SUMMERANA MAGAZINE |October 2018 |The "Fall" Issue

Summerana

October 2018 | The "Fall" Issue

SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE FOR THE CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHER

OCTOBER 2018

THE “FALL” ISSUE

HOW COLOR TONES

CREATE MOOD

WHAT’S IN

SIERRA UHRICH’S

CAMERA BAG

INTERVIEW WITH

WHITNEY CRIMEFIGHTER

OF LITTLE DREAMERS TUTUS

20 ESSENTIAL TIPS FOR

PHOTOGRAPHERS


SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

CONTENTS

THE “FALL” ISSUE

4

WHAT’S IN SIERRA UHRICH’S

CAMERA BAG?

9

FEATURED SUMMERANA MEMBER

CRYSTALMARIE PHOTOGRAPHY

10

HOW TO CREATE A WHIMSICAL FALL

LOOK IN PHOTOSHOP USING

SUMMERANA TOOLS

12

TOP 10 PHOTOGRAPHERS OF THE

MONTH

22

STYLE INSPIRATION FOR YOUR NEXT SES-

SION BY NADINE BRECHT

25

10 MINUTES WITH

WHITNEY CRIMEFIGHTER

OF LITTLE DREAMERS TUTUS

28

HOW COLOR TONES CREATE A MOOD

31

HOW TO ENCOURAGE YOUR

CREATIVE SIDE

32

PROPS AND LOCATIONS YOU NEED

TO PHOTOGRAPH THIS FALL

36

20 ESSENTIAL TIPS FOR

PHOTOGRAPHERS

38

HALLOWEEN INSPIRATION

FOR YOUR HALLOWEEN SESSION

46

HOW SAFE IS YOUR PORTFOLIO

FROM THEFT

2

Image courtesy of Twenty-Three Photography

Model: Annaleigh Boitnott Tyler


SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

ON THE COVER

THE “FALL” ISSUE

FRONT

BACK

TWENTY-THREE PHOTOGRAPHY

www.twentythreephotography.com

MODELS: ANNALEIGH BOITNOTT,

EMMA BOITNOTT AND

ISABELLE GENTRY-GILLIAM

CAMERA: CANON 5D MARK IV

LENS: 70 -200mm f2.8

LIGHT: NATURAL

LOCATION: BULLARD, TX

MODEL: LAYNEE CAVENESS

CAMERA: CANON 5D MARK IV

LENS: 70 -200mm f2.8

LIGHT: NATURAL

LOCATION: BULLARD, TX

DRESS: DOLLCAKE

EDITOR - IN - CHIEF

GRACE PAMELA

CREATIVE DIRECTOR / SENIOR DESIGNER

MONIKA CIOBAN

AUTHOR

RHIANNON D’AVERC

PUBLISHER

SUMMERANA

WWW.SUMMERANA.COM

COVER CONTRIBUTER

ALICIA GENTRY

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WHAT’S IN

SIERRA UHRICH’S

CAMERA BAG?

Throughout the past 6 years of my professional

career I have gone through a variety

of lenses. I have owned, rented, or

borrowed everything from the basic "Nifty

Fifty" to the legendary Canon 200mm

f/2L. But as of right now I only have two

lenses in my bag that I regularly use. The

Sigma Art 135mm 1.8 and the Canon

24-70mm 2.8L, and I shoot with the

Canon 6D body. I've found the glass I

really truly love and honestly I've had

more fun spending the extra money on

props and wardrobe pieces for my amazing

clients to use!

I mainly photograph children so my bag

also contains things like extra hair elastics

& bobby pins, a small first aid kit, tissues/wipes,

lollipops (bribery...), and of

course my sidekick "Benny the Bunny."

He's my special stuffed bunny friend who

fits around my lens and helps me out

when I've got a super serious or distracted

kiddo. I've give Benny most of the

credit for those sweet smiles I capture!

Sierra Pearl Photography

Body: Canon 6D

Lens: Sigma Art 135mm f/1.8

Aperature: f/1.8

ISO: 100

Shutter Speed: 1/500

Dress: Little Dreamers Tutus

Model: Norah

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Sigma Art 135mm f/1.8

This is my favorite lens! The SOOC colors are

just amazing and this lens is tack sharp! This

lens is on my camera 90% of the time and I

am always happy with the results. I shoot

wide open at f1.8 very often and the bokeh

is gorgeous! I highly recommend this lens for

individual portraits, and I even photograph

families with it!

Sierra Pearl Photography

Body: Canon 6D

Lens: Sigma Art 135mm f/1.8

Aperature: f/1.8

ISO: 200

Shutter Speed: 1/500

Dress: Alora Safari

Model: Charlotte

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Sierra Pearl Photography

Body: Canon 6D

Lens: Canon 135mm f/2

Aperature: f/2.5

ISO: 250

Shutter Speed: 1/400

Dress: Miss Madison Photo Props

Model: Anel

6

Canon 135mm f/2

The 135mm focal length is my favorite.

The compression and bokeh this lens

offers is so dreamy and magical! I have the

Sigma Art version in my camera bag now

but the Canon L series is also amazing!

One downside is that you do have to be

standing a fair distance away from your

subject for those full body images, but

once you get used to it, it's second nature.

And the results are so worth it!


Canon 24-70mm f2.8L

I absolutely love the 24-70mm for my

studio newborn sessions. The versatility of

this lens makes it ideal for photographing

babies by themselves as well as the entire

family. I love taking overhead shots like

this one during each of my newborn sessions

and this lens allows me to zoom out

far enough to capture the entire set up

without having to stand on a step stool.

It's also beautiful for close-up portraits of

babies. When zoomed in to 70mm you

avoid the distortion that can happen when

shooting with a wider angle lens.

SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

Sierra Pearl Photography

Body: Canon 6D

Lens: Canon 24-70mm f/2.8L

Focal Length: 35mm

Aperature: f/2.8

ISO: 800

Shutter Speed: 1/200

Model: John

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FEATURED

SUMMERANA MEMBER

CRYSTALMARIE PHOTOGRAPHY

SUMMERANA TOOLS USED FOR THIS COMPOSITE:

- Animal Composite Workshop

- Everyday Workflow Essential Action Collection

- Elephant Overlay / Ivory Dreams Collection

CrystalMarie Photography

FB: ChrystalMarie Photography

IG: @crystalcoodey

Model: William

BEFORE

AFTER

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Image courtesy of:

Feather and moss photography

FB: Feather and moss photography

IG: @featherandmoss_photography

www.featherandmoss.co.uk

Model: Isabella May Johnson

Canon 5D Mark III

Sigma Art 50mm

Aperature: f/1.6

Shutter Speed: 1/1600

ISO: 100

Light: Natural

Location: Manchester, UK

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HOW TO CREATE A WHIMSICAL FALL

LOOK IN PHOTOSHOP USING

SUMMERANA TOOLS BY RHIANNON D’AVERC

The first thing to do when creating a fall look is to make sure you have the right image to start with. You won’t get the best results if you try to

add fall elements to a snow scene or a shoot at the beach, for example! Areas with trees are often the best setting for fall looks – even if they are

bright green and showered in sunlight, you can give them a fall tone easily.

You can also start out by cleaning up your RAW file and making sure that it is ready to start editing. Don’t worry if you don’t know where to start.

There is actually a cleaning action included with the ColorFall collection, so you can get that done right away.

The biggest and most important part of creating that whimsical fall image is the colors. Everyone knows that the leaves turn orange and brown in

the fall, before they start to fall off the trees. There is also a different quality to the light during the fall, as the days get shorter and the weather

changes. This means that even grass, which doesn’t change color year-round, will look a little different. The sky, too, might have a different cast.

It’s all about how we perceive light, and when we have experienced fall ourselves, we just know what it looks like. That’s why you won’t fool

anyone if you don’t get the colors right!

Color-toning your image can take a lot of time and effort, especially when it comes to picking out the colors that have that real fall magic to

them. The ColorFall action collection comes with a choice of different fall color tones, so you don’t have to worry about tracking them down. Just

pick the one that works best with your image and press play – the action will do all of the work for you.

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The next step is all about making it look more realistic. When you take a look at your image after using the fall edits, you might feel like it

doesn’t quite look right yet. There are lots of solution for this, as you can see demonstrated in the tutorial video for the ColorFall action collection.

You may need to use a brush at a lower opacity to remove some of the color toning, such as to bring a little more green back through on the

ground. Or you may wish to reduce the opacity of the layer as a whole and set your shoot in early fall.

When you are happy with the effect of this edit, there’s more to play around with if you wish. The final image editor actions are set up to do

those final touches, such as removing color casts, getting rid of dull areas, and adding more depth. You can also use some extra color casts to

create a gorgeous look, as well as adding a vignette if you want to.

Since the sun sits lower in the fall, you can also add some light flares, which add real oomph to the image and can make it more realistic for

your viewers.

Next up, you can have a lot of fun adding some leaves to your image! During the fall, a stiff breeze can easily knock down leaves from trees and

allow them to swirl in the air before they drop. This has a really romantic effect, although it’s almost impossible to capture that perfect look in

camera.

There’s a solution to this which doesn’t involve you throwing leaves at your clients for hours. Yes, you can get your assistant to put the leaf

blower down! Simply take your photograph as normal, or use an image you edited with the ColorFall Photoshop actions, and add some leaf

overlays.

These overlays are really easy to apply with the Summerana action collection dedicated to getting them looking perfect. First, you drop in your

leaves, choosing an overlay which has as many or as few floating leaves as you prefer.

Get the overlay placed over the top of your image, and you can apply a range of edits to them. You can even take some leaves out if they are

over your subject’s face or if you don’t want them across the whole image.

The leaves are even blurred or left sharp in different areas of the overlay to add depth to your image, making it look as though they really are

there in the scene. Match them up to the tones of your trees created with the ColorFall actions and you will have a perfectly believable, but utterly

whimsical, fall scene.

Even if you never see real fall weather again for the rest of your life, you can provide it in post-production for your clients any time they want.

This is a great way to add a new service to your portfolio and really enchant your clients with magical portraits!

Images courtesy of

Stephanie Ratto Photography

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“FALL”

OCTOBER

www.michellezumbachphotography.com

FB: Michelle Zumbach Photography

IG: @michellezumbachphotography

Model: Lyndon

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MAGAZINE

“FALL”

OCTOBER

FB: Marcella Mae Photography

IG: @marcellamaephotography

Styled by: Katie Andelman

Model: Mia

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

“FALL”

OCTOBER

www.cindyarthur.com

FB: Cindy Arthur Photography

IG: @cindyarthur613

Models: Emerson & Ivy

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MAGAZINE

“FALL”

OCTOBER

www.momentskeptbylisa.com

FB:Moments Kept Photography

IG: @momentskeptphoto

Model: Alyssa

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

“FALL”

OCTOBER

www.inspiredandenchantedphotography.com

FB: Inspired and Enchanted Photography

IG: @inspiredenchantedphotography

Model: Evangeline

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

“FALL”

OCTOBER

www.allisonhinmanhotography.com

FB: Allison Hinman Photography

IG: @allisonhinmanphotography

Models: Kat & Ryan Eckles

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“FALL”

OCTOBER

FB: Danielle Sullivan Photography

IG: @danielle_sullivan_photography

Model: Bianca

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MAGAZINE

“FALL”

OCTOBER

www.stephanierattophotography.com

FB: Stephanie Ratto Photography

IG: @stephanierattophotography

Model: Alice

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

“FALL”

OCTOBER

www.allisondittmanphotography.com

FB: Allison Dittman Photography

IG: @allisondittmanphotography

Models: Brody and Emery

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“FALL”

OCTOBER

FB: Stephanie Henneman Photography

IG: @stephaniehennemanphoto

Model: Maya

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Image Courtesy of

Photoart by Nadine Brecht

FB: Photoart by Nadine Brecht

IG: @nadine.brecht

Styled by: Katharina Hakaj Couture

FB: Katharina Hakaj Couture

IG: @katharinahakajcouture

www.katharinahakajcouture.com

Models: Adrian & Aria

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Image Courtesy of

Photoart by Nadine Brecht

FB: Photoart by Nadine Brecht

IG: @nadine.brecht

Styled by: Katharina Hakaj Couture

FB: Katharina Hakaj Couture

IG: @katharinahakajcouture

www.katharinahakajcouture.com

Models: Adrian & Aria

SUMMERANA

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Image courtesy of:

Regina Moneypenny Photography

Dresses: Little Dreamers Tutus

Models: Briana Marie Munoz &

Marilyn Nicole Magana

24

Image Courtesy of: Sierra Pearl Photography

Dress by: Bentley & Lace

Model: Charlotte


SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

TEN MINUTES WITH

WHITNEY CRIMEFIGHTER

The Designer of Little Dreamers Tutus

Who is Whitney Crimefighter?

If I had to answer this question with just one word, I

would say I’m a creative. I love all types of art. And I feel

a real need to make something, even if it’s just crafts

with my kids. I love to paint, I love photography, I love

to read and dance and sing. Most importantly though, is

that I’m a mom. I always wanted to be a mom and I love

spending time with my husband and three kids. We’re a

really tight family, and my husband, Cameron, is my

best friend, and I couldn’t do any of this without their

support. It’s definitely a family business, and that’s what

makes it so fun, because even though we’re working,

we’re together. They help me to be what I want to be and

to succeed in this life.

When did you turn your passion into business?

In 2008 I was prepping to sell my creations at the Portland

Saturday Market. My husband and I were going to

college, we had a 2-year-old, and I was pregnant with

our second. I had to do something that would allow me

to make money from home. So I came up with these

butterfly mobiles, the kind that hang over a babies crib,

and a few other little things, like hair clips. Well the

weekend before my first day at the Market, my mom and

I saw a tutu in a boutique, and of course, my 2-year-old

daughter wanted it, but it was $45, and we were poor

college students. My mom turns to me and says, “You

could make that!”. She then shows up at our apartment

the next day with like $100 in tulle. So here I am, thinking,

I’ve got to make these tutus now because I have to

pay her back the hundred dollars! So I made as many

tutus that week as I could, it was enough fabric to make

18 tutus. I delivered our second baby girl on Friday, and

my husband and I went to the Market two days later that

Sunday. We kept our 2-day old baby in her car seat

under the table, no one even knew she was there, and

our two-year-old was running around having a blast. We

sold 16 of the 18 tutus in less than two hours and made

$311, and that’s how “Little Dreamers Tutus” came

about.

I was a member of the Saturday Market for 3 years, and

in that time I was on the Product Review Committee and

at the end I was on the Board of Directors, but I had also

started an Etsy shop and we had so many sales that we

couldn’t keep up with both the Market and online

orders, so we eventually left the Market to do our online

shop, and tutus grew into flower girl dresses, and those

grew into custom couture gowns, and now here we are!

What’s your least favorite fabric and why?

Okay, so I have a love/hate relationship with certain fabrics

for the way they look, but they can be hard to sew

with. Sequins, for example, are terrible to sew with, because

they’re always breaking needles, but they’re so

fun! And stretch velvet, it’s just too slippery!! But I love

the way it looks and feels. Chiffon is my most favorite

fabric, I love how fluttery it is and the way it drapes, but

it frays like crazy, so there’s that. But really I just love

fabric, it’s weird. My dream date would be to go fabric

shopping.

If you could dress one celebrity for the red

carpet, who would it be and why?

I don’t really watch TV, and I don’t keep up with celebrities

at all, so this is a tough question for me. I’m going to

say Claire Danes. I loved her in Romeo and Juliet (my favorite

movie), and in Les Miserables. She’s so classic and

elegant, and I imagine she would wear something that I

would love to wear, so it would be fun to dress her.

Where do you get your inspiration from?

Anything and everything. I love taking inspiration from

nature, from a bouquet of flowers, from a painting I saw.

I get inspiration from the fabric itself as well. I’ll go

fabric shopping with nothing specific in mind and certain

fabrics will just look like they belong to a certain

design.

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And I’m obsessed with watercolor fabric. I work with

artists to create exclusive designs, so I’ll commission

them to make a watercolor painting, and I’ll just give

them a general color palette and theme, and then they

create a painting that we then transfer to fabric, which I

then make into a dress. So I guess we’re getting inspiration

from each other, and that’s my favorite.

Image courtesy of:

Regina Moneypenny Photography

Dresses: Little Dreamers Tutus

Model: Briana Marie Munoz

Words to live by?

“Never let anyone keep you down. Never give up.”

If I didn’t live by those words I wouldn’t be where I am

today. Everyone, especially our families, thought we

were crazy when we started this business 10 years ago.

Because it’s scary to not have a “secure” job with health

insurance and a regular schedule, but I wouldn’t go back

and I wouldn’t change a thing. It was so much hard

work getting here, but here we are and it’s a wonderful

place to be.

What's your favorite season and why?

26

Fall, because October is my favorite color. And I love

sweater weather, and when there’s a nip in the air.

Coffee or Tea?

Neither. I’m a Dr. Pepper addict.

Image courtesy of:

Regina Moneypenny Photography

Dresses: Little Dreamers Tutus

Model: Marilyn Nicole Magana

Early mornings or late nights?

Definitely early mornings. I love getting up when it’s just

starting to get light and everyone else is still sleeping and

everything is quiet. I get my best ideas in the morning.

And I get super grumpy when I’m tired so staying up late

is a no-go!

What is one thing You can you find wish Little you Dreamers knew when Tutus here:

www.littledreamerstutus.comF

you started your business?

FB: Little Dreamers Tutus

IG: @whitney_littledreamerstutus

Well I didn’t know anything when we started this, I was

a photographer major in college, I hadn’t taken a single

business class, and my sewing skills are totally

self-taught, so there was a lot I wish I knew! Probably

the most important thing I’ve learned, which is the same

as the one thing I wish I knew, is that it’s okay to accept

help and that you don’t have to do it all on your own.

That was something that was really hard for me to

accept, and to be honest, is still something I’m working

on. If you work with others who have been where you’re

at you get farther and grow faster and have a community

of support around you. I fall into the trap of thinking that

no one is going to do it as well as I am because no one

cares as much as I do about my business, and that’s not

true. I believe the world wants you to succeed, and I believe

that everyone can succeed, that there’s an endless

amount of opportunities to be had, you just have to

work for it


SUMMERANA

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Image Courtesy of:

Leica Palma Photography

Dress: Little Dreamers Tutus

Model: Hailey

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HOW COLOR TONES

CREATE A MOOD

BY RHIANNON D’AVERC

Color tones are one of the easiest ways to edit photographs. You no longer have to worry about color correction if you are

adding a cast to the overall image, and you can also use subtle touches to introduce a new mood. Whether you go for a delicate

flash, as with some of the Colorosity Lights Action Collection, or you change the seasons as with the Colorfall Action

Collection, you can make a big impact. Here are all of the colours of the rainbow that you can add to your photographs, and

what they mean for the mood.

RED

If you want to add warmth and passion to an image, then red is a great choice. It is strongly associated with love and especially

with Valentine’s Day. You can also use it to raise the temperature of a photograph – especially one taken indoors. It can look hot

and steamy if you use the right touch. If you go all the way up to bright red for a highlight or flash of color, it can evoke thoughts

of danger. You can play with this to create a very dramatic image.

ORANGE

This tone is also very warming, and can make the image seem like it was taken during the golden hour if you

keep the color subtle. It’s a colour that evokes thoughts of fall, but can also create that warm summer feeling

depending on how it is used. It’s a more enthusiastic and fun colour than red and can create the impression

of a happy situation. It’s great for portraits where the subject is smiling.

YELLOW

Be very careful about how you use yellow, as applying too much as an overlay can cause the subject to look

washed-out or ill. It is also the kind of colour that doesn’t look great when it is too bright. Keep it to the

background where possible and mask off your model. You can use it to brighten an image and make it look

more summery, but too much of a heavy hand will simply leave it looking odd to the human eye. Yellow can

even cause tiredness and irritation if you stare at it for too long, according to some studies, so don’t make it

too prominent.

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BLACK

Black will always darken your image dramatically, so this is something that you have to consider carefully.

It’s not generally a good choice unless the image was overexposed in the first place. It will dominate the

image and may even distract the viewer from the subject. It makes for a good choice if you want spooky

images, however, such as for Halloween specials. It can also close the image in and make it feel more claustrophobic,

especially if used as a vignette.

BLUE

You probably know that blue is associated with calmness, which makes this a good colour for toning down

images that are a little too busy. It can also edge over into sadness, so look at the tones that you are choosing

if you want to really emphasise the poignancy of an image. Deep, dark blue can also create a sense of

mystery and even mysticism in an image. It’s quite a powerful colour and is often used to convey corporate

messages, so it will function well for more official uses. A sunny day can be turned cold and even wintery

with use of blue tones over the background. Your model can also become cold, unfeeling, or sad when you

apply the color over the whole image.

GREEN

Adding green to a photograph can help it to feel calmer and more tranquil. It’s a natural color and this can

help to add vibrancy as well. If you want to make yellow work better, try pairing it with green – as these colours

have the opposite effects, they can cancel one another out. Outdoor photographs can benefit from a

splash of green, which can transform a cold day into spring sunshine. It can also feel very nature-friendly.

WHITE

White is the opposite of black, and will help to open the image up. You can make it brighter and even create

a sense of space in the photograph. Go too far, though, and you will end up with a misty look to your photograph,

which may even convince the viewer that you got the exposure wrong. White requires a light touch

and is often best used in combination with other photographs.

PINK

Pink is a colour of youth, of romance, and of the flush of spring. It helps the image to warm up and can even

make the subject appear more likeable. It’s a great option for senior portraits as it can bring a young and

playful vibe to the photographs. In couples shoots, you will find that a dash of pink evokes feelings of love.

Of course, when shooting a female subject, it can also give that overall girly and feminine look!

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Masquer8 Photography

Camera: Canon 6D Mark II

Lens: 70-200mm f/2.8L

Model: Bianca Cioban


SUMMERANA

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HOW TO ENCOURAGE YOUR

CREATIVE SIDE

As a photographer, we need to tap in to our creative side time and time again. It’s an important part of our work, and it’s easy to struggle with

creative block. You can also end up feeling like you have run out of ideas at some points. So how can you encourage your creative side to boost

you at all times? These tips should help you out.

Get a Hobby

For many of us, photography is a hobby. When this makes

the transition into being full-time work, you can end up in

a position where you have no hobbies left! Even though

photography is a fun job and does have many creative elements,

it’s still work. It’s important to have another

outlet which challenges your creative mind in different

ways.

So, what kind of hobbies could you take up? They could

even be things that go well with your photographic business.

For example, you could start making props, or creating

jewellery for your models to wear. You could take

up sewing, whether creating clothing or making artistic

embroidery. You could start to paint or draw. Even making

elaborately decorated cakes would fit! There are so many

creative disciplines out there, and adding another string

to your bow is never a bad thing.

Your hobby can be something that you eventually start to

make money from, or an artistic project that you want to

display in galleries. It could even be something just for

yourself. Whatever it is, just make sure that it’s creative!

Seek Inspiration – Everywhere

Getting into a creative frame of mind means looking out for inspiration

wherever you are. You can find a jolt of creative energy

from seeing autumnal leaves on trees, or from hearing a radio

DJ talk to a guest about their daily habits. It could be from reading

a book, or watching a film.

The important thing is to open yourself up to inspiration. Don’t

just wait for it to strike – get out there! Consume cultural matter

like books, films, television shows, and music. Go to museums

and local art galleries, and browse their collections online.

Spend time on social media sites like Instagram and Pinterest

where there is a big art community.

You should also actively try to use the inspiration you find as

jumping-off points for new work. For example, if you love a particular

show on Netflix, try capturing a portrait that looks like it

was a screenshot from the last episode. If you have been inspired

by a poem, try to capture that feeling in a photograph. It

doesn’t have to work, and you don’t have to show it to anyone.

The point is that you are out there making art! Creativity is the

kind of thing that grows the more you put into it.

Something Old, Something New

One of the best ways to get creative when you are stuck in a rut

is to take something old, and do something new with it. Bring

up an old photograph that you took years ago, or even a piece of

inspiration that you have used before. Now treat it as if you are

seeing it for the first time. Make a new edit, or take a new photograph

matching that inspiration. See where it takes you years

after the first contact.

This is also a really great way to show potential clients how

much your style has grown and changed. Post up a comparison

of your original edit and the new one side by side to show the

difference. Now you have not only encouraged your creative

side, but also found something new to post for your social

media fans. Two birds with one stone!

Set an Appointment

As creatives, we often think that we have to wait until inspiration

strikes. We will be there, ready and waiting, when it does,

but we don’t go after it ourselves. This kind of thinking isn’t the

best for encouraging yourself to be creative all the time. Instead,

what you should do is set an appointment with yourself

to be creative.

If photography is your side-gig or hobby, then make sure that

you are working on it once a week (or however often you can fit

in reliably). If it is your full-time thing, then try setting appointments

for your creative hobby. You should have a set time every

week – or every day if you can manage it – which is just for

being creative.

Make sure that you use this time every week, without fail. If you

miss an appointment due to a conflicting schedule, you will

have to book it in for a different day so that you don’t miss out.

Don’t wait for the creativity to come to you. Get out there and

capture it for yourself.

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PROPS AND LOCATIONS

YOU NEED TO PHOTOGRAPH

THIS FALL

BY RHIANNON D’AVERC

It may be hard for some to transition from the sunshine of summer to the blustery days of fall, but it is vital for us Photographers to embrace

the season for the beautiful things it has to offer for our photo sessions. As a photographer, I try to be observant and creative with the different

elements of the season, and bring those things to my work and to my photographs. Today I thought I would share with you some Fall locations,

props, and creative concepts to really bring your images to life!

SECLUDED FOREST/WOODS

Nothing says Fall more than crisp yellow and orange leaves! In a wooded area there are lots of fall foliage all around and the trees provide many good

posing opportunities. Maybe you will even find a spot where there is a pond of small waterfall! There is an abundance of natural light that peek

through the trees and if you take your pictures during the golden hour (the hour before the sun sets) you can really take advantage of the beautiful

warm lighting. Whether your subject is a fashion model or a playful child; there are many possibilities.

Bring these fun props with you:

Pine cones- Spelling out your clients names in pine cones or even making a heart would be oh so much fun!

Leaves- One fun idea would be to have your subject playing in the leaves (make a pile and have them jump in) or spell out their names in the leaves.

Wooden or Tire swing (or old tire to sit in for poses) - You would need an adult nearby for younger children, but this is a fun photo op for children

and adults alike! You may also need to bring a ladder to tie this to a tree. You can wrap fall foliage to the ropes for even more oohs and ah's!

THE PUMPKIN PATCH

Oh the memories! Everyone LOVES the pumpkin patch and what better way to bring that nostalgic feeling to your sessions by having your photos

there!

Bring these fun props with you:

Pumpkins -have your clients pick one out and if they have kids take pictures of the little guys picking out their big pumpkins! Some poses you

could do is you could have the subject sit on or around a piling of pumpkins, have them stand posed with the rows of pumpkins behind them, or have

them with their face close up to a pumpkin for a nice festive headshot!

Hay bales- There’s just something about hay that is so fun and festive for fall! Of course be aware of any hay allergies your clients may have. You

can have them sitting on the hay, throwing hay in the air, or just simply having it in the background and surroundings makes for a nice fall photo.

Scarecrows- Either have clients bring a scarecrow of their own (if it’s not too big) or if there is one for décor at the patch, have them pose by the

scarecrow.

Costumes- This can be a fun opportunity to have kids wear their costumes (if the weather permits and it’s not too muddy).

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APPLE ORCHARD/FARM

It’s the season for apples! This is a good opportunity to capture your subject (or multiple subjects) in candid fun moments picking apples or at the

farm. This is also another opportunity to use natural lighting coming through the trees to highlight your subjects and to use the trees and fences to

pose against. Don’t be afraid to take some photos of the natural scenery, these pictures can really tie in the seasonal feel if you are making an album

or collection of photos for your clients.

Bring these fun props with you:

Apples- Take photos of your client picking them, biting into them, posing with them (in their hands) and doing whatever creative things they may

think of with them!

Small Wooden Ladder – You can bring a wooden ladder (or have them use one if available at the orchard) to pose your clients on. Really make sure

you keep the height of the ladder to a minimum to keep the risk factor down. If you have small children with you, you could use a small step stool alternatively.

Apple Cider Booth- Most orchards have a booth set up this time of year for hot apple cider! You can have your subjects pose by the booth and take

this opportunity to photograph them sipping a nice steaming hot cup of cider. This is a fun opportunity for couple photos to have them cozy up and

sip their drinks. This also ties in with the next prop…

Cozy blankets (preferably a quilt, plaid, or red/orange fall colors) – Nothing like cozying up in a blanket with hot cider. If you’re photographing couples

you can have them snuggle up and kiss or just capture them candidly relaxing and enjoying the moment with their cider.

CORNFIELDS AND MAZES

In some locations (like in my town) corn mazes are at the same location as the pumpkin patch. If this is the case, you can use this opportunity to also

snap a few shots of your subjects by the tall corn. Cornfields/mazes are another great opportunity to take advantage of golden sunlight peering

through the corn husks. This would make a beautiful couples photo or child portrait.

Bring these fun props with you:

Pumpkins- If the cornfield/maze is at a pumpkin patch, you can easily purchase one of the pumpkins to use as a prop (or possibly just hold one

nearby). Have your subjects holding them or sitting with them next to the corn.

Corn- A fun idea for children is to find a good ripe corn cob and have them bite into it! At some locations they even have cooked corn on the cob and

you can use this with any of our subjects for a fun candid moment!

Rustic Truck- A fun idea (if possible and allowed with your location) is to have your subject pose with a rustic old truck near or in a corn field. If it’s

a little later in the day or in the evening, you could even have the truck’s headlights on and have your subjects posing in front of the truck for a nice

backlight effect.

Hay bales- Again, like the pumpkin patch, you could use hay bales in your sessions. They are so much fun for posing!

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20 ESSENTIAL TIPS FOR

BETTER PHOTOS

BY RHIANNON D’AVERC

WHETHER YOU ARE A PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER OR AN AMATEUR, ONE THING YOU WILL

ALWAYS BE STRIVING FOR IS TAKING BETTER PHOTOGRAPHS.

We’ve put together this

list of the 20 most essential

tips for photographers,

which will help your

images really come to life.

Try out these and you will

find your work improving

hugely. Even someone with

a lot of experience can

benefit from reminding

themselves of these key

points!

36

KNOW YOUR

CAMERA

It’s really important that

you know how to use your

equipment. Your camera is

the backbone of everything

you do, and if you

don’t know it inside out,

you have room to improve.

What does this setting

change? How do you

solve that warning message?

Spend some time

with your manual to figure

it all out.

SHOOT IN MANUAL

THEN PRIORITY

First, you should learn how

to shoot in manual mode.

Then, when you have done

that, you can start using one

of the priority modes – aperture

or shutter speed. This

gives you greater control

combined with a better

adaptability in changing

situations.

TALK TO YOUR

SUBJECT

Almost everyone gets nervous

during a photoshoot, and

even a professional model can

stiffen up without the right encouragement.

Learn to talk to

your subject, even if you are

only saying encouraging

words over and again – they

will always respond. A friendly

nature gets your subject to

relax and provide a better portrait.

USE A WIDE APERTURE

FOR PORTRAITS

Creating a shallow depth of

field in your portraits will

allow the background to fade

away and blur, while your

subject remains sharp. Take it

down as low as you dare with

a f-stop of around f1.8 or

below in the best situations.

BE CREATIVE

You don’t need to have a

full professional lighting

kit so long as you have

some kind of light. You

don’t need to buy a reflector

so long as you have

something reflective. And

you can always create a

beautiful photograph

whatever situation you are

presented with. Open your

creative mind and practice

exercises which will help

you to use it more effectively.

STUDY

PHOTOGRAPHY

We don’t necessarily

mean that it’s time to go

back to school, but you

should definitely be learning

as much about photography

as you can. Read up

on the classic masters, or

find out who the latest big

name is.

CREATE YOUR

OWN STYLE

Having your own unique

style is the easiest way to

start building a solid business

from the ground up.

If you shoot in such a way

that everyone can tell you

are behind the lens, then

no one will ever be able to

steal your customer base.

When you have a unique

style, you will find your

popularity soaring.

USE FILTERS

Filters are essential first of

all for protecting the lens,

especially if you drop it.

Secondly, they can really

enhance the effects of the

images that you are taking.

With a filter you can

smooth out dark shadows,

shoot day for night, bring

out the blue of the sky, or

so much more. The possibilities

are almost endless

with a full kit of filters.

KNOW HOW TO EDIT

You could be the best

shooter in the world, but it

won’t matter if you don’t

know how to select photos

and edit them properly. An

unedited shot from

in-camera might look

good, but it will always

look better with a little

color-correction and some

contrast balancing.


USE THE

GOLDEN HOUR

This magical time of day

gives you a golden light in

your photographs which

makes portraits glow. It’s

especially essential for

portraits, family photos,

and fashion shots. Land-

scape photographers

should make it their favourite

time of day, too.

USE ACTIONS

AND FILTERS

How much time do you

spend in Photoshop? The

answer should probably

be longer than it is, but

you just don’t have the

time. Using actions and

filters cuts down on the

time that you need to

spend editing, and you

can achieve much better

results than doing it all

manually. It doesn’t make

sense to ignore them.

KNOW

YOUR FRAMING

Your model might be

beautiful, but if everyone’s

eyes are drawn to the

bright red fire hydrant or

post box just at the edge

of the frame, it will be

wasted. Know how to spot

a good frame, and what to

look out for in your backgrounds.

Don’t let a stray

moment ruin your shot.

SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

FOCUS

ON THE EYES

What makes a great portrait?

There are a lot of

possible answers to this

question, but one that you

should never ignore is a

good focus on the eyes. If

the eyes are out of focus,

the portrait is lost. Always

keep that focus sharp on

the eyes.

ALWAYS

HAVE BACKUPS

Your camera bag should

contain plenty of spares.

Spare memory cards and

spare batteries are essential,

and you should

always have at least a

second lens with you.

What happens if the card

stops working, the battery

runs out, or you break the

lens? Don’t let it ruin the

shoot and leave you with

no results.

DON’T BE AFRAID

OF THE CAMERA

Handle it with respect, but

never fear. You’re in

charge.

CALIBRATE

YOUR SCREEN

Editing for print? Always

calibrate your screen first

to avoid unwanted color

casts or contrast errors.

KEEP IT STABLE

Use your elbows tucked in

against your body to keep

your camera stable when

not shooting on a tripod.

This avoids camera shake,

which can be a problem

even at 1/125.

MAKE PLANS

Shooting an outdoor portrait

session? Have a

back-up location in case

of rain. Always make plans

for what you will do if it

all goes wrong.

BELIEVE

IN YOURSELF

If you want to be a professional,

you have to act like

one. Don’t try to give excuses

or talk yourself

down. You’re only as good

as you think you are, so

have some confidence in

yourself and your abilities.

PRACTICE

EVERYTHING

Don’t ever stop shooting.

The more you shoot, the

better you will get. Don’t

let your skills go rusty,

even if you’re taking a

break from paid clients –

keep your arm in whenev-

er possible.

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MAGAZINE

HALLOWEEN

IS AROUND

THE CORNER

GET SOME INSPIRATION FOR YOUR

HALLOWEEN SESSIONS

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

Shana Carter Photography

Camera: Canon 5D Mark IV

Lens:85mm f/1.4

Model: Marissa

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

Stevi Bean Photography

Camera: Canon 5D Mark III

Lens: 50mm f/1.8

Model: Aubrey Elise

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

Kara Taylor Photography

Camera: Canon 6D

Lens: 35mm f/2

Model: Caleb

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

Cindy Arthur Photography

Camera: Nikon D750

Lens: Tamron 70-200mm f/2.8 VC

Model: Kendall

"The Other Side of Fairytales" Shoot Out

presented by Traci Marie Photography

and Designer Adrianna Ostrowska

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MAGAZINE

Trandafir Photography

Camera: Canon 6D

Lens: 70-200mm f/2.8L

Model: Alexandru Toews

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

Stephanie Henneman Photography

Camera: Nikon D750

Lens: Sigma 50mm f/1.4

Model: Dori

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

Maribella Portraits

Camera: Canon 6D

Lens: 135mm f/2

Models: Bella and Marissa

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SUMMERANA

MAGAZINE

HOW SAFE IS YOUR

PORTFOLIO FROM THEFT?

BY RHIANNON D’AVERC

In this day and age, digital safety is becoming an increasing concern. We are seeing images being hacked from the Cloud and distributed

online, as well as a lot of theft involving cropping and reappropriation of images. Someone can recrop your Instagram images right from

your feed and sell them for a figure with four zeroes in it. And of course, there is the age old problem of images by Western photographers

showing up on counterfeit goods made in Asian sweatshops.

DO YOU HAVE WATERMARKS ON YOUR IMAGES?

This is the first question to ask about anything that you post anywhere. Are the images on your website watermarked? How about your

social media posts? Yes, even Instagram? Watermarking does not have to be an ugly distraction from your image. You can use opacity

levels in Photoshop and clever placement to ensure that your name and logo is out of the way of the action and yet still visible.

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You can easily add metadata to your images through Photoshop. Again, you can add this easily by batch processing after you have set up

a new Photoshop action with the right data. You can do this for each set of images if you want to add details such as team credits and

specifics. If you just want your name and copyright data added, you can create one action to go across all of your imaging needs.

You can also set up metadata in Lightroom, and a few other photography editing suites.

HOW MANY FOLLOWERS OR FANS DO YOU HAVE?

Like the type of images you take, how popular you are may also have some bearing on how safe your portfolio is. When you have a lot of

attention on your work, you may find that you become a target for those who want to steal it and pass it off as their own.

This is also a big bearing on whether you should be checking for stolen work being sold on products or as prints. Take the case of British

photographer Lara Jade, who made headlines when her self portrait image was used on the cover of a pornographic DVD. Shockingly, she

was just 14 in the picture. Rising popularity on the art site DeviantArt led to her images getting more views, and she ended up successfully

suing the company that stole the popular image.

Basically, if you have a large following and your photos are getting a lot of views, they may need more protection. Failing that, you may

need to think about running checks often to be sure that nothing of yours has been stolen.

SO HOW CAN YOU CHECK YOUR

PORTFOLIO?

There are a number of ways to be sure that

nothing of yours has been stolen. First of all,

rely on your fans and followers to help you out.

If you have a good attitude and listen to their

comments, you may find that they bring you

cases of your work being posted or used elsewhere.

You can then take the necessary steps

to have it removed.

You can normally do this through the support section of a website if it has been posted up through a larger site; if it is hosted on a private

site, you will need to contract the perpetrator directly and see about having it taken down. If they refuse, legal action may be the next

step – but only if you deem it worthwhile, since it will most likely be a costly and drawn out process.

You can also use reverse image searches such as Google’s tool to check for instances of your work on the internet. If you are a high risk

group and you often charge a lot of money for the use of your photographs, you could even consider employing someone on a part time

basis to check your catalogue regularly.

For most of us, this won’t be much of an issue. But if you are concerned about it, or you find that your work becomes hugely popular in

the future, these tips will help you to take steps towards a safer portfolio.

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There’s an easy way to automate it, too. Set up an action for web which will make it difficult for your images to be stolen. First open the

document, then hit record on your new action. Resize it to 1000 pixels on the longest side, at 72 dpi. Now use the place tool to add in

your logo and website address to the bottom left or right corner of the image. Hit the button to stop recording. Now whenever you want to

watermark images for use online, you can batch process the whole group.

It’s important not to merge layers right away, so you can go through each one and adjust if necessary. When you have done so, you can

batch process the layers merging and save the files to close them.

HOW DO YOU BACK UP YOUR IMAGES?

External hard drives are the tried and tested method of backing up images. Yes, they are expensive, and yes, they may fail, but they are

one of the best options available to you. Using two backed up drives for all of your work (one as the back up you use, and one as a spare

should that one crash) is a very easy way to back up your images.

If you back them up to a cloud storage service like Dropbox, you may be more susceptible to theft than you think. While an external hard

drive has a physical presence, and therefore has to be touched to be stolen, the same is not true of digital content. If someone on the

other side of the world manages to guess your password or hack into your account, they could have access to all of your files.

Worst of all, you may not even know they have been in and out. They can download everything, and unless your service is set to notify

you of unusual logins, you will never be told. There are many benefits to Cloud storage, and it can certainly be used alongside physical

data as a very convenient option. For most people, theft here will not be a problem. But if you had a particularly valuable image to protect

– for example, if you were a celebrity photographer with some unretouched files of Kim Kardashian looking less than perfect – then you

may want to think twice about using an online solution.

WHAT KIND OF IMAGES DO YOU TAKE?

This question probably will not feel very fair, especially if you are someone who comes out on the negative side. But unfortunately, what

you take pictures of will probably make you more or less likely to be a target of image theft. There are some images that are not worth

the effort of stealing to most thieves. There are others which could be the biggest haul of their lives.

If you take senior pictures, shoot weddings, deal with newborns, or generally have a part time photography hobby which is just something

you are passingly good at, you should be fine. That’s the good news.

The bad news is for anyone who falls into the other categories. Those who are most at risk of theft are celebrity photographers, those who

work on nude or boudoir shoots, high fashion photographers, and fine artists. If you take picturesque landscapes or stunningly detailed

still life, then you could be at risk too.

If you want to assess how desirable your work would be to thieves, consider the uses they may get out of them. If your images would

make someone popular on a social network, they may steal them to pass off as their own. If they can resell them by printing them on

products, they are definitely a theft risk. If they are something that the world would like to see leaked, you could be in trouble.

DO YOU ADD METADATA?

If your answer to this question was “What is metadata?”, then you may be in trouble. Metadata is information that is attached to an

image and travels with it, whether you add it to a website or simply send it as a file. It can give all sorts of information about the image.

This includes when and where it was taken, who took it, who was in it, who the copyright holder is, and what sort of usage it is available

for. It can even include tags which denote the content.

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A GOOD PHOTOGRAPH

IS ONE THAT

COMMUNICATES A

FACT, TOUCHES THE

HEART, AND LEAVES

THE VIEWER A

CHANGED PERSON

FOR HAVING SEEN IT.

- IRVING PENN

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