gundagai, Yass<br />

and Goulburn past the western<br />

outskirts of Sydney and then onto<br />

the Pacific Highway near Pymble<br />

to Newcastle.<br />

From Adelaide<br />

Around 15,500 kms and just<br />

under 17 hours drive. Take the<br />

Sturt Highway to Renmark onto<br />

Mildura, through Narrandera to<br />

Wagga Wagga and then onto the<br />

Hume Highway to Gundagai, Yass<br />

and Goulburn. You will pass the<br />

western outskirts of Sydney and<br />

then get onto the Pacific Highway<br />

near Pymble and follow it to<br />

Newcastle.<br />

Saying this, just fly. It is a hell of<br />

a lot easier and you can save your<br />

energy for the waves and not for<br />

behind the wheel.<br />

Accommodation<br />

When it comes to where to<br />

stay, you have a couple of good<br />

options. Why stray too far from<br />

the beach?<br />

Noah’s is a comfortable luxury<br />

hotel right opposite Newcastle<br />

Beach. At first light, you can<br />

look out and survey the surf<br />

with a bird’s eye view. After a<br />

paddle, you can enjoy a beautiful<br />

breakfast behind a massive glass<br />

window that makes you feel like<br />

you’re still in line-up. Their food<br />

and service is superb.<br />

For a grown-up and very civilised<br />

stay in Merewether, Brezza Bella<br />

is about as upmarket as you<br />

could hope to go for a luxury<br />

B&B, and it’s just a short walk to<br />

Merewether Beach.<br />

Photo: Christine<br />

70 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

71


TRAVEL: PLANE TRIP<br />

Papua New Guinea is possibly not the<br />

first name to pop up in conversation on<br />

surf trips. In relation to other far more<br />

well-travelled spots such as Bali or Fiji,<br />

PNG still flies under the radar a little.<br />

But it turns out, as Gus Brown discovered on<br />

a recent visit with a group of good mates,<br />

PNG truly holds its own as a standout<br />

spot for an affordable surf getaway.<br />

WORDS: GUS BROWN PHOTOS: TEAM PNG -<br />

SIMON, RICHARD, RORY, ANGUS, DANNY & ASH<br />

72 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

73


TRAVEL: PLANE TRIP<br />

74 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


When Papua New Guinea is mentioned as destination<br />

for a surf adventure the reaction is genrally mixed. With<br />

a close historic relationship to Australia in wartime,<br />

thoughts of a lush unspoilt environment, stories of wild<br />

locals, perfect breaks, and big mining interest, who<br />

knows what to expect.<br />

But expect good times. An abyss of unspoilt tropical<br />

landscapes, crisp clean ocean, and few trappings of our<br />

consumer driven society. Papua New Guinea is one of<br />

our closest neighbours and therefore easily accessible<br />

and affordable even for short trips.<br />

The airport at Port Moresby is on the main flight route<br />

from most capitals in Oz. Port Moresby is legendary for<br />

being a dangerous city so a direct connecting flight to<br />

Kavieng is probably a wise decision. Transferring from<br />

the international to domestic airport can be quite an<br />

intimidating experience for the novice with hundreds<br />

of people waiting around the walkway to the domestic<br />

centre, just hanging out!<br />

New Ireland is on the outer tail of the Papua New<br />

Guinea islands and is exposed to the Pacific Ocean<br />

and open to swell coming down from the Hawaiian<br />

chain. New Ireland’s most famous break, Kavieng is<br />

located near the airport and is a long right hand reef that<br />

holds good swell when it’s on. Skeletons of military<br />

remnants are common place as Kavieng was occupied<br />

by the Japanese in World War II and represented a<br />

dark time for those caught up in the situation. Small<br />

forts for housing guns are spread out covering strategic<br />

points and the rusting components of tanks and other<br />

equipment are easily located.<br />

A range of boat trips are available which depart from<br />

Kavieng and travel north into a seemingly endless chain<br />

of remote islands and reefs.<br />

From Kavieng, the Bromminske Highway (using the term<br />

“Highway” very loosely) runs south down the east coast<br />

of New Ireland for some 600 Kilometers. The road is<br />

partly tarred and largely poorly grated, which can make<br />

the long journey to surf and adventure a true mission.<br />

Preconcevied ideas of long, white, sandy beaches and<br />

headlands are quickly dismissed... the reality being a<br />

rocky coastline with jagged reef outcrops, on which<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

75


TRAVEL: PLANE TRIP<br />

PNG is primarily an unspoilt paradise and largely remains un influenced by capitalism. There is little in<br />

the way of pollution, plastic is not present and many of the locals live as they would have for thousands of<br />

years. So respect and appreciation for what its people, land and ocean have to offer is a must.<br />

76 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


CONTINUED<br />

perfectly shaped waves form and unexpectedly close<br />

out on. Many surfing opportunities are tempting but not<br />

worthwhile given medical help is hours away. Kavieng<br />

has a basic hospital but more serious injury requires<br />

flights back to Moresby, or better still, home.<br />

The waters in this region of Papua New Guinea are<br />

teaming with a variety of fish which can be helpfull<br />

when the surf is not working at its best. The ocean<br />

is basically unspoilt with only the odd local fisherman<br />

heading out in a traditional canoe looking to feed his<br />

family. Hour after hour of looking out to sea, there is<br />

nothing to see but storms, birds, and generally smooth<br />

ocean. If you get access to a boat trip, take it, but make<br />

sure you bring some pretty strong line and lures as<br />

fishing is as good at gets, even for non mullet-heads.<br />

The locals are super friendly with waving to strangers<br />

being the norm. The further away from Kavieng you<br />

travel the more subsistence the living gets and you start<br />

to understand that you are lucky to have the experience.<br />

There is no evidence of pollution or the eyesore of<br />

plastics which litter the roadsides of other developing<br />

nations. Don’t fear the machette - it’s a common tool and<br />

many men carry them. It is the jungle after all. Small<br />

villages dot the highway, consisting of well constructed<br />

shantys made from natural materials that are sourced<br />

from the rich surrounds. They are perfectly suited to<br />

the environment and created in a style that reflects<br />

thousands of years of tradition.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

77


TRAVEL: PLANE TRIP<br />

Shane at Rubio is the main man.<br />

Originally from Hawaii, he and his<br />

family have lived in PNG for many years.<br />

Shane and his wife run Rubio Island<br />

Retreat and they make a special effort<br />

to entertain a keen surfing crew.<br />

The PNG Surf Association coordinates the<br />

number of surfers able to access sections<br />

of the coastline. To surf in PNG you need<br />

to purchase a permit which enables only a<br />

limited number of surfers to access large<br />

areas of coastline. These cost about $30<br />

for 2 weeks. Depending on conditions,<br />

accessing breaks can be difficult and time<br />

consuming but you are definitely not going<br />

to be dealing with crowds.<br />

The average surfer can have fun and find<br />

challenging waves to saftisfy a healthy<br />

appetite for waves. Kavieng is surf<br />

central, but there are a number of boat<br />

trips for small groups that head north into<br />

an amazing looking group of islands with<br />

limitless opportunities.<br />

KAVIENG<br />

Kavieng when on fire is more suited to the<br />

good / advanced surfer who doesn’t freak<br />

out looking down at coral from 6 feet plus<br />

in the air. This is the premier break.<br />

RUBIO RIGHTS<br />

(about 6 hours south from Kavieng)<br />

A consistent but challenging right hander<br />

that can still be taken on by those of<br />

us who cry when the word “reef” is<br />

mentioned. Good fun in anything between<br />

2 and 5 foot. A quick barrelling left also<br />

breaks from this area.<br />

SLIPPERY’S<br />

(Somewhere between Kavieng and Rubio rights)<br />

Great long left handers to be had in idealic<br />

surrounds. Apparently holds larger swell<br />

but at about 4 foot it is a highlight. Named<br />

as the steep path down the hill to the<br />

water is a nightmare when we, which is<br />

most of the time.<br />

“PIG BOWLS” OR YOU NAME IT<br />

Our surfing troup had the opportunity to<br />

name a few which we were assured by<br />

our guide we were the first to surf. The<br />

crew weren’t convinced, but it was a nice<br />

thought and the screams coming from<br />

the jungle as we caught waves made<br />

the idea more convincing. There are<br />

still plenty of yet to be found and named<br />

breaks along the coastline of New Ireland.<br />

It just depends on how game you are to<br />

take on the gnarly reefs and rocks. Due<br />

to the tribal nature of the culture we<br />

were advised that travellers should name<br />

the spots based on their experiences.<br />

When researching the trip it is very hard<br />

to identify specific locations on maps<br />

as the villages and landmarks are not<br />

clearly defined. This is what adds to the<br />

adventure and although there have been<br />

many surfers in the region before, you get<br />

the feeling that you are the first.<br />

78 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


WATER TEMPS<br />

BEST TIMES<br />

DRAWCARD<br />

HAZARDS<br />

Warm-Hot in Season<br />

November to February<br />

Offshore, no crowd factor, isolation<br />

nature and the locals<br />

You should have seen it last week.<br />

Festy reef cuts.<br />

Short board, fish, retro, mini-mal. You can take a<br />

Mal but probably not the best choice. Have a backup<br />

as some damage is largely inevitable. As per the<br />

smorgasboarder ethos - any board is a good board.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

79


TRAVEL: PLANE TRIP<br />

There are a number of guest houses (huts) along the<br />

Bromisky highway which can be accessed by getting a<br />

ride in a local van come bus, which infrequently makes<br />

the journey servicing the locals. Although accessing<br />

breaks and local knowledge may present a challenge<br />

with this choice. Surf camps and boat trips provide<br />

transfers which are helpful.<br />

Rubio Island Retreat is located approximately 3 hours<br />

(give or take 2 hours) down the Bomisky highway and<br />

provides all the necessities including comfortable<br />

bungalows on the beach. A surf break is right out the<br />

front so you don’t have to wait to get the crew together<br />

to get some fun waves. All food, boat trips and drives<br />

to surf breaks and other locations are included and<br />

the hospitality is excellent. This surf camp acts as a<br />

central point for surrounding villages and seems to be<br />

the heart of the simple local economy. Most necessities<br />

are available at the camp shop. Shane, the owner and<br />

super-keen supersurfer, is part of the community and<br />

gives back by supporting the local people.<br />

Many of the village<br />

people love Betel Nut and<br />

many locals are hooked<br />

on it. An hallucinogenic,<br />

Betel Nut is injested by<br />

chewing a combination of<br />

the palm nut, a mustard<br />

pod and some calcium<br />

which is derived from<br />

coral. By all accounts, it<br />

smells a little like incense,<br />

has an initial flavour of<br />

cinammon or nutmeg<br />

with a lingering aftertaste<br />

of soap.There is a big<br />

economy in Betel Nut and<br />

it’s available everywhere<br />

on roadside tables,<br />

however it represents<br />

a major health problem<br />

for the population due<br />

to its addictive qualities<br />

and surrounding issues<br />

including untreated tooth<br />

decay and throat cancer.<br />

Only two surf tour operators service this area at the<br />

moment -The perfect Wave and World Surfaris.<br />

The experience cost about $2500 for a ten-day adventure<br />

from Brissy. All Incusive. Well, there is nothing to buy<br />

as shops are in short supply.<br />

FISHING<br />

Take a rod. Fishing from the rocks is hard work but if oyu<br />

can access a boat your are sure to catch plenty.<br />

BEER<br />

Buy your beer at Kavieng before you head south because<br />

it becomes a valued commodity in short supply after a<br />

good day of activity.<br />

SCHOOL<br />

The schools are underfunded and unfortunately<br />

education is a luxury so take some supplies and drop<br />

them in at any of the schools you come across in your<br />

travels.<br />

HANG OUT!<br />

This is paradise and a week seems like a long time.<br />

Giddy Up!<br />

80 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


FLIGHTS<br />

Available from Brisbane and Sydney through Air Niugini,<br />

transferring over to domestic at Port Moresby through to Kavieng<br />

Airport. Six hours for the first haul, three for the second. Total<br />

ravel time depends on the connecting flight.<br />

PASSPORT<br />

A visa is required and needs to be arranged through the PNG<br />

embassy in Australia and costs about $100. Organise well before<br />

travel time.<br />

HEALTH<br />

Malaria tablets and a TB shot are generally recomeneded.<br />

Expect about $100 of medical expenses before you go. A good<br />

first aid kit is also a must.<br />

BAGGAGE<br />

Pack light as PNG is in the tropics, so no jumpers are required.<br />

Boardies, thongs and tees! <strong>May</strong>be something to keep the rain<br />

off. Air Niugini is board friendly (including Mals) so at the time<br />

of travel no sneaky charges were applied. Check with the Airline<br />

just to be sure. Booties are essential, so don’t go without them.<br />

OTHER LINKS FOR RESEARCHING YOUR TRIP<br />

Surfing Association of Papua New Guinea<br />

www.surfingpapuanewguinea.org.pg<br />

Papua New Guinea Tourism<br />

www.pngtourism.org.pg<br />

World Surfaris<br />

www.worldsurfaris.com<br />

The Perfect Wace Surf Travel<br />

www.the perfectwave.com.au<br />

Air Nuigini<br />

www.airniugini.com.pg<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

81


Andy Abel at Tupira<br />

CROWD CONTROL<br />

HOW PNG IS PROTECTING ITS CULTURE, IN AND OUT OF THE SURF WORDS: DAVE SWAN<br />

ANDY ABEL wears many hats<br />

and is a more than capable<br />

surfer. He is the President of<br />

the Surfing Association Papua<br />

New Guinea Inc. (SAPNG)<br />

and represents SAPNG as a<br />

board member of the PNG<br />

Tourism Promotion Authority.<br />

He is Vice President of the<br />

PNG National Museum &<br />

Art Gallery, President of<br />

the PNG Tourism Industry<br />

Association and member<br />

of the International Surfing<br />

Association (ISA) New Surfing<br />

Nations Committee. He<br />

also recently took out both<br />

the master shortboard and<br />

longboard titles at the SAPNG<br />

<strong>2011</strong> National Surfing Titles<br />

at Tupira Surf Club in the<br />

Madang Province. Yes, he’s a<br />

busy man.<br />

For a boy from Milne Bay<br />

Province, a small island<br />

blessed with all things<br />

paradise, it was only natural<br />

Andy Abel would gravitate<br />

towards surfing and follow in<br />

his ancestors’ footsteps.<br />

We talk with one of surfing’s<br />

true gentlemen about his<br />

beloved country and Papua<br />

New Guinea’s unique<br />

approach to surf tourism that<br />

is paving the way for others<br />

to follow.<br />

What can surfers visiting<br />

your country for the first<br />

time expect in terms of<br />

their surfing experience?<br />

“A blend of Melanesian<br />

friendly hospitality, traditional<br />

culture, uncrowded pristine<br />

waves and the best seafood<br />

right off the reef and straight<br />

onto your dining table... and<br />

the freshest, fresh fruit.”<br />

You have been quoted<br />

as saying you want to<br />

develop surfing in PNG<br />

but want to encourage its<br />

growth at a rural level.<br />

Could you explain this in<br />

more detail?<br />

“Basically, what I am saying<br />

is, as a proud local and<br />

surfer, we want to create a<br />

conducive environment for<br />

commercial common sense<br />

to prevail without damaging<br />

the environment. We want to<br />

preserve the traditional surf<br />

resource custodians way of<br />

life - their values and culture,<br />

our country’s geographic<br />

beauty, pristine beaches,<br />

water falls...We want to<br />

create an equitable and<br />

sustainable environment for<br />

current and future generations<br />

to enjoy and prosper from.<br />

“It is all about creating a<br />

balance so that we do not<br />

have overcrowding issues so<br />

as to attract sustained repeat<br />

business.<br />

“We want to avoid the traps<br />

of mass tourism like in Bali<br />

where there is a negative<br />

side to it, such as prostitution,<br />

STDs and AIDS, unwanted<br />

pregnancies and babies born<br />

with no fathers.<br />

“As a responsible surfer and<br />

leader in my country that has<br />

committed 25 years to the<br />

birth of modern surfing and<br />

surf tourism in PNG, the buck<br />

essentially stops with me as<br />

President with my 13-man<br />

Board of Directors.<br />

“As responsible surfers,<br />

we must be mindful of the<br />

pitfalls that other developed<br />

and developing nations have<br />

endured.<br />

“Many have the cart before<br />

the horse and are now<br />

wanting to adopt our SAPNG<br />

model. But how do you turn<br />

things around 180° and put<br />

the horse before the cart?<br />

“The countries faced with<br />

these scenarios, many cases<br />

of which are irreversible, can<br />

be attributed to individuals<br />

or groups in the early stages<br />

being driven by greed and<br />

forgetting common sense and<br />

respecting the most important<br />

people in the tourism<br />

equation - the traditional<br />

resource custodians.<br />

“As a local surfer I have<br />

had the fortune of growing<br />

up as a mixed breed PNG/<br />

English background, living and<br />

learning both the white man’s<br />

way of doing things and the<br />

PNG way. I have been able<br />

to blend the two worlds to<br />

create a win-win for all.<br />

Tell us about the interest<br />

from other countries who<br />

are keen to learn more<br />

about your approach to<br />

surf tourism.<br />

“Countries like Fiji, the<br />

Mentawais, the Solomon<br />

Islands and Vanuatu have<br />

always aspired to create a<br />

model that empowers their<br />

people but they did not know<br />

how to go about it.<br />

“I was lucky enough to start<br />

out at 19 years of age with<br />

a clean slate. I had no model<br />

or template to follow except<br />

for using my own personal<br />

ingenuity and instinct of what<br />

I thought was best as a surfer<br />

and as a Papua New Guinean<br />

citizen.<br />

“I must say that I owe much<br />

to my upbringing coming from<br />

a pioneering family and this<br />

I believe gave me the vision<br />

and inspiration to emulate<br />

my late father and pioneering<br />

statesman, Sir Cecil Abel<br />

KBE OBE.<br />

“This coupled with<br />

the foundations of my<br />

grandfather, Reverend Charles<br />

Abel, who was a pioneer as a<br />

missionary. His work serving<br />

the people and our nation<br />

took precedence in his life.<br />

“This same philosophy is also<br />

mine, but I have pursued my<br />

passion for surfing to create<br />

this legacy as my way as a<br />

surfer and as a Papua New<br />

Guinean.<br />

Do you describe yourself<br />

as a shortboarder,<br />

longboarder or<br />

smorgasboarder?<br />

“I ride both as PNG has<br />

variable waves on reefs and<br />

of course, I’m preparing for<br />

retirement so I can still be<br />

charging at 90 when my son<br />

will be carrying on my work...<br />

I hope!”<br />

82 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


DID YOU KNOW?<br />

PNG has a set surf quota system,<br />

which is used throughout<br />

the country. The system was<br />

formulated by Andy Abel<br />

and SAPNG. It divides up the<br />

country into surf areas each<br />

with their own respective surf<br />

management plans to limit surfer<br />

numbers and guarantee guests<br />

uncrowded waves.<br />

Every travelling surfer pays a<br />

levy that goes back into the<br />

local community for improving<br />

education and health services.<br />

Money is also set aside for<br />

other community based projects,<br />

including nurturing youth surfing<br />

talent with a select few locals<br />

selected to represent PNG in<br />

international surfing events such<br />

as the Oceanic games and ISA<br />

world surfing games.<br />

Nick and Shaun Keane<br />

“I GO BACK TO PNG EVERY<br />

YEAR TO ENJOY THE SIMPLE<br />

THINGS IN LIFE AND GET BACK<br />

TO GRASS ROOTS SURFING.”<br />

SHAUN LEVINGS - WORLD SURFARIS<br />

PNG PEOPLE &<br />

PERSONALITIES<br />

WORDS: SHAUN LEVINGS<br />

NICK & SHAUN KEANE<br />

Aussie brothers, Nick and Shaun<br />

kicked off Nusa Island Retreat in<br />

Kavieng in 1997. Having started with<br />

only a couple of huts, they now run one<br />

of the most successful surf camps in<br />

the world.<br />

SHANE & ANNETTE CLARKE<br />

Ex-Hawaiian married to local girl with<br />

an amazing Cocoa plantation property<br />

on the east coast of New Ireland now<br />

called Rubio Plantation Retreat. This<br />

encompasses the mountain range all<br />

the way to the sea with surf directly<br />

out front.<br />

“PNG MAY HAVE BEEN ON<br />

SURFER’S HIT LISTS FOR A<br />

WHILE NOW BUT IT IS STILL<br />

VERY MUCH A LAST FRONTIER<br />

SURF DESTINATION THAT<br />

HAS SOME OF THE BEST SURF<br />

OPERATORS IN THE WORLD<br />

DOING WHAT THEY LOVE<br />

BEST, IN A PLACE THAT IS<br />

EASY TO FALL IN LOVE WITH.”<br />

JAMIE GRAY - THE PERFECT WAVE<br />

Dani Smith Shane Clarke<br />

ADAM & DANI SMITH<br />

Ex-Melbournians who sold up and left<br />

the rat race, bought a catamaran and<br />

run small group charters to remote<br />

New Hanover as well as New Ireland.<br />

Dani is the only known female surf<br />

charter skipper in the surf tourism<br />

industry and could sail rings around<br />

most blokes.<br />

ANDY & JUDE RIGBY<br />

Andy is the modern day Alby Mangels<br />

with his good wife Jude who is a<br />

gourmet cook. They operate the<br />

PNG Explorer with exploration at the<br />

forefront of their agenda. Finding<br />

new waves in remote regions with<br />

unbridled enthusiasm for adventure is<br />

their thing.<br />

Louis Harris (left) compares fish with<br />

Jamie Gray of The Perfect Wave Surf Travel<br />

Adam Smith<br />

Justice Kirriwom<br />

JUSTICE NICHOLAS KIRRIWOM<br />

Patron of Tupira Surf Club and now<br />

a Supreme Court Judge. Tupira Surf<br />

Club has given the locals a new lease<br />

on life with the SAPNG national titles<br />

being held at Tupira in March this year.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

83


PERFECT<br />

PNG<br />

We know & love PNG<br />

After 15 years of commercial surf travel, PNG has proven itself<br />

to be a truly professional destination with quality operators<br />

delivering time after time. But with new regions and areas only<br />

now being discovered and surfed, the opportunity still awaits<br />

for any surfer with discovery in their mind.<br />

with SAPNG surf quota system<br />

· Land Camps – Nusa Island Retreat, Rubio<br />

Plantation Retreat & NEW Vanimo Surf Camp<br />

· Guaranteed un-crowded waves<br />

· Surf Charters – PNG Explorer & Tiki Tu<br />

· Wholesale airfares with Air Niugini<br />

<strong>2011</strong> / 2012 Season is filling fast! SO DON”T MISS OUT!<br />

Call 1300 00 WAVE to check on the spot availability<br />

www.theperfectwave.com.au<br />

84 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


THE HULL IN PICTURES<br />

Everyone is talking about them<br />

but what the hell are they? To be<br />

honest, until recently I didn’t have<br />

the slightest idea myself but here is<br />

my best explanation, any hullophiles<br />

can feel free to correct me.<br />

WHAT THE HULL?<br />

Top: Single fin hull setup<br />

Right: a hull in the making<br />

WITH KEN REIMERS<br />

OF ZAK SURFBOARDS<br />

The displacement hulls that I am currently making are<br />

awesome fun to shape and ride and have increased my<br />

knowledge of curve dynamics.<br />

To those who are not sure of what a displacement hull<br />

looks like, here’s a brief introduction.<br />

The look of the hull is quite unique, the rolled bottom<br />

contour is probably the most radical part compared to a<br />

normal board. Starting from the tip of the nose, the roll<br />

across the bottom of the board increases as it heads<br />

to about a third down the board where it apexes to its<br />

maximum roll, from there it continues to abate until about<br />

the last third of the bottom where it ends up being flat. The<br />

original concept was borrowed from the boating sector, the<br />

roll up front to break the water and the flat at the back to<br />

keep it planning once it reached speed.<br />

The rails are 50/50 style throughout the roll and come back<br />

down to a knife rail in the tail area for bite.<br />

The foils of the boards are another noticeable factor, with<br />

a very flat rocker for trim speed, extra thickness to handle<br />

the bottom roll and 50/50 rail, plus the thinning of the nose<br />

and tail areas creates what was called an S-deck back in<br />

the early days. If you look down the deck of the board from<br />

the tail end, you will see the S-deck controlling the volume<br />

and balance of the foil.<br />

The outlines are wider overall because the bottom roll<br />

makes the board surf narrower.<br />

So, this is the basic form of a displacement hull but as<br />

with any board design, there is a multitude of design<br />

options.<br />

When designing these hulls I was aiming to fill a place in<br />

my quiver that would allow me to drop down from my 9’0”<br />

mal without losing the trim feel that a mal gives, while<br />

creating more manoeuvrability for forgiveness in sucky<br />

waves.<br />

I found the fins and placement to be an important factor<br />

affecting performance. Having a long fin box in the board<br />

helps you find the right position for you personally. As<br />

far as single fins go, I really like the 9” flex fins similar<br />

to George Greenough’s early designs. It’s a great feeling<br />

when you load up the fin on a bottom turn and it drives you<br />

forward. The side plugs are there for two reasons, firstly as<br />

a small side bite fin - because the tail area is flat and a bit<br />

wider than normal, the side bites can help it hold on larger<br />

or suckier waves, plus they can add a little more drive.<br />

Secondly, the plugs are in the right spot if you want to try<br />

the board as a twin fin, removing the single. It changes the<br />

dynamics of the board again and I probably ride this setup<br />

more than a single because I like the feel, but I was into<br />

twins more than singles in the early days. The MR FCS.<br />

twin fins will work fine if you want to try it like this.<br />

After riding these boards for a couple of years now I have<br />

grown to love the feel that this style of board gives and<br />

D-Hulls will always be apart of my quiver.<br />

Ken Reimers shapes displacement hulls for Zak Surfboards<br />

in Thornbury, Victoria. For more info, check out the website:<br />

zaksurfboards.com<br />

A classic hull style surfboard<br />

contains a number of design<br />

elements all working together in<br />

unison, as explained in detail by Ken<br />

Reimers to the left:<br />

(please note the drawing has<br />

been exaggerated to assist<br />

understanding)<br />

THE BOTTOM of the board is<br />

basically like a boat. It is not flat<br />

as with a modern day performance<br />

shortboard or longboard. It has<br />

curvature.<br />

DISPLACEMENT is the volume of<br />

water the ‘hull’ shoves aside.<br />

THE NOSE is often wider and<br />

sometimes quite rounded.<br />

THE RAILS are very ‘blady’ and often<br />

feature razor sharp 50/50 rails. The<br />

‘razor’ edge or apex being at the<br />

centre of the rail.<br />

THE S-DECK The nose has a slight<br />

kick and is quite thin. The board<br />

beefs up under your chest right<br />

through to just in front of where you<br />

would traditionally place your back<br />

foot. Then its thin again at the tail.<br />

INSIDE...<br />

Classic Malibu<br />

MT-3 - PXX<br />

INSIDE THE WETSUIT P104<br />

SHAPING FOR WHEEL P117<br />

BRAND NEW BOARDS P94<br />

All the latest designs and ideas from shapers along the coast. Check out some<br />

great new shapes and designs from our talented local surfboard makers.<br />

All the elements are blended<br />

together to provide the surfer with<br />

a board that trims well and makes<br />

long arcing turns using the rail as<br />

much as the fin. You really draw out<br />

your turns and then glide like in a<br />

late sixties surf movie.<br />

You do not pivot these boards<br />

off the tail, manoeuvring them at<br />

will, but rather ride them in a very<br />

forward trim riding style. They are<br />

great for long point waves. Riders<br />

often make mention of how the<br />

boards ‘hold’ or ‘fit’ into the wave as<br />

if you are connected to it rather than<br />

skimming across it.<br />

85


IVERSE<br />

“What has always<br />

captivated me is<br />

downtown Tokyo,<br />

the neon lights<br />

and flashing<br />

billboards, that<br />

total visual<br />

overload.”<br />

DAVE VERRALl, DIVERSE SURF<br />

86 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


the<br />

candy<br />

man<br />

GEAR: SHAPER<br />

WITH SO MANY<br />

BOARDS, COLOURS AND<br />

DESIGNS TO CHOOSE<br />

FROM, WALKING INTO<br />

DIVERSE SURF AT<br />

TUGUN FOR THE FIRST<br />

TIME IS LIKE WALKING<br />

INTO A CANDY STORE<br />

But it’s not just the number of boards, but the sheer variety that hits you.<br />

Longboards, shortboards, retro fish, eggs, hybrids, mini-Simmons, chambered<br />

wood boards and even finless creations... and some are in resin tints or have<br />

unique ‘one-of’ decals. The diverse range of boards in just one surf store<br />

(pardon the pun) is staggering.<br />

If there is one shaper that truly typifies the spirit of a smorgasboarder, one<br />

that epitomises what our mag is all about, it’s Dave Verrall - or Feral Dave as<br />

he’s otherwise known. We paid the Candy Man a visit to see what makes him<br />

tick. WORDS: DAVE SWAN PHOTOS: MARK CHAPMAN<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

87


the<br />

candy<br />

man<br />

Variety is the spice of life they say.<br />

That rule certainly applies as far<br />

as our perspective on surfing is<br />

concerned - experiment, experience<br />

and master different watercraft.<br />

Don’t slip into the mundane routine<br />

of riding one board and one board<br />

only. Build your quiver with boards<br />

of every shape and colour under the<br />

sun. In doing so, you might as well<br />

pay Diverse Surf a visit, they have it<br />

all under one roof. But how did Dave<br />

become so diverse?<br />

“I guess it is an ingrained part of<br />

my personality, my love of various<br />

watercraft. I am probably suffering<br />

from attention deficit disorder where<br />

I can’t stick with one shape for too<br />

long. I always want to try something<br />

else and see what this shape or this<br />

construction method can do. I also<br />

like boards to be unique – different<br />

colours, different decals.<br />

“What has always captivated me is<br />

downtown Tokyo, the neon lights and<br />

flashing billboards, that total visual<br />

overload. In some small way, that is<br />

the feeling we have tried to recreate<br />

when you walk in here.”<br />

But what of Dave’s customers, do<br />

they share his same philosophy on<br />

surfing all types of boards?<br />

“Most of my customers have a pretty<br />

expansive quiver of all kinds of<br />

boards. I guess they are confident in<br />

the fact that whatever I have in store<br />

works, because it’s what I do.<br />

“If you went to a shaper who only<br />

focused on 6ft white shortboards and<br />

asked him to make you a mini-Simmons<br />

or a quad, you are probably going to be<br />

throwing him a real curve ball.<br />

“There is a big movement of people<br />

out there who don’t go for the<br />

mainstream big brands. People who<br />

don’t pigeon hole themselves as a<br />

shortboarder or a longboarder, people<br />

who just love surfing. “<br />

Developing a<br />

sweet tooth<br />

Born in Alice Springs (his parents<br />

were travelling around Australia at<br />

the time), Dave spent most of his first<br />

15 years growing up on a farm near<br />

the beach in the Yorke Peninsula in<br />

South Australia.<br />

“My father was a pretty creative<br />

inventor and had a lot of influence<br />

on me. He made things like pedal<br />

powered airplanes from plywood,<br />

houseboats from recycled oil drums<br />

and timber from the rubbish dump.”<br />

Dave ‘found’ his first board at 10<br />

years of age in the very same place.<br />

“My cousin and I pulled the door skin<br />

of a kero fridge and used the foam to<br />

make a board. We surfed it unglassed<br />

until we had no nipples left! The<br />

next one was a little more upmarket<br />

and also came from the dump. It<br />

was a little red single fin with the fin<br />

missing. I made a fin from plywood<br />

at school with the help of my teacher<br />

Paul Balcerek, who was a state<br />

titleist in south Oz at the time.”<br />

Moving to Queensland at 15 got<br />

Dave closer to warm water but he<br />

initially became more involved with<br />

motocross and enduro racing. Over<br />

the ensuing years he finished a<br />

mechanics apprenticeship and worked<br />

as a photographer for a studio whilst<br />

freelancing as a senior photographer<br />

for a dirt bike magazine.<br />

It was a camping trip to Flat Rock near<br />

Ballina that Dave found surfing again.<br />

He was about 20 years of age.<br />

“It didn’t take me long to give up<br />

everything else and spend most of<br />

my time surfing. I moved to Duranbah<br />

and worked or used the dole to get<br />

enough to live and surf all the time!<br />

I became good friends with Greg<br />

Kerr (father of Josh Kerr on the WCT)<br />

and thru conversations with him and<br />

my next-door neighbour, who was<br />

sanding at a local surfboard factory,<br />

88 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


“Most of my customers have a pretty<br />

expansive quiver of all kinds of boards.”<br />

I landed some part time work putting<br />

in leggy plugs. It didn’t take long to<br />

get more work there making fins and<br />

so forth.”<br />

Dave found working there really<br />

inspired him and opened up his<br />

‘creative genes’. He liked the<br />

challenge that no two boards were<br />

the same and the fact that every little<br />

thing could make amazing differences<br />

to how a surfboard performed.<br />

He was surrounded by legends like<br />

Billy Grant, Zappa, Neal Purchase Snr,<br />

Jim Banks and Thornton Fallander.<br />

They all possessed an immense<br />

amount of knowledge from which<br />

Dave could learn from. What they<br />

didn’t tell him, Dave picked up by<br />

watching and listening.<br />

“One of my best teachers was ex<br />

English pro champion Martin Wright.<br />

Martin lent me his planer and templates<br />

and I started hacking into blanks...<br />

“The first board I made was a 7’0”<br />

egg style board with a resin marble<br />

tint! One of our glassing customers<br />

was Nev Hyman and he sold me a<br />

few rejected profiles and I finished<br />

them off. Those blanks taught me a<br />

few things. One, was always follow<br />

your own ideas and go down your<br />

own path. The other thing I learnt was<br />

reject blanks are soft and rejected for<br />

a reason.”<br />

From that point on Dave worked hard<br />

on learning everything he could about<br />

making quality boards. He had a<br />

burning desire to know how and why<br />

everything worked and developed<br />

an even stronger passion to make it<br />

better than the status quo.<br />

“I shaped myself a new board every<br />

two weeks for the first year, spending<br />

all my pay on glassing materials and<br />

blanks. A travelling Hawaiian surfer<br />

came in to do some part time work<br />

at the factory, we made friends and<br />

I made him a board to try, which he<br />

loved. He ended up on a photo shoot<br />

with Munga Barry on Stradbroke<br />

Island. I ended up with a cover shot in<br />

Waverider magazine. Inspired by this<br />

and the amount of orders I received,<br />

I started to sell to a couple of the<br />

shops. It didn’t take too long to get<br />

enough orders to give up working in<br />

the big production glassing company<br />

and go out on my own.”<br />

The start of an<br />

international<br />

following<br />

Dave started travelling to Bali for a<br />

few months every year to surf. Each<br />

time he would take several boards<br />

with him to learn how they worked<br />

in those kinds of conditions. He used<br />

to sell them all to Japanese surfers,<br />

each time completely paying for his<br />

trip before coming home.<br />

Dave still enjoys a strong following in<br />

Bali to this day. His Japanese market<br />

has also expanded with visitors to his<br />

Gold Coast store prompting him to<br />

venture to the Land of the Rising Sun<br />

on a regular basis.<br />

“I have been back and forwards to<br />

Japan for more than 15 years. At<br />

present though, I am pretty concerned<br />

about the whole country.”<br />

With close family ties to Japan<br />

(Dave’s wife Tae is Japanese) his<br />

level of concern is understandable.<br />

Japan also makes up a significant<br />

part of his export market.<br />

“From all reports it appears surfers<br />

are copping a pretty hard time, being<br />

persecuted in the media for going out<br />

and having a good time when the rest<br />

of the country is struggling to come to<br />

grips with the catastrophes that have<br />

unfolded. Surfing is perceived as drug<br />

laden counter culture, much the same<br />

as how it was here in Australia in the<br />

seventies.“<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

89


Diverse’s Isaac Paddon (second<br />

from left) spending time in Japan<br />

with Dave. Photo: Supplied<br />

Does your shaper<br />

surf? Dave does.<br />

Photo: Supplied<br />

the<br />

candy<br />

man<br />

GEAR: SHAPER<br />

Candy cravings<br />

We know of Dave’s love for an<br />

expansive quiver but what is it that<br />

drives him.<br />

“I love making surfboards. I’m<br />

obsessed with making them better.<br />

I froth off science and technology.<br />

I scour the internet for any new<br />

advances in all kinds of fields. From<br />

cold spraying, powder coating and<br />

resin infusion, I want to find the next<br />

better way to make a board stronger,<br />

lighter and outperform anything we<br />

have ever made.”<br />

Trick or treat<br />

Dave Verrall is an affable kind of bloke<br />

but he’s no marshmallow when it<br />

comes to expressing his bugbear with<br />

the surf industry today.<br />

“What drives me is what I see<br />

everyday in my shop. I see customers<br />

bring in boards to be repaired that<br />

have been made here on the Gold<br />

Coast and around the world. I am<br />

appalled at the quality of most of<br />

them. The major brands are the worst.<br />

The foam is so over shaped there is<br />

no dent resistance. The decks look like<br />

golf balls. The fin systems are glued<br />

in with the most incompatible resins,<br />

causing fin plugs to break out left, right<br />

and centre.<br />

“Worst still, one of the newer trends<br />

of wood or carbon around the rails<br />

creates more landfill. What happens<br />

when you ding your rail? The stringers<br />

are cut. Bye, bye strength. There’s no<br />

way to fix that board properly. None<br />

of those brands stand behind their<br />

product with any kind of guarantee!<br />

I don’t know of any other sporting<br />

product in the world that has such poor<br />

back up and service as that.”<br />

Dave’s also not<br />

a fan of cheap<br />

imports.<br />

“I see people riding all kinds of cheap<br />

imported boards that are as shiny<br />

as a wet ladybird. The graphics are<br />

as generic as the shelves in a Coles<br />

supermarket. They last the newbie<br />

for most of his or her surfing career<br />

because they only spend an hour in the<br />

water once a fortnight. And because of<br />

the board, they never actually get good<br />

enough for them to improve to the<br />

stage of desiring a better board. ‘That<br />

90 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


surfing is sure hard, let’s try stand up<br />

paddling next honey...’”<br />

But the quality of the make is not<br />

the only thing that gets Dave’s goat,<br />

in his mind, the narrow-minded<br />

focus of most on just performance<br />

shortboards is limiting.<br />

“Thanks to the fish fashion of the<br />

last few years at least some people<br />

are riding the right volume. But<br />

the majority of mainstream surfing<br />

brands and marketing is centered<br />

on the thruster and it’s low volume<br />

narrowband performance boards.<br />

When are they going to wake up<br />

that 90% of the world go surfing for<br />

fun? They need floatation and ease<br />

of use. <strong>May</strong>be it’s a conspiracy so<br />

only the good surfers can get waves<br />

at the best spots… then again if<br />

everyone out there rode the right<br />

board I might never catch a wave.<br />

<strong>May</strong>be all those set waves would<br />

have lots of people riding on them<br />

like the pictures we see of the old<br />

days when 15 guys are on one wave<br />

riding their malibus towards the<br />

shore.”<br />

Dave still has a passion for<br />

performance surfboards though, he<br />

has simply incorporated them into<br />

his diverse range.<br />

Performance<br />

orientated<br />

design and new<br />

technologies<br />

“Most people know I shape a variety<br />

of boards from logs through to fishes<br />

and fun boards but possibly not<br />

the full extent of my venture into<br />

performance shortboards.<br />

“The thing is, I have always shaped<br />

performance shortboards but I found<br />

the majority of everyday surfers<br />

weren’t interested in them because<br />

it’s not what they ride. Hence I<br />

focused on fish and fun boards. This<br />

gave me joy because it got everyone<br />

enjoying their surfing again. In my<br />

heart though, I still want surfers to<br />

get the most out of their surfing.<br />

“Now that I have been able to<br />

develop a technology such as the<br />

Dyncore, where I can give highly<br />

skilled and elite level surfers<br />

something that is super light, strong<br />

and high-performance orientated,<br />

and it will last, I want to pursue that<br />

market. “<br />

Hard coated<br />

candy<br />

Jawbreakers<br />

“With quality always being<br />

important to my customers, it<br />

drove me to make tougher, stronger<br />

boards.<br />

“My inventive nature lead me to<br />

create an additive we add in the<br />

resin to toughen the boards. Small<br />

differences in attention to detail<br />

make a large impact on durability<br />

and quality.<br />

“Dabbling in many forms of board<br />

construction methods and materials<br />

teaches us so much about our<br />

technical needs in a board too. I<br />

am constantly putting my efforts<br />

into trying things like resin infusion,<br />

multiple core boards (sandwich<br />

construction) and wooden board<br />

building methods. Just looking for<br />

those differences teaches me how I<br />

can make better boards with a lesser<br />

environmental footprint.”<br />

This experimentation lead to the<br />

discovery that is Dynocore. Dave<br />

goes on to explain what his new<br />

approach to board building is all<br />

about.<br />

“The glass that we use is a new<br />

technology. A material called<br />

Innegra that, until recently could<br />

not be used effectively. It is used<br />

in V8 super cars and formula one<br />

around the world because when it<br />

hits something it absorbs the impact<br />

rather than shattering and exploding<br />

like carbon fibre does.<br />

“It is quite hard to work with under<br />

normal surfboard glassing standards.<br />

That’s why I formulated my own<br />

process to go with it. It is durable<br />

but also has three times the flex of<br />

normal fiberglass. There are three<br />

different types of fibre we use on the<br />

board as well as carbon and basalt<br />

patches that further strengthen the<br />

board.<br />

The foam used is an EPS foam but<br />

as Dave explains there are different<br />

grades of EPS.<br />

“The really open grade which is<br />

quite cheap to produce is used in<br />

insulation. The next grade they use,<br />

which is reasonably waterproof, is<br />

used in paper cups and iceboxes.<br />

Then there is what we have, that is<br />

purpose built for surfboards. Within<br />

that style of foam, I can choose from<br />

three different grades from light<br />

to heavy to tune the board for its<br />

performance.<br />

“The fact is, we are still developing<br />

this technology and it just keeps<br />

getting better and better.”<br />

With regards to how this technology<br />

performs, Dave puts it in terms<br />

of his new range of Dynocore<br />

performance shortboards.<br />

“It’s a WCT performance surfer’s<br />

board. It has the super light feel but<br />

will last for ages. A board you can<br />

take on a surf trip overseas and be<br />

confident it is not going to break in<br />

the first week. Something you can<br />

surf everywhere for a long time and<br />

it still goes great. You may get sick<br />

of it in 6 months and want to trade it<br />

in for something else and you know<br />

what, because of how it is made, it<br />

is still a good board and worth a lot<br />

of money.”<br />

Regard for the<br />

environment<br />

It is the pursuit of better boards and<br />

stronger boards that has stoked<br />

Dave’s environmental consciousness.<br />

“The way we go about our surfboard<br />

building process is what we find to<br />

be the most simple and effective<br />

way without enforcing our views<br />

and beliefs. We start from eco<br />

friendly printing inks for our board<br />

art instead of nasty paint sprays and<br />

we buy stronger more durable raw<br />

materials.<br />

“That said, we still use poisons and<br />

toxic chemicals in manufacturing as<br />

we are without effective options.<br />

As yet, there are currently no better<br />

performing alternatives. We are<br />

willing to try them if someone can<br />

show us a better way.”<br />

With that in mind, Dave set about<br />

looking towards how he could<br />

reduce the amount of waste when<br />

crafting a surfboard.<br />

“Did you realise when everyone<br />

makes a surfboard that 40% of<br />

the raw materials purchased to<br />

produce your awesome board is<br />

wasted? Starting with the foam<br />

removed from the blank thru to the<br />

resin that drips of the glass to the<br />

dust sanded of the finish coat, it all<br />

ends up in the appropriate waste<br />

facilities. At Diverse we do our best<br />

to keep emissions and dust down to<br />

a minimum.<br />

“But everyday we see boards made<br />

locally and all over the world that<br />

are a few weeks old, they look<br />

pockmarked like old golf balls.<br />

DAVE ON Fins<br />

“One of my first jobs in the factory<br />

was making fins, so I have always<br />

been kind of into them. Removable<br />

fins took away a lot of the<br />

knowledge people need to know<br />

about fins. I guess back then the<br />

shaper had to do all the testing and<br />

know what fins would intricately<br />

match the shape of the board.”<br />

“Having made fins it’s nice to be able<br />

to recommend the appropriate fins to<br />

match a board without the confines of<br />

political brand association.”<br />

Diverse make their own range<br />

of fins to suit each board,<br />

including specifically<br />

made blades for<br />

their Dynocore<br />

range.<br />

DYNOCORE...<br />

INDESTRUCTIBLE?<br />

VERY CLOSE.<br />

HAMMER-PROOF STRENGTH.<br />

HOW OFTEN DOES A SHAPER<br />

ASK YOU TO BASH a BOARD?<br />

91


the<br />

candy<br />

man<br />

SELECT BOARDS FROM THE<br />

DIVERSE SURF QUIVER<br />

HULL<br />

BROAD<br />

BEAN<br />

Wave<br />

dominator<br />

DS<br />

SPRINT<br />

KARVSTIx<br />

FEATURING ART<br />

BY DAVE VERRAL<br />

DYNOCORE<br />

SONIC PRO<br />

TWIN<br />

KEEL<br />

FISH<br />

HPI<br />

LONGBOARD<br />

DP PIG<br />

Minisimmons<br />

CHAMBERED<br />

TIMBER<br />

QUAD FISH<br />

SG<br />

CRUISER<br />

92 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


Photo: Supplied<br />

Candy<br />

wrappers<br />

DAVE TALKS ABOUT THE DIVERSE RANGE OF OPTIONS FOR<br />

BEAUTIFYING YOUR BRAND NEW BOARD<br />

“Aside from our Dynocore range - which involves a<br />

competely different process - what we prefer to do<br />

as a standard is glass your board a little heavier (ie<br />

stronger), shape the board from better grade foam,<br />

use tougher fibreglass, laminate it with strong<br />

resins and let it cure for several weeks, you will<br />

now have a board that lasts for several years. We<br />

even guarantee to give you 50% trade in every 12<br />

months to back the quality and life of the board.<br />

Your old one gets sold on to the next person who<br />

can get loads of satisfaction from a great durable<br />

product! That is responsible manufacturing.<br />

“This is how we do our bit for the environment.<br />

If you were to have a new board every 3 months<br />

because your old one is trashed, think about how<br />

much waste and damage that does to our fragile<br />

ecosystem. What better way to do your bit and<br />

help the environment by having longer lasting,<br />

more durable boards that are worth something to<br />

someone else when you are finished with it?<br />

“If this is not good enough for you... pony up and<br />

pay me to make you a beautiful wooden board<br />

made from plantation grown Paulownia here<br />

in Australia. You will have it to pass on to your<br />

grandchildren.<br />

“The environment we surf in has always been a<br />

beautiful place. Growing up I learnt to look after<br />

the earth as best as I could little by little. As one<br />

company we cannot change the surfing world’s<br />

trends and general misuse of the environment.<br />

I find the best we can do is leave the smallest<br />

footprint of effect on our past.”<br />

Dave has been recently working on a project with<br />

the CSIRO to create and analyse ways to change our<br />

archaic board making processes to fresh, new ecofriendly<br />

methods.<br />

“Dynocore has morphed out of this desire<br />

to make the best board around. Advances in<br />

surfboards, EPS and epoxy resins along with my<br />

proprietry semi-automatic glassing process will<br />

make your best board yet.<br />

“One thing my dad always taught me was, ‘Good<br />

better best, never let it rest, until your good is<br />

better and your better is best!’”<br />

Photo: Supplied<br />

“Making 20 white boards a week<br />

gets pretty boring for a creative like<br />

me. I learned how to use photoshop<br />

to design my logos and design my<br />

own adverts. This lead me to try<br />

and incorporate that style of art<br />

onto my boards.<br />

“I met a young guy who worked<br />

at a sign writers using a plotter/<br />

vinyl cutter and bingo my idea was<br />

a reality. I created the art on the<br />

computer, cut out stencils with<br />

the plotter and stuck them on the<br />

board, painting the colour in then<br />

removing the vinyl masking.<br />

“My unique style was born. I went<br />

crazy for a while doing all kinds<br />

of things no-one had ever painted<br />

on boards before. This created a<br />

real niche brand approach for our<br />

products.”<br />

It didn’t stop there. Around 10 years<br />

ago Dave started making high-end<br />

graphic art boards and worked with<br />

Troy Bremner at TBD to create full<br />

colour inserts that came out of a<br />

$100,000 large format printer.<br />

“Working with an American graphic<br />

company, we had boards with<br />

inlays printed on them hanging in<br />

galleries in France for $3000. These<br />

days the printers are a little more<br />

affordable and Diverse have our<br />

own printing machine pumping out<br />

unique and personal graphics for<br />

boards everyday.”<br />

Dave has over 700+ examples of<br />

his own designs on the Diverse<br />

website and pays royalties to<br />

artists who want to display a<br />

gallery of work on there.<br />

Better still, if you are creative, you<br />

can even personalise your own<br />

surfboard by designing your own<br />

board decal.<br />

“With our innovative new process<br />

available, if you can create it on<br />

a computer, we can apply it to a<br />

board. Any static graphic that is.<br />

We can’t do not video boards..<br />

yet!”<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

93


Vintage Log<br />

by Jye Byrnes The Cigar<br />

Shaper: Jye Byrnes<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’6” x 23 1 /8” x 3”<br />

Ideal conditions: 0-3 ft<br />

points or beach breaks.<br />

Ability level: Int to adv<br />

loggers looking to step<br />

back in time and style.<br />

Description: Traditional<br />

noseriding longboard with<br />

a few hidden features.<br />

Deep nose concave<br />

blended with a rolled<br />

bottom and 50/50 rails.<br />

Construction: Foam<br />

& Fibre range. Choose<br />

coloured foam insert,<br />

multiple red or whitewood<br />

stringers, tints and<br />

polishes for a unique and<br />

functioning art piece that<br />

look as good as it goes.<br />

Fins: One fin only for this<br />

beauty - set or box fin.<br />

Shaper comment: Tried<br />

and tested all over the<br />

east coast. Fuller outline<br />

in the last third increases<br />

tip time and the late flip<br />

in the tail allows the<br />

board to turn with style.<br />

by Zak Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Ken Reimers<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’6”x 22 ½” x 3”<br />

Conditions: Point breaks<br />

Suits: a mad logger<br />

Description: The 9’6 foot<br />

Cigar is a model that I have<br />

a lot of respect for, mainly<br />

for the guys who rode this<br />

style of beast in the 60’s in<br />

waves of consequence. A<br />

super flat rocker with 50-50<br />

rails, rolled vee, big tail fin<br />

and heavy glass job these<br />

things have momentum<br />

that is a challenge to<br />

master. Ride the glide<br />

Construction: 6oz bottom,<br />

12oz deck.<br />

Fins: 10” hatchet<br />

Shaper comment: Surf<br />

this board with love and it<br />

will give you twice back.<br />

SOD Model MK 2<br />

by Thomas<br />

Shaper: Thomas Bexon<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’2” x 22 ½”x 2 ½”<br />

16 ½” nose, 16 ½” tail<br />

Ability: Intermediate to<br />

experienced<br />

Suits: Around 60 - 65kg<br />

and on the shorter side.<br />

Description: Rolled<br />

bottom with slight narrow<br />

concave through the front<br />

half of the board. Very,<br />

very subtle step deck<br />

for increased bladiness<br />

and extra flex through<br />

the nose. Really rounded<br />

off square tail with deck<br />

concave for hold and<br />

stability on the nose.<br />

Construction: ½ inch<br />

cedar stringer, double 8oz<br />

deck, 4oz patches and full<br />

8oz bottom.<br />

Fins: Glassed on, big red<br />

racked pivot fin.<br />

Shaper comment: This<br />

board is not for kooks but<br />

if you can surf you won’t<br />

find a much better log.<br />

Stay tuned to my website<br />

for info on the new shed.<br />

Swine Flu<br />

by Black Apache Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Jesse Watson<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’6” x 23” x 3 1 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions: Up to<br />

head high sliders<br />

Suits: Hepcats to kooks,<br />

kicks flicks and hanging<br />

heels.<br />

Description: Traditional<br />

pig-inspired modern sled,<br />

but with modernised<br />

rockers and foils for the<br />

logger who wants to<br />

noseglide and whipturn<br />

like it aint no thang.<br />

Construction: 6/4oz deck<br />

+ 6/4oz bottom resin tints,<br />

60’s comp stripe and a full<br />

gloss and polish.<br />

Fins: Black Apache<br />

revised D-fin<br />

Shaper comment: This<br />

one is a modern sled<br />

for the discerning kook,<br />

traditional in looks - but a<br />

real hotrod under your feet.<br />

It’ll flash you a smile and<br />

then punch you in the face.<br />

Bobby Brown<br />

Stringerless<br />

Shaper: Floyd Smith<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’2” x its a secret<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

Sunday Best<br />

Suits: Someone with<br />

exquisite taste in boards<br />

Description: Shaped<br />

off Bobby’s last board<br />

from August 1967 by the<br />

legendary Floyd Smith -<br />

Bobby’s shaping mentor.<br />

Beautifully foiled rails and<br />

iconic nose concave.<br />

Construction: Stringerless<br />

foam wrapped in Volan<br />

glass (using some of the<br />

old school techniques<br />

passed on to us by Floyd)<br />

and a full polish.<br />

Fins: Glassed on upright<br />

paddle pop fin<br />

Shaper comment: This<br />

board is one of the last<br />

great longboards made<br />

in the 60’s before the<br />

shortboard revolution.<br />

Built with all round hotdogging<br />

in any size waves<br />

in mind.<br />

THE SURF FACTORY<br />

16 Maitland Rd Islington<br />

Newcastle N.S.W 2296<br />

Ph: 02 4969 5889<br />

Mob: 0409 227 407<br />

info@thesurfactory.com.au<br />

thesurffactory.com.au<br />

ZAK SURFBOARDS<br />

307 Victoria Road<br />

Thornbury VIC 3071<br />

Ph: 03 9416 7384<br />

Mobile: 0438 416 738<br />

zak@zaksurfboards.com<br />

zaksurfboards.com<br />

THOMAS SURFBOARDS<br />

PO Box 234<br />

Maroochydore Qld 4558<br />

Ph: 02 6584 1995<br />

Mob: 0412 131 491<br />

thomas_bexon@hotmail.com<br />

thomassurfboards.com<br />

black apache surfboards<br />

BLACK APACHE<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

Ph: 0410 419 791<br />

E: blackapachesurfboards@<br />

live.com.au<br />

blackapachesurfboards.com.au<br />

GORDON AND SMITH<br />

Ph: 0404 486 654<br />

dane@gordonandsmith.com.au<br />

gordonandsmith.com.au<br />

94 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


Minty boards<br />

make the most<br />

of Straddie<br />

Photo: Supplied<br />

by Minty Surfboards<br />

GEAR: BOARDS<br />

Popsicle Punter<br />

by Oke Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Rory Oke<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’9 x 19 ¼” x 2 ¼”<br />

Ideal conditions: 1-4ft<br />

Suits: Anyone who<br />

wants the speed and<br />

paddling ability of a fish,<br />

but the performance of a<br />

shortboard.<br />

Description: A wider<br />

nose outline, low entry<br />

rocker and single to<br />

double concave generates<br />

plenty of speed in smaller<br />

waves, while the pulled-in<br />

squashtail and extra tail<br />

kick allows the board to<br />

be surfed more vertical.<br />

Construction: Ocean<br />

Foam blank, 4oz glass<br />

with optional carbon<br />

kevlar tail patches<br />

Fins: Speedfins s115s -<br />

FCS compatible<br />

Shaper comment: After<br />

spending the last few<br />

years working with the<br />

team to develop a board<br />

for everyday Victorian<br />

conditions, this is the<br />

result. Surf it around 4”<br />

shorter than your standard<br />

shortboard.<br />

OKE SURFBOARDS<br />

1/1-7 Canterbury Rd,<br />

Braeside, VIC, 3195<br />

Ph: 03 9587 3553<br />

okesurfboards.com<br />

All-round Board<br />

by Minty Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Bob Minty<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’ x 18 ¼” x 2 1 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

3-8 foot<br />

Designed for:<br />

All round performance<br />

Description:<br />

Rounded square tail with<br />

small hip. 4 mm concave.<br />

Construction:<br />

Burford foam and glassed<br />

with Hexcel cloth.<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Great all-round board. Fast<br />

off the bottom. Powerful<br />

off the top with great<br />

down-the-line speed.<br />

MINTY SURFBOARDS<br />

Point Lookout,<br />

North Stradbroke<br />

QLD, 4183<br />

Ph: (07) 3409 8334<br />

Mob: 0438 783 191<br />

bob@bobmintysurfboards.com<br />

bobmintysurfboards.com<br />

High Performance<br />

Small Wave Board<br />

by Minty Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Bob Minty<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’9” x 19” x 2 1 /16”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

Small waves<br />

Designed for:<br />

Performance surfing<br />

Description:<br />

Stringerless small wave<br />

board with flex-control<br />

glassing.<br />

Construction:<br />

EPS and epoxy.<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

High performance board.<br />

Easy to launch and fast to<br />

respond.<br />

MINTY SURFBOARDS<br />

Point Lookout,<br />

North Stradbroke<br />

QLD, 4183<br />

Ph: (07) 3409 8334<br />

Mob: 0438 783 191<br />

bob@bobmintysurfboards.com<br />

bobmintysurfboards.com<br />

Somewhere in Victoria...<br />

Flying high on an<br />

Oke Surfboard<br />

Photo: Supplied<br />

by Oke Surfboards<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

95


Blackbird<br />

by Primitive Surf<br />

Shaper: Craig Rees<br />

Dimensions: 5’7’’ - 6’4’’<br />

Above 5’7” x 18 ¾” x 2 1 /8”<br />

Ability level:<br />

Intermediate and up<br />

Suits: Different sizes<br />

Description: Primitive<br />

Surf Team rider Nick<br />

Vitko sat me down<br />

and we nutted this<br />

new model out. It’s a<br />

high performance fish<br />

and works best when<br />

combined with the MR<br />

twin fins from FCS. They<br />

have great down the line<br />

speed and turn on a dime.<br />

Construction: PU foam<br />

with polyester resin,<br />

Vacuum bagged with<br />

Carbon/Kevlar.<br />

Fins: Twin. MR twin fins<br />

from FCS recommended.<br />

Shaper comment: Go<br />

down 6 inches from your<br />

normal short board length<br />

and hang on. I took a 6’2<br />

to PNG and it was the<br />

most popular board on the<br />

boat. They seem to do all<br />

the work on a wave and<br />

just needed to be pointed<br />

in the right direction.<br />

Big Bird<br />

by Primitive Surf<br />

Shaper: Craig Rees<br />

Dimensions: Sizes<br />

range from 6’4’’ to 7’6’’.<br />

Featured: 7’x 21 ½’’ x 2 ¾”<br />

Ability level:<br />

Beginners and up<br />

Suits: Different sizes<br />

Description: A follow<br />

on from our very popular<br />

Blackbird model, just on<br />

a bigger scale. The Big<br />

Bird has the volume of<br />

a mini-mal but is much<br />

more responsive under<br />

your feet, similar to a<br />

performance fish that<br />

will handle a little juice<br />

as well.<br />

Construction: PU foam<br />

with polyester resin.<br />

Fins: Quad or twin FCS.<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Perfect for guys using<br />

mals that wish to surf<br />

something smaller<br />

without sacrificing too<br />

much volume or even<br />

beginners that don’t want<br />

a longboard.<br />

Old Eighty-One<br />

by Ed Sinnott/ESP<br />

Shaper: Ed Sinnott<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’9 x 19 ¼ x 2 3 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

Anything up to 6’<br />

Suits: Anybody<br />

Description: This is a<br />

combination of all my<br />

old single fin and twinfin<br />

templates combined with<br />

new school bottom curves<br />

and rails. The result is a<br />

sensational hybrid that<br />

flys. Flat entry, deep vortex<br />

concave, razor edges and<br />

wet and dry finish.<br />

Construction: Burford/<br />

South Coast PU blanks,<br />

Silmar polyester resin,<br />

Colan and Surf Nine glass.<br />

This combination has<br />

stood the test of time.<br />

I love the flex.<br />

Fins: Thruster<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Surfboard design has<br />

gone the full circle now.<br />

We’ve got boards that<br />

make so-called normal<br />

6’1’’ boards look like guns.<br />

Go smaller, thicker and<br />

wider. Yew!<br />

Blimp<br />

by Underground<br />

Shaper: Tony Dempsey<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’9” x 21” x 2 5 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions: Up to<br />

3ft beachies or points<br />

Ability level: From<br />

beginner to advanced<br />

Suits: Everyone<br />

Description:<br />

High-performance small<br />

wave board with low<br />

rocker and performance<br />

bottom. The bottom has<br />

increased V in the tail,<br />

lifting the board quickly<br />

rail to rail.<br />

Construction:<br />

PU foam and polyester<br />

resin, totally handshaped.<br />

Fins: FCS fibreglass keels<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

These boards are totally<br />

handmade to your<br />

requirements - as are all<br />

Underground boards -<br />

using the best possible<br />

materials. Original,<br />

retro styling with high<br />

performance and loads<br />

of fun.<br />

Six Pack<br />

by Zak Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Doug Rogers<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’2” x 20” X 2 5 /8”<br />

Conditions: 2-5ft<br />

Suits: Anyone<br />

Description: Double flyer,<br />

rounded pin, mild vee into<br />

6 channels. Clear with pin<br />

line, fairly flat rocker.<br />

Construction:<br />

6oz bottom 10 oz deck.<br />

Fins: 8” single with<br />

3” side biters.<br />

Shaper comment: Can<br />

ride as a straight single<br />

or as a 2+1. Revamped<br />

mids vicco single fin, built<br />

to hold high and fast on<br />

steeper sections.<br />

PRIMITIVE SURF<br />

601 Nudgee Rd,<br />

Nundah, Qld 4012<br />

Ph: 07 3266 1001<br />

E: info@primitivesurf.com<br />

www.primitivesurf.com<br />

PRIMITIVE SURF<br />

601 Nudgee Rd,<br />

Nundah, Qld 4012<br />

Ph: 07 3266 1001<br />

E: info@primitivesurf.com<br />

www.primitivesurf.com<br />

ESP SURFBOARDS<br />

2/81 Centennial Circuit<br />

Byron Bay, NSW<br />

Ph: 0404 <strong>05</strong>9 321<br />

espsurfboards.com<br />

www.edsinnott.com.au<br />

UNDERGROUND SURF<br />

3/31 McLean St,<br />

Coolangatta, QLD 4225<br />

Ph: 07 5599 1040<br />

kirra@undergroundsurf.com.au<br />

undergroundsurf.com.au<br />

ZAK SURFBOARDS<br />

307 Victoria Road<br />

Thornbury VIC 3071<br />

Ph: 03 9416 7384<br />

Mobile: 0438 416 738<br />

zak@zaksurfboards.com<br />

zaksurfboards.com<br />

96 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

“Super fast and super<br />

responsive.<br />

Holds so well in the<br />

pocket, it’s crazy.<br />

I havent gone back to my<br />

normal board... Actually this<br />

is my normal board now.”<br />

Jet Jet<br />

by Glenn Cat<br />

Shaper: Gcat & the<br />

Erle of Pedersen<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

4- 6 thousand foot<br />

intergalactic sound waves<br />

Description: is wot it is.<br />

Shaper comment: LSD<br />

may help, BUT wait for the<br />

move instead.<br />

Retro Single Fin<br />

by HWS<br />

Shaper: Robert Ivers<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’4” x 21 ½” x 2 5 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

3-6ft beach or point breaks<br />

Suits: Medium skill level<br />

Description: This Retro<br />

Twin Fin is full of punch<br />

with enough volume to<br />

get you into waves early<br />

and rails to help you hold<br />

onto to any wall. An easy<br />

paddler, this will put the<br />

fun back into your surfing.<br />

Construction: Hollow<br />

timber, Paulownia and<br />

Western Red Cedar,<br />

glassed in epoxy. With<br />

proper care these boards<br />

will last a lifetime. Due to<br />

the nature of natural timber,<br />

each board is unique.<br />

Fins: Single Fin, made<br />

Wiz Finz from Byron Bay.<br />

Shaper comment: Not<br />

all surfboards are the<br />

same. Enjoy the smooth<br />

ride and extra momentum<br />

of a timber board.<br />

Alternatively: Make<br />

your own timber board by<br />

attending one of our Tree<br />

to Sea workshops.<br />

Dynamo<br />

by Flanagan Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Jason Flanagan<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’3” x 18 7 /8” x 2 ¼”<br />

Ideal conditions: 1-4ft<br />

Ability: Novice to Pro<br />

Description:<br />

The Dynamo has a single<br />

to deep double concave<br />

with a vee off the tail pod.<br />

It features a low-medium<br />

rail with a very low rocker<br />

and flat deck.<br />

Construction: Cured<br />

Liquid Laminations<br />

Fins: Thruster<br />

Shaper comment: The<br />

Dynamo is taking off like<br />

a rocket in the popularity<br />

stakes - just as it does<br />

in the water. It’s a highperformance<br />

craft that<br />

will redefine your theory<br />

on a few aspects of board<br />

design. You will probably<br />

divorce your 6’1” before<br />

sunset.<br />

Alex Swadling,<br />

Coffs Harbour<br />

on the Flanagan Dynam0<br />

SURF1770NOOSA.COM<br />

Ph: 07 4974 7770<br />

surf1770@bigpond.com<br />

surf1770noosa.com<br />

HOLLOW WOODEN<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

Ph: 0409 211751<br />

E: hwsurfboards@gmail.com<br />

www.hwsb.com.au<br />

FLANAGAN SURFBOARDS<br />

26/22 Lawson Crescent,<br />

Coffs Harbour, NSW 2450<br />

Ph: 0432 361 694<br />

flanagansurfboards.com<br />

Photo: Tom Woods<br />

ST Surf Images www.stsurfimages.com<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

97


MT-3<br />

by Classic Malibu<br />

Shaper: Peter White<br />

Typical dimensions:<br />

5’8” x 20” x 2½”<br />

Conditions: Anything, but<br />

revels in 3ft hollow points<br />

Ability: More adept<br />

surfers. Forgiving, stable<br />

and custom-made to suit.<br />

Description: The MT-3 is<br />

an amalgam of two minds<br />

and three boards. Peter<br />

White and Mark Tume<br />

drew elements from two<br />

modern boards and one<br />

original ‘70s template to<br />

produce a flatter-rockered,<br />

wider board with a refined,<br />

quad-fin tail.<br />

Construction: PU foam,<br />

4mm stringer. Glassing -<br />

6oz and 4oz ‘S’ cloth on<br />

deck, 4oz ‘S’ cloth bottom<br />

Fins: FCS SF-4 quads<br />

as standard, but can<br />

be changed out if more<br />

performance is required<br />

Shaper comment: The<br />

MT-3 paddles easily and<br />

out-performs every other<br />

board in its class. Supreme<br />

speed down the line and<br />

excellent rail hold makes<br />

this a versatile little board.<br />

Yet to be named<br />

by Lee Cheyne<br />

Shaper: Lee Cheyne<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6” x 21” x 2 ¾”<br />

Ideal conditions: 0-2ft<br />

Ability level: Anyone<br />

Suits: This is one of my<br />

personal boards for mostly<br />

rubbish waves but seems<br />

to be going really well in<br />

good waves.<br />

Description: Flat rocker<br />

with a combination of<br />

concaves and vees.<br />

Construction: Burford<br />

blank with Silmar resin<br />

Surf 9 4oz and 6oz glass<br />

with carbon tail patches.<br />

I shape, glass and sand<br />

all my boards myself<br />

with the best materials<br />

available to ensure they<br />

are the best quality<br />

boards on the market.<br />

Fins: Future or set<br />

Shaper comment: Insert<br />

gigantic grin here!<br />

Leather Jacket Fish<br />

by Jye Byrnes<br />

Shaper: Jye Byrnes<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’ x 20 ½” x 2 ¾”<br />

or custom for you.<br />

Ideal conditions: 0-4 ft<br />

points or beach breaks.<br />

Ability level: Int to adv.<br />

All shapes and sizes.<br />

Description: Wide<br />

and curvy semi-deep<br />

swallow tail for loose and<br />

controlled turns. Flatter<br />

rocker and slight rolled<br />

V-bottom, subtle double<br />

concave between the<br />

fins. This fish is the sultan<br />

of speed and the king of<br />

style. Retro look, modern<br />

features. Lets go surfin’!<br />

Construction: Foam &<br />

Fibre range. Choose your<br />

coloured foam, stringers,<br />

tints and polishes for a<br />

unique and functioning<br />

piece of art. Apply this<br />

process to any order.<br />

Fins: Twin keel or quad<br />

fin. Available in set fin,<br />

FCS or Futures.<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Classic features with<br />

modern influences for<br />

smooth lines and drawn<br />

out turns. Perfect to add<br />

to your quiver.<br />

The Quadfather<br />

by More Surfboards<br />

Shaper: Mark Pridmore<br />

Dimensions: Custom, just<br />

for you - This one is a 6’0”<br />

Ideal: Small beachies to<br />

throwing barrells<br />

Suits: Surfers who want a<br />

fast, stable, manouverable<br />

board that paddles well. I<br />

make a lot of these for guys<br />

frustrated with standard,<br />

overly refined shortboards...<br />

Description: A high<br />

performance board, but<br />

designed to be easy to<br />

ride and perform in all<br />

conditions. A little extra<br />

area and volume, so it<br />

paddles great. The quad<br />

ensures a lot of speed and<br />

hold, but the planshape,<br />

rocker, fin placement and<br />

bottom shape makes it<br />

very easy to turn. Really<br />

the best of both worlds.<br />

Construction: PU foam,<br />

Polyester resin. Made<br />

here in Oz.<br />

Fins: Quad FCS. Fast and<br />

holds in great. Not tight<br />

like some people think<br />

quads are. Additional tail<br />

plug for thruster if needed.<br />

Shapers Comment: Fast<br />

and loose! See reports and<br />

reviews on the website.<br />

Quad Fish<br />

by Sam Egan<br />

Shaper: Sam Egan<br />

Dimensions:<br />

Order from 5’6” to 7’2”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

Enjoys almost everything<br />

Ability level:<br />

Intermediate to advanced.<br />

Description: Fuller outline<br />

– easy paddler, fun type<br />

board, fast and surfs tight<br />

to the face of the wave.<br />

Will still go vertical with a<br />

tri fin set up.<br />

Construction: Bennett<br />

ISO foam, Dion polyester<br />

resin<br />

Fins: FCS Fusion fin<br />

system with SF4 glass<br />

flex fins<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Drawing off retro lines,<br />

the quad fish is a good<br />

step down from a mal<br />

in bigger sized waves<br />

or perfect for ther highperformance<br />

surfer after<br />

a volumetric fish.<br />

CLASSIC MALIBU<br />

Cnr Gibson & Eumundi Rd<br />

Noosaville, QLD 4566<br />

Ph: 07 5474 3122<br />

info@classicmalibu.com<br />

www.classicmalibu.com<br />

LEE CHEYNE DESIGNS<br />

19/48 Machinery Dr,<br />

Tweed Heads South<br />

NSW 2486<br />

Ph: 07 5523 3237<br />

lcdboards@gmail.com<br />

myspace.com/454626994<br />

tradewindsurf.com.au<br />

THE SURF FACTORY<br />

16 Maitland Rd Islington<br />

Newcastle N.S.W 2296<br />

Ph: 02 4969 5889<br />

Mob: 0409 227 407<br />

info@thesurfactory.com.au<br />

thesurffactory.com.au<br />

MORE SURFBOARDS<br />

Ph: 04<strong>05</strong> 475 026<br />

moresurfboards.com<br />

Now based on the Sunshine<br />

Coast but delivery to just about<br />

anywhere is not a problem.<br />

SAM EGAN<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

28 Maitland Road<br />

Islington NSW 2296<br />

Ph: 02 4969 7299<br />

info@samegan.com<br />

www.samegan.com.au<br />

98 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

Single Fin<br />

by The Factory<br />

Shaper: Paul Carson<br />

Dimensions:<br />

7’4” x 21 ½” x 3”<br />

Ideal conditions: 2 - 6ft<br />

Suits: Anyone<br />

Description: Double<br />

flyer, round pin single fin.<br />

Very light concave running<br />

to vee in tail.<br />

Construction: Burford<br />

blank. Red tint all over<br />

with pinlines.<br />

Fins: Set single fin,<br />

handmade.<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Bigger board for someone<br />

chasing single fin cruise.<br />

THE FACTORY<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

CALOUNDRA<br />

17 Allen Street<br />

Caloundra QLD 4551<br />

Ph: 07 5492 5838<br />

paul@thefactorysurfboards.com.au<br />

thefactorysurfboards.com.au<br />

Carbon Wrap<br />

by DMS<br />

Shaper: Dan McDonald<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’7 x 18 ¾” x 2 5 /16“<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

Varies according to model<br />

Suits: Beginner to Pro<br />

Description: The carbon<br />

wrap provides tension and<br />

drive through the front<br />

section of the board. By<br />

wrapping the carbon to<br />

the deck, we’ve created<br />

strength around the foot<br />

area but this still allows<br />

the tail to flex and pop you<br />

out of turns.<br />

Construction: Fused<br />

cell EPS core with a<br />

combined outer skin of<br />

carbon fibre & fibreglass<br />

composite, laminated with<br />

100% epoxy resin.<br />

Fins:<br />

FCS Fusion or Future Fins<br />

Shaper comment: The<br />

carbon wrap has great<br />

flex characteristics. Mix<br />

this with the buoyancy<br />

and weight of an EPS core<br />

and you’ve got a light,<br />

responsive board that<br />

paddles into waves with<br />

ease.<br />

Single Fin<br />

by Bushrat<br />

Shaper: Jed Done<br />

Dimensions:<br />

7’ x 20 ¼” x 2 7 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

2’ to 6’ river mouth and point<br />

breaks. Will also handle a bit<br />

of chop in the water.<br />

Suits: Intermediate to<br />

advanced surfers with a<br />

clean flowing style.<br />

Description:<br />

Custom single fin with<br />

the thickness held right<br />

through to the boxy,<br />

oldschool rails. The wide<br />

point and thickest part of<br />

the foil is well forward of<br />

centre. The rocker is very<br />

flat through the tail with<br />

only an inch of tail lift. Blue<br />

fade around the rails to<br />

match blue tinted fin and<br />

the owner’s own artwork<br />

supplied.<br />

Construction: Dion PU<br />

foam, single red cedar<br />

stringer, polyester resin.<br />

Fins: Hand foiled, blue<br />

tinted single fin.<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

This board is a replica of<br />

an old lost single fin. The<br />

shape was established<br />

using photos of the<br />

original board and verbal<br />

descriptions.<br />

The Squid<br />

by Mark Richards<br />

Shaper: Mark Richards<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’8” x 22” x 2 ¾”<br />

Ideal conditions: 1-5 foot<br />

Designed for:<br />

Recreational to advanced<br />

surfers looking for a fun,<br />

all-round small wave board<br />

Shaper’s Comment: A<br />

performance-oriented fish<br />

which will work in a variety<br />

of conditions. Single-todouble<br />

concave bottom<br />

with an accentuated<br />

stringer spine on the<br />

double, so it will go rail<br />

to rail easily. Phenomenal<br />

paddling performance due<br />

to the forward area and<br />

volume . Available from<br />

5’8” to 7’2”<br />

Construction:<br />

Burford Pu Foam<br />

Burford “Surf 9” USA Glass<br />

Silmar Resin<br />

Glassing: All 4oz, or all<br />

6oz, or combo 6/4 available<br />

Fins: Exclusively FCS<br />

twin, tri or quad.<br />

Bump Tail Fish<br />

by Woody Jack<br />

Shaper: Woody<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’8”x 19 ½” x 2 3 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions: 1-6 foot<br />

Description: A super<br />

fun board you can change<br />

up to suit almost any<br />

conditions. The bump tail<br />

gives you the looseness<br />

and feel of a pulled in tail,<br />

while the added width<br />

between the side fins will<br />

help get you through those<br />

slower, fatter sections of<br />

the wave. The concave in<br />

the front gives you lift up<br />

the face of the wave, while<br />

the vee double accelerates<br />

the water through the tail<br />

for down-the-line speed.<br />

Construction: Burford<br />

feather weight blank,<br />

poplar stringer. 4oz glass<br />

top and bottom with<br />

tailpatch.<br />

Fins: Five fin set up, to<br />

be used as a thruster or<br />

a quad. Currently using<br />

Scarfini Quad Fins HX2<br />

Shaper comment: don’t<br />

be afraid to try a bunch of<br />

different fin set ups<br />

DANIEL MACDONALD<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

3/56 Currumbin Creek Rd<br />

Currumbin, QLD 4223<br />

Ph: 07 55 595 949<br />

info@dmshapes.com<br />

www.dmshapes.com<br />

BUSHRAT SURFBOARDS<br />

Merimbula NSW<br />

Ph: 0409 813 431<br />

E: jed@bushrat.com<br />

www.bushrat.com<br />

MARK RICHARDS<br />

SURFBOARDS<br />

755 Hunter Street,<br />

Newcastle West<br />

NSW Australia 2300<br />

Ph: 02 4961 3088<br />

Fax: 2 4961 6872<br />

markrichardssurfboards.com<br />

WOODY JACK<br />

SURFBOARDS AUSTRALIA<br />

Unit 7, 25 Leonard Parade,<br />

Currumbin QLD<br />

Ph: 0415 789 706<br />

E: wjboards@gmail.com<br />

www.woodyjack.com<br />

And here’s<br />

Harry...<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

99


GEAR: BOARDS<br />

Situated in Noosa, on the Sunshine Coast,<br />

Illusions Noosa supplies a huge selection of<br />

surfboards, SUP's & gear to suit your style.<br />

SUP<br />

paddles<br />

too!<br />

Cutlass<br />

Pro Surf SUP<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’6” x 29” x 5”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

Can handle any size swell<br />

Suits: Competent to pro.<br />

For shortboarders who<br />

want to take the next step.<br />

Description: With high<br />

performance in mind the<br />

Cutlass is the protege<br />

of its close sister the<br />

Element. Designed for fast,<br />

responsive, ‘cut & slash’<br />

manoeuvres. Bulk in the<br />

main deck area assists<br />

with paddling speed and<br />

gilde. Hard, tight, rail<br />

allows the rider to execute<br />

snappy manoeuvres with<br />

speed and accuracy. Can<br />

handle any size swell that<br />

‘Huey’ can throw your<br />

way!!<br />

Construction: The boards<br />

are vacuum bagged and<br />

constructed of a D-XP3<br />

core, which is a 100%<br />

recycled bamboo fibre<br />

blank with bamboo veneer<br />

and 4oz fibreglass top and<br />

bottom. Each board has 2<br />

leash plugs and one vent at<br />

tail, a plastic grip box and<br />

1/3 deck grip Eva pads<br />

Fins: 2 FCS side fins and<br />

a fiberglass 10” center fin<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

The ideal board for<br />

those looking for a fast,<br />

performance SUP that is<br />

highly responsive.<br />

Shredder<br />

Pro Surf SUP<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9”x 30”x 5”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

Can handle any size swell<br />

Suits: Competent to pro.<br />

For shortboarders who<br />

want to take the next step.<br />

Description: Designed<br />

and built for performance<br />

the Shredder is fast,<br />

responsive and displays<br />

many unique features. The<br />

high volume deck assists<br />

the paddling speed to catch<br />

smaller waves but drops<br />

away rapidly to a hard,<br />

tight, rail which allows the<br />

rider to execute snappy<br />

manoeuvres with speed<br />

and accuracy. This board<br />

brings the aggressive short<br />

board style to the world of<br />

stand up.<br />

Construction: The boards<br />

are vacuum bagged and<br />

constructed of a D-XP3<br />

core, which is a 100%<br />

recycled bamboo fibre<br />

blank with bamboo veneer<br />

and 4oz fibreglass top and<br />

bottom. Each board has 2<br />

leash plugs and one vent at<br />

tail, a plastic grip box and<br />

1/3 deck grip Eva pads<br />

Fins: Quad FCS fins.<br />

Shaper comment: If<br />

you’re into competitive<br />

surfing and want to win,<br />

this is the board for you.<br />

Noserider<br />

Malibu<br />

Dimensions:<br />

9’3”x 23”x 3”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

A good board for small to<br />

medium sized waves<br />

Ability level:<br />

This is the perfect board<br />

for the beginner or<br />

occasional surfer right<br />

through to advanced<br />

Description: Classicflowing<br />

Malibu shape with<br />

subtle but ample rocker.<br />

This board features a<br />

slight double concave from<br />

nose to tail which assists<br />

speed and glide on those<br />

full sections between<br />

banks. Moderate volume<br />

thoughout, especially on the<br />

nose and tail ensures this<br />

board lives up to it’s name...<br />

...Noserider!<br />

Construction: The boards<br />

are vacuum bagged and<br />

constructed of a D-XP3<br />

core, which is a 100%<br />

recycled bamboo fibre<br />

blank with bamboo veneer<br />

and 4oz fibreglass top and<br />

bottom.<br />

Fin set-up: 2 + 1 or quad<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Designed in Australia,<br />

this is a great all purpose<br />

longboard and noserider<br />

for well under $1000.<br />

You can be sure to ‘Hang<br />

loose during a session on<br />

this one.<br />

Retro<br />

Bamboo Fish<br />

Dimensions:<br />

6’10” x 22 ½ x 3 1 /8”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

Fantastic manouverability,<br />

handling & speed in both<br />

big & small surf.<br />

Ability level: Whether<br />

you’re a light weight<br />

grommie or a ‘skeg head’<br />

from the 70’s who’s<br />

6-pack is now ‘hidden<br />

in the carton’ you’ll be<br />

taken back in time then<br />

projected into the pocket<br />

of every wave you catch!!<br />

Description: Like a<br />

vision from the 70’s this<br />

classic Fish has all the<br />

great shape & style of<br />

it’s ancestors but all<br />

the advantages of the<br />

modern construction<br />

and design technology.<br />

Certain aspects of this<br />

board are unique only to<br />

Illusions Noosa.<br />

Construction: The<br />

boards are vacuum<br />

bagged and constructed<br />

of a D-XP3 core which is<br />

a 100% recycled bamboo<br />

fibre blank with bamboo<br />

veneer and 4oz fibreglass<br />

top and bottom.<br />

Fins: Twin fin<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

Designed in Australia, this<br />

is a great board for those<br />

who enjoy their surfing<br />

and are after a retro fish<br />

shape for under $500.<br />

Flying Fish<br />

with Wings<br />

Dimensions:<br />

5’6” x 19 ¾” x 2 ½”<br />

Ideal conditions:<br />

For those progressive,<br />

surfers that want to<br />

push their boards to the<br />

absolute limit!!<br />

Ability: From a child<br />

starting out to the<br />

experienced surfer who<br />

wants a lightweight board.<br />

For surfers looking to rip it<br />

with attitude and style.<br />

Description: Compact<br />

short board with plenty<br />

of width to help on fuller<br />

waves and through those<br />

flat sections. A classic<br />

fish design with stylish<br />

flyers and a thruster fin<br />

configuration for powering<br />

hard off of those gnarly<br />

bottom turns! A subtle<br />

double concave adds<br />

speed and power.<br />

Construction: The<br />

boards are vacuum<br />

bagged and constructed<br />

of a D-XP3 core, which is<br />

a 100% recycled bamboo<br />

fibre blank with bamboo<br />

veneer and 4oz fibreglass<br />

top and bottom. The deck<br />

is laminated with full<br />

bamboo veneer for a firm,<br />

‘depression proof’ deck.<br />

Fins: FCS fins<br />

Shaper comment:<br />

The Flying Fish is super<br />

light and fast<br />

ILLUSIONS NOOSA SURFBOARDS - KAYAKS - SURFCRAFT<br />

2/2 Venture Dve, Noosaville and Shop 3A/11 Sunshine Beach Rd, Noosa Junction, QLD 4566<br />

Phone: 0488 686 206 fax: 07 3319 7269<br />

www.illusionsnoosa.com.au<br />

100 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


GEAR: FINS<br />

CHAPTER III:<br />

BEND & FLEX<br />

The humble fin can significantly effect the performance of your surfboard,<br />

particularly with regard to how it works in unison with your board’s rails,<br />

bottom contour and tail. But what material makes the best fin? Here we<br />

continue our quest and talk to Phil Way from Phil’s Foils (formerly Fluid Foils)<br />

about his preference for fiberglass. WORDS: DAVE SWAN<br />

WHAT<br />

LIES<br />

BENEATH<br />

“Fibreglass delivers a unique combination of<br />

flex, rigidity and an even foil that gives the rider<br />

heightened performance.”<br />

So what does this all mean?<br />

“A fin needs a base area to help hold the board<br />

in the face of the wave. The base needs to be<br />

quite stiff or rigid in roughly the bottom two<br />

thirds of the fin to achieve this feat. The top<br />

third should have some flex to allow smooth<br />

entry into turns and release when exiting turns<br />

or changing direction.<br />

“The foil of the fin is also very important. It<br />

should be a continuous curve with no flat areas.<br />

Simply put, flat spots create turbulence, or<br />

cavitation as it is referred to in surfing terms,<br />

making your board hard to turn and slowing it<br />

down. A hand-laid and foiled fiberglass fin is<br />

pretty much the best way to achieve all this.”<br />

Phil goes onto explain that when laying up the<br />

26 layers of 6oz fiberglass and resin, the weave<br />

of the cloth is run at a forty-five degree angle<br />

so the spine runs up the centre in the direction<br />

of the fin. This stops the base of the fin from<br />

twisting but enables the tip to have flex. This<br />

way you have drive, which is delivered through<br />

the base of the fin and flex at the tip, which<br />

assists your turning capabilities.”<br />

“As moulded fins are not made up of layers of<br />

fiberglass cloth, they haven’t got that spine so<br />

they don’t have that even flex. They want to<br />

bend from half way down or from top to bottom<br />

and not just at the tip. This makes your board<br />

‘shift’ in the wave when turning, forcing you<br />

to nurse your board around, whereas when<br />

you are turning, you really want to push down<br />

hard against your fins and have that immediate<br />

response and drive that projects you out of your<br />

turns. Your fins should coil back and release and<br />

whip you into and out of turns.<br />

“Moulded fins are often made with a Coremat<br />

or foam centre sandwiched between layers of<br />

cloth in an effort to reduce weight by reducing<br />

the amount of fiberglass and resin used. This<br />

method of construction curves the glass around<br />

the center sandwich material as opposed to the<br />

foil being created through multiple individual<br />

layers of glass. If you curve glass it stiffens it up<br />

straight away. Just imagine if you had a sheet<br />

of flat glass, it is floppy. Grab a corrugated sheet<br />

and it is really rigid.<br />

“As I said earlier you want a delicate balance<br />

of flex and rigidity. When you consider a solid<br />

glass fin may be 10 to 15 grams heavier then<br />

moulded fins for a complete set, the difference<br />

is marginal compared to the superior flex<br />

capabilities of a hand foiled fin. You will notice<br />

the differences most when the surf picks up…<br />

when you really need a fin to perform.”<br />

Through the years in the business, Phil Way can<br />

lay claim to shaping fins for the best from Tom<br />

Carroll, Occy, Kieren Perrow and Jason Blewitt<br />

through to Kelly Slater.<br />

FOR WHAT WE’VE EXPLORED IN THE WORLD OF FINS<br />

SO FAR, CHECK OUT OUR BACK-ISSUES ON OUR<br />

WEBSITE: WWW.SMORGASBOARDER.COM.AU<br />

Top: Phil hand-foils his fins<br />

Above: An amazing selection of fin templates<br />

Left: Phil shows off some of his handiwork<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

101


BRING<br />

BACK<br />

THE<br />

DEAD...<br />

BEFORE<br />

...AFTER<br />

Through the steps... Sanding, filling, sanding, taping, spraying, surfing... Restoration photos: Paul Woodbry<br />

Paul Woodbry is far too generous with his time when it comes to saving an old board from the tip.<br />

For more information on his restoration work and his own surfboards, drop him a line on 0408 763 541<br />

102 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


The old girl is given her<br />

first ride in years by Karl<br />

‘Surf-Everything’ De Wet<br />

Photos: Lucas Muro<br />

www.lucasmuro.com.au<br />

GEAR: PROJECT<br />

AFTER A FOUR-DAY SURF TRIP TO BYRON BAY,<br />

WE WERE ON THE ROAD HOME.<br />

DROPPING A LANDLOCKED MATE HOME IN<br />

THE MOOLOOLAH VALLEY, AN EAGLE-EYED<br />

NORTHSIDER IN OUR LITTLE POSSE SPOTTED<br />

THE ULTIMATE KERBSIDE COLLECTION FIND - A<br />

SURFBOARD. WE JUST HAD TO PICK IT UP.<br />

Despite being covered in mud and well bashed<br />

up, this fat, 80’s pintail thruster with double-flyers<br />

and more channels than Freeview still looked like<br />

it had a lot of fun left in it - if it could be saved.<br />

Paul Woodbry, the Megafish man of Woody<br />

Surfboards in Caloundra, was too brave for his<br />

own good, taking on an absolutely mammoth task<br />

of resurrecting this board, originally shaped by<br />

Nick Masarin under his brand Living Water which<br />

was active between 1977-1987.<br />

THE JOB<br />

This board was meant for the tip for a reason. Full<br />

of punctures through the glass and with massive<br />

delamination on the back end of the deck, a<br />

broken nose and totally faded spray job that was<br />

once upon a time garish flouro, this old girl had<br />

certainly seen her time.<br />

After far too much sanding, Paul had to patch<br />

all the holes in the board with epoxy filler. More<br />

sanding and the nose point had to be reshaped,<br />

again using filler.<br />

Where the delamination had occurred, Paul had<br />

to cut away and remove all the glass before filling<br />

that in too - a big repair in itself.<br />

To retain as much of the original art as possible,<br />

Paul painstakingly taped up and cut around the<br />

original decals and graphics. Finally, the board<br />

was resprayed, toning down the 80’s flouro while<br />

retaining the original design elements.<br />

THE RESULT<br />

As we just couldn’t wait to give it a go, we didn’t<br />

even give Paul time to finish the final coat, but he<br />

reckoned she would be okay in the water... He<br />

was right. More than okay, in fact. Despite being<br />

a little heavier thanks to the repairs, she paddled<br />

great and handled just fine. This one will most<br />

definitely not be a wall hanger - there’s too many<br />

waves left in her yet. But man, those old superpointy<br />

noses feel a little dangerous...<br />

THE conclusion<br />

Restorations save pieces of history. While this<br />

might be a lesser-known name, it’s no less a part<br />

of our surfing history and has been worth saving<br />

all the same. Was it worth the time and money<br />

spent? While a new board would have been less<br />

effort, rather than ending up as scrap, this little<br />

board will now provide many more waves and fun<br />

for many more years to come.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

103


104 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


HOW? WHAT? WHERE?<br />

GEAR: WETSUITS<br />

WE EXPLORE THE WORLD OF WETSUITS AND THE ALTERNATIVES<br />

OUTSIDE OF THE BIG BRANDS WORDS: DAVE SWAN<br />

WETSUITS:<br />

TURN UP THE HEAT<br />

There is nothing worst than being cold when<br />

you’re surfing, nor a poor fitting wetsuit that<br />

chafes your skin leaving you looking like you<br />

have some dreaded disease, that is, aside from<br />

probably being eaten by a shark or, as they say,<br />

being poked in the eye with a red-hot poker, which<br />

incidentally leads me to say, “Who on earth has<br />

been poked in the eye with a red-hot poker to<br />

actually know what it feels like anyway? I mean<br />

it wouldn’t be nice but… anyhow I digress.”<br />

Freezing your proverbials off, it is not nice.<br />

Photo: Seventhwave<br />

Photo: C-Skins<br />

They say when you first start to feel the effects<br />

of hypothermia your body actually starts to shut<br />

down. You gradually lose your mental and physical<br />

abilities; you become confused and uncoordinated<br />

and have difficulty in speaking. That’s why I always<br />

figured Mark must be cold, but enough jokes about<br />

my backward South African work mate.<br />

Crap wetsuits - they suck. But it is important to<br />

remember there are more than just the big three or<br />

four brands to choose from. There are other quality<br />

wetsuit manufacturers producing suits that rival the<br />

big brands for far less sting in your hip pocket.<br />

Now the other mags aren’t allowed to possibly<br />

say what we just did but what the hell, we are<br />

all about offering our readers something a little<br />

different, a bit outside of the mainstream with a<br />

little more meaning.<br />

We’re all about the everyday surfer. Sure, you may<br />

not pull airs in Iceland but you want to stay warm<br />

just the same and have a snug-fitting wetsuit to boot.<br />

Here we explore a couple of the alternatives. We<br />

talk to some stalwarts of the industry, discuss<br />

wetsuit construction, different advancements in<br />

wetsuit manufacturing and the new technologies<br />

employed. We also showcase how wetties are<br />

actually made and why fit is so important.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

1<strong>05</strong>


GEAR: WETSUITS<br />

THE<br />

WETSUIT<br />

WETSUITS:<br />

TURN UP THE HEAT<br />

WETSUITS ARE A CORE PART OF SURFING. JUST AS YOU<br />

NEED A SURFBOARD, WETSUITS ARE A NECESSITY IF<br />

YOU PLAN ON SURFING THROUGH WINTER.<br />

WETSUIT TERMINOLOGY<br />

STRETCH<br />

the elongation and flexibility of<br />

wetsuit neoprene<br />

MEMORY<br />

the ability of the neoprene to return<br />

to its original state<br />

NEOPRENE<br />

<br />

is in fact a type of foam and is often<br />

referred to as such or as ‘sponge’<br />

JERSEY<br />

is what lines the neoprene, usually<br />

on both sides. Manufacturers<br />

use a range of materials and<br />

combinations from nylon to<br />

polyester, polypropylene, spandex<br />

and even wool (only internal lining).<br />

SMOOTH-SKIN <br />

is the ‘shiny’ rubber surface often<br />

located on the chest and back<br />

panels of the modern-day wetsuit.<br />

Instead of using jersey on both<br />

sides of the neoprene it is only<br />

used on the interior with the raw<br />

material or ‘smooth-skin’ exposed<br />

on the outside.<br />

BACK ZIP<br />

The original method of opening and<br />

closing a wetsuit<br />

BATWING <br />

Is an additional piece of neoprene<br />

that sits underneath your back zip<br />

and often has a piece that slips over<br />

your head. It is designed to limit<br />

water entry.<br />

CHEST ZIP<br />

<br />

Zips generally speaking are not<br />

watertight, so the shorter the zip,<br />

the less water can penetrate your<br />

suit. A chest zip is shorter than a<br />

back zip and thus is primarily used<br />

in most cold-water wetsuits.<br />

106 may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

Photo: C-Skins<br />

HOW DOES A WETSUIT ACTUALLY WORK?<br />

Wetsuits are made of a thin synthetic rubber fabric<br />

called neoprene. Neoprene is a chemical compound<br />

containing hundreds of small closed cell nitrogen<br />

bubbles, or foam as it is commonly called, that help<br />

insulate the wearer. The wetsuit itself protects the<br />

WARMTH<br />

How warm a wetsuit makes you feel is important but<br />

is subjective because we all feel the cold in different<br />

ways. The thickness of the neoprene will largely<br />

dictate how warm you feel. Simply put, the more<br />

neoprene, the more insulation.<br />

Wetsuit thickness is usually given with two numbers<br />

like 3/2, 4/3, 5/3. They represent the thickness of the<br />

neoprene used in the wetsuit in millimetres eg. A 3/2<br />

wetsuit is made out of 3 mm and 2 mm thick neoprene.<br />

The reason being, you have thicker neoprene in parts<br />

that do not need lots of flexibility, such as your body and<br />

parts that are constantly in motion like your arms have<br />

thinner neoprene so they are flexible.<br />

WATER ENTRY<br />

Particularly in our southern states, eliminating<br />

wearer from cold water but also works by trapping<br />

a thin layer of water between the wetsuit and the<br />

wearer’s skin. The surfer’s body heat warms the<br />

trapped layer of water, further insulating the wearer.<br />

IMPORTANT CONSIDERATIONS WHEN BUYING A WETSUIT<br />

water entry is pivotal to your comfort. Ice-cold<br />

water trickling into your suit is never comfortable.<br />

Manufacturers have been able to limit water entry<br />

through the evolution of the seams used to join<br />

neoprene panels together and zip designs.<br />

FIT<br />

Simply put, a poor fitting wetsuit lets in water,<br />

makes you cold, gives you a nasty rash and can be<br />

restrictive inhibiting your surfing.<br />

EASE OF ENTRY<br />

Some wetsuit designs have effectively eliminated<br />

the possibility of water entering your suit but in<br />

doing so have made it near impossible for the<br />

wearer to do the same. If you can’t get into your suit<br />

easily it is a pain in the arse and the time you are<br />

most likely to damage your suit.


ZEE MAN<br />

ZEE WETSUITS BERNIE<br />

FILER, ZEE WETSUITS<br />

ZEE FEATURES<br />

WORKMANSHIP<br />

“Our workmanship is warrantied for<br />

life and we do that because nothing<br />

really goes wrong with it.<br />

“As for the lifespan of our suits, they<br />

are lasting forever. We have people<br />

walking in here for a new zip and the<br />

wetsuit is 20 years old. Our biggest<br />

trip is we have such good word of<br />

mouth because our wetsuits are really<br />

good. We also custom tailor suits to<br />

fit.” A custom fit steamer is $60.<br />

GUARANTEED BUY BACK FOR KIDS<br />

“We don’t charge custom fits for kids.<br />

We also have a guaranteed buy back<br />

for kids. Children grow so fast it is<br />

understandable the buying motivation<br />

for parents is that they want to get a<br />

couple of years out of a wettie and as<br />

Bernie Filer has an extensive history<br />

in the wetsuit industry so he knows<br />

his stuff. He represented companies<br />

such as Turnbull Fins before joining<br />

The Curl (Rip Curl) in September<br />

1975 where he stayed until 1986. An<br />

incredibly humble man and not one for<br />

titles, we eventually prised out of him<br />

that in his final year with the company<br />

he was the national sales manager,<br />

was looking after a couple of divisions<br />

and responsible for setting up Rip<br />

Curl’s UK distribution network. During<br />

his time with The Curl, Bernie worked<br />

closely with Ray Thomas and Doug<br />

Warbick on the design and manufacturing<br />

side of the business.<br />

Bernie left the company in 1986 when<br />

he felt it was time to move to the beat<br />

of his own drum. He identified a niche<br />

in the market and set up Zee Wetsuits<br />

and Moomba (wetsuits for water<br />

skiers) in Geelong in 1987. In 1996<br />

Bernie and over half of his staff moved<br />

to the Sunshine Coast and set up their<br />

current base.<br />

WETSUIT CONSTRUCTION AND<br />

THE DIFFERENT ADVANCEMENTS<br />

IN WETSUIT MANUFACTURING<br />

“There is no doubt wetsuit technology<br />

is coming ahead in leaps and bounds<br />

from where it used to be. In the old<br />

days, you could park trucks on the<br />

rubber used in wetsuits. It was that<br />

thick, and if you wanted it to stretch,<br />

well forget it. As for colours, you could<br />

have green, red, black or brown, and<br />

if you waited long enough the black<br />

turned brown anyhow.<br />

“In terms of the development of wetsuit<br />

manufacturing and the technologies<br />

employed, I have to give guys<br />

like Ray Thomas from Rip Curl credit.<br />

They have been, and still are, at the<br />

leading edge of wetsuit development.<br />

With that said though, we also need<br />

to dispense with some of the bullshit<br />

circulated nowadays. Marketing crap<br />

influences way too many consumers.”<br />

STRETCH<br />

“Some of the most significant<br />

advancements in wetsuit technology<br />

are stretch and the memory of the<br />

material. The laboratories have been<br />

able to develop the sponge so it is<br />

super light instead of being highdensity<br />

foam, which does have some<br />

applications in diving but not surfing<br />

because the neoprene is warm but is<br />

quite heavy. The type of lightweight<br />

sponge developed is referred to as<br />

‘S foam’ and has enormous stretch<br />

capabilities. When you have a raw<br />

piece of neoprene that’s in cell form,<br />

the stretch is absolutely fantastic.<br />

JERSEY<br />

“Jersey linings have become very<br />

important. As stated, today’s neoprene<br />

has an incredible amount of stretch.<br />

The jersey aids comfort, warmth and<br />

protects the neoprene but it also<br />

inhibits its stretch capabilities.<br />

“It is the quality of the jersey and<br />

the way it is knitted that is particularly<br />

important, as is the mix in the<br />

fabric itself. A lot of jerseys now have<br />

spandex woven into it to enhance the<br />

stretch capabilities of the neoprene.<br />

Nylon tends to have the best stretch<br />

characteristics. As for wool, in my<br />

opinion and to be frank, it is at the<br />

enth degree of ‘techni-crap’. It will<br />

keep you warm but is as heavy as buggery.<br />

A woollen footy jumper shoved<br />

down your wettie will do the same job<br />

and weigh about the same.<br />

“So in essence, a quality wetsuit really<br />

comes down to the quality of the<br />

neoprene, or the cell as it is called,<br />

the jersey lining and how they are<br />

intertwined or laminated so to speak.”<br />

POWER HEATING<br />

“As for battery powered heating devices<br />

and so forth, I guess they sound<br />

good in theory, but then again, so did<br />

the neutron bomb. There are problems<br />

with the batteries and recharging…<br />

The industry tells me there is a fair<br />

fail rate with this kind of technology<br />

and of course, I am pretty close to the<br />

industry.”<br />

AND WHAT OF DEVELOPMENTS<br />

OF THE NEOPRENE ITSELF? DOES<br />

IT MATTER WHAT COUNTRY IT<br />

COMES FROM AND WHAT IS SBR?<br />

“As for where the neoprene comes<br />

from and its associated quality, I think<br />

that is quite subjective. Comments<br />

are made with respect to Japanese<br />

neoprene but I suppose it is just like<br />

saying Japanese cars are better. There<br />

is a company now in Taiwan that<br />

easily produces the best neoprene in<br />

the world in my opinion. They have a<br />

full-blown research and development<br />

department, not just a token effort.<br />

“As for SBR, it isn’t actually neoprene.<br />

It feels like neoprene, looks like it and<br />

smells like it but it is not neoprene.<br />

It’s a different chemical formula and<br />

is very stiff and not flexible at all. It is<br />

still warm and significantly cheaper<br />

but the durability, stretch and comfort<br />

is not even close to neoprene. These<br />

are the low price-point kinds of<br />

wetsuits you find in BCF, Aldi, Big W<br />

and the like.”<br />

such, will buy one that is too big. The<br />

problem is, a wetsuit needs to fit to<br />

work. We convince our customers to<br />

buy the correct size and to come back<br />

and trade it in for their next suit when<br />

they grow out of it.”<br />

PRICING<br />

“Price doesn’t always mean a wetsuit<br />

is superior. With regards to the big<br />

brands, our materials, construction<br />

and technology are the same. The only<br />

difference is that all of our wetsuits<br />

(bar the chest zip model) are made<br />

locally on the Sunshine Coast and have<br />

Zee written on them. The reason why<br />

we are so affordable is we’ve spent<br />

less on marketing bullshit and I don’t<br />

sponsor any pro surfers or have a ski<br />

chalet in Chamonix.”<br />

WHERE TO GET A ZEE WETSUIT<br />

“I only supply a select range of stores<br />

and direct to the public. My reason<br />

for this is simple. The big brands have<br />

gone straight vertical - they own the<br />

whole process from manufacturing<br />

through to retail. They dictate terms<br />

via crush and rule. Because they own<br />

the market from start to finish, Joe<br />

Average surf shop down the corner<br />

has got his proverbials squeezed.<br />

Other than that, many of the top surf<br />

shops are dictated to by the major<br />

brands and as a result, they cannot<br />

purchase from us.”<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

107


GEAR: WETSUITS<br />

INTERESTING FACT<br />

Water can sap heat from the<br />

body up to 25 times faster<br />

than air, people can get<br />

hypothermia much faster in<br />

water than on land.<br />

WETSUITS:<br />

TURN UP THE HEAT<br />

GOING<br />

CUSTOM<br />

Wetsuits have come a long way since their birth in the early 1950’s. New<br />

construction methods, patterns and materials have enabled wetsuits to<br />

become warmer, lighter and more flexible.<br />

Not only can you walk into a most good surf stores these days and get<br />

kitted out with almost everything from a small warm vest for up north<br />

through to the full hoods-and-booties setup for the south, you can<br />

even get a wetsuit made from scratch - a custom-fit suit, made to your<br />

measurements and local break requirements that’s a perfect fit for your<br />

body and a perfect match for your local conditions.<br />

We look at how one comes together.<br />

1.<br />

4.<br />

108 may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

2.<br />

5.<br />

3.<br />

1-2. DRAWING AND CUTTING THE PATTERN.<br />

3. PRINTING THE DESIGNS AND LOGOS.<br />

4. THE CUT, PRINTED PATTERN PIECES.<br />

5-7. GLUEING 8-11. STITCHING<br />

12. LINING THE INSIDE WITH MELCO TAPE<br />

13. ADDING THE FINISHING TOUCHES<br />

14. THE FINAL SUIT, READY TO SEND<br />

15. JOE MORETTI - MAKING THE MOST OF IT


What’s the most critical feature of a comfy wetsuit?<br />

It needs to fit. A well-fitted wetsuit is so important<br />

for warmth and flexibility. You can have all the bells<br />

and whistles but if it doesn’t fit you’ve wasted your<br />

money. A bad fit means your suit might flush water,<br />

bunch up and of course make for a miserable surf on<br />

those nasty winter mornings. One company providing<br />

this sort of custom service - Seventhwave Wetsuits<br />

in New Zealand – gave us a behind-the-scenes look<br />

into what goes into the making of a custom suit and<br />

showed us how they are cut, printed and sewn by<br />

hand on site in Christchurch, New Zealand.<br />

First the suit is ordered (in this case using an online<br />

custom fit chart) and the customer’s measurements<br />

are run through the in-house system to create the<br />

pattern. The pattern is drawn onto the neoprene<br />

and any custom alterations are made. This includes<br />

what you may have specified for choice of colour,<br />

thickness, and any other special features.<br />

The material being used is limestone-based<br />

Japanese Yamamoto neoprene, designed to<br />

absorb next to no water, last longer, and be more<br />

environmentally friendly.<br />

This nitrogen-infused neoprene is said to have a<br />

30% higher air count than petrol-based neoprene<br />

and weighs nearly the same wet or dry. With less<br />

absorption - and therefore lighter neoprene - paddle<br />

fatigue is reduced, with flexibility and warmth<br />

increased, which means a more fun day surfing.<br />

The pattern pieces for the wetsuit are cut out and<br />

any decals, logos or pictures are printed by hand<br />

using a silkscreening process. Then the stitching<br />

begins. In this particular case, the suit pictured is<br />

the MAX winter model, which means the seams are<br />

double glued and blind-stitched with a curved needle.<br />

This technique means the seams are watertight as<br />

the needle never passes right through the neoprene.<br />

The inside of the suit is then lined with melco tape<br />

for added warmth and comfort.<br />

With the body of the suit assembled, the last few<br />

bits of trim are added, the stitching is tied down to<br />

prevent it coming apart and the zip is sewn in. After<br />

a thorough series of checks and re-checks, the suit is<br />

ready to be packaged up and sent you.<br />

To watch a video of this wetsuit being made, check<br />

out: http://seventhwave.co.nz/about<br />

Over 24 years of wetsuit-making experience goes<br />

into each suit and Seventhwave offer a lifetime<br />

warranty on the construction and workmanship.<br />

While you could pop in to try a wetsuit to get your<br />

very own custom-fit in person, Seventhwave’s<br />

measurement chart, online process and free<br />

worldwide shipping mean you can do it from<br />

anwhere. They’ve sent suits to Peru, Canada, Ireland,<br />

South Africa, Japan and even Switzerland. For more<br />

info, check out www.seventhwave.co.nz<br />

6.<br />

8.<br />

10.<br />

12.<br />

7.<br />

9.<br />

11.<br />

13.<br />

14.<br />

15.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

109


GEAR: WETSUITS<br />

WETSUIT CARE<br />

As for caring for your wetsuit,<br />

all manufacturers agreed on the<br />

following:<br />

RINSE IN COLD WATER ONLY?<br />

Cold or hot, it doesn’t really matter,<br />

unless the water is scalding<br />

whereby it will actually cook the<br />

fabric. Fresh water is the key<br />

ingredient.<br />

WHY RINSE IN FRESH WATER?<br />

It gets rid of the salty sea dog smell<br />

plus the seam of your wetsuit can<br />

accumulate salt. If you do not rinse<br />

the salt out of your wetsuit it becomes<br />

like sandpaper on your skin.<br />

DON’T DRY IN DIRECT SUNLIGHT?<br />

The sun kills them. The UV detoriates<br />

the fabric. The jersey actually<br />

cooks and it will crack and the<br />

wetsuit loses all of its stretch and<br />

its memory. You only have to see<br />

how rapidly your wettie fades in the<br />

sun to see the damage it is doing.<br />

PEEING IN YOUR WETSUIT?<br />

It probably makes you warmer in<br />

Torquay but aside from that doesn’t<br />

damage the suit. Sanitisation and<br />

smell could be an issue leading<br />

many to question hiring a wetsuit.<br />

They also say peeing in your<br />

wetsuit can attract sharks so there’s<br />

enough reason to abstain.<br />

IRON, DRY CLEAN OR BLEACH?<br />

As for these care instructions, we<br />

didn’t ask the manufacturers. If<br />

you’re not smart enough to figure<br />

out why you shouldn’t do this<br />

to your wettie, deck yourself in<br />

spandex and take up bike-riding.<br />

X RATED<br />

WITH DON MUNRO OF TRIPLE X WETSUITS<br />

Don Munro, like Bernie Filer, has been in the surf<br />

industry for a lifetime. Don travelled around the world<br />

with his young family in the early seventies with his<br />

first surf label Close to Earth. Later on he made his<br />

first fortune with a surf label he developed in Australia<br />

called Mango.<br />

Back then, the big three were just starting out. Rip Curl<br />

were focused on their wetsuits and both Billabong and<br />

Quiksilver on their boardshorts. Don had the idea to<br />

focus on screen-printed surf t-shirts. It took off.<br />

Following on from Mango, Triple X was born in 1993<br />

starting with rash shirts and later wetsuits. With the<br />

big three brands diversifying into other categories, Don<br />

believed their focus had drifted and seized upon the<br />

opportunity to become a specialist wetsuit company.<br />

18 years on, Triple X have a following of core surfers.<br />

WHAT EXACTLY IS TITANIUM?<br />

“It is a derivative of Titanium, which is of course a<br />

metal, combined with several other things.<br />

“The Titanium is extruded to its liquid form and<br />

laminated onto the neoprene like ink. It flexes and<br />

moves with the material.<br />

“Because of how it is applied, we don’t have any<br />

issues with it flaking or cracking. With our earlier<br />

suits it did eventually wear off with general wear and<br />

tear as your body rubbed up against the laminate. To<br />

combat this we now cover the laminate with the latest<br />

multi-stretch jersey.”<br />

SO WHAT DOES THE TITANIUM<br />

ACTUALLY DO?<br />

“Every one of our suits has a titanium insulation shield.<br />

It stops windchill and increases thermal warmth by<br />

recycling your body heat. It extracts your body heat and<br />

reflects it back at you.<br />

“That is why it is laminated onto the inside of the neoprene<br />

and not the outside. Scientific tests have proven<br />

titanium laminated suits work.<br />

“We make lots of suits for commercial abalone divers<br />

around Australia and tuna farmers in Port Lincoln,<br />

South Australia. Down there the water is not only<br />

bitterly cold but these guys are exposed to extreme<br />

windchill. They leave the offshore tuna farms, still in<br />

their Triple X wetsuits, and travel back to port in a boat.<br />

Before using our wetsuits they would have to change<br />

back into their clothes to return to port.”<br />

“TITANIUM<br />

INSULATION:<br />

IT STOPS<br />

WINDCHILL<br />

AND INCREASES<br />

THERMAL<br />

WARMTH”<br />

110 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


WETSUITS:<br />

TURN UP THE HEAT<br />

THAT’S MAGIC<br />

WELL I FAILED SCIENCE CLASS IN SCHOOL SO<br />

I‘LL BE BUGGERED IF I CAN EXPLAIN WHAT IS<br />

GOING ON HERE APART FROM THIS:<br />

TRIPLE X FEATURES<br />

A WIDE RANGE OF RUBBER<br />

“We have an extensive range of suits that all<br />

feature our titanium insulation shield from 1/1<br />

through to a 5/5 for surfers. Our neoprene also<br />

resists compression – often a standard 5/5 suit<br />

will eventually end up a millimetre or so thinner.”<br />

STITCHING<br />

“All our steamers in the mega-stretch range<br />

feature the latest technology in sealed seam glue<br />

welding. We do that on the inside of the suit.<br />

On the outside we use a blind stitch to give the<br />

seam support and strength without penetrating<br />

the fabric so it doesn’t leak water into the suit.<br />

We chose this over liquid seams because we<br />

found these crack over time and are a nightmare<br />

to repair.”<br />

ZIP HOOP<br />

“We found pulling up a zip needed to be made<br />

easier. How many times have you seen surfers<br />

doing a funny little dance trying to wrestle their<br />

zip up whilst holding the base of their wettie<br />

near their lower back with the other hand? With<br />

the new super stretch materials, this area is also<br />

prone to tearing. We reinforced the area at the<br />

base of the zip to prevent just that and stitched<br />

in a hoop to hold onto.<br />

ZIPS<br />

“We discovered a new heavy-duty zip that<br />

because of the way it locks off, stops water<br />

leakage. This enabled us to resist going with<br />

the trend of what is called a ‘batwing’ as many<br />

surfers had commented to us they didn’t like how<br />

restrictive these were.<br />

“Our substantial following of surfers and coldwater<br />

divers have never complained about water<br />

leakage. As a further measure to minimise any<br />

water penetrating the suit we have a pocket at<br />

the base of the zip with drain holes in it.”<br />

PRICING?<br />

Triple X is not only priced substantially<br />

below the major brands, they also offer a<br />

warranty considered ridiculous by many. Many<br />

manufacturers give a lifetime guarantee on<br />

workmanship; Triple X goes one step further. If<br />

anything goes wrong with one of their suits in<br />

the first twelve months Triple X will replace it.<br />

They will also repair a suit for life free, if it is<br />

repairable. Hence, they are pretty confident in<br />

the quality and make of their wetsuits.<br />

WHERE TO GET A TRIPLE X WETTIE?<br />

Whilst still supplying a couple of select stores,<br />

Triple X predominantly sells direct to the public<br />

through their online site and warehouse in<br />

Ballina.<br />

Their broad range of styles and sizes from XS<br />

through to XXXL, coupled with suits using the<br />

latest multi-stretch material means they can fit<br />

a wide range of body sizes. Triple X ships their<br />

suits all around Australia for free and if the fit<br />

isn’t what you want, they’ll happily exchange it.<br />

There is also a service line customers can call to<br />

speak with knowledgeable staff<br />

The Magic Heater is like a kidney belt<br />

made out of wetsuit material and is fixed<br />

around your waist with velcro and goes<br />

under your wetsuit.<br />

It is not reliant on batteries so you don’t<br />

have to worry if they are fully charged or<br />

any of that business.<br />

Within the belt is a pouch and inside that<br />

is a bag filled with some kind of gel or<br />

‘crystals’, as they call it.<br />

You press the button on the bag and some<br />

mighty weird shit goes on, the crystals<br />

change colour and next minute, the thing is<br />

as hot as hell.<br />

You wack the bag back in the pouch, affix<br />

the belt to your waist, pull up your wettie<br />

and away you go.<br />

The heat lasts for an hour.<br />

The Magic Heater can be reused again<br />

and again.<br />

It is friggin’ amazing and one of the coolest<br />

things I have ever seen plus it works. You<br />

can check it out on http://www.youtube.<br />

com/watch?v=-3PD9cAMa08<br />

As Caspian De Looze, Sydney north shore<br />

artist and surfer explains it, “That’s twisted<br />

alien technology.” That it is Caspian, and<br />

coming from you means it really is ‘out there’.<br />

The Magic Heater retails for $184.95.<br />

Stockists of Tools can be found on<br />

WWW.TOOLSSURFAUSTRALIA.COM.AU<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

111


GEAR: WETSUITS<br />

WETSUITS:<br />

TURN UP THE HEAT<br />

THE<br />

SKIN I AM IN<br />

WITH TOMAS MARTIN FROM C-SKINS<br />

WHY FIT IS SO<br />

IMPORTANT<br />

A wetsuit is arguably the most<br />

exacting item of clothing you will<br />

ever wear. The fit should be tight<br />

but not so you can’t move freely.<br />

If it is too loose, it’s useless. Your<br />

wettie will continually flush with<br />

cold water and you will end up<br />

carrying around heaps of water<br />

causing you to resemble the<br />

Michelin Man or someone suffering<br />

from severe incontinence.<br />

BRIEF BACKGROUND ON<br />

C-SKINS<br />

Carey Brown founded C-Skins after originally working<br />

with a company called Gull in the UK, a huge surf brand<br />

that manufacturers everything surf related from boards<br />

to apparel. Carey’s uncle, Dennis Cross, was the founder<br />

of Gull and together they developed the first ever surfing<br />

steamers in Europe back in 1969.<br />

After Gull was sold in the late nineties, Carey set up<br />

C-Skins in 2000 as a specialist wetsuit company. Their<br />

focus was, and still is, to specialise in manufacturing<br />

quality wetsuits and neoprene products for the core<br />

surfer.<br />

Their first item they produced was the C-Skins Original -<br />

apparently a world first lightweight vest with a titanium<br />

laminate. You only have to look at where we are today<br />

to realise these guys are at the forefront of wetsuit<br />

innovation.<br />

FIT<br />

“The fit is such a key aspect of a good wetsuit. If the fit<br />

isn’t right, it won’t matter what the suit is made out of,<br />

it will not keep you warm. The fit is the most important<br />

thing bar none.<br />

“Not every wetsuit is perfect for everybody but that’s<br />

why it is important manufacturers carry a broad and diverse<br />

range of sizes. Our C-Skins range for men consists<br />

of XS, S, M, as well as M short and M tall, L, as well as<br />

L short, L tall, XL, XXL and XXXL.”<br />

HOW CAN YOU TEST IF THE FIT<br />

IS RIGHT?<br />

“You want a neoprene with a great deal of stretch so<br />

your suit moves with you. You can test it in a number<br />

of ways. First, grab a hold of either arm of a wetsuit<br />

with a mate and pull it apart. Try the various brands and<br />

price points. You will see a notable difference as to the<br />

grade of neoprene used. Secondly, try on heaps of suits.<br />

A wetsuit is a significant and important investment<br />

that will enable you to enjoy your surfing in the cooler<br />

months, so take the time to properly research what you<br />

are after. With the suit on, simulate the movements you<br />

would do while surfing including general stretches. In<br />

particular, perform kinetic movements not just static<br />

poses. You want to be able to move freely and not feel<br />

like you are in a straightjacket.”<br />

WARMTH<br />

“You want a wetsuit that is super stretchy but not at<br />

the expense of durability or warmth. With our C-Skins<br />

suits we pride ourselves on specking up the neoprene. If<br />

you were to take a close look at some suits and actually<br />

measured their thickness with a caliper, you would<br />

notice they are specked down. In their efforts to make<br />

a suit super light or super stretchy, many manufacturers<br />

actually spec down the rubber. What you end up with<br />

instead of a 3/2 wetsuit is a 2.5/1.5 wettie. You are<br />

not as warm and because the stitch holding the various<br />

panels together has less to hold onto, it is more prone<br />

to tearing.”<br />

112 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


5<br />

KEY TIPS<br />

TO FINDING<br />

THE RIGHT<br />

WETSUIT<br />

Bettina with Steve of Skipp Surfboards<br />

C-SKINS FEATURES<br />

QUALITY FIRST<br />

“Our C-Skins suits often end up being a half-millimeter<br />

thicker because we appreciate neoprene will compress over<br />

time and we don’t wish to skimp on rubber. For us it doesn’t<br />

matter if a suit costs another dollar to make because we<br />

don’t make as many as the big boys. Our focus isn’t on continuously<br />

increasing profit margins for shareholders. Saving<br />

a dollar by cutting a corner doesn’t make a difference to<br />

us. We are all about quality. Why buy a wetsuit from a<br />

company that has spent more money on marketing than the<br />

raw materials that go into it?”<br />

WATER REPELLATION<br />

“A number of our suits have various features to keep water out.<br />

• Lockdown cuffs -the circumference is reduced by about<br />

a third so you have this incredible watertight seal on<br />

your wrist.<br />

• Opti-wick in the legs to draw water away from your body.<br />

• Liquid seams on the outside of the suit to repel water<br />

off the suit. Liquid seams on the inside tend to grip the<br />

skin and are uncomfortable. Liquid seams inside and<br />

outside restrict the stretch.”<br />

DURABILITY<br />

“Some manufacturers lay claim to the fact their suit will<br />

last at least three seasons. Having been recently developed<br />

and released onto the market, how do they know? The fact<br />

is, some surfers simply wear through their wetties quicker<br />

because of the way they surf and where. Rather than make<br />

unsubstantiated claims we have focused on the areas prone<br />

to wear and tear.”<br />

SMOOTH-SKIN RUBBER<br />

• great at stopping windchill but it’s not durable<br />

• we have replaced it with our ultraflex neoprene on the<br />

outside and quick-dry polypropylene on the inside<br />

CHEST ZIPS<br />

“Asymmetric chest zips zip down one shoulder and are an<br />

absolute nightmare to get on and off. As a result you place<br />

a lot of strain on the suit getting in and out of it. That’s<br />

where most people do the damage to their suits. Having<br />

one shoulder closed off also makes you feel somewhat<br />

lop-sided.<br />

“Our suits have an overhead collar instead with a diagonal<br />

chest zipper, bungee fixers and a double clamshell.The<br />

double clamshell, as opposed to the single, means you can<br />

open the top of your wetsuit up wider to assist ease of<br />

entry.<br />

MINIMAL SEAMS<br />

“Less seams means more stretch, a lesser likelihood of<br />

water entry and less areas for joins to deteriorate. “<br />

PRICING?<br />

“Many manufacturers have benefitted from a strong Aussie<br />

dollar because they manufacture overseas and the subsequent<br />

cost of materials and the make have come down<br />

substantially but this has not been reflected in their price.<br />

“As C-Skins is new to the market, we have based our prices<br />

on the current state of affairs and that’s why we are up to<br />

$200 cheaper on a basic steamer than the big brands. Either<br />

that or you can get a wettie with a stack more features for<br />

the same price.<br />

WHERE TO GET A C-SKIN WETTIE?<br />

Stockists are listed on www.c-skins.com If your local<br />

doesn’t stock it encourage them to do so or contact C-Skins<br />

direct on 61 (0) 412 081 546 or email: tomas@c-skins.com<br />

Bettina Huckel is possibly the<br />

longest serving employee in the<br />

surf industry. She has worked for<br />

John Skipp in Wollongong for<br />

close to 35 years, starting back<br />

on the 23rd October 1976. Skipp<br />

Surfboards incidentally was<br />

the first ever account for a then<br />

fledgling surf label that specialised<br />

in wetsuits called Rip Curl.<br />

Bettina has fitted plenty of<br />

wetsuits in her time, so we asked<br />

her for some tips on finding the<br />

right wetsuit.<br />

1. Support and shop at your<br />

100% local surf shop<br />

2. Talk to a wetsuit specialist –<br />

someone who takes the time<br />

to ensure you get a proper<br />

fitting wettie and provides<br />

you with personalised<br />

service<br />

3. Know your weight and height<br />

for the fitting<br />

4. Know your budget<br />

5. Take the time for a proper<br />

fitting and be patient<br />

Next time you are in The Gong<br />

and in the market for wettie, drop<br />

by and have a chat to Bettina. She<br />

is a lovely lady who knows her<br />

stuff and a real spunk to boot.<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

113


GEAR: FORUM<br />

EXPORTING<br />

AUSSIE BOARDS<br />

WORDS: DAVE SWAN AND TOMMY LEITCH<br />

Classic Malibu’s Peter White has been heavily ensconced in surfboard<br />

manufacture for over forty years. His Classic Malibu label, based in<br />

Noosa Heads, has been established for almost twenty years, and has<br />

been exporting for well over half of that. Destinations for Classic Malibu<br />

boards include New Zealand, France, the US and across the Asia Pacific.<br />

He had this to say about the exportation of Australian boards:<br />

WHAT IS YOUR VIEW ON EXPORTING BOARDS AS A NATION?<br />

We could and should be exporting a lot more boards than we probably<br />

do because of the quality and the fact that, of the top professional<br />

surfers, the majority seem to be Australian, therefore our equipment<br />

must work better. But with the Australian dollar at an all-time high, it’s<br />

very difficult at the moment.<br />

HOW DID YOU DEVELOP YOUR EXPORT MARKET?<br />

From a lot of early overseas travel making friends and acquaintances<br />

within the industry, general research, making trips to countries that we<br />

wanted to deal with, sounding out what they needed and wanted and<br />

giving them exactly that.<br />

“JUST CROSS YOUR ‘T’S AND DOT<br />

YOUR ‘I’S AND MAKE SURE ALL<br />

YOUR PAPERWORK IS IN PLACE<br />

WAS IT SOMETHING YOU INSTIGATED?<br />

In a lot of cases, they approached us, through word of mouth, quality,<br />

and obviously our team riders achieving results in national and<br />

international events.<br />

HOW HAVE YOU FOUND THE PHYSICAL EXPORTATION OF<br />

BOARDS AND ALSO THE BUSINESS GENERATED?<br />

It’s helped our business – there’s no doubt about it. We rely a lot on<br />

export. Probably 20 percent or more of our manufacturing is for export.<br />

It can get a little awkward with the different seasons: in summer here,<br />

we’re usually busy, but it’s the time when Europe wants boards for their<br />

pre-summer deliveries.<br />

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO OTHER MANUFACTURERS<br />

WISHING TO BEGIN EXPORT?<br />

We’ve travelled some rough roads – it’s not easy. They’ll screw you<br />

down every chance they get, promise you payment that you don’t<br />

receive until you’re at the very end of your tether. But basically, just<br />

cross your ‘t’s and dot your ‘i’s and make sure all your paperwork is in<br />

place and you’ve got an agreement that you can hold them to.<br />

114 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


NO FREE RIDES THANKS<br />

WORDS & PHOTO:<br />

DEREK ELLENS<br />

Boards<br />

for land<br />

and sea<br />

This photo was shot in the Sunshine Coast<br />

hinterland. We went up there to find the<br />

hairpin turn that overlooks the Coast, under<br />

construction.<br />

The construction workers actually didn’t mind us<br />

being there - Boardstore rider Millsy Makenzie<br />

flying by on loose gravel was just entertainment<br />

for them. But the hairpin had no cement left on<br />

it, so we opted for some other turns down the<br />

mountain. I remember holding the boot open<br />

for Millsy, expecting him to put his board and<br />

helmet in and ride down in the car, but there<br />

he stood with a big cheesy grin on his face, all<br />

padded up, longboard in hand.<br />

“I didn’t come all the way up here just to ride<br />

down in a car. I’ll meet you at the bottom” he<br />

said, already giddy from the thought of how<br />

many turns, sweeps and slides he was about to<br />

under take in one solid run.<br />

Needless to say he made it all the way to the<br />

bottom in one piece and still giddy. All this on a<br />

bum knee, two weeks after surgery.<br />

Not just a surf shop,<br />

Southern Man Surf has<br />

a fantastic range of<br />

skateboards - customs<br />

and completes.<br />

Skater: Simon Deutcher<br />

Photo: Tim Saunders<br />

EVERYBODY WANTS NEOPRENE<br />

SAFE TO SAY, THE RESPONSE TO THE RISEN LONGBOARD GIVEAWAY<br />

IN OUR LAST EDITION WAS HUGE. It seems that everyone who read<br />

the piece loved the idea of the neoprene deck-grip and couldn’t wait to<br />

get their feet onto it... With so many submissions, we asked the Trinity<br />

Distribution boys to pick their favourite...<br />

For personal<br />

service and<br />

great advice,<br />

come in an<br />

talk to Tim<br />

to get kitted<br />

out with the<br />

perfect board<br />

for you.<br />

WINNER!<br />

Congrats to Craig Stewart of Woonona, NSW. His dodgy feet and<br />

dodgier photo got him the nod and a slightly used Risen longboard, with<br />

neoprene deck-grip thanks to Trinity Distribution. Craig, please get on<br />

your new board and get yourself to the pharmacy to get some heel balm.<br />

HONORABLE<br />

MENTIONS<br />

As much as we’d like<br />

to give everyone free<br />

stuff, there can only be<br />

one winner. However,<br />

these creative folks<br />

deserve a good backpat<br />

for valiant efforts all<br />

‘round. Well done...<br />

Carrie wanted to<br />

replace her dad’s 25<br />

year old classic...<br />

“It’s really heavy,<br />

doesn’t move and<br />

won’t turn. Dad says<br />

there is nothing wrong<br />

with it. How is that<br />

going to help a girl<br />

improve her surfing?”<br />

Hey, Dad’s board rocks!<br />

“I love to skate along the concrete<br />

Especially in my size 12 bare feet.<br />

But this can be a very painful feat<br />

because of my deformed plates of meat.<br />

To score a neoprene deck would be really neat.<br />

Then I could board pain free along the street,<br />

giving my dodgy toes a real sweat treat.”<br />

Mike Jones<br />

138 Princes Highway<br />

Ulladulla, NSW 2539<br />

www.southernman.com.au<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

115


Skateboards...<br />

PHOTOS BY CHARLIE HARDY PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

...for<br />

surfers!<br />

32” FLYING FISH TAIL SKATEBOARD<br />

The ultimate in self-propelling skateboards<br />

designed for surfers. For more info, call 0407 4<strong>05</strong> 390 or visit<br />

www.smoothstar.com.au<br />

116 may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

Check out video online!


DIFFERENT<br />

SHAPES<br />

GEAR: SKATE LOCAL<br />

Adam Baldwin is a shaper of a different kind. He designs<br />

and makes longboard skateboards. This Sunshine Coast<br />

schoolteacher-by-day gets his kicks experimenting with<br />

creating the perfect wheeled board under his label, Skatement<br />

Speedboards. Derek Ellens of the Boardstore in Maroochydore<br />

and Caloundra caught up with him to find out more.<br />

WORDS AND PHOTOS: DEREK ELLENS<br />

WHEN DID YOU FIRST START<br />

LONGBOARDING?<br />

Since I was a teenager my main focus<br />

had always been surfing. I had ridden<br />

a skateboard in the skate parks a fair<br />

bit but it was never really any more<br />

than transport and a bit of fun. My<br />

first real exposure to longboarding<br />

was when I was introduced to Yvon<br />

Labarthe’s vimeo channel. His videos<br />

were really the start of it all for me.<br />

WHAT WAS IT ABOUT THE<br />

VIDEOS THAT MADE YOU WANT<br />

TO LONGBOARD?<br />

He travels to all of the events in the<br />

european summer and gets footage<br />

from right in the middle of the action.<br />

He rides a street luge as well as a<br />

stand up longboard, and the footage<br />

makes you feel like you are right there<br />

flying down the hill with him. He gets<br />

permission to follow the final of each<br />

of the standup events on his luge and<br />

films the entire race, great footage,<br />

great sound tracks. It just made me<br />

want to try it.<br />

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST BOARD?<br />

I think I got a lime green plastic<br />

skateboard for about my 10th<br />

birthday. It was really flexible and you<br />

could get the middle of the board to<br />

touch the ground if you bounced on it.<br />

Back then I thought the Tick Tack was<br />

the coolest move and dropping off the<br />

two-step gap off the patio at home.<br />

I wish I still had it.<br />

I had a secondhand 46” pintail given<br />

to me around September 09, it was<br />

really flexy and I just used it to cruise<br />

to the beach to check the surf out. I<br />

was introduced to Adrian at Cre8tive<br />

Sk8 in Townsville to get bearings and<br />

bushings for the “no name” trucks<br />

that were on it and I started to see<br />

the potential of having the right gear.<br />

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE PART<br />

ABOUT LONGBOARDING?<br />

Coming from a surfing background the<br />

feeling of speed when rolling down<br />

a hill, the feel of drive that you can<br />

create when pumping the board along<br />

flat ground. But I guess the one thing I<br />

have really been enjoying lately is the<br />

feel of breaking traction and drifting<br />

around corners, not just sliding the<br />

board sideways but tracking around<br />

the corner, its hard to explain, like a<br />

rally car going around a corner.<br />

WHAT WAS YOUR MOTIVATION<br />

TO DESIGN YOUR OWN BOARDS?<br />

Originally it was because I couldn’t<br />

really afford to buy a production deck.<br />

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN<br />

MAKING YOUR OWN BOARDS?<br />

I made my first board in February 2010<br />

HOW MANY BOARDS DID YOU<br />

MAKE BEFORE YOU WERE<br />

COMPLETELY SATISFIED WITH<br />

THE OUTCOME?<br />

I am a perfectionist so I find little<br />

things that I would like to change in<br />

every deck. I would have to say that<br />

my 4 th board was the first one I was<br />

completely happy actually riding. I<br />

had worked out the wheelbase that I<br />

really liked and the last 15-20 boards<br />

have all been based on that design<br />

with small adjustments to the shape,<br />

changes in materials and changing<br />

specifications to suite individual<br />

clients.<br />

WHAT IS IT ABOUT “SKATEMENT<br />

SPEEDBOARDS” THAT MAKE<br />

THEM DIFFERENT?<br />

The “W” concave is something I think<br />

really sets them apart from what<br />

most surfers see as a skateboard.<br />

Although, the W concave is actually<br />

something that would probably<br />

appeal to most surfers, it lets you feel<br />

where you foot is on the back of the<br />

board very similar to a tail pad on a<br />

surfboard.<br />

One of Adam’s<br />

Skatement creations<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

117


DIFFERENT<br />

SHAPES<br />

My current boards are made from a combination of timber veneers<br />

specifically chosen for different strength requirements. Held together with<br />

epoxy, carbon fibre and fibreglass the main aim has been to find materials<br />

that can provide the strongest, most stable construction while keeping the<br />

weight of the boards to a minimum.<br />

I have tried to keep all my materials local, the veneer comes from Brisbane<br />

the epoxy and composites come from a Sunshine Coast store, and of course<br />

the artist I employ lives in the same house as me. (Laughs)<br />

When I make a person a board they have input into the, specifications and<br />

colour. The board is personalised for them, depending on their weight and<br />

the level of flex they would like in the deck.<br />

IS IT A STRUGGLE JUGGLING TEACHING, A FAMILY AND MAKING<br />

LONGBOARDS?<br />

Quite simply, yes.<br />

IS IT JUST A HOBBY TO TAKE UP SOME DOWNTIME OR DO YOU<br />

DAYDREAM ABOUT MAKING BOARDS ALL DAY?<br />

I find time where I can. At the moment it’s a hobby, but I would like it to<br />

be more, so I’ll keep working at it. I don’t really have any down time. It’s<br />

teaching, renovating, jobs to live your life and a bit of time each week to<br />

make or test something fun.<br />

I do tend to think about making or riding all day in between work and life.<br />

I used to think about surfing all day, but I haven’t been able to find time for<br />

both. So building and riding skateboards has taken over. Some surfers will<br />

say I’m crazy, but when there is a long flat spell I still have something to get<br />

stoked about.<br />

ANY LAST THOUGHTS BEFORE YOU GO?<br />

Saftey gear really is cool. Being hurt, a vegetable or dead is not.<br />

TEST<br />

EVERYTHING<br />

BOARDS OF LAND AND SEA: CRUISY DAYS WITH A SMOOTHSTAR<br />

AND FIGHTING SURF SLOP WITH SOME GREAT SURFBOARDS<br />

Smoothstar<br />

Shortboard Cruiser<br />

WORDS: DAVE SWAN<br />

“After riding just<br />

once, I bought one<br />

immediately”<br />

Columns such as this are not designed to pay ‘lip service’ to<br />

manufacturers of surf and skate gear. Our ‘Test Everything’ section<br />

is genuinely committed to providing readers with honest appraisals<br />

of the latest and greatest products. To date we’ve been extremely<br />

fortunate to have tested a number of products we really like. I<br />

suppose it helps when you love everything about surfing and skating.<br />

Anyhow, that all changed when we tested the new Smoothstar<br />

skateboard.<br />

Did I hook you in by making you think we were going to trash some<br />

crappy product? If I did, I am sorry to disappoint.<br />

Following the week we tested the Smoothstar Shortboard Cruiser<br />

I bought one without hesitation. Believe me, I am on just as tight a<br />

budget as everyone at the present moment but there was no question<br />

of ‘if’ or ‘when’. The Smoothstar was my answer for those flat surf<br />

days, ensuring I still got my fix of surf stoke.<br />

In my opinion the Smoothstar Shortboard Cruiser is the closest thing<br />

to surfing, just on land. If you suffer from terrible mood swings like<br />

me when the surf is unfavourable do yourself, your family, your wife/<br />

girlfriend and/or friends a favour and buy one immediately. It’s that good.<br />

The board is so loose and responsive you can imagine yourself<br />

cruising across the face of a wave or ripping it to shreds with an array<br />

of cutbacks, roundhouses and bottom turns. You can even work the<br />

board, just like you would a surfboard, and generate a huge amount<br />

of speed even on flat roads and not just steep declines. I even got<br />

it going up a slight incline, a real workout but an incredible way to<br />

improve your surfing.<br />

I give it the biggest thumbs up. In fact, I give it two thumbs and two<br />

big toes. For more, see www.smoothstar.com.au<br />

Go Adam, go...<br />

FOR MORE INFORMATION, LOOK UP SKATEMENT SPEEDBOARDS ON FACEBOOK.<br />

Check out the Yvon Labarthe vimeo channel that inspired Adam to start Skatement:<br />

http://vimeo.com/user1990279.<br />

118 may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

Dave can’t do<br />

this trick (or<br />

much, of anything<br />

really) so here’s<br />

a cooler photo of<br />

someone who can...


Truly awful surf conditions:<br />

Proof that we’re silly<br />

enough to test everything in<br />

absolutely anything<br />

Photos: Lucas Muro<br />

www.lucasmuro.com.au GEAR: REVIEW<br />

Diverse<br />

Sonic Pro Model<br />

• 5’10 x 18 ¼ x 2 3/16 Thruster<br />

• 24.3 litres<br />

• Epoxy with ‘Internal Integration Dynocore’<br />

construction<br />

Ok, for starters it is a high performance shortboard and<br />

I am not a high performance surfer. I am not even a<br />

medium performance surfer, I’m more of a performing<br />

surfer... of various comedy routines, so I will do my best<br />

to describe it.<br />

I rarely ride performance shortboards. I am a strong<br />

swimmer, so paddling is not a problem, but I still<br />

find getting onto a wave late and getting your feet<br />

placement right, on a small board that is not forgiving, a<br />

challenge.<br />

You can imagine what I thought when Dave Verall<br />

selected a board for me that was only 18 ¼” wide and<br />

2 3 / 16” thick. (I’m 6ft and about 82 kgs)<br />

I gave the board a run in Newcastle and on the Sunshine<br />

Coast and have to say I genuinely now want to own<br />

a true performance shortboard – in fact, I want this<br />

one. It’s weird. Even though it is narrow, it just sticks<br />

to your feet. That’s the only way I can describe it. It’s<br />

extremely steady underfoot, particularly for a board of<br />

its size. It’s also quick off the mark, has good drive and<br />

because it’s so small and light, I found myself doing<br />

some manoeuvres I usually wouldn’t associate with my<br />

personal surfing ability.<br />

It’s easy to paddle and rather corky under chest and<br />

seemingly indestructible – all the boards I ride get a solid<br />

test in that department. I copped a beating this morning<br />

and not the slightest dent in the board<br />

My verdict? I am truly impressed. Whatever weird and<br />

secret stuff that has gone into making this board, it<br />

works. The Dynocore is dynamite.<br />

More Surfboards<br />

5’7” Swinger<br />

• FUNctional design<br />

• Quad fin with quite a different set-up<br />

• Big flyer about halfway up the board<br />

The first thing people do when they see this board is<br />

raise their eyebrows. You can see them thinking to<br />

themselves, “Another weird-arse, goofy design.” Every<br />

one of my mates who saw it admitted that this is what<br />

they thought at first glance– all show and no go.<br />

Now I am far from being an expert shaper or a fountain<br />

of knowledge on surfboard design but I do know one<br />

thing, this board works. AND, every one of my mates<br />

who tried it, liked it. In fact, they were all forthright and<br />

glowing in their praise.<br />

The board basically has the nose of a fish so it is easy<br />

to paddle and get onto a wave. It has loads of stability<br />

and the additional planing area gets you up and going<br />

speedily without trying. It skips across flat sections with<br />

ease. However when you turn the board, it handles like a<br />

performance shortboard. You can turn it hard and tight.<br />

So in essence it is half fish, half performance shortboard.<br />

The nose allows you to generate speed easily and the<br />

tail allows you to whip the board around. It is a great<br />

board to ride and testament to the fact that Swingers<br />

have more fun.<br />

THE SWINGER: Guest-tester Karl De Wet took a<br />

shine to the More Surfboards quad, going out twice the<br />

same morning on this model. He couldn’t get enough.<br />

THE NEAR-INDESTRUCTIBLE DYNOCORE: A performance<br />

board that doesn’t make an average surfer feel like a total kook.<br />

You can see by the wax we’ve made good use of the tester.


OFF THE BEATEN TRACK, IN THE BEACHSIDE<br />

SUBURB OF MARCOOLA ON THE SUNSHINE<br />

COAST, WALLY’S WATER GALLERY IS MOST<br />

CERTAINLY NOT YOUR AVERAGE SURF SHOP.<br />

A FAMILY<br />

AFFAIR<br />

WORDS & PHOTOS:<br />

MARK CHAPMAN<br />

How many people, at the age of 15, run their own surf shop? While<br />

many other coast teenagers are hanging out at Sunshine Plaza,<br />

you’ll find Wally Johnson behind the counter of his own, very unique<br />

store - when the surf’s not on, anyway.<br />

“It’s a shop full of different things, but it’s all about the beach,”<br />

says Wally, standing amongst collections of shells, recycled timber<br />

frames and a shelf of very cool looking Wegener boards. “You won’t<br />

find a lot of what we have in here in most other surf shops.”<br />

It’s all about<br />

the beach<br />

surf art • shells<br />

driftwood things<br />

chenille shorts<br />

wood surf boards<br />

beach stuff • retro<br />

sunnies • thongs<br />

stripy towels<br />

umbrellas<br />

The reason for this variety could be the family input - most<br />

noticeably the beautiful recycled furniture and picture frames<br />

displaying Wally’s own surf photography built by dad, Phil Johnson.<br />

Seeing Phil’s creations made from old fence palings and assorted<br />

bits of found timber is worth the visit alone. But there’s much more.<br />

Wally’s sister Emma also contributes with her handmade coasters<br />

and jewellery, and mum Debbie’s years of collecting shells on<br />

Marcoola beach fills bowl upon bowl in store.<br />

Wally’s Water Gallery is also all about supporting local<br />

manufacturers, proudly displaying everything from Tom Wegener’s<br />

boards to handmade chenille towels and shorts from Caloundra’s Jay<br />

Ce Kay, retro sunnies from Savage in Noosa and local thongs, Souls.<br />

You could pretty much completely kit yourself out for the beach and<br />

redecorate and refurnish your home in just one visit. While you’re<br />

there, you can even enjoy a surf movie in-store on a big projector<br />

screen, or choose from the hire section to take one home overnight -<br />

a great little service to get your surf movie fix.<br />

A healthy, refreshing change from mass marketing and big brands,<br />

this store is is truly something special worth supporting.<br />

6 Lorraine Ave<br />

Marcoola Beach<br />

07 5448 8560<br />

So where’s Wally? At Wally’s Water Gallery, 6 Lorraine<br />

Ave, Marcoola Beach. Call (07) 5448 8560 for more info.<br />

120 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


A one-of-a-kind surf shop with<br />

one-of-a-kind products<br />

COUNTER CULTURE<br />

Main image: Inside Wally’s Water Gallery - is that a real jellyfish in glass?<br />

Above: Wally Johnson with a Wegener timber fish<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

121


CLOSEOUT: FITNESS<br />

BOOST YOUR PADDLE POWER<br />

STRENGTHEN YOUR PADDLING MUSCLES AND MAKE THE MOST OF THE WINTER SWELLS WORDS: CLAYTON BEATTY<br />

CLOSEOUT: FITNESS<br />

With the winter swells hitting for the next few<br />

months, it’s the perfect time to do a bit of dry land<br />

surf training in order to boost your paddle power. We<br />

all know that surfers who can paddle the fastest and<br />

hardest generally get the most waves, especially<br />

when the surf is bigger and there is more water<br />

moving around.<br />

Training your upper body with functional exercises<br />

is one of the easiest ways to improve your paddle<br />

power. However, as with training any part of your<br />

body, it is important to keep your muscles in balance<br />

by doing exercises that work both sides of your body.<br />

Strengthen one muscle group too much more than<br />

another and you will likely cause an imbalance and<br />

increase your chance of injury.<br />

As a general rule, for every upper body “push”<br />

exercise you need to do an upper body “pull”<br />

exercise. This will help keep your body’s muscular<br />

system healthy and in balance.<br />

Have a go at the following functional exercises<br />

to help build your upper body strength and in turn<br />

increase your paddle power.<br />

The first exercise is a “push” dominant exercise and<br />

is a variation of the standard pushup - one of the<br />

best upper body strength exercises. Doing pushups<br />

on a swiss ball increases the need for stabilisation of<br />

your core and shoulders and will also help with your<br />

popups. You can also substitute the swiss ball for a<br />

balance board or BOSU balance trainer.<br />

The second, which is a “pull” dominant exercise,<br />

targets your back and arms, which both play a major<br />

part in paddling strength. Using a resistance band<br />

allows you to do more repetitions and build up your<br />

strength fast so you can then advance to doing<br />

pullups with just your bodyweight.<br />

The final exercise is a great way to train your<br />

paddling endurance at home between surf sessions.<br />

All you need is a swiss ball and a resistance band<br />

and you can have a great paddling workout. The<br />

band’s resistance will help improve the power in your<br />

paddling muscles so when you hit the water it will<br />

feel like you have propellers for arms.<br />

SWISS BALL PUSHUPS<br />

• Start with your feet shoulder width apart<br />

and hands on the swiss ball (you can also do<br />

this exercise using a balance board or BOSU<br />

balance trainer).<br />

• Keeping your core braced, lower your chest<br />

to touch the ball and then push back up to the<br />

start position.<br />

• Do 2-3 sets of 10-20 repetitions.<br />

BAND ASSISTED PULLUPS<br />

• Loop a resistance band over the bar and under<br />

your feet/legs.<br />

• Hold the bar with an overhand grip slightly<br />

wider than shoulder width.<br />

• Pull the top of your chest up to the bar and<br />

then lower yourself back down until your arms<br />

are straight.<br />

• Perform 2-3 sets of as many repetitions as<br />

you can.<br />

RESISTANCE BAND PADDLING<br />

• Loop a resistance band around a fixed object<br />

hold onto the handles.<br />

• Lie with your chest on a swiss ball and paddle<br />

like you are on your surf board.<br />

• Try doing intervals of 20 seconds paddling<br />

followed by 10 seconds of rest. Repeat this<br />

8 times for a total of 4 minutes. Rest for 2<br />

minutes and then repeat the 4 minute paddle<br />

workout 3-4 times.<br />

TRAINING<br />

TIP<br />

ADD THESE EXERCISES INTO YOUR WEEKLY SCHEDULE AND WATCH<br />

YOUR WAVE COUNT INCREASE THIS WINTER.<br />

122 may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

Clayton Beatty is a qualified Exercise Scientist with a BSc Human Movement Degree from the University of WA and is a member of Exercise and Sports Science Australia<br />

(ESSA). He runs Total Surfing Fitness, created to help surfers improve their skills and reduce the risk of injury.<br />

We’re all keen to improve our surfing, so check out his website for surf-specific functional training exercises. Go to<br />

TotalSurfingFitness.com, and there’s even a free sample workout to get you started.


Photo: Lucas Muro<br />

History...<br />

A little bit of<br />

Brought to you by<br />

Underground Surf<br />

CHECK YO’ NECK<br />

PADDLING AND NERVE COMPRESSION IN THE NECK. WORDS: JOHN HART<br />

While you are young this may not<br />

seem an issue, however after many<br />

years of surfing, nerve entrapment or<br />

compression can become a real “pain<br />

in the neck”.<br />

Nerve compression in the cervical<br />

region (neck) can result from many<br />

years of paddling or even just a long<br />

day of surfing with your neck extended<br />

on your board.<br />

Some of the symptoms can include<br />

pins and needles in your triceps, arms<br />

or hands, and a feeling of muscle<br />

weakness. Often you may leave the<br />

surf with a pounding headache on the<br />

left or right side of your head.<br />

YOUR NECK<br />

In total there are seven vertebrae<br />

in our necks - the cervical part of<br />

our spine. Each vertebra has a bony<br />

prominence called the spinous process<br />

which is situated behind the spinal<br />

cord protecting our nerve tissue.<br />

Between each of the vertebrae<br />

are discs which act like cushions<br />

against impact on the spinal column<br />

such as occurs with movement or<br />

hyperextension when we paddle. Each<br />

disc has a soft jelly-like substance in<br />

the middle.<br />

This area can rupture, bulge or herniate<br />

through the surrounding outer ring<br />

of the disc and even affect the nerve<br />

tissue and injure our ligaments, which<br />

are composed of fibrous tissue that hold<br />

the vertebrae together and surround our<br />

cervical discs.<br />

The discs and the joints are stacked<br />

on top of each other. Our facet joints<br />

are then subject to wear and tear over<br />

time and degenerate, which is when<br />

we see dramatic changes occur.<br />

This degeneration of the cervical discs<br />

- often called cervical spondylosis -<br />

then leads into osteoarthritis.<br />

The nerve roots that come out of the<br />

area in the neck can be affected by<br />

sudden stretching, hyperextension or<br />

compression. The pain and spasm in<br />

the muscles of the neck tend to occur<br />

as a result of this along with numbness<br />

and severe headaches that can last<br />

for days. Pain can also radiate to the<br />

shoulder.<br />

TREATMENT<br />

It’s difficult to treat nerve pain. Drugs<br />

can have little effect. Usual treatment<br />

includes ice, rest, heat treatment,<br />

painkillers, muscle relaxants and<br />

physiotherapy. In most cases<br />

symptoms will settle within a few<br />

weeks, but there are no guarantees.<br />

With severe prolonged pain and severe<br />

impairment of function a localised<br />

injection by your doctor to the facet<br />

joint area may be recommended.<br />

Surgery is rarely performed and the<br />

exact nature of the procedure depends<br />

on the overall condition of your spine,<br />

your age and the severity of the<br />

problem. However surgeons don’t<br />

seem to like tackling this area.<br />

PREVENTION<br />

Positioning yourself on your board with<br />

less hyperextension of your neck will<br />

eliminate this problem. While it’s a bit<br />

difficult to master, the surfer needs to<br />

be aware and keep his/her neck to the<br />

side and change the position from left<br />

to right when paddling. Be conscious<br />

of the neck being held up and facing<br />

forward for long periods of time.<br />

Strengthening the area will also assist.<br />

IT’S BONZER!<br />

WORDS AND PICS: ANDRÉ MARSAUS<br />

Bonzer (Bon-zer) adj; Australian slang; extaordinary. unique.<br />

The Bonzer was the first tri-fin surfboard made in a US garage by the<br />

Campbell brothers in december 1970. It had a triangular fin arrangement of<br />

three fins: two ‘keel’ like fins placed forward of a centre fin. The side fins<br />

were placed 10 1/2” to 12” from the tail and 1 1/2” to 2” from the rail and<br />

were towed in towards the nose.<br />

The bottom shape was single to double concave - the first in the history<br />

of surfboard design - which worked in conjunction with the fins to<br />

organise water flow through the tail, making it fast, positive and ultra<br />

maneuverable.<br />

The early Bonzers were short: 5’4” to 5’8” based on the Aussie shortboard<br />

designs, as the Campbell brothers - and the rest of the world - had a lot of<br />

respect for our shapers and surfers. Aussies were a force in surfing.<br />

During the early days the Bonzer’s were being made in the Campbell’s<br />

garage and were constantly being improved.<br />

After sending letters describing their unique surfboard design to the major<br />

American manufacturers, the only response the brothers received was from<br />

Bing and Mike Eaton, two of the most highly regarded shapers of the time.<br />

Bing and Eaton were intrigued by the boards the boys showed them and<br />

eagerly watched footage of the boards in action.<br />

The guys decided to make a few boards together at the Bing Surfboards<br />

factory and gave them to team riders to try out. The crew were stoked so<br />

production of the Bonzers moved from the Campbells garage to the shaping<br />

bay and into professional hands.<br />

Aussie’s Pete ‘PT’ Townend and Brian ‘Fury’ Austin soon jumped on the<br />

Bonzer bandwagon and boards started emerging from shaping bays all<br />

over the country including Goodtime in Kirra, Gordon & Smith and Cooper<br />

in NSW and Klemm Bell in Victoria. PT, Ian Cairns, Terry Richardrson and a<br />

load of top Aussie surfers were enjoying great success in surf comps.<br />

The Bonzer was historically the first tri-fin, overshadowed in the 80’s by<br />

Simon Anderson’s thruster. The Campbell brothers let the hype of the<br />

thruster die down keeping the Bonzer under wraps for eight years before<br />

they revealed the Bonzer 5 designed in 1982 and released in 1990.<br />

Pro surfers including Taylor Knox, Joel Tudor and Rob Machado started<br />

riding the boards and Bonzer 5 earned it’s well-deserved respect.<br />

Within months of Bonzer 5 hitting the water Rusty released its new 5-fin<br />

design and the boys were overshadowed once again.<br />

Over 40 years later, the Bonzer lives on, still shaped by those in the know<br />

and a testament to its design. With thanks to the Campbell Brothers.<br />

John Hart is a qualified fitness instructor and personal trainer with a<br />

Masters in education who also writes books, trains and rehabilitates<br />

people, takes photos, directs movies and is always happy to share<br />

what he’s learned.<br />

• Masters In Education (Disability) Newcastle University Australia<br />

• Grad Cert Education Newcastle University Australia<br />

• Diploma Fitness/Recreation<br />

• Diploma of Sport and Recreation<br />

• Cert 4 Personal Training<br />

• Level 1 Strength and Conditioning Coach<br />

WWW.JOHNHARTFITNESS.COM<br />

New surf shop, old-school feel<br />

RETRO LONGBOARDS & SHORTBOARDS<br />

NEW & CUSTOM BOARDS • BOARD HIRE • REPAIRS<br />

SKATEBOARDS • CLOTHING • AND MUCH MORE...<br />

3/31 McLean St, Coolangatta, QLD Ph: 07 5599 1040<br />

WWW.UNDERGROUNDSURF.COM.AU


SURF DIRECTORY<br />

Pick<br />

QLD CENTRAL COAST<br />

REEF 2 BEACH SURF SHOP<br />

07 4974 9072<br />

Shop 1, 10 Round Hill Road<br />

Agnes Water/1770<br />

www.reef2beachsurf.com<br />

SUNSHINE COAST<br />

NOOSA SURF WORKS<br />

07 5474 4567<br />

1/11 Bartlett St, Noosaville<br />

www.shotgunsurf.com<br />

www.lagunabaysurf.com<br />

WATERLINE<br />

07 5474 1010<br />

2/15 Venture Dr, Noosaville<br />

www.zeewetsuits.com<br />

ILLUSIONS NOOSA<br />

0488 686 206<br />

2/2 Venture Dve, Noosaville<br />

Shop 3A/11 Sunshine Beach Rd,<br />

Noosa Junction, QLD 4566<br />

CLASSIC MALIBU AUSTRALIA<br />

07 5474 3122<br />

Cnr Gibson and Eumundi Rds.<br />

Noosaville<br />

www.classicmalibu.com<br />

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE<br />

07 5474 1222<br />

3 Gibson Rd, Noosaville<br />

ON SURFARI<br />

07 5474 2162<br />

197 Gympie Terrace<br />

Noosaville<br />

www.onsurfari.com.au<br />

GOLDEN BREED<br />

07 5455 3722<br />

15 Noosa Drive,<br />

Noosa Heads<br />

www.goldenbreed.com.au<br />

NOOSA LONGBOARDS<br />

07 5447 2828<br />

SHOP 2/55 Hastings St,<br />

Noosa Heads<br />

www.noosalongboards.com<br />

SOLACE<br />

07 5455 4826<br />

20 Duke Street, Sunshine Beach<br />

solacestore.blogspot.com<br />

SURF SHOP<br />

07 5471 3489<br />

224 David Low Way,<br />

Peregian Beach<br />

www.surf-shop.org<br />

COOLUM SURF<br />

07 5351 1742<br />

Shop 14, 8-26 Birtwill St<br />

Coolum Beach<br />

www.alexsurfshop.com.au<br />

BLUE LINES<br />

07 5351 1986<br />

Shops 17 & 18 -<br />

1776 The Esplanade,<br />

Coolum Beach<br />

124 may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

WALLY’S WATER GALLERY<br />

07 5448 8560<br />

6 Lorraine Beach, Marcoola Beach<br />

OLD WOMAN SURF SHOP<br />

07 5448 7025<br />

Santorini Shop 6,<br />

15 Mudjimba Esp, Mudjimba<br />

WEIR’S INSIDE EDGE<br />

07 5443 4143<br />

14 Memorial Ave, Maroochydore<br />

DA BOMB<br />

07 5451 0620<br />

3/25 Plaza Pde, Maroochydore<br />

(07) 5437 9201<br />

7/12 Thunderbird Dr, Bokarina<br />

www.dabombsurf.com.au<br />

OCEAN ADDICTS<br />

07 5309 6624<br />

103-1<strong>05</strong> Aerodrome Rd<br />

Maroochydore<br />

www.oceanaddicts.com.au<br />

ALEX SURF<br />

07 5452 6276<br />

188 Alexandra Pde<br />

Alexandra Headlands<br />

www.alexsurf.com.au<br />

BEACH BEAT<br />

07 5443 2777<br />

164 Alexandra Pde<br />

Alexandra Headlands<br />

07 5491 8215<br />

Shop 2&3 4-6 Beerburrum St<br />

Dicky Beach<br />

07 5491 4711<br />

119 Bulcock Rd,<br />

Caloundra<br />

www.beachbeat.com.au<br />

WORLD SURFARIS<br />

1800 611 163<br />

2/174 Brisbane Rd,<br />

Mooloolaba<br />

www.worldsurfaris.com<br />

SURF PLANET<br />

07 5476 6200<br />

Shop 5, Buderim Marketplace<br />

Buderim<br />

www.surfplanet.com.au<br />

THE FACTORY<br />

07 5492 5838<br />

15 Allen St, Caloundra<br />

thefactrorysurf.com.au<br />

SURFWARE AUSTRALIA<br />

07 5491 3620<br />

2 Bulcock St, Caloundra<br />

BRISBANE<br />

PRIMITIVE SURF<br />

07 3266 1001<br />

601 Nudgee Rd,<br />

Nundah<br />

www.primitivesurf.com<br />

up the next edition of smorgasboarder at any of these fine businesses - out in July.<br />

Businesses that advertise in smorgasboarder allow us to bring you the magazine for FREE. So, be sure to support them!<br />

GOODTIME SURF & SAIL<br />

07 3391 8588<br />

29 Ipswich Rd, Wooloongabba<br />

www.goodtime.com.au<br />

FIIK<br />

Unit 2/3366 Pacific Hwy,<br />

Springwood<br />

www.fiikskateboards.com<br />

COD<br />

07 3207 0116<br />

25 Kestrel Crt, Victoria Pt<br />

www.codsurfing.com.au<br />

NORTH STRADBROKE<br />

ISLAND<br />

MINTY SURFBOARDS<br />

07 3409 8334<br />

Point Lookout<br />

www.bobmintysurfboards.com<br />

GOLDCOAST<br />

SURF FX<br />

07 5531 3199<br />

127 Ferry Road, Southport<br />

www.surf-fx.com<br />

SIDEWAYS<br />

07 5592 3849<br />

3012 Surfers Blvd, Surfers Paradise<br />

sidewaysboardsports.com.au<br />

DUKE’S LONGBOARDS<br />

07 5572 0477<br />

2578 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.dukeslongboards.com<br />

STUART SURF DESIGN<br />

07 5572 0098<br />

2576 Gold Coast Hwy,<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.stuartsurf.com.au<br />

GANGSTA SURF<br />

07 5526 6969<br />

Shop 1/ 2558 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.gangstasurf.com<br />

GREENLINE<br />

0412 398 585<br />

2544 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.greenlinepaddlesurf.com<br />

BOARD CULTURE<br />

07 5572 9866<br />

2438 Gold Coast Hwy,<br />

Mermaid Beach<br />

www.boardculture.com.au<br />

LOCAL KNOWLEDGE<br />

07 5526 6377<br />

2251 Gold Coast Hwy, Nobby Beach<br />

THE BOARDROOM<br />

07 5527 7877<br />

2084 Gold Coast Hwy,<br />

Miami<br />

LOWEN 88<br />

07 5526 5161<br />

2a/2172 Gold Coast Highway<br />

Miami<br />

www.lowen88.com<br />

HARVEY SURF GALLERY<br />

0414 557 624<br />

Unit 3, 10 Pacific Ave, Miami<br />

www.harveysurf.com<br />

MT WOODGEE<br />

07 5535 0288<br />

1730 Gold Coast Hwy<br />

Burleigh Heads<br />

www.mtwoodgee.com.au<br />

PATAGONIA BURLEIGH<br />

116 Surfcoast Highway<br />

Burleigh Heads<br />

www.patagonia.com.au<br />

WORLD SURFERS<br />

07 5535 4037<br />

63 Lower West Burleigh Road<br />

Burleigh<br />

SEAN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

07 5520 2774<br />

Old Burleigh Theatre Arcade,<br />

Shop 10, Goodwin Tce,<br />

Burleigh Heads<br />

seanscottphotography.com.au<br />

DALE CHAPMAN SURF DESIGNS<br />

07 5593 8411<br />

Unit 3/48 Junction Road<br />

Burleigh Heads<br />

www.chapmansurfboards.com<br />

SOUTHCOAST FOAM<br />

07 5522 1600<br />

15 Greg Chappell Dr,<br />

Burleigh Gdns Estate,<br />

Andrews<br />

www.southcoastfoam.com.au<br />

MY PHOTO EXPERT<br />

07 5535 2763<br />

3/71 Township Drive<br />

Burleigh Heads<br />

www.myphotoexpert.com.au<br />

GOLD COAST SURF WORLD<br />

07 5525 6380<br />

Tomewin Street,<br />

Currumbin<br />

www.surfworldgoldcoast.com<br />

FIREWIRE SURFBOARDS<br />

07 5587 7700<br />

1/49 Currumbin Creek Rd<br />

Currumbin<br />

www.firewiresurfboards.com<br />

DMS<br />

07 5559 5949<br />

3/56 Currumbin Creek Rd<br />

Currumbin<br />

www.dmshapes.com<br />

D’ARCY HANDSHAPES<br />

07 5559 5866<br />

1/8 Hawker St,<br />

Currumbin<br />

www.darcysurfboards.com<br />

LONG-EAZ<br />

LONGARM BOARD HOLDER<br />

Arms too short? Too far to<br />

walk? Get a grip!<br />

0408 092 122<br />

www.long-eaz.com<br />

SHAPERS<br />

07 5534 4228<br />

9/7 Traders Way, Currumbin<br />

www.shapers.com.au<br />

BURFORD REINFORCED PLASTICS<br />

07 5534 3777<br />

5 Stewart Rd, Currumbin<br />

MT WOODGEE<br />

07 5598 2188<br />

2 Stewart Rd, Currumbin<br />

www.mtwoodgee.com.au<br />

DIVERSE SURF<br />

07 5598 4848<br />

476 Gold Coast Highway<br />

Tugun<br />

www.diversesurf.com.au<br />

DORRINGTON SURFBOARDS<br />

07 5599 4030<br />

16 Musgrave Street, Kirra<br />

www.dorringtonsurfboards.com<br />

BOARD CULTURE<br />

07 5536 5866<br />

Gold Coast Hwy(outside airport)<br />

Coolangatta<br />

www.boardculture.com.au<br />

KIRRA SURF/WORLD SURFARIS<br />

07 5536 3922<br />

Shop 6, 8 Creek St,<br />

Bilinga<br />

www.kirrasurf.com.au<br />

UNDERGROUND SURF<br />

07 5599 1040<br />

Shop 3/31 McLean St,<br />

Coolangatta<br />

www.undergroundsurf.com.au<br />

MT WOODGEE<br />

07 5536 5937<br />

122 Griffith St, Coolangatta<br />

www.mtwoodgee.com.au<br />

COOLANGATTA BOARD STORE<br />

07 5536 7850<br />

152 Griffith St, Coolangatta<br />

www.cbsboardstore.com


SEAN SCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

07 5599 1150<br />

Shop 3, 110 Marine Pde,<br />

Coolangatta<br />

seanscottphotography.com.au<br />

COOLY SURF<br />

07 5536 1470<br />

Cnr Dutton St & Marine Pde<br />

Coolangatta<br />

www.basesurfboards.com<br />

NSW NORTH COAST<br />

SIDEWAYS<br />

07 5524 6699<br />

2/13-21 Greenway Dr, Tweed Heads<br />

sidewaysboardsports.com.au<br />

FULL FORCE SURFBOARDS<br />

07 5524 2933<br />

Factory 18 / 48 Machinery Drive<br />

Tweed Heads<br />

SURF XCESS<br />

02 6674 5350<br />

88 Marine Parade, Kingscliff<br />

CABARITA SURF SHOP<br />

02 6676 3151<br />

1/38 Tweed Coast Rd,<br />

Cabarita Beach<br />

BRUNSWICK SURF<br />

02 6685 1283<br />

1/12 The Terrace,<br />

Brunswick Heads<br />

www.brunswicksurf.com.au<br />

MCTAVISH<br />

02 6680 8807<br />

91 Centenial Circuit, Byron Bay<br />

www.mctavish.com.au<br />

MADDOG SURF CENTRE<br />

02 6685 6395<br />

91 Jonson St, Byron Bay<br />

02 6685 6466<br />

4 Jonson St, Byron Bay<br />

www.maddog.com.au<br />

MC SURF DESIGNS<br />

02 6685 8778<br />

3 Banksia Drive, Byron Bay<br />

www.mcsurf.com.au<br />

NORTH COAST SURFBOARDS<br />

02 6685 6896<br />

1/29 Acacia St, Byron Bay<br />

www.bearsurfboards.com.au<br />

MUNRO SURFBOARDS<br />

02 6685 6211<br />

29 Acacia St, Byron Bay<br />

www.munroesurfboards.com.au<br />

T&C SURF DESIGN / MCCOY<br />

02 6685 7485<br />

10 Acacia Street, Byron Bay<br />

BYRON BAY LONGBOARDS<br />

02 6685 5244<br />

Shop 1 - 89 Jonson St,<br />

Byron Bay<br />

HO’OKUPU<br />

02 6685 8861<br />

2/9 Lawson St, Byron Bay<br />

hookupusurf.com<br />

UNPLUGGED<br />

02 6685 7441<br />

Shop 1/ 2 Lawson Street,<br />

Byron Bay<br />

www.unpluggedbyronbay.com<br />

ALL ABOVE BOARD<br />

02 6687 7522<br />

68 Ballina St, Lennox Head<br />

MADDOG SURF CENTRES<br />

02 6685 6094<br />

45 River St, Ballina<br />

www.maddog.com.au<br />

TRIPLE X WETSUITS<br />

02 6686 3939<br />

10 Piper Drive, Ballina<br />

www.triple-x.com.au<br />

THE PLANK SHOP<br />

02 6645 8362<br />

Top of the Hill, Yamba<br />

NSW MID NORTH COAST<br />

XS SURF<br />

02 6654 1049<br />

76 Beach Street,<br />

Woolgoolga<br />

www.xssurf.com<br />

COOPERS SURF CENTRES<br />

02 6654 0033<br />

56D Beach St,<br />

Woolgoolga<br />

02 6652 8146<br />

28 Orlando St,<br />

Coffs Harbour<br />

www.cooperssurf.com.au<br />

FLANAGAN SURFBOARDS<br />

0432 361 694<br />

Unit 26, 22 Lawson Cres,<br />

Coffs Harbour<br />

www.flanagansurfboards.com<br />

WATER SURF+ART+CAFE<br />

Distinctively relaxed<br />

atmosphere, exceptional<br />

food, coffee and tea, great<br />

service, photographic<br />

art from Australia’s best<br />

photographers, exquisite<br />

gifts and select surfwear and<br />

boards.<br />

(02) 6651 4500<br />

370 Harbour Drive, Coffs<br />

Harbour Jetty<br />

www.watersurfartcafe.com<br />

THE LOG SHACK<br />

02 6658 0223<br />

392 Harbour Drive,<br />

The Jetty Strip,<br />

Coffs Harbour<br />

www.thelogshack.com.au<br />

OUTER ISLAND SURFBOARDS<br />

02 6655 7007<br />

7 Bayldon Dr, Raleigh<br />

www,outerislandsurfboards.com<br />

VALLA SURFBOARDS<br />

02 6568 8909<br />

8 Monro St, Nambucca Heads<br />

www.vallasurfboards.com.au<br />

COASTAL CURVES<br />

02 6568 6902<br />

Ridge St, Nambucca Heads<br />

www.coastalcurves.com<br />

SONIC SURF<br />

02 6568 4666<br />

1 Cooper Street, Macksville<br />

SCOTTS HEAD SURF SHOP<br />

02 6569 8344<br />

Scotts Head NSW 2447<br />

scottsheadsurfschool.blogspot.com<br />

WAVE WEAR<br />

02 6566 5177<br />

1/15 Livingstone St,<br />

South West Rocks<br />

CRESCENT HEAD SURF CO.<br />

02 6562 8306<br />

33 Smith St, Kempsey<br />

CRESCENT HEAD SURF SHOP<br />

02 6566 <strong>05</strong>50<br />

1 Crescent Head Tavern<br />

Crescent Head<br />

CRESO EXPRESSO<br />

4 Shore Holiday Park,<br />

Crescent Heads<br />

INNER VISION SURF ‘N’ SKATE<br />

02 6583 7790<br />

80 William St, Port Macquarie<br />

SALTWATER WINE<br />

02 6584 4877<br />

1/125 Gordon St, Port<br />

Macquarie<br />

www.saltwaterwine.com.au<br />

SANDY FEET<br />

02 6584 1995<br />

5/21 Clarence Street ,<br />

Port Macquarie<br />

www.sandyfeetsurf.com.au<br />

JUNGLE SURF<br />

02 6555 8556<br />

86 Manning Street, Tuncurry<br />

www.junglesurf.com.au<br />

SALTWATER WINE<br />

02 6554 7979<br />

5 Wharf St,<br />

Forster<br />

www.saltwaterwine.com.au<br />

BOOMERANG BEACH SURF<br />

02 6554 0351<br />

Shop 4, Boomerang Drive<br />

Pacific Palms<br />

GRAFFITI SURF DESIGNS<br />

02 4981 3409<br />

43 Donald St, Nelson Bay<br />

NEWCASTLE<br />

NEWCASTLE SURF DESIGNS<br />

02 4968 9989<br />

4 Maitland Rd, <strong>May</strong>field<br />

SAM EGAN SURFBOARDS<br />

02 4969 7299<br />

28 Maitland Rd,<br />

Islington<br />

www.samegan.com.au<br />

SURF FACTORY<br />

16 Maitland Rd<br />

Islington<br />

www.thesurffactory.com.au<br />

MARK RICHARDS SURFSHOP<br />

02 4961 3088<br />

755 Hunter St,<br />

Newcastle<br />

markrichardssurfboards.com<br />

SURFHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHY<br />

61 Hunter Street<br />

Newcastle<br />

surfhousephotography.com<br />

BREAKAWAY SURF<br />

02 4929 1144<br />

Shop 6 Hunter Street Mall,<br />

Newcastle<br />

PACIFIC DREAMS SURFSHOPS<br />

02 4926 3355<br />

7 Darby St, Newcastle<br />

www.pacificdreams.com.au<br />

SANBAH<br />

02 4962 2420<br />

Shop 27, The Junction Fair<br />

Union Street,<br />

Newcastle<br />

www.sanbah.com.au<br />

BREAKAWAY SURF CO<br />

02 4943 2699<br />

181 Pacific Hwy<br />

Charlestown<br />

EGANS<br />

02 4945 8<strong>05</strong>5<br />

575 Pacific Hwy,<br />

Belmont<br />

THE SURF SHACK<br />

02 4945 8965<br />

703 Pacific Hwy<br />

Belmont South<br />

SWANSEA SURF SHOP<br />

02 4971 4422<br />

164 Pacific Hwy,<br />

Swansea<br />

www.swanseasurf.com.au<br />

CENTRAL COAST<br />

BEACHIN SURF<br />

02 43 96 5159<br />

262 Main Rd, Toukley<br />

BOARD CITY<br />

02 4397 1092<br />

150 Main Road, Toukley<br />

www.boardcity.com.au<br />

ADRIFT SURF<br />

02 4332 8355<br />

133 The Entrance Road<br />

The Entrance<br />

www.adriftsurf.com.au<br />

BOARDERLINE SURF SKATE<br />

02 4332 7175<br />

421 The Entrance Rd<br />

Long Jetty<br />

www.boarderlinesurfskate.com<br />

SURFERS CHOICE<br />

02 4334 6532<br />

473 The Entrance Rd<br />

Long Jetty<br />

www.surferschoice.com.au<br />

BATEAU BAY SURF N SPORT<br />

02 4332 1157<br />

101a Bateau Bay Road<br />

Bateau Bay<br />

ONE EIGHTY SURF COMPANY<br />

02 4385 8440<br />

Shop 2, 82a Ocean View Drive<br />

Wamberal<br />

www.180surfco.com.au<br />

SLIMES<br />

02 4365 5511<br />

1/203 The Entrance Rd<br />

Erina<br />

ESS BOARDSTORE<br />

251 The Entrance Rd<br />

Erina<br />

www.essboardstore.com.au<br />

THREE POINTS SURF<br />

02 4382 1541<br />

170 Avoca Drive,<br />

Avoca Beach<br />

www.avocasurfscholl.com.au<br />

STS THE BOARD CENTRE<br />

02 4342 2555<br />

326 West St, Umina<br />

NORTHERN BEACHES<br />

BEACH WITHOUT SAND<br />

02 9918 2763<br />

1a Nth Avalon Rd, Avalon<br />

RAISED BY WOLVES<br />

02 9918 8861<br />

U 2/40 Old Barrenjoey Rd, Avalon<br />

www.raisedbywolves.com.au<br />

02 9997 4838<br />

9b Waratah St, Mona Vale<br />

www.raisedbywolves.com.au<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

125


SURF DIRECTORY CONTINUED<br />

Pick up the next edition of smorgasboarder at any of these fine businesses - out in July.<br />

Businesses that advertise in smorgasboarder allow us to bring you the magazine for FREE. So, be sure to support them!<br />

LITTLE DRAGON<br />

0403 974 967<br />

1 Bramley Lane, Newport Beach<br />

RON WADE SURF DESIGN<br />

02 9979 7071<br />

0410 443 776<br />

23 Bassett Street, Mona Vale<br />

ronwadesurfboards.com.au<br />

CHANNEL ISLAND SURFBOARDS<br />

02 9997 8266<br />

4/76 Darly St, Mona Vale<br />

www.cisurfboards.com<br />

QUIKSILVER MONA VALE<br />

02 9999 3727<br />

1729 Pitt Water Rd, Mona Vale<br />

SUPER SWELL<br />

02 9144 3229<br />

166 Mona Vale Rd, St Ives<br />

STAND UP PADDLE GEAR<br />

AUSTRALIA<br />

02 9986 3420<br />

6/53 Myora Rd, Terrey Hills<br />

www.supgearaustralia.com<br />

SUGARMILL SURF EMPORIUM<br />

02 9913 3332<br />

2/1329 Pittwater Rd, Narrabeen<br />

www.sugarmillsurf.com<br />

SIX OUNCE<br />

0408 259 783<br />

48-50 Pittwater Rd, Manly<br />

www.sixounceboardstore.com<br />

ALOHA MANLY STYLE<br />

02 9977 3777<br />

44 Pittwater Rd, Manly<br />

www.alohasurfmanly.com.au<br />

CRONULLA SURF DESIGN<br />

02 9544 0433<br />

8 Cronulla St, Cronulla<br />

cronullasurfdesign.com.au<br />

BUSTED SURF CO<br />

02 4447 3485<br />

10 Fairlands St, Culburra Beach<br />

OCEAN & EARTH SURF STORE<br />

02 4441 2482<br />

12 Springs Road, Sussex Inlet<br />

www.oceanearth.com<br />

SERIOUS SURF STUFF<br />

03 5674 2540<br />

1 Williams Street , Inverloch<br />

www.strapper.com.au<br />

VORTEX SURF & SKATE<br />

03 5672 4112<br />

54 McBride Ave, Wonthaggi<br />

www.strapper.com.au<br />

POWERLINEZ<br />

02 9913 2128<br />

16a Waterloo St, Narrabeen<br />

www.powerlinez.com.au<br />

BALMORAL BOARDS<br />

02 9970 8600<br />

1228 Pitt Water Rd, Narrabeen<br />

www.balmoralboards.com.au<br />

WICKS SURF CENTRE<br />

02 9971 0760<br />

1103 Pittwater Road, Collaroy Beach<br />

LONG REEF SURF<br />

02 9982 4829<br />

1012 Pittwater Rd, Collaroy<br />

www.longreefsurf.com.au<br />

WIND SURF ’N’ SNOW<br />

02 9971 0999<br />

17 Anzac Ave, Collaroy<br />

www.windsurfnsnow.com.au<br />

THE PERFECT WAVE<br />

02 9939 0890<br />

Suite 38, 42-46 Wattle Rd<br />

Brookvale<br />

www.theperfectwave.com.au<br />

BENNETT SURFBOARDS<br />

02 99<strong>05</strong> 5157<br />

180 Harbord Rd, Brookvale<br />

DRIPPING WET SURF CO<br />

02 9977 3549<br />

398 Pittwater Rd, Mona Vale<br />

02 9977 3549<br />

93 North Steyne, Manly<br />

www.dripwetsurf.com<br />

SUNSHINE SURFING<br />

02 9977 4399<br />

89 Pittwater Rd, Manly<br />

www.sunshinesurfing.com.au<br />

BASE SURFBOARDS<br />

02 9976 <strong>05</strong>91<br />

46 North Steyne Rd,<br />

Manly<br />

www.basesurfboards.com<br />

SALTMOTION<br />

02 9976 6518<br />

Market Place, Manly<br />

www.saltmotion.com<br />

MANLY LONGBOARD CO.<br />

02 9977 0093<br />

39 Belgrave Street, Manly<br />

www.manlylongboard.com<br />

SURFECTION<br />

02 9977 6955<br />

110 The Corso, Manly<br />

www.surfectionmosman.com<br />

HERITAGE SURF AUSTRALIA<br />

02 9977 7623<br />

24 Darley Rd,<br />

Manly<br />

www.heritagesurfaustralia.com<br />

SURFECTION<br />

02 9969 1011<br />

522 Military Rd,<br />

Mosman<br />

www.surfectionmosman.com<br />

SYDNEY SOUTH<br />

BONDI UNDERGROUND<br />

02 9365 0870<br />

2/72 Campbell Pde,<br />

Bondi Beach<br />

DRIPPING WET SURF CO<br />

02 9300 0<strong>05</strong>5<br />

180-186 Campbell Parade<br />

Bondi Beach<br />

www.drippingwetsurf.com<br />

SURF CULTURE<br />

02 93895477<br />

40 Bronte Road, Bondi Junction<br />

www.surfculture.com.au<br />

CRONULLA SUTHERLAND<br />

KING SURFBOARDS<br />

02 9521 3645<br />

577 Princes Hwy, Kirrawee<br />

JACKSON SURFBOARDS<br />

02 9524 2700<br />

57 Captain Cook Drive, Caringbah<br />

www.jacksonsurfboards.com.au<br />

TRIPLE BULL<br />

02 9524 4822<br />

41 Captain Cook Dr, Caringbah<br />

02 9544 0354<br />

23 Kingsway, Cronulla<br />

www.triplebullsurf.com<br />

EASTCOAST STAND UP PADDLE<br />

Dedicated to SUP - Sydney’s<br />

original Stand Up Paddle<br />

outlet. Performance,<br />

flatwater, race, and distance<br />

boards – we have a board to<br />

suit all skill levels.<br />

0413 456009<br />

0418 294854<br />

27 Throsby Close<br />

Barden Ridge<br />

eastcoaststanduppaddle.com.au<br />

WOOLONGONG<br />

FINBOX BOARDSTORE<br />

02 4268 2<strong>05</strong>0<br />

1/ 269 Lawrence Hargrave Drive<br />

Thirroul<br />

thefinbox.blogspot.com<br />

SURF PIT<br />

02 4283 7196<br />

2/100 Railway St, Corrimal<br />

www.surfpit.com.au<br />

BYRNE SURF AND SKI<br />

02 4226 1122<br />

115 Princes Highway, Fairy Meadow<br />

byrnesurfboardsaustralia.com<br />

SKIPP SURFBOARDS<br />

02 4229 1202<br />

231 Crown Street, Wollongong<br />

(factory showroom)<br />

02 4228 8878<br />

24 Flinders St, Wollongong<br />

www.skippsurfboards.com.au<br />

CARABINE SURF DESIGNS<br />

02 4229 9462<br />

36 Flinders St,<br />

Wollongong<br />

NSW SOUTH COAST<br />

ZINK SURF<br />

02 4233 1189<br />

136 Terralong St, Kiama<br />

www.zinksurf.com.au<br />

NATURAL NECESSITY SURF SHOP<br />

02 4234 1636<br />

115 Fern St,<br />

Gerringong<br />

www.nnss.com.au<br />

AQUATIQUE<br />

02 4464 1881<br />

123a Queen Street, Berry<br />

02 4421 8159<br />

125-127 Junction St, Nowra<br />

02 4441 5530<br />

55 Owen St, Huskisson<br />

www.aquatique.com.au<br />

SUN & SURF SHOP<br />

02 4441 1938<br />

Shop 1, 168 Jacobs Drive<br />

Sussex Inlet<br />

AKWA SURF<br />

02 4454 5222<br />

Shop 1, Mellick’s Corner, Princess<br />

Highway, Milton<br />

www.akwasurf.com.au<br />

SOUTHERN MAN SURF SHOP<br />

02 4454 0343<br />

138 Princes Hwy, Ulladulla<br />

www.southernman.com.au<br />

SALTWATER DREAM<br />

02 4472 3811<br />

2 Bay Central, Batemans Bay<br />

OFFSHORE SURF SHOP<br />

02 4474 4350<br />

66 Vulcan St, Moruya<br />

www.offshoresurf.com.au<br />

NAROOMA SURF & SKATE<br />

02 4476 1422<br />

30 Princes Hwy, Narooma<br />

DSC SURFBOARDS<br />

0424 867 962<br />

Princes Highway, Narooma<br />

BERMAGUI SURF SHOP<br />

02 6493 4849<br />

4/28 Lamont St, Bermagui<br />

RAW SURFBOARDS<br />

02 6494 4466<br />

Lot 1291 Tathra Road, Kalaru<br />

www.rawsurfboards.com.au<br />

MERIMBULA SURF SHOP<br />

02 6495 1515<br />

Merimbula Drive, Merimbula<br />

SALTWATER DREAM<br />

02 6495 1600<br />

39 Market St, Merimbula<br />

CORE SURF SKATE AND KITE<br />

02 6494 3374<br />

49 Toalla St, Pambula Village<br />

www.pambulasurfshop.com.au<br />

COUNTRY VIC<br />

SURF SHACK<br />

03 5155 4933<br />

507 Esplanade,<br />

Lakes Entrance<br />

ATOLL TRAVEL<br />

1800 622 310<br />

4 Bridge Street,<br />

Foster<br />

www.atolltravel.com<br />

PHILLIP ISLAND<br />

OUTEREEF<br />

03 5678 5677<br />

73 Phillip Island Rd, San Remo<br />

www.outereef.com.au<br />

FULLCIRCLE SURF<br />

03 5678 5873<br />

115 Marine Pde, San Remo<br />

www.fullcirclesurf.com.au<br />

03 5956 7453<br />

4-5 Vista Pl,<br />

Cape Woolamai<br />

www.fullcirclesurf.com.au<br />

ISLANTIS<br />

03 5956 7553<br />

10-12 Phillip Island Rd<br />

Newhaven<br />

www.islantis.com.au<br />

ISLAND SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5952 2578<br />

147 Thompson Ave,<br />

Cowes<br />

www.islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

03 5952 3443<br />

65 Smiths Beach Rd<br />

Smiths Beach<br />

www.islandsurfboards.com.au<br />

ISLAND SURF SHACK<br />

03 5952 1659<br />

148 Thompson Ave,<br />

Cowes<br />

MELBOURNE<br />

ZAK SURFBOARDS<br />

03 9416 7384<br />

319 Victoria Rd,<br />

Thornbury<br />

www.zaksurfboards.com<br />

TRIGGER BROS SURF & SAIL<br />

03 9537 3222<br />

Shop 2, 1 St Kilda Rd,<br />

St Kilda<br />

www.triggerbros.com.au<br />

REPEAT PERFORMANCE SURF<br />

(THE BOARD STORE)<br />

03 9525 6475<br />

87 Ormond Rd,<br />

Elwood<br />

www.rpstheboardstore.com<br />

BRIGHTON SURF CO.<br />

03 9593 2211<br />

43 Church St, Brighton<br />

SHQ BOARDSPORTS<br />

03 9598 2867<br />

81 Beach Road,<br />

Sandringham<br />

www.shq.com.au<br />

126 may/jun <strong>2011</strong>


DING REPAIRS<br />

MORDY SURF CENTRE<br />

03 9580 1716<br />

628 Main St, Mordialloc<br />

www.mordysurf.com.au<br />

PAULOWNIA SURFBOARD<br />

SUPPLIES<br />

03 9588 2533<br />

45 Governor Road, Mordialloc<br />

paulowniaparadise.com.au<br />

OKE SURFBOARDS<br />

03 9587 3553.<br />

Factory 1 1-7 Canterbury Rd,<br />

Braeside<br />

www.okesurfboards.com<br />

TRIGGER BROS SURF & SAIL<br />

03 9770 2223<br />

7 Rossmith St, Frankston<br />

www.triggerbros.com.au<br />

03 5989 8402<br />

Point Leo Rd, Point Leo<br />

www.triggerbros.com.au<br />

03 5984 5670<br />

46 Ocean Beach Rd, Sorrento<br />

www.triggerbros.com.au<br />

PENINSULA SURF CENTRE<br />

03 9783 3811<br />

40 Wells St, Frankston<br />

03 5975 1800<br />

835 Nepean Hwy, Mornington<br />

03 5985 4637<br />

2137 Pt Nepean Hwy, Rye<br />

www.peninsulasurf.com.au<br />

BEAN SURFING<br />

03 5984 5199<br />

4 Ocean Beach Rd, Sorrento<br />

VIC SURF COAST<br />

MURFS LONGBOARDS<br />

03 5255 5525<br />

82 The Terrace, Ocean Grove<br />

www.murfslongboards.com.au<br />

STRAPPER SURF<br />

03 5255 2666<br />

67b The Terrace, Ocean Grove<br />

www.strapper.com.au<br />

GREEN ROOM SURF SHOP<br />

03 5256 2996<br />

64 The Terrace, Ocean Grove<br />

www.greenroom.com.au<br />

RASTA’S EARTH & SURF SHOP<br />

03 5254 3255<br />

51 Hitchcock Ave, Barwon Heads<br />

www.rastasurfboards.com.au<br />

TONIK SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5254 1470<br />

60/62 Hitchcock Ave, Barwon Heads<br />

www.tonik.com.au<br />

STONKER TORQUAY<br />

03 5261 6077<br />

1a Baines Court, Torquay<br />

www.stonker.com.au<br />

HYDROPHILIC<br />

0421 504 621<br />

1C Baines Court, Torquay<br />

www.southcoastlongboards.com.au<br />

BLUNT<br />

03 5261 7590<br />

Shop 2, Surf City Plaza, Torquay<br />

TORQUAY SURF WORLD<br />

03 5261 4606<br />

Surf City Plaza, Torquay<br />

www.surfworld.org.au<br />

PATAGONIA<br />

03 5261 4420<br />

116 Surfcoast Hwy, Torquay<br />

www.patagonia.com.au<br />

BASE SURFBOARDS<br />

03 5261 5666<br />

3/108 Surfcoast Hwy, Torquay<br />

www.basesurfboards.com<br />

STRAPPER<br />

03 5261 3508<br />

96 Surfcoast Hwy, Torquay<br />

03 5261 2312<br />

106 Surfcoast Hwy, Torquay<br />

www.strapper.com.au<br />

TORQUAY SURFING ACADEMY<br />

03 5261 2022<br />

34A Bell St, Torquay<br />

www.torquaysurf.com.au<br />

TIGERFISH<br />

03 5264 7271<br />

12/15 Bell St, Torquay<br />

www.tigerfish.com.au<br />

ANGLESEA SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5263 1530<br />

111 Great Ocean Rd, Anglesea<br />

www.secondhandsurfboards.com.au<br />

LORNE SURF SHOP<br />

03 5289 1673<br />

130 Mountjoy Pde, Lorne<br />

SHARKY’S<br />

03 5289 2421<br />

Mountjoy Pde, Lorne<br />

HODGY’S SURF CENTRE<br />

03 5237 7883<br />

143 Great Ocean Road, Apollo Bay<br />

www.hodgys.com<br />

SHIPWRECK COAST<br />

PORT CAMPBELL TRADING CO<br />

03 5598 6444<br />

27 Lord Street, Port Campbell<br />

TAYLORS SURFODESY<br />

03 5562 5681<br />

132 Liebig Street, Warrnambool<br />

SOUTH AUSTRALIA<br />

CUTLOOSE SURF<br />

08 8326 0939<br />

4 Piping Lane, Lonsdale<br />

www.cutloosesurf.com.au<br />

MID COAST SURF<br />

08 83845522<br />

8/200 Dyson Road, Lonsdale<br />

www.midcoastsurf.com.au<br />

PREECE’S SOUTH PORT SURF<br />

08 8386 0404<br />

159 Esplanade,<br />

Port Noarlunga South<br />

www.preece-sthport-surf.com.au<br />

BARREL SURF<br />

08 8555 5422<br />

10c Cadell Street, Goolwa<br />

www.barrellsurf.com.au<br />

BIG SURF AUSTRALIA<br />

08 8554 2399<br />

24 Goolwa Rd, Middleton<br />

SOUTHERN SURF<br />

08 8554 2375<br />

36 North Tce, Port Elliot<br />

THE SURF SHOP<br />

08 8552 5466<br />

15 Albert Place, Victor Harbor<br />

www.thesurfshop.net.au<br />

THE DING KING /<br />

CLARK SURFBOARDS<br />

0422 443 789<br />

20 Cottage Road, Hackham<br />

leightonclark01@yahoo.com.au<br />

SURF ESTEEM<br />

08 8557 7201<br />

Aldinga Central Shopping Centre<br />

www.surfesteem.com<br />

ONBOARD SURF WIND SNOW<br />

08 8294 3866<br />

21 Saltfleet St, Port Noarlunga SA<br />

08 8294 3866<br />

1-3 Lights Landing<br />

Holdfast Shores, Glenelg<br />

www.onboardsurf.com.au<br />

JRS SURF & SKI<br />

08 838 47466<br />

Centro Colonnades<br />

08 8377 0322<br />

Westfield Marion<br />

08 8223 55<strong>05</strong><br />

121 Grenfell St, Adelaide CBD<br />

08 8231 9577<br />

Myer Centre, Adelaide CBD<br />

08 8396 4822<br />

Tea Tree Plus<br />

www.jrssurfandski.com.au<br />

FLY BOARDRIDING<br />

08 8386 0100<br />

Shop 41<br />

Seaford Shopping Centre<br />

www.flyboardriding.com.au<br />

ISLAND SURF<br />

08 8296 9776<br />

363 Brighton Road<br />

Hove<br />

EXTREME BOARDRIDERS<br />

08 8295 1219<br />

1/118 Jetty Rd, Glenelg<br />

WALLBRIDGE SURFBOARDS<br />

08 8376 4914<br />

27 Oaklands Rd<br />

Somerton Park<br />

www.wallbridge.com.au<br />

SANCTUARY SURFERS<br />

0403 134 478<br />

201 Waymouth Street<br />

Adelaide City<br />

www.sanctuary.net.au<br />

SNOW & SURF CO.<br />

08 8223 5277<br />

187 Rundle Street<br />

Adelaide 5000<br />

www.snowsurf.com.au<br />

AGNES WATER/1770<br />

REEF 2 BEACH<br />

(Mon – Sat, 9-5pm, Sun,10-4pm)<br />

07 4974 9072<br />

SUNSHINE COAST<br />

DA BOMB<br />

(Mon – Sat, 9-5pm, Sun,10-4pm)<br />

07 5451 0620 - Maroochydore<br />

07 5437 9201 - Bokarina<br />

BRISBANE<br />

PRIMITIVE SURF<br />

(Mon-Fri, 8:30-5:30pm, Thurs<br />

8:30am-8pm, Sat, 8:30-4pm,<br />

Sun, 10-4pm)<br />

07 3266 1001<br />

SOUTHPORT<br />

KOMA<br />

(M-F 9-5pm, Sat 9-12pm)<br />

0402 863 763<br />

MIAMI<br />

DINO’S DING REPAIRS<br />

(M-F 9-5pm, Sat 9-12pm)<br />

0409 727 735<br />

TUGUN<br />

DIVERSE<br />

(M-F,8:30-5:30pm, Sat and<br />

Sun, 9-4pm)<br />

07 5598 4848<br />

COOLANGATTA<br />

UNDERGROUND SURF<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

07 5599 1040<br />

BYRON BAY<br />

BYRON BAY DING REPAIRS<br />

(Mon-Fri, 8:30-4:30pm)<br />

02 6685 6770<br />

0409 849 442<br />

YAMBA<br />

THE PLANK SHOP<br />

02 6645 8362<br />

TOMBSTONE SURFBOARDS<br />

(Tues-Fri, 9-4pm, Sat, 9-12pm)<br />

0432 330 826<br />

COFFS HARBOUR<br />

THE LOG SHACK<br />

(M-F, 10-5pm, Sat & Sun<br />

10-2:30pm)<br />

02 6658 0223<br />

NORAH HEAD<br />

BUCKO’S SURFBOARD REPAIRS<br />

& RESTORATIONS<br />

(M-F, 10-5.30pm, weekends by<br />

appointment<br />

0422 304 078<br />

LONG JETTY<br />

S & D SURF DESIGNS<br />

(M-F, 9-4pm, Sat 9-12pm)<br />

0437 032 614<br />

SYDNEY NORTH<br />

BROOKVALE SURFBOARD<br />

REPAIRS<br />

(M-F,8:30-5:30pm, Sat and<br />

Sun, 9-4pm)<br />

0403 971 072<br />

CHAOS SURFBOARDS<br />

(M-F,9-6pm, Sat & Sun 8:30-<br />

6pm)<br />

02 9907 2769<br />

BONDI JUNCTION<br />

SIX OUNCE<br />

(7 days , 9:30-6:30pm)<br />

0408 259 783<br />

WOOLONGONG<br />

SKIPP SURFBOARDS<br />

M-F,9-5:30, Thurs 9-7:30pm,<br />

Sat 9-4, Sun 10-4)<br />

02 4228 8878<br />

JERVIS BAY<br />

INNER FEELING SURFBOARDS<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

02 4441 6756<br />

NAROOMA<br />

DSC SURFBOARDS<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

0424 867 962<br />

THORNBURY<br />

ZAK SURFBOARDS<br />

(Mon-Fri,10-6pm; Sat 10-5pm)<br />

03 9416 7384<br />

TORQUAY<br />

STONKER TORQUAY<br />

(Mon – Fri, 9-5pm)<br />

03 5261 6077<br />

PHILLIP ISLAND<br />

ISLANTIS<br />

(7 days , 9-5pm)<br />

03 5956 7553<br />

ISLAND SURF SHOP - COWES<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

03 5952 2578<br />

FULLCIRCLE SURF<br />

(7 days, 9-5pm)<br />

03 5956 7453<br />

SOUTH ADELAIDE<br />

THE DING KING<br />

(M-F, 9-5pm)<br />

0422 443 789<br />

ADELAIDE<br />

WALLBRIDGE SURFBOARDS<br />

08 8376 4914<br />

FIX BROKEN BOARDS?<br />

Promote your repair business for $15<br />

an edition. Call 0401 345 201<br />

may/jun <strong>2011</strong><br />

127


SURF TRIP ACCOMMODATION<br />

QUEENSLAND<br />

Planning a surfing holiday or weekend away? These fine accommodation options offer<br />

great proximity to surf beaches in some of the country’s best surf spots. Get out there.<br />

NEW SOUTH WALES<br />

VICTORIA<br />

PORTOBELLO BY THE SEA<br />

<br />

6 Beerburrum St, Dicky Beach<br />

Caloundra<br />

Fantastic surf spots right on<br />

your doorstep. Moffat, Neill<br />

Street, Dicky Beach all within<br />

a 5 minute walk. Luxury<br />

accommodation within 50 m of<br />

some of the best restaurants<br />

Caloundra has to offer.&