NL_101818

22ndcenturymedia

®

Spreading awareness

Mayor stresses importance of domestic abuse awareness

and breast cancer awareness month, Page 3

Race time

Will County Board District 7 and 9 candidates talk issues

facing the area, explain how to fix them, Pages 7-8

Running for a cause

Upcoming LWSRA 5K to help fund wheelchair-accessible

playground, outdoor rec center, Page 11

new lenox’s Award-Winning Hometown Newspaper newlenoxpatriot.com • October 18, 2018 • Vol. 12 No. 31 • $1

A

Publication

,LLC

Providence marks 100 years of educating, spreading faith to students, Pages 4-5

LEFT: Pictured is Providence High School in 1918 when it was located in Joliet, located at Cass and Ottawa streets. That year, the Sisters of Providence assumed administration of St.

Mary Parish High School and changed its name to Providence High School.

RIGHT: Providence Catholic students pose for a picture outside of the school’s new addition on Friday, Oct. 12. photos submitted

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2 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot calendar

newlenoxpatriot.com

In this week’s

Patriot

Halloween Contest.........10

Standout Student...........16

Sound Off.....................19

Obits.............................22

Puzzles..........................33

Home of the Week.........37

Athlete of the Week.......45

The New Lenox

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THURSDAY

Business After Hours

5-7 p.m. Oct. 18, Tri-Star

Cabinet and Top Co., 1000

S. Cedar Road, New Lenox.

Join the New Lenox Chamber

of Commerce in partnership

with Tri-Star Cabinet

and Top Co., Inc. for a Business

After Hours networking

event. For more information,

call (815) 485-4241.

‘The Outsiders’

7 p.m. Oct. 18 and 20,

Lincoln-Way West, 21701

Gougar Road, New Lenox.

Lincoln-Way West Theatre

Company will present “The

Outsiders,” a play adapted

from the classic book by S.E.

Hinton which deals with real

people, seen through the

eyes of young Ponyboy, a

Greaser on the wrong side of

life, caught up in territorial

battles between the have-itmade

rich kids, the Socs, and

his tough, underprivileged

“greaser” family and friends.

FRIDAY

NARVRE Meeting

11 a.m. Oct. 19, Little

Joe’s Pizza, 300 N. Cedar

Road, New Lenox. Join the

National Association of Retired

and Veteran Railway

Employees for social hour

followed by lunch at noon

and a meeting at 1 p.m.

SATURDAY

Trick or Trot 5K

8 a.m. Oct. 20, Lincolnway

Special Recreation

Center, 1900 Heather Glen

Dr., New Lenox. Join the

LWSRA for their third annual

Trick or Trot 5K and help

raise funds for the ADA inclusive

playground that will

be used by LWSRA participants

and community members.

Cost is $30 for adults,

and $15 for children ages 14

and younger. Register online

at www.lwsra.org/5k. Registration

on the day of the race

begins at 6:30 a.m.

The Villians’ Bash

10:30-11:15 a.m. Oct. 20,

New Lenox Public Library,

120 Veterans Parkway, New

Lenox. Mingle with Maleficent,

Captain Hook, the Evil

Queen, and other baddies at

our spooktacular bash. Play

awful games, eat despicable

treats, and cause some mayhem.

This proram is for children

ages 3-12. To register,

visit www.newlenoxlibrary.

org.

Pumpkin Carving

1-2:30 p.m. Oct. 20, New

Lenox Public Library, 120

Veterans Parkway, New

Lenox. Carve and decorate

a pumpkin. From spooky to

silly, see what you can come

up with.

SUNDAY

Pant for the Pantry 5K

8:30 a.m. Oct. 21, Old

Plank Trail Community

Bank, 280 Veterans Parkway,

New Lenox. All participants

are encouraged to

bring two nonperishable

food items to donate to local

community food pantries.

Early registration cost

is $30 for adults 18 and

older, $15 for children 15-17

years, and $10 for children

14 years and younger. Race

day registration cost is $35

for adults 18 and older, $20

for children 15-17 years,

and $15 for children 14

years and younger. Shirts are

guaranteed for the first 300

registered adults and 500

children. Shirt sizes will be

distributed on a first-come,

first-served basis. Children

14 and younger can run for

free but will not receive a

tshirt. For more information

and registration, visit www.

pantforpantry.com.

MONDAY

Crafting with the Cameo

6-7:30 p.m. Oct. 22, New

Lenox Public Library, 120

Veterans Parkway, New

Lenox. Paper, vinyl, ironons

and more — make a

craft using the Silhouette

Cameo electronic cutter.

Village Board Meeting

7 p.m. Oct. 22, Village

Hall, 1 Veterans Parkway,

New Lenox. The New

Lenox Village Board meets

the second and fourth Monday

of each month. Meetings

are open to the public and all

citizens are invited to attend.

For more information and

meeting agendas, visit www.

newlenox.net.

TUESDAY

Business After Hours

5-7 p.m. Oct. 23, Gatto’s

Restaurant, 1938 E. Lincoln

Highway, New Lenox. Join

the New Lenox Chamber

of Commerce for a multichamber

business after

hours hosted by State Rep.

Margo McDermed.

Estate Planning

6:30-7:45 p.m. Oct. 23,

New Lenox Public Library,

120 Veterans Parkway, New

Lenox. Look closely at the

need to plan, planning techniques

and the documents

used in the planning process.

This class will explain the

difference between a will

and a trust. Attendees will

have a thorough understanding

of what steps needed to

take to protect their spouse

and heirs.

Wednesday

Paranormal Moms Society

7-8 p.m. Oct. 24, New

Lenox Public Library, 120

Veterans Parkway, New

Lenox. Join the Paranormal

Moms as they discuss different

ghostly haunts and

how they do their overnight

investigations. To register,

visit www.newlenoxlibrary.

org.

UPCOMING

Holli-Daze Craft Show

9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday,

Oct. 27 and 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

Sunday, Oct. 28, Lincoln-

Way East High School, 201

Colorado Ave., Frankfort.

Join the Mokena Woman’s

Club for their 45th annual

Holli-Daze Arts and Craft

Show. Admission is $4 per

person with free parking.

There will be more than 140

crafters, door prizes and a

food court. For more information

contact Mary at (815)

370-7751 or mjmmwc@ya

hoo.com.

Halloween Knight

10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday,

Oct. 27, Lincoln-Way

Central, 1801 E. Lincoln

Highway, New Lenox. Children

ages 11 and younger

are invited to dress up and

trick-or-treat inside Lincoln-

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Way Central. Each trick-ortreater

is asked to bring 1

canned good to be donated

to the New Lenox Food Pantry.

Fun Fair tickets may be

purchased at the end of the

trick-or-treat route. Fun fair

tickets cost $1 each or $5 for

six tickets. Cash only.

Halloween Fest

1:30-3:30 p.m. Saturday,

Oct. 27, New Lenox Village

Commons, 101 Veterans

Parkway, New Lenox. Enjoy

a performance by the New

Lenox District 122 Junior

High Bands, Trunk-or-Treat,

Pumpkin Party craft, Haunted

Egg Hunt and more. At 2

p.m. there will be a costume

contest for all ages. For more

information about this free

event, call (815) 485-4241.

ONGOING

Coloring Contest

Entries must be submitted

by Wednesday Oct. 24.

The New Lenox Chamber of

Commerce is accepting entries

for the annual Halloween

Fest Coloring Contest,

sponsored by LincolnWay

Community Bank. The contest

is open to children ages

3 - 12, and entries will be

judged in 3 age groups. All

entries will be displayed at

the New Lenox Public Library

during the New Lenox

Chamber of Commerce’s

Halloween Fest on Saturday,

Oct. 27. One winner for each

age division will be selected

and will receive a prize. To

enter, visit www.newlenox

chamber.com.


newlenoxpatriot.com news

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 3

New Lenox Village Board

Trustees recognize new business

and October awareness

Lincoln-Way Residents Looking to

Move Have Clear Choice …

Liquor licenses

approved for

Chipotle, Zin Café

Megan Schuller

Freelance Reporter

Two up and coming businesses

are one step closer to

opening up in New Lenox

after the Village Board of

Trustees unanimously approved

liquor licenses after

a first read through at

the Oct. 8 Village Board of

Trustees’ regular meeting.

Chipotle, slated to open on

Saturday, Nov. 17, now has

a Class D1 Liquor License

which allows the consumption

and sale of alcohol.

Meanwhile Zin Café was

approved for a Class A1

liquor license which approves

the sale of alcohol

for consumption on and off

the property.

A representative of Zin

Café said that they plan to

have a high end wine bar

with wine club memberships.

After construction

is completed, the café can

open sometime in December.

After the vote, Mayor

Tim Baldermann wished the

businesses well and thanked

them for choosing New

Lenox.

“Good luck at the new

location, we’re excited to

have you here,” Baldermann

said to representatives

of each business.

After recognizing local

business, the mayor took

a moment out to recognize

October as domestic abuse

Round it Up

Recap of action and discussion from the New Lenox Village

Board’s regular meeting on Oct. 8:

• First read was held for an ordinance granting a

landscape variation for Nogas Landscaping to put

chain link fence in place of the required solid fence.

• The trustees and Mayor Baldermann urged residents

to get out and vote for the Nov. 6 is the general

election. Early voting will be on Oct. 22-Nov.2 from 9

a.m.-4 p.m.

• Approved consent agenda, with Trustee Jasen

Howard abstaining from approving last meeting’s

minutes because he was absent.

awareness month and breast

cancer awareness month.

“There is a month for a lot

of different causes,” he said.

“These are two that affect

men or women, but primarily

affect women. I think they

are worthy of discussion.”

He urged women in the

community to get screened

for breast cancer and for

victims of abuse to reach

out to the New Lenox Police

Department so they can

get directed to the help and

resources they need.

“It’s one of those issues,

like drug addition, like

mental health, like suicide,

that sometimes people don’t

want to talk about it because

of the stigma attached to it,”

Baldermann said. “It’s easy

to sit up here and say there

is no price worth paying to

stay in that situation, and

that’s true, but that doesn’t

make it any easier for victims

of domestic violence.”

Baldermann said that

from his law enforcement

experience that it often

starts with psychological

abuse long before it gets to

physical abuse.

“Good women get to the

point that they start to believe

what they’re being

told,” Baldermann said.

“That they’re worthless,

they can’t do any better,

they have to be dependent.

It’s something that should

have no stigma because the

victim is never to blame.

Nobody asks for that type

of abuse.”

The board also discussed

the first phase of a concept

plan for Lot 68 Leigh Creek

Park Site, adjacent to the

Lincolnway Special Recreation

Association building

at 1900 Heatherglen Drive.

They had the first reading

for the consideration of accepting

a trustee’s deed for

and authorizing the conveyance

of the lot. It was also

was passed unanimously after

brief discussion, without

having to undergo a second

reading. This will allow the

park district to move forward

with applications for

grant funding.

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4 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot NEWS

newlenoxpatriot.com

Providence Catholic to celebrate 100 years

Megan Schuller

Freelance Reporter

More than a century ago,

what is now known as Providence

Catholic High School

began as a select commercial

and finishing school for girls

called St. Mary Academy.

The school grew with

the community around it,

and has undergone a lot of

changes in the past century.

When the Sisters of Providence

took over the school

in 1918, located at Cass and

Ottawa Streets in Joliet, they

changed its name to what

the community knows it as

today.

According to historical records,

the school had 59 students

enrolled its first year,

with the graduating class

of 1919 featuring only six

Providence Catholic girls track team celebrates a state title

in 1978. That same year, the Celtics’ baseball and wrestling

teams also won state championships.

members, along with eight

others who received certificates

from the commercial

class.

Now, Providence’s current

enrollment is more than 900,

and graduating classes average

at 240.

“The school was composed

of mostly people from

Please see provi, 5

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LINCOLN - WAY RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL SPECIALIST FOR OVER 27 YEARS

Providence Catholic High School officials break ground at its New Lenox location on

Route 30. The school opened in 1962 after being in Joliet since 1918. Photos courtesy of

Providence Catholic High School

815.474.1450

chriskaczmarski@yahoo.com

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experienced Stylists & Barber would like to stay with long time customers. Almost all the personal property /

equipment will stay! Couch, 2 seats, washer, dryer, refrigerator, microwave oven, credit card machine, coffee

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newlenoxpatriot.com NEWS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 5

Provi

From Page 4

rural areas,” longtime Providence

Catholic employee

Ken Raymond said. “It was

a small school, no real athletic

facilities, except for

a baseball field. We really

evolved into a college prep

school and a coeducational

institution.”

Raymond started coaching

and teaching at Providence

in 1965 and retired

last school year, through the

high school’s most transformative

period.

Over the years, Providence

Catholic has had its

ups and downs.

By the 1950s, the building

in Joliet was condemned, so

the students and faculty temporarily

moved to St. Mary

Nativity Parish in Joliet until

the new Route 30 building

in New Lenox was built in

1962.

While the school was then

coed, boys and girls were

kept in separate wings of the

building to be taught separately.

Over time, financial

hardships led to coed classes

becoming the norm.

“They experimented with

coeducational classes, and

after that they began to meld

the classes together, because

it made sense economically,”

Raymond said.

In the early 1970s, the

school faced possible closure

because of financial

struggles. Bishop Romeo

Blanchette went against the

grain, objecting to the advice

of the Diocesan Board

of Education and vowing

to keep the school open.

This spurred the “Save Our

School” campaign, which

raised $30,000 in its first

year and saved the school

from closure.

“The [1970s] were a

very dynamic time for the

school,” Raymond said. “It

was really a fun experience

to watch everyone get involved

and invested in the

school. Everybody thought

they were a part of something.”

Providence Catholic 100th Anniversary Celebration

1800 W. Lincoln Highway in New Lenox

Schedule of Events...

Saturday, Oct. 20

12:30 p.m – Dedication of the LaVerne and Dorothy

Brown Student Commons – Speeches will given by

Providence dignitaries and special guests.

1:30-3 p.m. – Family Day – Birthday cake and

refreshments are to be served after the dedication.

Children’s events and tours of the new commons will

be offered.

7-11 p.m. – Alumni Sock Hop – The alumni party

includes a photo booth, DJ, memorabilia displays,

guided tours, food and cash bar. Event is for those 21

and older. Fee is $15.

Sunday, Oct. 21

10 a.m. – 100th Anniversary Celebration Mass –

Coffee and pastries will be served after mass.

For more information...

Web: www.providencecatholic.org/alumni/100thanniversary-celebration

The successful fundraising

campaigns in the 1970s

led to school improvements

to enhance student education

and experience. Under

the new direction of the Rev.

Roger Kaffer as principal, a

larger gymnasium, a wrestling

room (now the weight

room) and the theology wing

were added.

Providence began making

a name for itself within

the local sports community

after receiving its first three

state championships in 1978

for wrestling, girls track and

baseball. Over the years, it

continued to prove itself a

worthy athletic opponent,

with the football team having

a 50-game winning

streak and taking home four

consecutive state championships

from 1994-1997.

The wrestling team had six

consecutive state championships

from 1997-2002.

Raymond said the Kairos

retreat became a tradition for

the school in 1984 as a way

for students to build relationships

with each other and

with God. The retreat program,

along with an increase

in religious studies coursework,

led the school to be

named Providence Catholic

within that decade.

“From my own children

who went here, what they remember

the most is Kairos,”

Raymond said. “The group

interaction within a faithbased

school is a wonderful

program.”

When the administration

of Providence was turned

over to the Augustinians

from the Midwest Province

of Our Mother of Good

Counsel, a series of academic

changes were made under

its leadership.

With the Augustinians

now leading the school,

graduation requirements

were refined, and an Honors

Curriculum, Developmental

Program and a College

Preparatory Program were

established through the early

1990s.

“The Augustinians have

polished up the school and

reorganized the academics,”

Raymond said.

The early 2000s was a

time of exponential expansion

for the school.

The new fine arts wing

opened in 2002 after more

than $2.5 million was raised.

Soon after, the school also

chose to purchase 50 acres

west of campus at Gougar

Road and Route 30, and

later in 2012 the school acquired

25 acres southwest of

the campus for athletic fields

Pictured is a graduating class from the 1930s. Photos courtesy of Providence Catholic High

School

and future growth.

The new fine arts wing

opened in 2002 after more

than $2.5 million was raised.

Soon after, the school also

chose to purchase 50 acres

west of campus at Gougar

Road and Route 30, and

later in 2012 the school acquired

25 acres southwest of

the campus for athletic fields

and future growth.

“There was constant

growth, and that constant

search of, ‘Let us not rest

at being just be Providence

Catholic,’” Raymond said.

“We asked, ‘What else can

we do? Where do we stand?

How can we get better?’”

John Harper, a Providence

Catholic Class of

1977 graduate and former

superintendent of Plainfield

Pictured is a photo from the 1970’s of a group of students

gather outside the school building when it was still called

Providence High School.

Community Consolidated

School District 202, returned

to Providence in 2014 as the

current principal. To keep up

with the growth in the community,

the $6 million La-

Verne and Dorothy Brown

Student Commons was built

to replace the original cafeteria

to provide a more updated

gathering space.

Kathleen Kennedy, director

of community relations

and varsity tennis coach,

graduated from Providence

in 2011 and came back to

work at her alma mater.

“Providence has always

been my home,” Kennedy

said. “If it was not for Providence,

I do not think I would

have excelled the way I did

in college or in my career.

The staff, academics and

athletics truly set a stepping

stone for students that you

just won’t find anywhere

else.”

Kennedy said she sees

Providence is heading in the

right direction as it grows

academically and aesthetically.

“It was a great school

when I was student, but it’s

an even better school now,

with the new student commons,

improved athletic

facilities and discussion of

implementing a STEM program

next year,” Kennedy

said. “I had some amazing

memories as a student, and

continue to make some as a

staff member and coach.”

PCHS has come a long

way from an all-girls finishing

school to the wellknown,

four-year Catholic

high school it is today.

“It’s been so fun to be

a part of that change and

growth,” Raymond said.

“This year’s celebration is

about reliving the memories

and the history of the past

100 years.”

The school plans to hold

a celebration to commemorate

the past 100 years of

operation on Saturday, Oct.

20, and Sunday, Oct. 21. A

ceremony to dedicate the

newly built student commons

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with a Mass and other festivities

for students, alumni

and families.


6 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot NEW LENOX

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newlenoxpatriot.com Election 2018

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 7

Will County District 7 Board Member (3 for 2 seats)

Name: Steve Balich

Age: 68

Town of Residence:

Homer

Glen

Occupation: Will

County Board

Member

Elected Political Experience:

Homer Township Trustee for

eight years, Homer Township

Clerk for four years and Will

County Board Member for five

years.

Why are you running for reelection

in District 7?

I want to serve the people of

Will County to the best of my

ability always remembering to

stand for only what is in the best

interest of people. I believe in

less taxes, regulation and a smaller

government. I have been very

vocal about not raising the property

tax rate, since I understand

that property values decrease as

taxes increase. I also understand

seniors and others on a fixed income

can be forced out of their

home when taxes increase. [Response

truncated for exceeding

word count.]

What makes you the best candidate

for this position?

The thing that separates me

from other candidates is experience

and understanding

how to get issues addressed in

government. I am not afraid to

speak out, even if no person in

the room agrees with me. It is

my job to convince others to

join me in doing what is best

for the people. Beside being

against increased taxes, a good

example is getting the County

policy changed to: when your

car is towed and you are found

innocent in court, your attorney

can ask for your money back for

towing, storage and administration

expenses. The belief that

what is good for the people is not

always what is good for the government

is very important. Participation

in government, private

groups, organizations and clubs

help me want to listen to people

and understand their needs. [Response

truncated for exceeding

word count.]

What are the Top 3 issues you

see facing the district, and what

would you do to solve them?

I recognize excessive taxes is

the single most important issue

facing our county. As taxes increase,

property value and family

disposable income decrease. The

State of Illinois continually passes

on unfunded mandates, and, at

the same time, takes away more

and more money from what is

supposed to come in the form of

grants for needed projects. This

puts the County in a bad position.

The problem of necessary

programs being stopped is not

what anyone wants, but taxes

can’t be raised enough to pay

what is needed to keep these programs

funded. Simply put, programs

funded by the State will

end when the State stops funding

them. These programs only

existed because of State funding.

Getting people to understand the

State is responsible for funding,

not the County, which is only administering

the program, is very

important.

The courthouse, sheriff facility

and health department are being

built while lowering the tax

rate. Republicans took control of

the Board three years ago, saying

no to the Public Safety Tax

proposed by the Democrats as a

method of funding. These buildings

should have been replaced

long ago.

Public safety and jobs will

continue to be a huge issue. We

need to support our police, who

must deal with media-driven

disdain for police. Heroin is a

problem we are addressing with

education. However, creating a

positive environment where addicts

can get a good job and even

raise a family should be a goal.

Putting people in jail is very

costly. The County is currently

trying to find innovative ways

to reduce the jail population. We

need to continue to bring good

paying jobs to our county.

Name: Mike Fricilone

Age: 63

Town of Residence:

Homer

Glen

Occupation: Sales

Elected Political

Experience: Will County Board

Member, Chairman of the Finance

Committee, Vice Chair of the

Capital Improvement Committee,

Forest Preserve of Will County

Commissioner, Chairman of the

Operations Committee FPD,

President of the LTHS Foundation

and Children’s Advocacy Center

Board Member

Why are you running for reelection

in District 7?

I want to continue the work of

making sure our residents receive

the best services at the lowest cost.

I want to serve the individual, as

well as the community as a whole,

and public service is the best way

to do that. My cell number is (708)

Name: Kyle P.

Killacky

Age: 23

Town of Residence:

Homer

Glen

Occupation: Student

Elected Political Experience:

Been involved in local politics

since 2015

Why are you running for election

in District 7?

I am running because I believe I

can make a difference. Right now,

our politics is so divisive and

ugly. It is turning off the voters.

Both sides demonize the other,

and that is not how any government

should work. Yes, we have

many different views, but I am

sure we can find common ground.

In the words of Maya Angelou,

“We are more alike, my friends,

than we are unalike.” [Response

truncated for exceeding word

count.]

What makes you the best candidate

for this position?

I think I would bring a more

310-9831, and my email is mike

fricilone@gmail.com. I want to be

accessible to all our county residents.

What makes you the best candidate

for this position?

I am a businessman. I look at

things different than the typical

politician. I want to reduce the

tax burden while increasing the

County services. It can be done!

Efficient government and wise

spending can make that happen.

On my website, mikefricilone.

com, you can see a list of my accomplishments,

which should

give you a sense of my experience.

Over the last three years as

chairman of the Finance Committee,

I have eliminated pensions

for all County Board Members,

reduced the County Tax rate three

times and yet we have increased

the budget at the health department,

provided more drug awareness

programs, built a new public

safety complex, started the build

youthful, more modern take on

how the county works. I think I

can bring fresh, new and exciting

ideas to the county. Having people

that bring fresh ideas to the table

is very vital in leading the County

into the future. If we keep electing

the same people, with the same

ideas, then the county isn’t moving

forward.

What are the Top 3 issues you

see facing the district, and what

would you do to solve them?

1. Jobs. Will County is growing,

and with that growth, we

need jobs. People think that putting

up warehouses is the solution;

it is not. Warehouses are,

in my view, a band-aid and are

not a long-term solution. They

are fine now, but they will not

last. Automation is sadly the future,

and we need to prepare for

that future. Plus, for what I heard

from people who have worked

in those warehouses, they do not

have great working conditions.

We need jobs that treat workers

like human beings, and that pay

their workers a living wage. On

the board, I will work to get those

on our new county courthouse

and will soon start the build on

our new health department. [Response

truncated for exceeding

word count.]

What are the Top 3 issues you

see facing the district, and what

would you do to solve them?

1. Continue to work on reducing

our taxes.

2. Continue oversight on our

spending and operations, making

sure the taxpayer is getting the

best services for what they pay.

3. Continue the fight against

drug use, especially with our children.

The earlier our children are

educated on the dangers of drugs,

the better prepared they will be

to fight this battle. I will continue

to ask both the State and Federal

government for grant dollars to

fight this epidemic. We are getting

results, as this past week the

Feds approved legislation providing

funding to local governments

to help in the fight.

jobs into the county.

2. To get well-paying jobs in

Will County, we must continue to

invest in our infrastructure. The

county is doing a good job, but we

need and I will do more to fix our

crumbling roads.

3. The biggest priority that I

have on my list is battling the

heroin epidemic. It seems that it

is getting worse, and our county

needs to do more. They must invest

more in our county health

department. Right now, our health

department is underfunded, and

at a time when we have a health

epidemic raging in the county,

our health department should not

be underfunded. It was insane

to think that in 2016 there were

people on the board that wanted

to defund the health department.

We also need to make sure the

Sheriff’s Department has enough

resources to continue their hardfought

battle in lowering the death

toll. The Sheriff’s Department has

been successful, but they need

more help from the board. These

things are vital in combating this

disease. This is the most important

issue facing the county.


8 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot Election 2018

newlenoxpatriot.com

Will County District 9 Board Member (3 for 2 seats)

Name: Jim Murphy

Age: 61

Town of Residence:

Joliet

Occupation: Creative

Director, J.V.

Murphy & Associates

Marketing, Advertising

& Public Relations

Elected Political Experience: I am

a first-time candidate for a major

elected office.

Why are you running for election

in District 9?

I believe my strong business experience

and years of local community

involvement will be of value to

the residents and businesses in District

9, and to the entire Will County

Board. Having lived in Will County

for more than 30 years, I have a

deep understanding of District 9’s

past, a positive vision for its future

and will be a strong voice for this

extremely diverse district.

Name: Rachel Ventura

Age: 37

Town of Residence:

Joliet

Occupation: Business

Director, Legendary

Games

Elected Political

Experience: Did not provide answer

Why are you running for election

in District 9?

I’m running for Will County

Board District 9 because I believe

we need a government that works

for everyone! I plan to focus on the

issues and find bold solutions to the

everyday kitchen table problems.

I’m committed to listening to the issues,

researching the problem, asking

the tough questions and working

to create solutions that best represent

the needs of the people and area.

What makes you the best candidate

for this position?

I am a native of Joliet. I spent 10

What makes you the best candidate

for this position?

My business experience includes

managing multi-million dollar budgets,

as well as directing employee

staffs of up to 350 people. I have

been actively involved in the local

community for several decades

working with, and volunteering

for, many nonprofit organizations. I

support fiscally responsible leadership,

road improvements and capital

projects, creating job growth in Will

County, expanding Will County

green spaces and providing County

government employees with technology

and training so they remain

efficient and effective. I am strongly

endorsed by the Will County Deputy

Sheriff’s Union, Joliet Firefighters

Local 44, American Federation of

Teachers Local 604, the Will-Grundy

Central Trades & Labor Council,

the Will-Grundy Building Trades,

Operating Engineers Local 150, the

National Association of Letter Carriers

and many more.

What are the Top 3 issues you

see facing the district, and what

would you do to solve them?

I have walked all of District 9’s six

Townships and 25 precincts twice

in order to listen to the concerns of

residents. They clearly believe that

our inferior roads and infrastructure

are Will County’s biggest issue, and

I completely agree. The Joliet-area

portion of Interstate 80 was completed

over 50 years ago and was not

years as a military spouse, which

allows me to bring both local experiences

and new ideas to the table. I

have worked as an actuary, a substitute

teacher, a state park naturalist,

a pet nurse, a marketing manager,

and, currently, I am a business director.

I volunteer for Joliet School

District 86, Girl Scouts, Educurious,

Bicentennial Park and the

American Legion Auxiliary.

As a single mother of twins, I understand

today’s kitchen table problems

like high property taxes, safe

roads, keeping our loved one’s safe

and good jobs. With years of experience

serving others through my

work and volunteerism, I am ready

to serve my community as a member

of the Will County Board District 9.

What are the Top 3 issues you

see facing the district, and what

would you do to solve them?

My first priority would be to invest

in our infrastructure. The expanse of

warehouses in the area has increased

truck traffic and deteriorated our

designed to serve today’s high traffic

counts. I-55 must be improved

and widened, as well. Many of our

local bridges have been declared

“structurally deficient” by [the Illinois

Department of Transportation].

I will work together with all County

Board members to show a united

front to Springfield and Washington,

D.C. in order to fast track and secure

funding of major construction projects

that will dramatically improve

the level of safety on our highways

today and for the future. I will also

work to maintain or improve Will

County’s AA+ bond rating. An excellent

bond rating lowers the cost

of doing government business. I do

not believe in spending money we

don’t have, and the taxpayer’s back

is only so big. Finally, I will work

with all parties to find a bipartisan

solution to the region’s dwindling

water supply. We must look at all

possible water sources and make

long-term decisions that will secure

an adequate supply for generations

to come at the lowest possible cost.

This is not a Republican or Democrat

issue. It’s a quality of life issue

for all Will County residents and

businesses.

roads and bridges. I plan to work with

all levels of government to create an

intergovernmental solution since

more than 60 percent of the truck

traffic in Will County is from outside

the county. By focusing on projects

like the I-80 expansion and bridge,

we can create a safer interstate but

also provide better economic development

that residents can support,

and thus better jobs in the county.

Secondly, investing in other infrastructure,

like renewal energy

such as wind and solar, also provides

jobs but helps offset the warehouse

and truck emissions. Couple

this with responsible land preservation,

and we can make Will County

a greener place to live.

Lastly, opioid deaths and addiction

continue to affect residents in

my district. I would like to create

an opioid treatment center at the

new health department and expand

mental health services, as

well. I support the Safe Passage

programs at local police depart-

Please see Ventura, 10

Name: Annette

Parker

Age: 48

Town of Residence:

Crest

Hill

Occupation:

Executive Director,

Lockport Chamber of Commerce

Elected Political Experience:

Will County Board (2014-18);

Vice President Forest Preserve

District of Will County (2016-

2018); Lockport Township Park

Board (2012-2014)

Why are you running for reelection

in District 9?

I want to continue to improve

the quality of life for all

residents and keep the positive

progress moving forward. In the

last four years since being elected,

I have voted to reduce the

county property tax rate while

still providing residents topquality

service, maintained and

preserved green space, supported

opioid prevention, treatment

and recovery, and promoted job

growth. I want to keep Chicago

politics out of Will County and

retain our own identity.

What makes you the best candidate

for this position?

I have consistently demonstrated

an ability to interact

with constituents, listen to varied

views, attend neighborhood

meetings, participate in discussions

and delve into and broaden

my understanding of county

issues. I am a lifelong resident

and am highly engaged with the

community. I am a proven leader

and dedicated to every cause I

become involved with. District 9

is diverse and composed of different

religions, ethnicities and

socioeconomic backgrounds.

Due to this makeup, it is important

to have a member from each

political party to be the voice of

the people. I am the only Republican

asking to represent District

9. I am the only candidate that

has been previously elected,

and my record of bipartisanship

shows I look for the right decisions.

[Response truncated for

exceeding word count.]

What are the Top 3 issues you

see facing the district, and

what would you do to solve

them?

1. Property taxes are the No.

1 complaint. Some residents are

being forced to sell their homes

and move because their tax bill

has gone beyond what they can

afford. As the County Board

representative in District 9 and

vice president of the Forest Preserve,

I have voted against tax

increases and have voted to reduce

the tax rate for the last four

years while still providing residents

with quality services. If

elected, I will continue to fight

against tax increases.

2. Infrastructure needs and

safety of our roads. With Will

County located in the Midwest,

near the third-largest city in the

country and having three interstates

surround us, truck traffic

will no doubt be traveling

through our county. I have been

working diligently with state and

federal officials to tell our story

of infrastructure needs. This past

September, Will County was

awarded State and Federal funding

in the amount of $47 million

for interchange and infrastructure

improvements on I-80 at

Route 30. I will continue to beat

that drum and fight for funding

from state and federal agencies

to improve the safety and efficiency

of our roads.

3. Opioids are becoming more

dangerous, easier to obtain and

are affecting people of all ages.

An increase in use, addiction and

deaths are on the rise. Opioid addiction

is a physical and mental

illness and needs to be treated

as such. I have supported the

education and awareness about

the dangers of this drug. I have

been in favor of Will County

taking actions to deal with this

issue head on, such as working

with the Sheriff’s Office, State’s

Attorney and specialty courts,

supplying Narcan to all Sheriff

deputies, supporting the Safe

Passage programs and working

with hospitals for recovery. I

will continue to vote to support

opioid prevention, treatment and

recovery.


newlenoxpatriot.com NEW LENOX

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10 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot NEWS

newlenoxpatriot.com

We’re gonna need a bigger inbox

Roughly two

weeks left to enter

costume, pumpkin

carving contests

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

Came here to carve pumpkins

and dress up, but you’re

all out of pumpkins?

Well then, show us your

Halloween best.

Just cut up a pumpkin with

a chainsaw?

That sounds “fine” (but seriously,

maybe use smaller,

safer tools).

Publisher 22nd Century

Media’s Halloween contests

are going for just a couple

more weeks. Details for each

are below, but questions can

be directed to Managing Editor

Bill Jones at bill@opprairie.com

or (708) 326-9170

ext. 20.

The Costumes

The Halloween Costume

Contest for 2018 features

a total of three categories.

Adults 16 and older have two

ways to win, with awards for

scariest costume and most

creative up for grabs. Children

15 and younger, meanwhile,

will compete in one

category in which creativity

is key.

We’re going to pick just

one winner across each category

from all seven of our

southwest suburban towns:

Orland Park, Tinley Park,

Frankfort, Mokena, New

Lenox, Homer Glen and

Lockport. So, your entries

need to be good.

We have just a few rules.

1) You have to be the person

in the costume. You cannot

submit for anyone else,

with the exception of parents

who submit for their children.

2) Each person can only

submit one costume for an

entry (basically, you cannot

send yourself in multiple costumes

— pick one), though

families can send one entry

per person from different

members of the family (and

they can be submitted together).

A group also may enter

one group costume, eligible

for one prize, as a group.

3) We understand there

may be a bit in the way of

scary imagery (such is the

nature of the holiday), but

the costumes have to be relatively

family friendly to be

considered and published.

Nothing beyond PG-13.

4) Entries must be submitted

no later than 2 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 1, to bill@opprairie.com

or 22nd Century

Media, c/o Managing Editor

Bill Jones, at 11516 W. 183rd

The Prizes

A breakdown of the prizes available in 22nd Century Media’s 2018 Halloween contests,

by category.

Best Adult Costume-Scary (16 and older)

• A $25 gift certificate for Rubi Agave Latin Kitchen, Tequila & Whiskey Bar, 12622 W.

159th St. in Homer Glen

• A $5 gift certificate for Whizzy Puffs, 106 MacGregor Road in Lockport

Best Adult Costume-Creative (16 and older)

• A $25 gift certificate for White Street Cafe, located inside the Trolley Barn in Frankfort

• A $5 gift certificate for Whizzy Puffs, 106 MacGregor Road in Lockport

Best Children’s Costume (15 and younger)

• Two hours of free bowling for up to six people, including shoe rentals, along with a

pizza and pitcher full of pop, at Laraway Lanes, 1009 West Laraway Road in New Lenox

• A $25 gift card for Gizmos Fun Factory, 66 Orland Square Drive in Orland Park

Best Adult-Crafted Pumpkin (16 and older)

• A $25 gift certificate for Rubi Agave Latin Kitchen, Tequila & Whiskey Bar, 12622 W.

159th St. in Homer Glen

• A $5 gift certificate for Whizzy Puffs, 106 MacGregor Road in Lockport

Best Pumpkin Created by a Child (15 and younger)

• Gift certificate valued at $25 from Odyssey Fun World, 19111 Oak Park Ave. in Tinley

Park

• A $25 gift card for Gizmos Fun Factory, 66 Orland Square Drive in Orland Park

St. Unit SW Office Condo

3, Orland Park, IL, 60467

(physical entries cannot be

returned), along with names,

ages, email addresses and/or

phone numbers, and towns

for each of the entrants.

5) The entries will be

judged by 22nd Century

Media’s editorial staff, with

winners being chosen based

on creativity, successful execution

of an idea, quality of

craftsmanship and consideration

of the holiday/season.

6) All entries are subject to

being published.

The prizes are detailed in

the accompanying sidebar.

The Pumpkins

Our pumpkin carving contest

returns in 2018 with a

category for adults 16 and

older, as well as one for children

15 and younger. In both

categories, it is all about creativity

and skill.

We will pick just one winner

across each category

from all seven of our southwest

suburban towns: Orland

Park, Tinley Park, Frankfort,

Mokena, New Lenox, Homer

Glen and Lockport.

We have just a few rules.

1) You have to be the person

who carved the pumpkin.

You cannot submit for anyone

else, with the exception

of parents who submit for

their children.

2) Each person can only

submit one pumpkin photo

(can feature multiple pumpkins

if there is a theme) for

an entry, though families can

send one entry per person

from different members of

the family (and they can be

submitted together).

3) We understand there

may be a bit in the way of

scary imagery (such is the

nature of the holiday), but

the pumpkins have to be relatively

family friendly to be

considered and published.

Nothing beyond PG-13.

4) Entries must be submitted

no later than 2 p.m.

Thursday, Nov. 1, to bill@opprairie.com

or 22nd Century

Media, c/o Managing Editor

Bill Jones, at 11516 W. 183rd

St. Unit SW Office Condo

3, Orland Park, IL, 60467

(physical entries cannot be

returned), along with names,

ages, email addresses and/or

phone numbers, and towns

for each of the entrants.

5) The entries will be

judged by 22nd Century

Media’s editorial staff, with

winners being chosen based

on creativity, successful execution

of an idea, quality of

craftsmanship and consideration

of the holiday/season.

6) All entries are subject to

being published.

The prizes are detailed in

the accompanying sidebar.

Ventura

From Page 8

ments, where people with

substance abuse disorders

can turn themselves in for

treatment without being

arrested, and believe this

should be expanded to all

police departments in Will

County. I also support our

county efforts, and [Will

County State’s Attorney

James] Glasgow’s office for

filing lawsuits against pharmaceutical

companies who

target our residents, especially

our youth.


newlenoxpatriot.com NEWS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 11

Run, walk, roll or trot to raise money for ADA playground

Annual Trick or Trot

race to take place

Saturday, Oct. 20

Amanda villiger, Assistant

Editor

Participants in the Lincolnway

Special Recreation

Association’s annual Trick

or Trot 5K raise money each

year for something more

tangible than research or

overseas causes.

They are raising money

for a playground to be built

in their own backyard.

People of all ability levels

are known for their

devotion to exercise and

their dedication to charity

through 5K and marathon

events throughout the year

that support good causes.

And this is another such

one.

Funds from the LWSRA’s

Trick or Trot will be put toward

building a wheelchairaccessible

playground and

outdoor recreation complex

complete with basketball

courts, a walking path, bags

games and more, so that no

child has to sit on the sidelines.

“This is something that

anyone in the area can now

come to if they have children

that are in a wheelchair

where they can actually

access the equipment and

actually play on it and not

have to watch from afar,”

said Karen Reczek, marketing,

outreach and fundraising

coordinator for the

LWSRA.

Now in its third year,

and in conjunction with the

Heather Glen Homeowners

Association, the race brings

awareness to many children

with special needs are excluded

from playtime because

of their physical limitations

and the constraints

of their wheelchairs.

What will make the playground

unique and fully

Pictured is the start of the Trick or Trot 5K from years past.

This year’s event is to take place Saturday, Oct. 20.

22nd Century Media File Photo

accessible for children in

wheelchairs is the material

beneath all the structures,

which is solid and cushioned

but will allow for

easy rolling in a situation

where pea gravel or wood

chips may hinder or make

progress impossible.

Reczek said many playgrounds

that use those materials

as the base also have

retaining-wall-like structures,

so without a ramp the

entire area is inaccessible.

The playground and other

recreation areas are slated

to be built on park district

land adjacent to the LWS-

RA building, and Reczek

said the facilities will likely

be popular with children

and families in the nearby

neighborhoods as well as

those that come to LWSRA

programs.

It will be a place where

all children, typical or with

special needs, can play sideby-side,

and Reczek said it

will be especially nice for

families where siblings will

be able to play together on

the same playground.

“The cool thing about that

is that it’s all inclusive, so

now those that are in wheelchairs

are going to be included

in regular play with

the typical kids,” she said.

“... [The LWSRA] facility

is for those that have special

needs, so this is something

that even when their

siblings come out they can

play with them. And that’s

really important to us.”

So far, the LWSRA has

raised more than $150,000,

and the organization is applying

for a $400,000 grant

as well. Reczek estimated

that last year’s 5K contributed

about $3,500 toward

that and hopes this year’s

event will bring in even

more.

Cost to participate on the

timed and certified course is

$30 for adults and $15 for

children 13 and younger.

Day-of registration will

begin at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday,

Oct. 20. The race

will begin at 8 a.m., and the

first 100 people to cross the

finish line will receive a

medal.

Trick or Trot 5k

Cost: $30 for adults and

$15 for children under 14,

and includes a T-shirt

Location: Lincolnway

Special Recreation

Association, 1900 Heather

Glen Drive in New Lenox

Register: online at www.

lwsra.org/5k

Costumes are encouraged,

but not required.

Upcoming event

Trunk or Treat

When: 11 a.m.-2p.m.

Saturday, Oct. 27

Location: Lincolnway

Special Recreation

Association, 1900

Heather Glen Drive in New

Lenox

In case of inclement

weather, the event will be

moved indoors

ATTENTION

BUILDERS!

MOKENA - small subdivision ready to

develop. Possibility of 5 lots. Sewer and

water very close. Located close to schools,

train and parks. Preliminary engineering

available. A great start to the spring

market in the very desirable Mokena.

Priced at $210,000

Call Sharon Ahrweiler: 815-263-2844

ahrshar@aol.com

SERVING THE LINCOLNWAY AREA

FOR THE PAST 40 YEARS

SharonAhrweiler.com

1200 E. Lincoln Hwy

New Lenox

815.485.5050

815.263.2844

Visit us online at

www.newlenoxpatriot.com


newlenoxpatriot.com NEWS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 11

Run, walk, roll or trot to raise money for ADA playground

Annual Trick or Trot

race to take place

Saturday, Oct. 20

Amanda villiger, Assistant

Editor

Participants in the Lincolnway

Special Recreation

Association’s annual Trick

or Trot 5K raise money each

year for something more

tangible than research or

overseas causes.

They are raising money

for a playground to be built

in their own backyard.

People of all ability levels

are known for their

devotion to exercise and

their dedication to charity

through 5K and marathon

events throughout the year

that support good causes.

And this is another such

one.

Funds from the LWSRA’s

Trick or Trot will be put toward

building a wheelchairaccessible

playground and

outdoor recreation complex

complete with basketball

courts, a walking path, bags

games and more, so that no

child has to sit on the sidelines.

“This is something that

anyone in the area can now

come to if they have children

that are in a wheelchair

where they can actually

access the equipment and

actually play on it and not

have to watch from afar,”

said Karen Reczek, marketing,

outreach and fundraising

coordinator for the

LWSRA.

Now in its third year,

and in conjunction with the

Heather Glen Homeowners

Association, the race brings

awareness to many children

with special needs are excluded

from playtime because

of their physical limitations

and the constraints

of their wheelchairs.

What will make the playground

unique and fully

Pictured is the start of the Trick or Trot 5K from years past.

This year’s event is to take place Saturday, Oct. 20.

22nd Century Media File Photo

accessible for children in

wheelchairs is the material

beneath all the structures,

which is solid and cushioned

but will allow for

easy rolling in a situation

where pea gravel or wood

chips may hinder or make

progress impossible.

Reczek said many playgrounds

that use those materials

as the base also have

retaining-wall-like structures,

so without a ramp the

entire area is inaccessible.

The playground and other

recreation areas are slated

to be built on park district

land adjacent to the LWS-

RA building, and Reczek

said the facilities will likely

be popular with children

and families in the nearby

neighborhoods as well as

those that come to LWSRA

programs.

It will be a place where

all children, typical or with

special needs, can play sideby-side,

and Reczek said it

will be especially nice for

families where siblings will

be able to play together on

the same playground.

“The cool thing about that

is that it’s all inclusive, so

now those that are in wheelchairs

are going to be included

in regular play with

the typical kids,” she said.

“... [The LWSRA] facility

is for those that have special

needs, so this is something

that even when their

siblings come out they can

play with them. And that’s

really important to us.”

So far, the LWSRA has

raised more than $150,000,

and the organization is applying

for a $400,000 grant

as well. Reczek estimated

that last year’s 5K contributed

about $3,500 toward

that and hopes this year’s

event will bring in even

more.

Cost to participate on the

timed and certified course is

$30 for adults and $15 for

children 13 and younger.

Day-of registration will

begin at 6:30 a.m. on Saturday,

Oct. 20. The race

will begin at 8 a.m., and the

first 100 people to cross the

finish line will receive a

medal.

Trick or Trot 5k

Cost: $30 for adults and

$15 for children under 14,

and includes a T-shirt

Location: Lincolnway

Special Recreation

Association, 1900 Heather

Glen Drive in New Lenox

Register: online at www.

lwsra.org/5k

Costumes are encouraged,

but not required.

Upcoming event

Trunk or Treat

When: 11 a.m.-2p.m.

Saturday, Oct. 27

Location: Lincolnway

Special Recreation

Association, 1900

Heather Glen Drive in New

Lenox

In case of inclement

weather, the event will be

moved indoors

ATTENTION

BUILDERS!

MOKENA - small subdivision ready to

develop. Possibility of 5 lots. Sewer and

water very close. Located close to schools,

train and parks. Preliminary engineering

available. A great start to the spring

market in the very desirable Mokena.

Priced at $210,000

Call Sharon Ahrweiler: 815-263-2844

ahrshar@aol.com

SERVING THE LINCOLNWAY AREA

FOR THE PAST 40 YEARS

SharonAhrweiler.com

1200 E. Lincoln Hwy

New Lenox

815.485.5050

815.263.2844

Visit us online at

www.newlenoxpatriot.com


newlenoxpatriot.com NEWS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 13

Local starts fundraiser for Crest Hill child with cancer

Resident connects

with child’s mother

through love of Harry

Potter series

Megan Schuller

Freelance Reporter










Masses:

Saturday Vigil....... 4:00 pm

Sunday ................. 7:30 and 10:30 am

Daily ..................... Mon., Wed., Fri. 7:30 am

Mass Schedule change effective October 1, 2018.


Thanks to the world-wide

fan base of Harry Potter, a

local man is throwing a fundraiser

to raise money for a

young Harry Potter fan in

Crest Hill recovering from

acute myeloid leukemia.

New Lenox native Johnny

Frank saw a Facebook post

from a family member of

13-year-old Kayla Zbroskewich,

who urged members

of the cosplayer Facebook

group to send positive messages

and photos of their

Harry Potter costumes to

Kayla to help lift her spirits

during her recovery.

The fundraiser is scheduled

to be held on Oct. 20 at

St. John Church in Mokena,

with all the proceeds going

to Kayla’s family for medical

expenses. Cosplayers

are coming from around the

nation to be involved. Even

local actors from All About

Music will be participating.

Todd Beebe, owner of All

About Music and Children’s

Theatre, said that he is

proud of their participation

in the fundraiser because it

is a great way for the young

actors to give back to their

community.

“We try to be community

minded and donate to

causes,” Beebe said. “It’s

great to use your talent to

help out others in any way

you can. It’s great to see because

that’s something we

try to instill in them.”

After realizing that Kayla

was local, Frank reached out

to the family and decided he

wanted to do more than send

some encouraging words.

He wanted to bring the wizarding

world of Harry Potter

Pictured is Kayla Zbroskewich, who is battling acute myeloid leukemia, at Lurie Children’s

Hospital. A fundraiser is scheduled for her at St. John’s UCC in Mokena on Saturday, Oct.

20. Photo Submitted

to life.

“When I saw her on the

Facebook page, a picture of

Kayla in a hospital bed with

medical machines around

her, it broke my heart and

put things into perspective,”

Frank said. “It just kind of

hit me hard because I have

three daughters and a son.

Next thing I know it’s four

in the morning, I’m in the

garage covered in foam and

paint.”

Kayla was diagnosed five

months ago after having

had a stroke and near heart

failure. After undergoing

chemotherapy and rehabilitation,

she is back home and

continuing with physical

and speech therapy rehabilitation.

“She has clung onto life

for the past five months,”

her mother, Amy Zbroskewich,

said. “She is in remission

up to 0.1 percent. If

there is even one bad white

blood cell, it can mutate in

to 400,000 cells again like it

was.”

Amy said that Kayla’s

love for things like Harry

Potter and music have been

Magic Market and Fair & Witches and Wizard Ball

*Proceeds from ticket sales benefit 13-year-old Kayla

Zbroskewich, who is battling cancer.

When: 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.

Where: St. John Church, 11100 2nd St. in Mokena

For more information...

www.eventbrite.com/e/magic-market-and-fair-witchesand-wizard-ball-tickets-47099854934

positive for her during her

recovery.

The community is joining

in on paying it forward by

contributing to the fundraiser.

Raffy Candy Store is donating

ice cream, and many

residents have donated their

time and supplies. Frank has

even made full-sized store

fronts to recreate sets from

the Harry Potter movies.

“Social media makes it

seem like people are divided,

but it makes you realize

that people can truly come

together and be wonderful,”

Frank said. “Everyone steps

up and pulls together. The

amount of people from the

community who have come

forth, its just amazing.”

More than 20 vendors are

scheduled to be at the fundraiser.

Harry Potter-themed

drinks, such as “Butterbeer,”

will be available, as

well as a live sorting hat and

more than 20 live characters

to take photos with. The

first main event begins at 9

a.m. Frank advises people

to bring their dancing shoes

because the venue will

transform for the “Hogwarts

Witches and Wizards Ball”

from 7-9 p.m.

“We just want to have a

good time and raise some

money for the family,”

Frank said. “We want people

to have a good time,

smile and forget their worries,

and embrace the spirit

of the event. Whether you

like Harry Potter or not, it’s

definitely going to be fun.”

Tickets are on sale via

eventbrite.com/e/magicmarket-and-fair-witch

es-and-wizard-ball-tick

ets-47099854934.

















Expires 11/1/18.

Broker - Management Team

“10”


















11/1/18.


14 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot SCHOOL

newlenoxpatriot.com

West student writes, directs,

performs at Second City

the new lenox patriot’s

Standout Student

Sponsored by Marquette Bank

Submitted by Lincoln-Way

Community High School

District 210

Lincoln-Way West student Cooper Lyke (right) takes a

picture with his castmates during a Second City event over

the summer. Photo Submitted

Every Saturday for nearly

a decade, Lincoln-Way West

Junior Cooper Lyke has

trekked to downtown Chicago

to do what he loves:

comedy.

“I used to watch all the

old [Saturday Night Live]

shows with my parents

when I was young,” Lyke

said. “We started looking

for comedy classes, but all

the acting classes were filled

up in my town, so I started

taking classes at Second

City. I started at 8 years old,

so I’ve been doing this for

more than half of my life.”

Lyke took improv and

sketch classes until age 11,

when he auditioned for Second

City’s Youth & Teen

Ensemble: a 50-minute

show performed by those

enrolled in Second City’s

highest level kid/teen classes.

Lyke’s admission to the

group made him one of the

youngest to perform, where

he wrote, produced and

acted alongside high school

students.

Every six months, auditions

for the Youth & Teen

Ensemble are held, and every

six months since he was

11, Lyke has been selected to

participate.

“The Ensemble is every

Saturday in the city. I’ve only

missed one Saturday,” Lyke

said. As a member, Lyke

writes a few sketches every

month and averages about

eight sketches that are chosen

to be performed in each

show. He spends much of his

time outside of school working

on his writing, traveling

downtown and crafting new

sketches in the writers’ room.

Over the summer, Lyke

was tasked with an even bigger

responsibility — a responsibility

that many adults

would find intimidating:

writing and performing an

entire set with his castmates.

Despite a bit of nervousness,

both performances of “I’m

Not Mad…I’m Just Disappointed”

sold out.

“I guess I have a dark,

unique sense of humor,”

Lyke said. “I think people

gravitate toward it. I like the

randomness and the creativity

and that everyone gets

to inject their own personal

viewpoint.”

Lyke hopes to continue his

practice of comedy and creativity

beyond high school.

“I want to be a writer and

director,” he said. “Not necessarily

just of comedy, but I

definitely want to go to film

school.”

Lyke intends on continuing

to perform at Second

City throughout high school,

and hopefully beyond.

Abigail Schliffka, Lincoln-Way

West senior

Abigail Schliffka was picked as this week’s

Standout Student because of her academic

performance.

What is one essential you must have when

studying?

Silence. To be able to concentrate and absorb

information, all speaking, singing and

laughing has to be turned off.

What do you like to do when not in school or

studying?

I enjoy reading when I am not busy. I love

any type of book that gives me a chance to

stretch my imagination. “Downtown Abbey”

is also a delight to watch. Life just isn’t complete

without some British culture.

What is your dream job?

If my job could be traveling the world and

exploring, I would definitely do that! During

my travels, I would also write books and

become an author of fiction.

What is one thing people don’t know about

you?

I come from a huge family; I have 43 first

cousins and more than 40 second cousins.

Our family reunions can be confusing at

times, but they are also tons of fun.

Whom do you look up to and why?

I look up to my Grandpa. The undying

love he shows for his family and dedication

he has as a preacher shine out every time I

visit him. His outlook on life inspires me to

stay strong and be courageous.

Who is your favorite teacher and why?

Obviously, my dad, Master Sgt. Schliffka!

He is, of course, the best! Mr. Ruklic

would be my other favorite because of all

the years he has been teaching me in band,

he always has a way to connect with students

by telling a story or giving a visual

representation we are able to relate back to

music.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

What’s your favorite class and why?

I quite enjoy AP European History taught

by Mr. Gallagher. Starting out my day learning

about things like the black plague and the

fall of the Roman Empire really is inspiring.

What’s your morning routine?

My favorite part of my morning routine

is seeing my nephew before I go to school

and hearing him yell “Abba!” before I leave.

My least favorite part is me forgetting my car

keys as I go out the door and having to come

back in. It happens almost every morning.

What extracurricular do you wish your

school had?

I wish our school had rock climbing. We

need to offer rock climbing because it is an

exciting way to get active and have fun at the

same time.

What’s your best memory from school?

My best memory was during freshman

year with the Marching Warriors when we

made it to finals at the ISU band competition.

Being a small school band at the time,

we could clearly see the gleam of everyone’s

smile as it was announced. Then to follow

were tears of joy from many people. That

marked an epic ending of the year we had

together.

Standout Student is a weekly feature for The

New Lenox Patriot. Nominations come from New

Lenox area schools.


newlenoxpatriot.com NEWS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 15

Old Plank Trail Community Bank

readies for 8th annual 5K fundraiser

Race on Saturday,

Oct. 21, benefits

New Lenox Township

food pantry

Staff Report

For the past seven years,

Old Plank Trail Community

Bank has donated $70,000,

or $10,000 each year, to the

New Lenox Township’s food

pantry, along with thousands

of food items.

Now it is gearing up for its

eighth year of serving the local

community with another

5K fundraiser on Sunday,

Oct. 21 at 8:30 a.m. The

Kids Race, which is only a

half mile, starts at 9:30 a.m.

The race will start and finish

at the bank’s New Lenox location

at 280 Veterans Parkway.

For early registrants, fee is

$10 for those 14 and younger;

$15 for ages 15-17; and

$30 for those 18 and older.

Fees on race day are $15 for

ages 14 and younger; $20 for

those 15-17; and $35 for 18

and older. The Kids Race,

for those 10 and younger, is

$10 for early registrants, or

$15 on race day. The first

300 registered adults and 50

registered children will receive

a race shirt.

All participants are encouraged

to bring two nonperishable

food items to donate

to the local community

food pantries.

To register and for more

information, visit www.

pantforpantry.com.

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16 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot NEWS

newlenoxpatriot.com

Pictured are (left to right) Will County Board Member Mike Fricilone, Illinois Gov. Bruce

Rauner, County Board Member Steve Balich, County Board Member Annette Parker

and County Board Member Gloria Dollinger at the site near I-80 and Route 30, where

construction will occur. Photo Submitted

Construction starts on

interchange at I-80 and U.S. 30

Project will improve

safety, reduce

congestion in NL,

county as a whole

Submitted by Will County

Board

Will County Board members

joined Gov. Bruce

Rauner, Illinois Transportation

Secretary Randy Blankenhorn,

and New Lenox

Mayor Tim Balderman this

week to begin the process of

rebuilding the interchange at

U.S. 30 and Interstate 80 in

New Lenox. The rebuilding

project is a major component

of the Freight Mobility

plan that the County Board

drafted last year and is now

implementing.

“Will County is home to

the largest inland port in

North America,” said County

Board Member Mike Fricilone.

“It is critical that we

maintain and improve our

infrastructure to continue the

quality of life that the residents

in Will County expect

and deserve.”

Fricilone said that the Will

County Board has worked

hard to keep their Community

Friendly Freight Mobility

Plan on the front burner

at both the federal and state

levels. The County Board has

had several meetings with

the Governor’s office over

the last few months to impress

upon the administration

the critical need facing Will

County infrastructure.

With the County Board’s

Freight Study undergirding

their request, the State of Illinois

awarded grant money

to Will County and the Village

of New Lenox to complete

the project. The total

amount granted to rebuild

the busy interchange is $47

million.

“There is no question that

Will County has seen tremendous

growth over the

last few decades in both

population and in jobs,” said

Will County Board Member

Annette Parker. “The infrastructure

in Will County

needs to be updated for modern

times and the County

Board will continue to push

for funding to implement our

Community Friendly Freight

Mobility Plan.”

When construction is

completed, the U.S. 30 interchange

ramps will be better

aligned to accommodate

traffic volumes. U.S. 30 will

also be rebuilt through the

interchange with traffic signal

and drainage improvements.

The bicycle and pedestrian

path along U.S. 30

will also be extended.

As part of the project, a

lane will be added to I-80 in

both directions from I-355

through the U.S. 30 interchange.

The I-80 bridges

over U.S. 30 and the Metra

Rock Island District Line and

Hickory Creek will also be

rebuilt.

Pre-construction will run

through the fall and winter

with construction on the

interchange starting in the

spring of 2019. The project

is expected to be completed

in late 2021.


newlenoxpatriot.com NEW LENOX

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 17

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New LenoxPublicLibrary

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Ghouls and Golf

Sunday,October28, 2018

11am–4pm

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A“hole”lot of fun, includingraffles

ComeDressed in Costume!

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Model is located at 14713 Astor

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Tickets can be purchased at Library

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on the commons

www.newlenoxlibrary.org


18 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot NEWS

newlenoxpatriot.com

FROM THE MOKENA MESSENGER

Activist group speaks out

against Respect Life Week

proclamation

Approximately 20 people

were in attendance Oct. 8

for a Mokena Village Board

meeting to demand a recent

proclamation made by

the board for Respect Life

Week be rescinded.

Several people spoke out

against the proclamation,

including Emily Biegel, of

the Southwest Suburban

Activists.

Biegel said the mayor’s

office told some of those

who called that the proclamation

had been done in the

Village for 25 years.

“[The staff member’s] intent

may have been to justify

a wrong practice by highlighting

its longevity, but

that just makes it worse,”

Biegel said. “This just

means that for 25 years, the

Village of Mokena has affirmatively

stated its support

for organizations seeking to

deny its citizens their constitutional

right of bodily

autonomy. This means that

for 25 years, the Village has

put religious agendas ahead

of the constitution.”

At the end of the regular

meeting, during his

comments to the board,

Mayor Frank Fleischer responded

to those in attendance

and those who had

voiced displeasure over the

proclamation.

“The proclamation stated

that respect for life was the

foundation of a modern society;

that the focus of the

week was that all people

have a right to life, liberty

and the pursuit of happiness;

that both secular and

nonsecular groups supported

that right,” Fleischer

said. “The Village has recognized

that right by such

a proclamation since 1994.

The federal government,

through the president, has

issued a proclamation recognizing

the national sanctity

of human life, which

was started by Ronald Reagan

in 1984.”

Reporting by Jon DePaolis,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit MokenaMessenger.com.

FROM THE TINLEY JUNCTION

Tinley Park considering more

than $7 million in incentives

for development

The developers proposing

to build a $36-million,

four-story mixed-use development

in downtown Tinley

Park have requested more

than $7 million in economic

incentives from the Village

after back-and-forth negotiations.

The Village’s Committee

of the Whole met Oct.

9 to discuss an agreement

for the Boulevard at Central

Station that includes

a $4.8-million rebate contingent

upon the project’s

completion, $2.2 million

in upfront TIF funds to assist

with public infrastructure

improvements, and a

$130,000 cap of permit and

review fees. Both parties

would agree to land swaps

upon completion of the first

and final phase of the project.

The total public and

private incentive request is

$7.52 million, according to

Village documents.

“The risk is on the developer,”

Village Attorney Patrick

Connelly said.

South Street — Robert

Hansen of Hansen Development

and Joseph Rizza

of Joe Rizza Auto Group

— has been working on the

project for approximately

12 years with the goal of

building a transit-oriented

development on roughly 3

acres of land, approximately

1 acre of which is owned

by the Village, adjacent to

the Oak Park Avenue train

station.

Recommended for approval

by the Plan Commission

on Sept. 6, plans

include 165 one- and twobedroom

apartments, and

29,853 leasable square feet

of commercial space, with

at least one restaurant built

over the course of two construction

phases.

The Village Board was

scheduled to consider the

first reading of two ordinances

Tuesday, Oct. 16,

that would approve the economic

incentive agreement

and grant a special use permit

with variance.

Reporting by Cody Mroczka,

Editor. For more, visit Tinley

Junction.com.

FROM THE FRANKFORT STATION

Durbins reopens with new

look following arson in July

Durbins in downtown

Frankfort is open again after

a July 15 fire that Frankfort

Fire Protection District officials

determined was an

act of arson, which led to a

complete remodeling of the

inside of the restaurant.

The fire caused enough

damage to ruin most of

Durbins interior, but coowner

John McAuliffe said

the incident gave the business

a chance to give the

place a new look. The majority

of the interior of the

reopened restaurant is new.

“At first, when the fire department

called, we were all

under the assumption that

we did something, like, ‘Oh,

what did we do?’” McAuliffe

said. “We thought maybe

we brushed something

hot into the garbage can, and

it smoldered. ... That was the

original thought, because

it was the garbage can that

started the fire.”

After reviewing the restaurant’s

video footage,

McAuliffe said it was obvious

someone had entered

the building, stolen cash and

equipment, and lit the fire on

the way out.

The business stayed closed

for almost three months after

the incident.

A setback along the way

resulted in Durbin’s remaining

closed during the Frankfort

Fall Festival, which

McAuliffe said is the last big

event before the slower winter

season starts.

“I am a little nervous

about the winter; it really

does scare me around here

... but I think our customers

are loyal,” McAuliffe said.

“And I think they’ll come

back, and hopefully they’re

going to come back and

support us to keep us going

through the rough times.”

Reporting by Amanda Stoll,

Assistant Editor. For more, visit

FrankfortStation.com.

FROM THE ORLAND PARK PRAIRIE

Police: Driver was under

the influence when semi

jackknifed on I-80

An Orland Park truck

driver allegedly was under

the influence of alcohol

when his truck tractor and

semitrailer jackknifed on Interstate

80.

John Mulica, 48, was

charged with driving under

the influence of alcohol, illegal

transportation of alcohol,

failure to reduce speed

to avoid an accident and improper

lane usage, according

to a press release issued Oct.

10 by Illinois State Police.

He reportedly was involved

in a one-vehicle

crash involving a commercial

vehicle at 4:29 p.m. Oct.

9 on I-80, just east of I-55 in

Will County.

He was driving a 2015

Kenworth truck tractor pulling

a semitrailer westbound

when he lost control of it and

the vehicle jackknifed in the

center median ditch, according

to the release.

Mulica was taken to an

area hospital with injuries

described as not life threatening

and then taken into

custody, police said.

Trooper DeAnn Falat,

with ISP District 5, said a

hospital blood draw is what

determined Mulica was under

the influence of alcohol.

Whether any other factors

caused him to lose control of

the vehicle is “still under investigation,”

Falat wrote in

an email to The Orland Park

Prairie.

Falat declined to release

information on what type of

alcohol reportedly was being

transported in the vehicle.

Reporting by Bill Jones, Editor.

For more, visit OPPrairie.com.

FROM THE LOCKPORT LEGEND

Please see Neighbors, 19

NL Chamber starts Halloween Fest Coloring Contest

Halloween Fest schedule

of events announced

Submitted by the New Lenox

Chamber of Commerce

The New Lenox Chamber of

Commerce is now accepting entries

for the annual Halloween

Fest Coloring Contest, sponsored

by LincolnWay Community Bank.

The contest is open to children

ages 3-12. There will be three age

divisions: 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12.

All entries will be displayed at

the New Lenox Public Library

during the New Lenox Chamber

of Commerce’s Halloween Fest

on Saturday, Oct. 27, 2018 from

1:30-3:30 p.m. One winner for

each age division will be selected

and will receive a prize. Winners

will be announced following the

Costume Contest at the Halloween

Fest. Winners need not be present.

Prizes will be available for pick-up

at the Chamber office.

To enter, complete the coloring

sheet and return your masterpiece to

the New Lenox Chamber of Commerce

or the New Lenox Public

Library on or before Oct. 24. Entry

forms are available at the following

locations: New Lenox Chamber of

Commerce, 1 Veterans Parkway,

Halloween Fest

1:30-3:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27 at the Village Commons

Schedule of Events (hed)

• 1:30-2 p.m. – New Lenox District 122 Junior High band

performance

• 1:30-3:30 p.m. – Trunk or Treat, Pumpkin Party: Arts & Crafts,

Halloween Haunted Egg Hunt

• 2-3 p.m. – Costume Contest (Categories: up to 2 years old, ages

3-4, grades K-2, grades 3-5, grades 6-8)

Room 104; Village Hall, 1 Veterans

Parkway; New Lenox Public Library,

120 Veterans Parkway.

Entry forms also could be found

online at www.newlenoxchamber.

com.

For more information, contact

the Chamber at (815) 485-4241.


newlenoxpatriot.com SOUND OFF

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 19

Social snapshot

Top Web Stories

From NewLenoxPatriot.com as of Monday,

Oct. 15

1. Providence president apologizes, comments

on football team’s forfeit against Mt. Carmel

2. Police Reports: Two men fight at light on Route

30, Gougar Road; one charged with DUI

3. McGrath relocated after archdiocese said it

learned of the allegations against him

4. Fire department hosts info sessions, outlines

referendum details

5. Football: West wins on homecoming

Become a member: NewLenoxPatriot.com/plus

New Lenox School District 122 posted this

Oct. 9:

“Fourth Graders at Nelson Ridge got to experience

animals local to the area when they

visited the Big Run Wolf Ranch.”

Like The New Lenox Patriot: facebook.com/TheNewLenoxPatriot

“We are proud of senior Greg Pasek who

ran the Chicago marathon this weekend!”

@LWWestWarriors, on Oct. 9

Follow The New Lenox Patriot: @TheNLPatriot

From the Assistant Editor

Having fun, creating costumes and staying safe

Amanda villiger

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.com

I

have always loved

dressing up for Halloween.

A few years

ago I decided I didn’t have

time to make a costume and

thought I would be alright

with not dressing up.

I was wrong. Halloween is

the one time a year when

everyone gets the chance to

be silly, express their creativity

through a costume

and be someone or something

else for the night.

I greatly regretted not putting

together even a simple

costume that year because

it is a Halloween tradition

that I’ve otherwise never

missed.

Neighbors

From Page 18

Lockport resident sees 25

years of local history as

cameraman

There’s a famous saying

that says, “Choose a job that

you love and you’ll never

work a day in your life.”

Lockport resident Paul

Martinez lives by those

words every day.

“I wasn’t cut out for a 9-5

job in an office,” Martinez

said. “I knew being a TV

cameraman would offer variety.”

Martinez has worked for

ABC 7 News for the last 25

years as a cameraman and

Sure, as children all we

probably cared about was

getting as much candy from

our neighbors as possible,

but there is still plenty to

enjoy about the holiday as

an adult.

Whether you are just putting

on a silly hat or pair of sunglasses

to hand out candy

to trick-or-treaters or going

all out to win the first-place

prize at a costume contest,

Halloween doesn’t have to

be just for youngsters.

Dress up as your celebrity

doppelganger, which

is what I will be doing this

year, or maybe do a costume

that coordinates with

something your child will

be wearing.

There are thousands of ideas

online, and a quick Google

or Pinterest search for “easy

Halloween costume ideas”

or “cheap costume ideas”

will yield results in seconds,

which means the “I didn’t

know what to dress up as”

excuse won’t cut it.

Being able to let your serious

side slide for an evening

and put on a silly costume

engineer. In addition to a

love for the camera, Martinez

met the love of his life,

Nadine, working at CNN in

1987.

“My wife and I worked

for CLTV for a number of

years,” he said. “We’ve lived

all over the country, working

for TV stations and other

markets. I enjoy the variety

of it. I’m somewhere different

every day. Being in different

places and meeting

different people.”

Martinez, who has lived

in Lockport for 25 years

and has four children with

his wife, Nadine, wakes up

much earlier than he would

if he worked 9-5, getting out

of bed at 1:55 a.m. each day.

or make your hair do crazy

things is the type of thing

that reminds you not to take

yourself, and others, so seriously

all the time.

We live in a world where

it seems someone is upset

by anything and everything

that happens or is said, so

let’s let Halloween be a

break from that.

That’s not to say that some

costumes are not inappropriate

— because there are

definitely ones that should

never be worn — but getting

upset because someone

dressed up as an axe

murderer at a party and

your great uncle, whom

you didn’t even know, was

killed by a man with an axe

is a bit extreme.

Basically, let others have

fun, and give yourself permission

to do the same.

That said, Halloween for

adults often involves alcohol.

Please do not let alcohol

lead to poor choices that

can ruin lives, whether it is

yours or someone else’s.

Get a cab. Risking yours

and others’ lives and getting

“I make the commute and

find out the early morning

assignment at about 3:15

a.m.,” Martinez said.

One thing Martinez

wouldn’t change about his

career is the commitment to

telling and documenting the

truth.

“Journalism can’t be suppressed,”

he said. “Then

when I hear it called fake

news, I resent that. I think

the first amendment is still

critical and important as it

ever has been. To try and

disguise the truth is a mistake.”

Reporting by Mary Compton,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit LockportLegend.com.

a DUI is not worth it.

Adults and children alike

need to remember to stay

safe and to use common

sense on Halloween.

During college, my friends

and I were always careful

when going out on the

weekends and would check

in with each other, travel to

parties with a buddy, and

get a ride home or take a cab

if we had been drinking.

Do not let those good habits

developed as young adults

go to the wayside as we get

older. It is still so important

to let someone know where

you are going, be aware of

your surroundings and have

people you trust to have

your back.

Bad things happen, but

they don’t have to. Have

fun, get dressed up and use

your best judgment this year

on Halloween — especially

if you’re going to be drinking.

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the

opinions of the author. Pieces

from 22nd Century Media are

the thoughts of the company as

a whole. The New Lenox Patriot

encourages readers to write letters

to Sound Off. All letters

must be signed, and names and

hometowns will be published.

We also ask that writers include

their address and phone number

for verification, not publication.

Letters should be limited to 400

words. The New Lenox Patriot

reserves the right to edit letters.

Letters become property of The

New Lenox Patriot. Letters that

are published do not reflect the

thoughts and views of The New

Lenox Patriot. Letters can be

mailed to: The New Lenox Patriot,

11516 West 183rd Street, Unit

SW Office Condo #3, Orland

Park, Illinois, 60467. Fax letters

to (708) 326-9179 or e-mail to

james@newlenoxpatriot.com.

www.newlenoxpatriot.com.


20 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot NEW LENOX

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the new lenox patriot | October 18, 2018 | newlenoxpatriot.com

Like a fine wine 22CM’s

Active Aging Expo provides

resources for aging well, Page 28

It’s BBQ season! Bear

Down in Frankfort unveils new menu

items as popularity grows, Page 31

Lincoln-Way Marching Band puts

on a show at own invite, Page 24

Members of the Lincoln-Way Marching Band preform during its own band

invitational on Saturday, Oct. 13. Megan Schuller/22nd Century Media


22 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot Life & ARts

newlenoxpatriot.com

In Memoriam

Margaret Rose Dykstra

Margaret Rose Dykstra

(Woodend), 103, formerly

of New Lenox, died Oct. 4.

Margaret is survived by her

son Philip (Sharon) MacFarlane;

step-son Gilbert (Marilyn)

Dykstra; daughter-inlaw

Charlene MacFarlane;

grandchildren Scott (Kerri)

MacFarlane, Amy (Shane)

Scott, Denise (Dave) McLellan,

Debbie (Mike) Kozal

and Gilbert (Val) Dykstra,

Jr.; and grandchildren Jack,

Ava and Finn MacFarlane,

Nevaeh, Trinity and Noah

Scott, Jennifer, Kristin, and

Justin McLellan, Monica

and Michael Kozal, and Samantha

and Nicole Dykstra.

Margaret was a member of

Trinity Lutheran Church and

the Trinity Women’s League

in New Lenox. Family received

friends at Trinity

Lutheran Church. Interment

was private. In lieu of memorials,

donations to Trinity

Lutheran Memorial Fund,

the Wounded Warrior Project,

woundedwarrior.org or

Lutheran Church Charities

Service Dog Program would

be appreciated.

Grant Anderson

Grant R. Anderson,

71, of

New Lenox, died Sept. 29.

Grant is survived by his

wife Pauline (nee Di Paolo)

Anderson; children Brian

Don’t let your business

short this season.

BE SMART. ADVERTISE IN

CONTACT

(Heather) Anderson, Nicole

(Steve) Bradley, Lisa

(Ross) Trout and Lori (Tom)

Drogemuller; sibling Allyson

(Bob) Ferkaluk; and

grandchildren Matthew

(Danhour), Justin (Trout),

Katie (Danhour), Joshua

(Drogemuller), Annelise

(Trout), Alexander (Drogemuller),

Benjamin (Trout),

Alyssa (Drogemuller), Zoey

(Trout), Thomas (Drogemuller),

Waylon (Anderson)

and Vivienne (Anderson).

Grant was a steel salesman

for various companies in

the Midwest area, a faithful

servant of Parkview Christian

Church for more than

15 years, a proud veteran of

the United States Marines

serving in Vietnam. He lived

his life proud of his service,

his family, his country and

his God. Family received

friends and family at Kurtz

Memorial Chapel. Interment

was private.

The New Lenox Patriot

LORA HEALY

708.326.9170 ext. 31 l.healy@22ndcenturymedia.com

Douglas R. Stewart

Douglas R. Stewart, 57, of

New Lenox, died Sept. 28.

Doug is survived by his wife

Tammy (nee Davis); children

Adam, Cassie (Tim) Evans

and Ryan; grandchildren

Connor and Shane Evans;

siblings Lori (Gary) Wenninghoff,

Daniel; and numerous

nieces, nephews and

friends. Doug was a Construction

Manager with Comcast

where he was employed

for more than 37 years. Family

received friends at Kurtz

Memorial Chapel. Interment

was private.

Donald R. Payne, Sr.

Donald R. Payne, Sr.,

73, of New Lenox, passed

away, died Sept. 27. Donald

is survived by his children,

Freda (Wyman) Markle,

Edward (Jodie) Payne; siblings

Rosie, Mildred, Patsy;

grandchildren Christopher,

Aaron, Samantha, Seth,

Shyanne, Spencer Ray; and

numerous nieces, nephews,

close neighbors and loving

friends, Linda Bruck, Josephine

Bruck, Geri Gorecki

and Chrissie Gorecki.

Donald was a member of

Pure Rod & Gun Club in

Plainfield. Family received

friends at Kurtz Memorial

Chapel. Graveside service

and interment was at Peaceful

Valley Cemetery in Odin.

In lieu of memorials, donations

to Life Harvest Ministries,

409 N. Sawyer, Wilsonville,

IL 62093, would be

appreciated.

Have someone’s life you’d like

to honor? Email Editor James

Sanchez at james@newlenox

patriot.com with information

about a loved one who was a

part of the New Lenox community.

®

FAITH BRIEFS

St. Jude Catholic Church (241 W. Second

Ave., New Lenox)

Harvest Luncheon & Craft

Show

10 a.m. Thursday Oct. 25.

The craft show will be from

10 a.m.-2 p.m. The luncheon

will be from 11:30 a.m.-1

p.m. Cost is $10 per person.

Tickets are only available in

advance. To purchase tickets,

stop by the parish office

or call (815) 485-3511.

There will also be carry-outs

available.

Poetry Corner

As I hear the message

Julie Sanders

New Lenox resident

I was wondering what

you’d do

If you were in my shoes

Are you stronger than

me?

The possibilities endless

In this case I must confess

I’m shattered internally.

What mystery happens

next

There’s a written text

Runs through me, a quiet

scare

Restraining the “crazy”

spin

Walls are closing in

This burden is mine to

bare.

In this capacity there is

not rest

Putting memory to test

Tragedy has shaken me

before

Pressure rises, battle rages

Coming in chaotic stages

United Methodist Church of New Lenox

(339 W. Haven Ave, New Lenox)

Trunk of Treat

3-4:30 p.m. Saturday,

Oct. 27. To sign up to decorate

your trunk, visit https://

www.signupgenius.com/go

/5080A4FABA82AABFB6-

halloween. For more information,

call (815) 485-8271.

We are United Methodists

1:30-3 p.m. Sunday, Oct.

28. Learn what it means to

be a United Methodist in this

four-class series, which is

open to all those who wish to

become members on Dec. 2.

For more information, contact

Pastor Wesley at (815)

485-8271 or email wesley@

umcnl.com.

Veterans Service

9 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.

Sunday, Nov. 11. The church

would like to recognize all

veterans, and those currently

serving in all of the five

branches of the Armed Services.

Veterans and family

are invited to attend either

or both services. For more

My emotions want to

soar.

Seems to be no rhyme or

reason

Is this just a warring

season?

A masquerade of pretend

Stepping on fragments of

glass

The revealing of my past

Loneliness to be my

friend.

Recognize the culprit to

blame

The Gospel message

came

Interrupting my sinful

ways

Illiterate to God’s Word

Vision spiritually blurred

How wretched sin decays.

Disasters, what lay ahead

In great fear, I dread

Rising currents want to

drown

There lies in the messagehope

information, call (815) 485-

8271. We are proud of you

and value your service to us

and our country.

Musical Opportunities

Join the vocal choirs, bells

choirs, or praise team. There

are opportunities for children,

teens, and adults. Rehearsals

are on Wednesday

or Thursday evenings. For

more information, call (815)

485-8271.

Chapel Bible Study

7 p.m. every Monday.

Mom Heart Group Book Club

6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays.

This group will meet

on the first Thursday of ev-

Please see Faith, 25

Identified truth-I cope

By sin, no longer bound.

The message came in

time

Holy Spirit revealed my

crime

Broken God’s law repeatedly

Unrighteous to the core

To hell’s opened door

Bearing sin’s debt,

ashamedly.

Righteousness like filthy

rags

Guilt ridden, sin laden

drags

Apply Christ’s sacrifice

to me

Jesus atoning blood was

shed

Brings life to the soul, not

death

The Gospel is the key.

To submit a poem to Poetry

Corner, email james@new

lenoxpatriot.com.


newlenoxpatriot.com NEW LENOX

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 23

Saturday, October 27, 2018

1:30 PM – 3:30 PM

New Lenox Village Commons

Trunk-or-Treat, Costume Contest,

Haunted Egg Hunt, Pumpkin Art Party, and

More FREE Fall Fun!

Plus a performance by the Liberty Jr. High and

Alex M. Martino Junior High Bands!

Be SPOOK-TACULAR

with the NLCC and

dozens of area

businesses!

Thank you to all our

event sponsors!

Visit newlenoxchamber.com

to see all of sponsors and

more information about this

BOO-tastic event!

A PLACE FOR MOM & DAD - NEXT DOOR TO YOU!

What a find! Two homes on one lot in the heart of New Lenox

419 N. Cedar Road New Lenox

Two story vintage with large covered front porch and

screened in back porch too. 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths,

office, formal living and dining room, eat-in kitchen

with granite counters, main floor laundry too. Full

basement has high ceilings with workshop area, two

large rooms and storage closet, plus another bathroom

roughed in. Oversized two-car garage, extra deep,with

walk up attic space for great storage. PLUS attached

newer wing that is all on one level, with large great

room, patio door to deck and shared back yard, open

kitchen with island and breakfast bar, plus space

for a dining set, master bedroom has large walk in

closet and handicapped roll in shower. Wider doors

for wheelchair and there is a concrete ramp off the

private side entrance off the kitchen and large laundry

room. Access to both residences from the garage

as well. The back yard is private with a beautiful

tall brick wall. Large tree in the front yard that you

can hang a swing from. All appliances stay in both

residences. On Chicago Water and village sewer. The

space in this home will fool you. Conveniently located

to stores, shopping, banking, metra near downtown

with easy access to I-80 and I-355. $379,000 buys it all.

A little over 4000 sq. ft. This was permitted through

the village. This set up could also work for an in-home

business that you wanted to keep separate.

Call Lori Lindberg,

BROKER/MANAGER

American Homes and Inv. Inc.

815-485-5000


24 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot LIFE & ARTS

newlenoxpatriot.com

LWMB lights up 23rd annual invitational

Megan Schuller

Freelance Reporter

The Lincoln-Way West

stadium lights illuminated

the dew-covered turf, reflecting

off an array of brass instruments

and bright colored

flags as they were marched

across the field on the 40-degree

night of Saturday, Oct.

13, by each band.

As the end of competitive

marching season draws

near for most local area high

school marching bands, they

took to the Lincoln-Way

West football field in local

competition at the annual

Lincoln-Way Marching Band

Invitational.

Unphased by the cold, each

band performed the shows

that they have been working

on since their band camps in

the late summer.

LWMB director Justin

Barnish said that the annual

invitational is a unique, local

experience for the bands and

community.

“We love having the community

out to showcase our

bands, and the kids love

showcasing what they’re doing,”

Barnish said. “It’s also

just a cool opportunity for the

students to perform at home

in front of a large crowd.”

Both bleachers of the stadium

were filled with band

families and band members

watching the area’s different

marching shows.

This is the 23rd year that

LW has held the invitational

at one of their schools. The

competition has suddenly

grown in the amount of participation

from local bands.

Last year and in years past,

around 12 bands competed.

This year there were 25 competing

bands and two exhibitions

performances: Mokena

Junior High School and the

LWMB.

For junior LWMB drum

major Madisen Tomaszewski,

the invitational is about

fostering the relationship

between community and the

marching bands.

“Band is a community, a

family,” Tomaszewski said.

“Few people realize there are

countless hours of practices

and so much that goes into an

eight-minute show.”

Senior LWMB drum major

Alex Guzzo said that although

the once separate LW

marching bands have joined

forces, the same sense of

solidarity and commitment

is brought onto the field, regardless

of what school the

students attend.

“We put it all out of the

field,” Guzzo said. “[LWMB

is] all one band, we fall within

the same district. It doesn’t

matter the what colors are of

the field we play on, we play

as one.”

The LWMB performed

their non-competitive exhibition

of their show “Las Rosas”

at the end of the night.

They were judged, as all the

other bands were, but strictly

for feedback purposes to improve

upon visual, music and

drill for the upcoming Tournament

of Roses Parade in Pasadena,

California, on Jan. 1.

“I hope all the bands enjoyed

it. The whole point of

this invitational is to showcase

what we’re doing and to

get feedback from the community

and the judges,” Barnish

said.

Lockport Township High

School performed their show

titled “Recomposed” as the

last competitive performance

of the night. LTHS won

awards for outstanding visual,

outstanding auxiliary and

outstanding percussion, leaving

Lockport to clinch not

only first place in the AAA

Class but also Grand Champion

of the night.

Senior LTHS drum major

Lincoln-Way Marching Band freshman Jack Forlenza plays the marimba during the opening part of the "Las Rosas" show

at the Lincoln-Way Marching Band Invitational held Saturday, Oct. 13, at Lincoln-Way West High School. Photos by Megan

Schuller/22nd Century Media

Becca Keller said she was

confident in their performance

moments before the

awards were announced.

“I thought we had a good,

solid performance,” Keller

said. “It was nice to compete

here locally before we compete

at Illinois State University.”

Other local area competing

schools included Marion

Catholic High School, Carl

Sandburg High School,

Plainfield South High School

and Joliet West High School.

“As a Lincoln-Way West

student it was really nice to

perform on my home turf,”

Tomaszewski said. “It is nice

to see the other bands perform

their shows, too. It’s

really grown into a big invitational.”

Lincoln-Way Marching Band members kneel after a costume change partway through the

show.


newlenoxpatriot.com LIFE & ARTS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 25

TRIAD TALK FOR SENIORS

Home maintenance tips and resources

Kathie Johnson

Director of Family Services for

New Lenox Township

Next TRIAD meeting

is Oct. 25 at NLPD

Training Room

For most homeowners

our homes are our

biggest investment

we have. That is why it is

so very important that we

stay current with our home

maintenance.

For older Americans this

can be increasingly difficult

as we age. All Will

County seniors are eligible

to participate in the “Safe

at Home” program through

Will County Senior Services

located at 251 N. Center St.

in Joliet. Their telephone

number is (815) 723-9713.

What is ‘Safe at Home?’

This service is for senior

citizens who need simple

home maintenance help. You

can count on Senior Services

to evaluate the situation,

offer solutions and even

connect to service providers

who can help with bigger

projects.

Will County Senior Services

makes sure that all the

service providers who work

on large-scale issues have all

been carefully screened for

cleanliness, skills, reliability

and safety. Our senior scholarship

program even helps

with the costs for our services

on a sliding scale, from

zero to an hourly charge of

$65 plus materials.

Here some things that you

can do to keep your maintenance

schedule on track.

A word of caution. Ask for

help. Some of the items on

this list will require you asking

relatives, neighbors or

friends for assistance. Nothing

is worth your health.

• Check your roof for

damaged shingles and vents.

• If your trees have grown

to overhang the roof, hire an

arborist to trim them back.

• Hire someone to clean

and repair your gutters and

downspouts every year.

• Check for holes, cracks

and peeling paint on interior

walls and exterior siding.

• If you see signs of

mildew or large cracks, call

a professional to inspect the

damage.

• Check your foundation

every year for signs of cracking

or damage.

• Cracked tile, wrinkled

carpet, and heaved walkways

are tripping hazards. Call

a flooring professional or

handyman as soon as you

notice any of these issues.

• Check your water heater

every month for leaks, especially

if it’s older.

• Newer washing machine

filter needs cleaning every

month.

• Check under sinks for

leaks whenever you clean.

• If your home has a septic

system, have it pumped

at least every five years to

prevent problems,

• Replace water filters as

ne eded.

• Test your ground-fault

circuit interrupter outlet

switches once a year by

pushing the test button,

which should cut the flow of

electricity to the outlet.

• Then push reset. Have

an electrician replace broken

outlets.

• Replace and upgrade

burned out lightbulbs as

needed.

• Check the pilot lights on

your gas-powered appliances

and visually inspect your

home’s emergency shutoff

gas valve once a year.

• Change your heating and

air conditioning filters according

to the manufacturer’s

schedule, usually monthly. If

you can’t change the filters,

ask your HVAC maintenance

provider about longer-lasting

filters they can change during

their twice-yearly visits.

• Check that your dryer

vent and range hood vent

outlets are clear of debris and

open properly.

• Vacuum your dryer

exhaust line or hire a pro to

clean it once a year.

• Clean the grease filter on

your range hood at least once

a year, more often if you

cook a lot.

• Check the humidity in

your basement and add a dehumidifier

to prevent mildew.

• Keep your fireplace clean

and have a chimney sweep

inspect it each fall before use.

• Take a broomstick

around your house and push

the test button on all your

smoke detectors.

• Replace the batteries

once a year and as needed.

• At same time, test your

carbon monoxide detector.

• Make sure your fire

extinguishers haven’t passed

their use-by date.

• If you have a personal

emergency response system,

test it monthly, too.

If you would like to learn

more about keeping your

home maintenance on track,

please consider attending our

Thursday, Oct. 25 TRIAD

meeting at the New Lenox

Police Department Training

Room, which is located at

200 Veterans Parkway. Our

topic this month is “Home

and Car Maintenance.”

If you have any questions,

please contact Kathie at

(815) 717-6221.

Faith

From Page 22

ery month to study “The

Lifegiving Home: Creating

a place of belonging and

becoming” by Sally and

Sarah Clarkson. Discuss

how to make “home” your

family’s favorite place to

be. The group will meet in

the Fellowship Hall and is

open to the public. For more

information, email stephaniekush@gmail.com.

Wildside

7-8:30 p.m. Thursdays.

This group is for students in

grades 7-12. For more information,

call (815) 485-8271.

Lincolnway Christian Church (690 E.

Illinois Highway, New Lenox)

Trunk or Treat

3-5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 28.

The parking lot will be full

of children, costumes and

excitement. This year will be

the biggest and best Trunkor-Treat

ever. This event is

open to the public, so don’t

miss out on the fun.

Caregiver Support Group

11 a.m. Mondays. Receive

insights from those who

have been on a similar journey,

suggestions for dealing

with various issues, and relief

from isolation, with confidentiality

in a non-judgmental

environment. Care

provided for your loved one

during meeting, if needed.

For more information, call

Roger and Connie at (815)

722-7841.

Grandparents Raising

Grandchildren

6:30-8:30 p.m. the fourth

Thursday of each month.

Are you a grandmother/

grandfather/aunt/uncle or

other relative age 55 or older

raising a child in place of

their parents? This support

group will assist with social

and emotional support and

ideas to help you cope with

the impact of this role on

Join us to celebrate thejoy of good friends and family

as youdine under amagnificent Christmas tree, listen to

holidaymusic, makewishes with Christmas fairies, visit

withSanta, and makememories that will last forever.

Hosted by Easterseals Joliet Region

To benefit children and adults with disabilites

Saturday, November 17th at4pm

Sunday, November 18th at12pm and 4pm

TheJacob HenryMansion Estate ~Victorian Ballroom

15 S. Richards Street, Joliet, IL 60433

Tickets:$40 adult and $20 children (12 and under)

To order tickets, call815-730-2052 ext. 2,

or visit joliet.easterseals.com.

Make your reservation by November 9th

your health, emotional wellbeing,

finances, and family.

Social skills groups are also

provided for children ages

3-12 with a reservation. To

reserve a spot, call Kimberley

Tarcak at the Senior Services

Center of Will County

at (815) 740-4225.

Central Presbyterian Church (1101 S.

Gougar Road, New Lenox)

Church Service

10:30 Sundays. For more

information, call the church

at (815) 485-5152.

Trinity Lutheran Church (508 N. Cedar

Road, New Lenox)

Worship Services

5 p.m. Saturdays; 8 a.m.

and 10:30 a.m. Sundays.

Have something for Faith

Briefs? Contact Assistant

Editor Amanda Villiger at

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.

com or call (708) 326-9170 ext.

34. Information is due by noon

on Thursdays one week prior to

publication.


26 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot LIFE & ARTS

newlenoxpatriot.com

Nature at its best

Hickory Creek photos featured in monthly contest

Josh Link captured this close-up of a deer at Hickory Creek.

This photo of a red spotted purple butterfly was taken by Michael Fagan at Hickory Creek.

Photos Submitted

This bee nestled in a flower was taken by Joe Stevenson at Hickory Creek.

This bullfrog perched on a tree log in Hickory Creek was also taken by Michael Fagan.

Joe Stevenson also captured this shot of a butterfly on a plant at Hickory Creek.

An egret stepping in shallow water was taken at Old Plank Road Trail by Leslie Cunnea.

This raccoon leaving a garbage can at Hickory Creek was captured by Joanne Gent.


newlenoxpatriot.com NEW LENOX

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 27

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GEN. WIRELESS: Subj. to Wireless Customer Agmt at att.com/wca. Svc not for resale. Deposit: Service deposit may apply. Limits: Purchase & line limits apply. Credit approval, activation (up to $45/line) and other fees, advanced payments and other charges apply. Other Monthly Charges/Line: May

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att.com/broadbandinfo for details. ©2018 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, the AT&T logo, and all other marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies.


28 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot LIFE & ARTS

newlenoxpatriot.com

The support you need to find quality

SENIOR LIVING SOLUTIONS

A Place for Mom has helped over one million

families find senior living solutions that meet

their unique needs.

There’s no cost to you!

CALL (855) 524-7398

! We’re paid by our partner communities

Area fathers forge bonds with daughters,

sons through long-standing group

Konow’s Corn Maze

to host families Oct.

21 activity

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

On Sunday, Oct. 21, there

will be no shortage of visitors

to Konow’s Corn Maze

in Homer Glen. Barring bad

weather, crowds likely will

grow in the waning weekends

leading up to Halloween.

Still, it might be hard to

miss a group of more than

100 fathers accompanying

their sons and daughters

in carving and decorating

pumpkins.

They will be from the Indian

Guides & Princesses

— for fathers, and their sons

and daughters, respectively

— under the banner of the

Algonquin Longhouse,

which oversees a number of

“nations” and their “tribes”

in the Chicago area. The organization

focuses mostly

on elementary school children,

though some stay involved

into middle school.

It reportedly was started in

the 1920s by a director of

the YMCA and an Ojibwa

hunting guide, but has since

left the Y after facing controversy

over its nomenclature.

The families carving at

Konow’s from 3-7 p.m.

Oct. 21 are all involved

with the Mohawk Nation,

with its members hailing

from Orland Park, Tinley

Park, Mokena, New Lenox,

Frankfort, Lockport and

other southwest suburbs.

Dan Dion, of Mokena, was

coaching his son’s baseball

team when another father

encouraged him to join

them.

“I ended up going and

sticking with it ever since,”

he said.

That was 12 years ago,

and he currently runs the

boys side of things, with

three boys and a daughter

who have been involved

with the program. He said

while he thinks the naming

convention helps expose

children to aspects of another

culture — some fathers

who were part of it still

fondly remember the tribes

from their childhoods — the

local group is more about

providing unique bonding

experiences for fathers and

their children than pushing

that theme.

And in addition to the

October event, fathers plan

monthly activities, such

as a trip to Camp Tecumseh

slated for November, a

Christmas party at Lincoln-

Way East in December and

a pinewood derby in January.

They also typically hold

a daddy-daughter dance

at Orland Chateau. They

have done Chicago Wolves

games, a museum sleepover,

bowling, drag racing and

more over the course of

their seasons, which tend

to run concurrent with the

school year.

“We’re open to do whatever

we find interesting,”

Dion said. “It really is a

good program.”

While the program has

been shrinking in recent

years, with commitments to

sports programs, Scouts and

a variety of other activities

for youths and their families

nowadays, Dion said it

recently has been building

back up membership. And

he credits that to dedicated

families.

“There are good, engaged

dads in the program,” he

said.

Members typically pay

$60 for a year’s worth of activities

if they sign up early,

$70 if they sign up later —

though certain things, like

some of the camping trips,

come at an extra fee. The

group is open to the public

at any time, though it is preferred

that people sign up

in advance through www.

algonquinlonghouse.org before

attending an event.

Still, Rick Trench, of

New Lenox, said people are

more than welcome to stop

by the Konow’s event to get

a feel for what the group is

all about. He has been part

of the program as a father

for two years now, after

originally being exposed to

it as a child.

“It’s been great,” he said

of being on the other side of

it now. “You start to relive

the memories you had. You

hope your kids will have the

same memories.

“I think other dads in the

community would enjoy

the program. The monthly

events are really a great way

to make memories and bond

with your kids. … Our focus

is on dad and daughter/

son doing something fun together,

and building a stronger

bond.”

Chris Lacina, of Orland

Park, said a neighbor used

to do it and raved about it,

so he joined with his daughters.

He has been involved

with the program now for

10 years and recently ran

the whole thing, largely because

he was taken those

“bonds that my daughters

and I have formed.”

“It’s a unique organization

that has the ability to

create strong ties between

father and daughter, father

and son,” he said.


newlenoxpatriot.com NEW LENOX

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 29

—Siegfried & Roy, Masters of the Impossible

“Absolutely

THE NO. 1 SHOW

in the world.”

—Kenn Wells, former lead dancer of English National Ballet

“Demonstrating

the highest realm

in arts.”

—Chi Cao, principal dancer of Birmingham Royal Ballet

“I’ve reviewed about

4,000 shows.

None can compare to what I saw tonight.”

—Richard Connema, Broadway critic

“This is the highest and

the best of what

humans can produce.”

—Olevia Brown-Klahn, singer and musician

DEC 26–30, 2018

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30 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot NEW LENOX

newlenoxpatriot.com


newlenoxpatriot.com DINING OUT

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 31

The Dish

Bear Down Barbecue remains competitive with new additions, TV show appearance

James Sanchez

Contributing Editor

No one’s more excited

than Rashid Riggins when

it comes to the Chicago

Bears’ potential this season.

And his love for his hometown

team is exemplified

through food.

Riggins opened down

Bear Down Barbecue in

Frankfort in 2016. And

while the Bears made key

moves over the summer, including

the acquisitions of

All-Pro defensive lineman

Khalil Mack and an entirely

new receiving core, Riggins

made several additions to

his menu, as well.

The biggest is the restaurant’s

first dessert option:

Bomb Banana Pudding

($3.75 for 6 ounces,

$8.25 for a pint). It is a

secret recipe that is topped

with crushed vanilla wafers

for texture. Another

is the No-Huddle Nachos,

which is a plate of tortilla

chips piled with one’s

choice of smoked chicken,

pork, turkey ($10.25) or

beef ($12.25), topped with

melted cheddar cheese, jalapeño,

sour cream, green

onion, signature seasoning,

homemade Cowboy Beans

and the signature barbecue

sauce.

Similar to the nachos is

the new Left-Tackle Loaded

Fries, which has the same

foundation and price as

the nachos but without the

Cowboy Beans, sour cream

and jalapeño. Riggins also

created a macaroni and

cheese recipe that features

a blend of smoked cheeses

topped with any meat

and barbecue sauce called

the Smokehouse Mac-N-

Cheese ($10.25 for pulled

pork, chicken or turkey; or

$12.25 for beef).

“We wanted to keep diversifying

the menu, offering

fun things that would be

Bear Down Barbecue &

Catering Co.

20857 South La Grange

Road in Frankfort

Hours

• 11 a.m.-8 p.m. or

when all meat is sold out

Tuesday-Saturday

• Sunday, Monday

catering only

For more information ...

Phone: (779) 324-5256

Web: www.

beardownbarbecue.com

attractive to grown-ups and

kids,” Riggins said. “We do

look at ourselves as a kidfriendly

restaurant.

“Those were things that I

knew I would add eventually.

We just always want

to add things a little at a

time. We don’t want to just

throw new stuff on the

menu. I want to ensure

we’re giving out quality

menu items.”

On top of the new dishes,

Riggins added to his cooking

staff because of the

increased customer base.

Chef Amanda Augustyniak,

a Mokena resident, joined

Bear Down over the summer

after receiving her culinary

degree.

Augustyniak said this

role is more than just helping

boost Bear Down’s efficiency;

it is expanding her

culinary horizons, too.

“Back then, my dad

would do barbecue chicken

in the backyard, but it was

just Sweet Baby Ray’s and

chicken,” Augustyniak said.

“So, I wanted to learn something

new.”

And through three

months, she said she has

already learned a lot from

Riggins’ barbecue prowess

and philosophy. Riggins has

been a pitmaster for more

than a decade.

“Low and slow is the way

to go,” she said. “Don’t

rush anything. If you rush

something, it’s not going

to turn out right. And the

highest quality ingredients

[are] your No. 1 priority.

You never want to take any

shortcuts.”

Riggins said he studied

barbecue techniques from

all over the globe, then developed

his own cooking

style, spice rub and sauce.

He cooks with cherry wood

and oak wood for a balanced,

smoke flavor. His

seasoning features 22 ingredients,

and his sauce is “a

little sweet, with a little heat

in the back end, and in the

middle there’s a little tang.”

Catering to a certain type

of barbecue style takes

away from its versatility, he

said.

“Sometimes, I feel sorry

for region-specific pitmasters,

because they have to

remain inside that box.”

Riggins said. “If you’re

in Texas, you only have to

put salt and pepper on your

brisket, and brisket can really

sing when you add other

things to it. We’re kind of

more like mavericks with

the way we do things.”

His spin on barbecue

caught the attention of one

of his favorite shows. “Chicago’s

Best” — a television

show on WGN — reached

out to do a feature on Bear

Down earlier this year. As

an added bonus, the show

sent out co-host Brittney

Payton — daughter of Hall

of Fame Chicago Bears running

back Walter Payton —

to lead the segment.

“I kind of teared up,”

he said. “I’ve been a fan

of ‘Chicago’s Best’ since

its inception — like, a decade

I’ve been watching.

We were feeding them the

whole time. Brittney was

eating the whole time. I’ve

Among Bear Down Barbecue’s signature items are the ribs. The St. Louis-cut spareribs

can be served dressed with a signature barbecue sauce, just the dry rub or both. Photos by

Tom Czaja/22nd Century Media

The new homemade banana pudding is the restaurant’s first dessert item.

never been on TV like that.

It’s weird to be on a TV

show that you’re a fan of.”

Riggins said he hopes

the exposure allows him to

one day expand to a bigger

place around the same area,

with a liquor license and

stage for jazz and blues. But

as for now, he is focused on

his food.

“We feel like you could

lift our restaurant and sit it

in the heart of Alabama, and

we’d still be a competitive

barbecue joint,” Riggins

said. “That’s the level of

quality we put forward.”


32 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot Puzzles

newlenoxpatriot.com

crosstown CROSSWORD & Sudoku

The crosstowns: Frankfort, Homer Glen, Lockport, Mokena, New Lenox, Orland Park, Tinley Park

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

Across

1. Collection of misc. info

4. Request to a vendor

7. Flunking letters

10. Civil War soldiers

12. Emissary of Moses

14. “Sitting on the ___ of

the bay” Otis Redding

15. Variable star in Cetus

16. Capri, e.g.

17. Suffix with consist

18. Independent ruler

19. Frankfort elementary

school

21. Gymnast Comaneci

23. Judd of “Taxi”

27. Gerund’s end

28. Color the walls

33. Constituent of dynamite

34. Campaigned for votes

37. Subgenre of punk

38. Hair dye

39. Animal throat

40. Much loved Frankfort

Park area

43. Headed for in a hurry

44. Shanty

45. Fill ’er up stuff

48. Boat back

50. Straight standing

52. Harsh and loud sounding

57. Formerly

58. Feed the kitty

61. Buzzed

62. Look closely

63. Junior or senior?

64. “Mean Girls” star,

Lindsay ____

65. Armchair quarterback’s

channel, perhaps

66. Hosp. readout

67. Wash. setting

68. A Cadillac

Down

1. Cardin rival

2. American painter of

sports scenes

3. Shortening

4. Precipitate

5. Ice sheet

6. ___-mell

7. One billion years

8. Broadcasting regulation

board (acronym)

9. Blue shade

11. Delhi dress

12. Pres. title

13. Blowout

14. “Heavens to Betsy!”

20. Deutsche article

22. A mimic

24. Eccentricity

25. Brigade

26. Coal carrier

29. Teen’s woe, with heart

30. Letters after arb or orb

(plural)

31. Golf hole

32. Polynesian kingdom

35. Loafer

36. D.E.A. agent

37. Important times

40. Kind of strap

41. ___ Maar, Picasso

subject

42. Survive, just

46. Embrace

47. Rears

49. Nonexistent

51. Lanyard

53. Poultry shelter

54. Circus cries

55. ___ the crack of dawn

56. Dict. offering

58. Eye rhyme

59. Known as

60. Shirt label

NEW LENOX

Little Joe’s Restaurant

(1300 N. Cedar Road,

New Lenox; (815) 463-

1099)

■5-8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays:

Piano Styles by Joe

LOCKPORT

Port Noir

(900 S. State St.,

Lockport; (815) 834-

9463)

■4-7 ■ p.m. Monday-Friday:

Happy Hour

■8-10 ■ p.m. Thursdays:

Comedy Bingo

■8-11 ■ p.m. Fridays and

Saturdays: Live Band

■7-11 ■ p.m. Sundays:

Open Mic Night

The Outpost Pub & Grill

(14929 Archer Ave.,

Lockport; (815) 836-

8893)

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays and

Thursdays: Live DJ and

Karaoke

ORLAND PARK

Girl in the Park

(11265 W. 159th St.,

Orland Park, IL; (708)

226-0042)

■7 ■ p.m. Mondays: Trivia

■5:30 ■ p.m. Tuesdays:

Live Music

■8 ■ p.m. Thursdays: Bingo

■8 ■ p.m. Fridays and Saturdays:

Live Music

Square Celt Ale House &

Grill

(39 Orland Square Drive,

Orland Park; (708) 226-

9600)

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Free

Bar Bingo

■8 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Free Trivia

■9 ■ p.m. Fridays or Saturdays:

Live Music

■10 ■ p.m. Sundays: Karaoke

TINLEY PARK

The Whistle Sports Bar &

Grill

(7537 W. 159th St., Tinley

Park; (708) 904-4990)

■6-8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Bar

Bingo

■2-5 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Happy Hour

■3-5 ■ p.m. Fridays:

Teacher Appreciation

■3-5 ■ p.m. Saturdays and

Sundays: Happy Hour

To place an event

in The Scene, email

a.stoll@22ndcenturymedia.

com.

answers

How to play Sudoku

Each sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that

has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3

squares. To solve the puzzle, each row, column and

box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9.

LEVEL: Medium

Sudoku by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan


newlenoxpatriot.com LOCAL LIVING

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 33

Distinctive Home Builders Introduces New Craftsman Homes

In Manhattan and Peotone – From the mid-$200’s

New designs are a result of buyer feedback

Two refreshing designs mark

the beginning of a new series

of Craftsman-style homes

available from Distinctive Home

Builders at its latest new home

communities: Prairie Trails;

located in Manhattan within the

highly-regarded Lincoln-Way

School District and at WestGate

Manor in Peotone within

the desirable Peotone School

District.

“Craftsman homes were

introduced in the early 1900s

in California with designs

based on a simpler, functional

aesthetic using a higher level

of craftsmanship and natural

materials. These homes were a

departure from homes that were

mass produced from that era,

“according to Bryan Nooner,

president of Distinctive Home

Builders.

“The Craftsman design has

made a comeback today for

many of the same reasons it

started over a century ago. Our

customers want to live in a home

that gets away from the “mass

produced” look and live in a

home that has more character. As

a result of our daily interaction

with our homeowners and their

input, we are excited to introduce

these two homes, with additional

designs in the works.”

Nooner, who meets with

each homeowner prior to

construction, has been working

on these plans forawhile and felt

that the timing was ideal for the

debut. “Customers were asking

for something different and

simple with less monotony and

higher architectural standards.”

The result was the Craftsman

ranch and the Prairie twostory,

now available at Prairie

Trails and WestGate Manor.

The Craftsman ranch features

an open floor plan with Great

Room, three bedrooms, two

baths and a two-car (optional

three-car) garage. The Prairie

features a two-story foyer and

Great Room, three bedrooms

and one and one-half baths, a

convenient Flex Room space

on the main level and a two-car

(optional three-car) garage. The

Craftsman architectural elements

on both homes include brick and

stone exteriors with cedar shake

accent siding, low-pitched gabled

bracket roofs, front porches with

tapered columns and stone piers,

partially paned windows, and a

standard panel front entry door.

Distinctive Home Builders

offers a Craftsman-style trim

package offering trim without

ornate profiles and routers. The

trim features simplicity in design

with rectangles, straight lines and

layered look trims over doors for

example. The front entry door

will have the standard Craftsman

panel style door. Distinctive has

also created a Craftsman color

palate to assist buyers in making

coordinated choices for the

interior of their new Craftsman

home. Colors, cabinet styles and

flooring choices blend seamlessly

with the Craftsman trim package

and are available in gray tones

package and earth tones.

Distinctive offers custom maple

kitchen cabinets featuring solid

wood construction (no particle

board), have solid wood drawers

with dove tail joints, which is

very rare in the marketplace.

“When you buy a new home

from Distinctive, you truly are

receiving custom made cabinets

in every home we sell no matter

what the price range,” noted

Nooner.

Distinctive Home Builders

works to achieve a delivery goal

of 90 days with zero punch list

items for its homeowners. “Our

three decades building homes

provides an efficient construction

system,” said Nooner. “Many of

our skilled craftsmen have been

working with our company

for over 20 years. We also

take pride on having excellent

communicators throughout our

organization. This translates into

a positive buying and building

experience for our homeowners

and one of the highest referral

rates in the industry.”

Nooner added that all homes

are highly energy efficient. Every

home built will have upgraded

wall and ceiling insulation

values with energy efficient

windows and high efficiency

furnaces. Before homeowners

move into their new home,

Distinctive Home Builders

conducts a blower door test that

pressurizes the home to ensure

that each home passes a set of

very stringent Energy Efficiency

guidelines.

With the addition of these two

new designs, there are now 15

ranch, split-level and six twostory

single-family home styles to

choose from each offering from

three to eight different exterior

elevations at both communities.

The three- to four-bedroom

homes feature one and one-half

to two-and-one-half baths, twoto

three-car garages and a family

room, all in approximately 1,600

to over 3,000 square feet of living

space. Basements are included in

most models as well. Distinctive

also encourages customization

to make your new home truly

personalized to suit your lifestyle.

Oversize home sites; brick

exteriors on all four sides of the

first floor; custom maple cabinets;

ceramic tile or hardwood

floors in the kitchen, baths and

foyer; genuine wood trim and

doors and concrete driveways

can all be yours at Prairie

Trails and WestGate Manor.

Most all home sites at Prairie

Trails and WestGate Manor

can accommodate a three-car

garage; a very important amenity

to the Manhattan homebuyer,

said Nooner.

“When we opened Prairie

Trails and WestGate Manor we

wanted to provide the best new

home value for the dollar and

we feel with offering Premium

Standard Features that we do

just that. So why wait? This is

truly the best time to build your

dream home!”

Prairie Trails is also a beautiful

place to live and raise a family

featuring a 20-acre lake on site,

as well as direct access to the 22-

mile Wauponsee Glacial Prairie

Path that borders the community

and meanders through many

neighboring communities and

links to many other popular

trails. The Manhattan Metra

station is less than a mile away.

Besides Prairie Trails,

Distinctive Home Builders

has built homes throughout

Manhattan in the Butternut

Ridge and Leighlinbridge

developments, as well as in the

Will and south Cook county

areas over the past 30 years.

Distinctive Home Builders

chose the Will County village

of Peotone for its newest

community of 38 single-family

homes at WestGate Manor

within walking distance of the

esteemed Peotone High School.

Its convenient location between

Interstate 57 and Illinois Route

50 provide easy access to I-80

and commuters enjoy several

nearby train stations and a

35-minute drive to Chicago.

Visit the on-site sales

information center for

unadvertised specials and view

the numerous styles of homes

being offered and the available

lots. Call Lynne Rinck at (708)

737-9142 or (708) 479-7700 for

more information or visit www.

distinctivehomebuilders.com.

The Prairie Trails and WestGate

Manor new home information

center is located three miles

south of Laraway Rd. on Rt.

52. The address is 24458 S.

Rt. 52, Manhattan, IL. 60422.

Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 5:00

p.m. Closed Wednesday and

Thursday and always available

by appointment.

Specials, prices, specifications,

standard features, model

offerings, build times and lot

availability are subject to change

without notice. Please contact

a Distinctive representative for

current pricing and complete

details.


34 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot Local LIVING

newlenoxpatriot.com

Impressive Luxury Townhomes are Closing Fast at Brookside Meadows.

This is it! One of the best values in a new

home will soon be gone forever. Brookside

Meadows, Crana Homes’ community

of award-winning luxury townhomes in

Tinley Park, is nearly complete. These

attractive luxury townhomes range from

the upper-$200s – including site - so

demand is high and buyers are advised

to act now while some choice sites are still

available.

Ideal location. Beautiful designs. Quality

construction. Great value. When shoppers

review their new home ‘wish list’ it’s clear

that Brookside Meadows is perfect for first

time buyers, last time buyers or those who

want a great place to raise a family. These

energy-efficient luxury townhomes are

impressively designed and set apart in a

quiet section of Tinley Park. But Brookside

Meadows is over 75% sold out so now is

the time to select a site and create a home

from the award-winning floorplans of the

Fahan II, the Lennan II and the latest

design, the Dunree II.

Need to stretch out? The Fahan II

is a beautiful 3,303 total square foot

luxury townhome (including a 1,216 sq.’

basement) with an attached two-car, drywalled

garage and cement driveway. The

two-story stately entrance foyer opens up

to a split level floor plan that has three

bedrooms (fourth bedroom optional) and

two and a half baths. A large open kitchen

design with stunning granite countertops

is surrounded by generous custom maple

cabinets and a ceramic tile floor. The

master bedroom offers an optional coffered

ceiling and the optional master bath plan

includes a soothing soaker tub.

The Lennan II is a comfortable two/

three bedroom split level home with two

and a half baths, and includes most of

the outstanding features and options of

the Fahan II with the spacious master

suite relocated to the upper level and the

addition of an impressive dining/family

room. With 3,167 square feet of total space

(including a 1,049 sq.’ basement), there

is plenty of room to entertain family and

friends in comfort and style.

The Dunree II is a sharp three bedroom,

two and a half bath home with 3,194 total

square feet (including a large 1,226 sq.’

basement) with a master suite on the first

floor. The foyer, powder room, kitchen and

living room all have stunning hardwood

oak floors. Attached is a two-car, drywalled

garage with a cement driveway. The home

also includes a 12’ x 12’ deck.

Brookside Meadows includes sprinkler

systems, smoke detectors and Lake

Michigan water in all homes. Energysaving

features like a high-efficiency

furnace and Lo-E glass, Energy Miser hot

water heater, vented soffits, 1.75” insulated

entrance doors, energy efficient appliances

and Tuff-R insulated wall sheathing are all

standard.

Brookside Meadows is close to everything:

retail, dining, transportation routes, Metra

rail station and airports. The school system

is among the best in the state and Tinley

Park, named “The Best Place In America

to Raise a Family” by Bloomberg’s

BusinessWeek maintains 40 parks and the

huge Bettenhausen indoor recreational

center.

It’s easy to see why this community

is nearly sold out. The sales center, with

fully furnished and beautifully decorated

models,is open MondaythroughThursday

10:00am to 4:00pm; Saturday and Sunday

from noon to 4:00pm; and open Friday

by appointment. Options, dimensions

and specs can change so contact a Sales

Associate at 708-479-5111 for updates

and go online at www.cranahomes.com.

To visit Brookside Meadows take I-80,

exit La Grange Road south for just under

two miles to La Porte Road and turn east

for one-half mile. If mapping by way of

a GPS, enter the address: 19839 Mulroy

Circle, Tinley Park, IL.

Dunree II

-3 Bedrooms Plus Loft,

2½ Baths

-Full Walkout or Lookout

Basement & Deck

-Chicago Water

-Open Concept Floorplans

- Cost-Efficient,

Energy-Saving Features

-School System is Among

the Best in the State

Situated on Unique Home Sites that back up to a Natural Setting

Since 1970

Contact the Sales Center for details at 708.479.5111 and visit online any time at www.cranahomes.com

Decorated Models are Open Mon-Thu 10am-4pm Sat/Sun Noon-4pm Friday by Appt.

Exit I-80 at La Grange Road south for just under two miles to La Porte Road and turn east for one-half mile to Brookside Meadows.

OPPORTUNITY


newlenoxpatriot.com CLASSIFIEDS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 35

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Help

Wanted

1003 Help Wanted

22nd Century Media seeks Inside Sales Director

Position Overview:

22nd Century Media, a media publishing company based in

Orland Park, is seeking an Inside Sales Director

to join their team.

Responsibilities Include:

Proactively prospecting and qualifying potential new advertising

accounts; handling incoming leads; identifying business

opportunities and working with decision makers to obtain

customer commitment; and achieving weekly revenue targets.

Qualifications:

Ideal candidates will possess 1–3 years of experience in

sales environment. Must have a strong work ethic and ability to

work independently as well as with a team. Excellent

communication skills, time-management and

interpersonal skills required.

Next Steps:

For more information or to be considered for this

opportunity, email a resume to:

careers@22ndcenturymedia.com

No phone calls please. EOE

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

F/T and P/T RESIDENTIAL CLEANING

PROS NEEDED!

START IMMEDIATELY! Up to $13/hr plus tips and

bonuses. APPLY NOW!

15868 WOLF RD, ORLAND PARK

708.873.9044 - MaidPro.com

customer_service_chisw@maidpro.com

Lou Malnati's Pizzeria

JOIN OUR TINLEY

PARK TEAM TODAY!

Now Hiring: Kitchen Staff,

Phone Staff, Host/Cashier

and Server

We are located at

9501 W 171st St,

Tinley Park, IL 60477

Please apply online,

in person or our hiring line

847-313-4949

MORTGAGE

ALERT!

LOCK-IN MORE BUSINESS.

ADVERTISE LOCALLY.

CONTACT THE CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

708-326-9170

22ndcenturymedia.com

Hiring Desk Clerk

(must be flexible w/ shifts)

& Housekeeping (Morning)

Needed at

Super 8 Motel

Apply within:

9485 W. 191st St, Mokena

No Phone Calls

As we continually grow,

SW Suburban cleaning co.

has openings for

Cleaning Pros

Exp. Preferred but Will

Train. P/T Weekdays.

No Evenings/Weekends

815-464-1988

Wanted in Frankfort,

a person for making

telemarketing phone calls 1

day a week for an insurance

agency. 815-534-1140

1003 Help

Wanted

Same Day Tees is looking for

a customer service/inside

sales person to join our team

in our new, expanded

Frankfort location. Previous

sales experience in ASI or

similar industry a plus. Ideal

candidate will work with

retail customers looking for

custom screen printed apparel

for their business, group or

organization. Strong computer

& customer service skills with

ability to multitask is

necessary. Email resume to:

pete@samedaytees.com

Orland Park law office

seeks qualified individual

for F/T or P/T. Duties

include office functions,

phone reception & filing.

Computer literacy &

keyboard efficiency a plus!

Email resume to:

mrowinski

@grottadivorcelaw.com

Sox Outlet - Register Help

Conducive to college student.

Must be over 18. $9.75/hr to

start, raise after 6 weeks.

Minimum 20 hours/week

Employee receives 15%

discount after 30 days.

Never work past 9 pm.

Apply within: 6220 W. 159th

Street, Oak Forest, IL

Part-time Telephone Work

calling from home for

AMVETS. Ideal for

homemakers and retirees.

Must be reliable and have

morning &evening hours

available for calling.

If interested,

Call 708 429 6477

M-F, 10am - 1pm Only!

1004 Employment

Opportunities

1023 Caregiver

Caregiver Services

Provided by

Margaret’s Agency Inc.

State Licensed & Bonded

since 1998. Providing quality

care for elderly.

Live-in/ Come & go.

708.403.8707

Heaven Sent Caregivers

Professional caregiving

service. 24 hr or hourly

services; shower or bath

visits. Licensed & bonded.

Try the best! 708.638.0641

Private Experienced Caregiver

Will care for elderly patients,

CPR Caregiver Certificate,

Background Check &

References Available. PT/FT.

(708)979-3797

1024 Senior

Companion

Senior Companion

If you need someone to run

errands, go shopping, take

to appointments or just sit

& socialize for your elderly

loved one...

Call Betty (815)545-4935

Retired RN willing to be

Senior Companion

to Elderly.

Call Barb 708-907-1489

Garage

Sale

1052 Garage Sale

Lockport , 335 Bruce Rd. Oct

20 & 21, 10-5p. Bar with

stools, china, king sz headboard

& much more!

Lockport, St. John’s

Episcopal Church,

11th & Washington

Rummage & Bake Sale

Fri Oct 19- Sat Oct 20 8-2p.

New Lenox 1401 London Rd

10/19-10/20 8-3pm Household,

tools, holiday, trampoline,

shelving units & much more!

New Lenox 310 Garfield Ave

(off Rt. 30 across from Lowes

by LA Fitness) 10/18-10/20

9-5pm New & like new items!

1052 Garage Sale

New Lenox, 851 Lenox/back

garage 10/18, 10/19 & 10/20.

9-2pm Clothes, tools,

antiques, housewares,

jewelry, goose clothes & RV.

Rain or shine!

1057 Estate Sale

Tinley Park 17830 S 66th Ct

10/19 8-2pm Furniture, yard

tools, tools, hshld, crafts, dolls,

freezer! Everything must go!

1027 Arts and Craft Fairs

Don’t Junk

Your Vehicle!

$$CASH$$ Paid

Vehicles Running or Not

Cars, Trucks, Vans etc.

(708)653-6799

Automotive

1061 Autos Wanted

WANTED!

WE NEED CARS, TRUCKS & VANS

Running Or Not from Old to New!

Top Dollar Paid - Free Pick-Up

Locally Located

(708)205-8241

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

708.326.9170


36 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot REAL ESTATE

newlenoxpatriot.com

Sponsored Content

The New Lenox Patriot’s

of the

WEEK

Where: 157 Kimber Drive, New Lenox

What: Updated three bedroom, two-and-a-half bath raised ranch!

Amenities: Beautiful mansard raised ranch in a fantastic location in New Lenox!

Nestled on Kimber Drive just one block from the Haines and Oster Schools, this three

bedroom, two-and-a-half bath updated home features, lush landscaping on a sprawling

property with thousands invested in recent improvements. Once you step inside, you

are welcomed by the rustic, elegant decor, stunning newer Acacia hardwood floors

adorn the living room and dining room. Home also features a spacious eat-in kitchen

with updated stainless appliances, granite and a newer Pella sliding glass door (2015)

leading out to a wooded backyard retreat with a spacious deck, large swimming pool

with an updated liner, pump and heater. Several recent improvements offered include

new light fixtures, leaded glass front door (2015), new interior doors, new furnace and

air (2018), new hot water heater (2018), new Pella garage door (2017), main level Pella

windows (2016), washer and driver, and (2015) new concrete driveway (2016).

Asking Price: $279,000

Open house will take

place Sunday, Oct. 21

from 1-3 p.m.

Listing Agent: Jessica

Jakubowski, (312)

810-6722 or www.

jessicakakubowski.com.

Listing Brokerage: CRIS

Realty,53 Old Frankfort

Way, Frankfort, IL 60423

Want to To know list a how home to as become Home Home of the of Week, the Week? contact Contact t.weber@22ndcenturymedia.com.

Tricia at (708) 326-9170 ext. 47.

Sept. 4

• 815 Wren Court, New

Lenox, 60451-8570 -

Bruce E. Cleveland to

Brian E. Banowski, Marisa

M. Banowski $275,500

• 404 Circlegate

Road 404, New Lenox,

60451-3600 - Brian

D. Miller to Meghan O.

Mockus, Michael Mockus

$158,000

Aug. 31

• 1918 Heatherway Lane

39, New Lenox, 60451-

2437 - Daniel S. Bruinius

to Taylor L. Tisoncik, Kadie

L. Nicely $152,500

• 2885 Foxwood Drive,

New Lenox, 60451-8567

- Hannigan Trust to Ian

Zahorik, Erin Zahorik

$405,000

• 331 E. Joliet Highway,

New Lenox, 60451-1869

- Patricia Trust to John M.

Dapkus Jr., $350,000

Aug. 30

• 107 E. Joliet Highway,

New Lenox, 60451-1801

- Steel City Properties

to Jennifer Kolerich,

Christopher Maul

$199,500

• 15749 Valley View St.,

New Lenox, 60451-5431

- Bwc Holdings Iii Llc to

Vincent M. Casalino,

Amanda R. Casalino

$530,000

• 1904 Spencer Road,

New Lenox, 60451-2638 -

Steven R. Barry to Julia M.

Roque, $254,000

• 800 Buckboard Drive,

New Lenox, 60451-1338

- Bayview Loan Servicing

to Kathy L. Foreman,

$212,500

Aug. 29

• 1914 Heatherway Lane

28, New Lenox, 60451-

2438 - Lisa L. Zurales

to Phillip Nevills, Carol

Nevills $142,500

• 22527 S. Farm View

Road, New Lenox, 60451-

8515 - Timothy J. Pastern

To Thomas E. Darnall

Jr., Michelle L Darnall

$400,500

• 615 Ogden Road, New

Lenox, 60451-2132 -

Thomas E. Darnall Jr.

to Edward M. Dedo,

$210,000

• 727 Ogden Road, New

Lenox, 60451-2231 -

Zarack Enterprise to Alan

Redmond, $89,000

• 751 Bon Terre Road,

New Lenox, 60451-3635 -

Natale L. Fazio to Ryan D.

West, $146,000

• 760 Somerset Court,

New Lenox, 60451-3931

- Chicago Title Land Trust

to Aaron Mcmann, Jillian

Mcmann $339,000

Aug. 24

• 2010 Digby Drive, New

Lenox, 60451-2514 -

Keith B. Koch to Jeremiah

Voss, $243,000

• 2357 Cardinal Drive,

New Lenox, 60451-8514

- Richard Ballweber to

Criag Ballweber, Jillian

Ballweber $304,000

The Going Rate is provided by

Record Information Services,

Inc. For more information,

visit www.public-record.com

or call (630) 557-1000.


newlenoxpatriot.com CLASSIFIEDS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 37

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

READYTO SELL YOUR

REAL ESTATE?

CALL

Mike McCatty

& ASSOCIATES

mccattyrealestate.com

708-945-2121

ONE BILLION IN LOCALLY

CLOSED SALES SINCE 1999

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

Automotive

Help Wanted

Real Estate

Merchandise

per line

DEADLINE -

$52

$13

$50

$30

4 lines/

4 lines/

7 lines/

4 lines/

Friday at 3pm

7 papers

7 papers

7 papers

7 papers

LOCAL REALTOR

DIRECTORY





Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

Contact Classified Department

See the Classified Section for more info, or call


to Advertise in this Directory (708) 326.9170


38 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot CLASSIFIEDS

newlenoxpatriot.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

1074 Auto for

Sale

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

1225 Apartments

for Rent

Business Directory

2003 Appliance Repair

2006 Basement Waterproofing

2004 Mitsubishi Eclipse

Spider G Convertible, V6 3.0,

123k miles. $3700 OBO.

Looks and runs great!

708-703-7583

2006 BMW 325i Charcoal,

heated seats, black leather, sun

roof. 80k miles, exc. cond.

$10,500 OBO 708-349-7229

2007 Mazda 3, manual trans,

2.3 motor, 93k miles.

Mint condition in & out!

$4000 OBO Text/VM to

708-228-8113

Toyota Camry 2013 SE Sport

V6 Loaded w/Options:

Metallic Grey, Leather Seats

$14,500 Call 219-730-3211

New Lenox

2BR furnished apartment, 2

bath, $1,750 includes appliances,

gas, water, heat, garbage

included. (Was custom

set up for annual two person

corporate rental so has basic

kitchen needs, linens, bedding

etc.) Washer and dryer available,

walk to shopping and

train. No pets, no smoking.

Rent does not include housekeeping.

ALSO,

Unfurnished, 2BR/2ba apartment

is available for $1300

per month

815-485-2528

QUALITY

APPLIANCE

REPAIR, Inc.

• Air Conditioning • Furnaces

Refrigeration • Dishwashers

Stoves & Ovens • Microwaves

Garbage Disposals

Washers&Dryers

Family Owned &Operatedsince 1986

Someone you can TRUST

All work GUARANTEED

BEST price in town!

708-712-1392

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

2004 Asphalt Paving/Seal Coating

2007 Black Dirt/Top Soil

Sawyer

Dirt

Pulverized Black Dirt

Rough Black Dirt

Driveway Gravel

Available

For Delivery Pricing Call:

815-485-2490

www.sawyerdirt.com

See the Classified

Section for more info,

or call 708.326.9170

22ndCenturyMedia.com

Don’t just

list your

real estate

property...

Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts

Rental

1220 Condos for

Rent

Orland Park Condo for Rent

First floor, 2 BD/1.5 BA

1 car garage & balcony

$1,400/mo. + electric

Call (708)743-8153

New Lenox 2 BR, water &

garbage included, basement

storage. $880/Month. Near

town center. No pets, 1.5

Month Security. 815-485-9134

1310 Offices for

Rent

1225 Apartments

for Rent

The perfect downtown

location!

11225 Front St. Mokena, IL

2006 Basement Waterproofing

Oak Forest Terrace

15815 Terrace, Oak Forest

Spacious 1 & 2 Bdrms.

Serene setting & Beautiful

Grounds. Tennis, Pool,

Walking Trails. Near metra.

708-687-1818

oakterrapts@att.net

Newly rehabbed office spaces

avail. Office spaces are flexible

for any type of business.

Includes lobby, private bathrooms,

utilities and Comcast

Internet/Wifi. Units ready to

lease Sept 1st. $299/mo total.

Julie Carnes 708-906-3301

Village Realty Inc.

Advertise your

RENTAL PROPERTY

in the newspaper

people turn tofirst CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

Leaky Basement?

• Bowing Walls

• Concrete Raising

• Crack Raising

• Crawlspaces

• Drainage Systems

• Sump Pumps

• Window Wells

(866) 851-8822 Family Waterproofing Solutions

(815) 515-0077 famws.com

FREE

ESTIMATES

A+


newlenoxpatriot.com CLASSIFIEDS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 39

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

2025 Concrete Work

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2060 Drywall

Drywall

*Hanging *Taping

*New Homes

*Additions

*Remodeling

Call Greg At:

(815)485-3782

2070 Electrical

EXPERIENCED

ELECTRICIAN

R E A S O N A B L E

D E P E N D A B L E

SMALL JOBS

CALL ANYTIME

(708) 478-8269

2075 Fencing

2080 Firewood

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

Call Us Today 708.326.9170

Gunderson

Construction,

Inc.

708 717 8228

gundersonconstructioninc.com

Frank J’s Concrete

Stoops

Curbs

Colored & Stamped

Patios

Driveways

Walks

Garage Floors

Over 30 Years Experience!

708 663 9584

Tinley Park Company

Sturdy

Deck & Fence

Repair, Rebuild or

Replace

Make It Safe - Make it Sturdy

708 479 9035

2032 Decking

Specializing in all types of

concrete work.

• Driveways • Patios • Color & stamped

concrete • Stair patching

• Decorative pool deck

coatings • Epoxy flooring

• Resurfacing

Family owned business

Senior & First Responders

Discount!

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

Advertise

your

RENTAL

PROPERTY

in the

newspaper

people turn

to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

GroundsKeeper

Landscape Services!

Get Your Firewood

Early This Year

FREE Local Delivery

Contact us at

708.301.7441

or

Visit our website

www.groundskpr.com

MORTGAGE

ALERT!

LOCK-IN MORE BUSINESS.

ADVERTISE LOCALLY.

CONTACT THE CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

708-326-9170

22ndcenturymedia.com


40 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot CLASSIFIEDS

newlenoxpatriot.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2132 Home Improvement

2090 Flooring

2120 Handyman

2130 Heating/Cooling

2120 Handyman

2132 Home Improvement

HANDYMAN SERVICE —WHATEVER YOU NEED

"OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE"

Windows, Doors, Decks Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling, Plumbing Interior and

Exterior Painting Wall Paper Removal Professional Work At Competitive Prices

CALL MIKE AT 708-790-3416

...to place

your

Classified Ad!

CALL

708.326.9170


newlenoxpatriot.com CLASSIFIEDS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 41

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

2132 Home Improvement

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

2140 Landscaping

2150 Paint & Decorating

2135 Insulation

Celebrating 3generations of outstanding service!

Tens of Thousands of Highly Satisfied Customers!

Family owned &operated -66years in business!

"HAVE ONE ON THE OUSE-

•Blown-In Fiber

Glass Insulation

•Foam nsulation

• nsulation Removals.

2140 Landscaping

2150 Paint & Decorating

Neat, Clean, Professional

Work At ACompetitive Price

Specializing in all

Interior/Exterior Painting

• Drywall/PlasterRepair

• WallpaperRemoval

• Deck/Fence Staining

• PowerWashing

Free Estimates

Senior Discounts

Forquality & service you

can trust, call us today!

MARTY’S

PAINTING

Interior / Exterior

Fast, Neat Painting

Drywall

Wallpaper Removal

Staining

Free Estimates

20% Off with this ad

708-606-3926

Don’t just list

your real estate

property...

Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

See the Classified Section for more

info,or call 708.326.9170

22ndCenturyMedia.com


42 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot CLASSIFIEDS

newlenoxpatriot.com

2170 Plumbing

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2200 Roofing


newlenoxpatriot.com CLASSIFIEDS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 43


44 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot CLASSIFIEDS

newlenoxpatriot.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2474 Appliances

Brand New Appliances

Whirlpool double oven, white

Stainless 4 burner gas stovetop

50 gallon water heater

52H x 22W

Mokena (708)478-0488

2489

Merchandise

Wanted

Metal Wanted

Scrap Metal, Garden

Tractors,

Snowmobiles,

Appliances, Etc.

ANYTHING METAL!

Call 815-210-8819

Free pickup!

MILITARY ITEMS WANTED

German, Japanese, Italian &

US. Civil War era thru WWII.

Swords, daggers, medals,

patches, flags, helmets, etc.

Call, text, or send pictures

630-660-5544

2490 Misc.

Merchandise

9” Table Saw w/attachments

$150, cabinet maker bench w/2

vices $100, 11-pc outdr Nativity

scene $100, 8 HP snow

blower $150 708-846-1492

Invacare Solo Oxygen

Concentrator. Paid $4,000.

Will sell for $2,000.

815-236-7954

Buy

It!

SELL

It!

Merchandise

Directory

FIND

It!

in the

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL

708.326.9170

2701 Property for

Sale

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

of 1019 School Gate Road, New Lenox,

IL 60451 (Single Family ). On the 8th

day of November, 2018 to be held at

12:00 noon, at the Will County Courthouse

Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street,

Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case

Title: U.S. Bank National Association

Plaintiff V. Brian K. Holmes; Sherry L.

Holmes Defendant.

Case No. 17CH 0866 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial Circuit,

Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

For Information Please Contact:

Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC

One East Wacker Suite 1250

Chicago, IL 60601

P: 1-614-220-5611

F:

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

2703 Legal

Notices

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR DEBT

COLLECTION PRACTICES ACT

YOU ARE ADVISED THAT THIS

LAW FIRM ISDEEMED TO BE A

DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING

TO COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL

BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFTHE

TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

U.S. Bank National Association

Plaintiff,

2703 Legal

Notices

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

vs.

Brian K. Holmes; Sherry L. Holmes

Defendant. No. 17 CH 0866

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that pursuant

toajudgment entered in the above

cause on the 24th day of July, 2017,

MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff of Will

County, Illinois, will on Thursday, the

8th day of November, 2018 ,commencing

at 12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction tothe highest and

best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

Lot 70, in Windermere West Unit

Eleven, a subdivision of part of the

North West 1/4 ofSection 27, Township

35 North, Range 11 East ofthe Third

Principal Meridian, according tothe Plat

thereof recorded August 4, 1988 as

Document No. R88-35919, in Will

County, Illinois.

Commonly known as: 1019 School

Gate Road, New Lenox, IL 60451

Description of Improvements:

Single Family

P.I.N.: 15-08-27-104-015-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%) at the

time of sale and the balance within

twenty-four (24) hours. Nojudicial sale

fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring

the residential real estate pursuant

to its credit bid at the sale or by any

mortgagee, judgment creditor, or other

lienor acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights in and tothe residential

real estate arose prior to the sale. All

payments shall be made in cash or certified

funds payable tothe Sheriff of Will

County.

In the event the property is acondomin-

ium, in accordance with 735 ILCS

5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and (H-2), 765

ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and 765 ILCS

605/18.5(g-1), you are hereby notified

that the purchaser of the unit, other than

amortgagee, shall pay the assessments

and legal fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and the assessments

required by subsection (g-1)

of Section 18.5 of the Illinois Condominium

Property Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03 (J)

if there is asurplus following application

ofthe proceeds of sale, then the

plaintiff shall send written notice pursuant

to 735 ILCS 5/15-1512(d) to all parties

to the proceeding advising them of

the amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty obtains

acourt order for its distribution or, in

the absence of an order, until the surplus

is forfeited to the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CON-

TACT:

Manley Deas Kochalski, LLC

One East Wacker Suite 1250

Chicago, IL 60601

P: 1-614-220-5611

F:

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF

AUDIT REPORT

April 1, 2017 - March 31, 2018

OF NEW LENOX TOWNSHIP

GOVERNMENT

New Lenox Township hereby provides

public notice that anaudit of

its funds for the period of April 1,

2017 through March 31, 2018 has

2703 Legal

Notices

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

been made, and that areport of

such audit dated September 11,

2018, performed by Bruns &

Bruns, LTD has been filed with the

Will County Clerk in accordance

with 30 ILCS 15/0.01 et seq. The

full report ofthe audit isavailable

for public inspection at the Office

of the Township Clerk, 1100 S.

Cedar Rd. New Lenox, Illinois

60451, during regular business

hours from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Monday through Friday except for

holidays.

Sue L. Smith

New Lenox Township Clerk

LEGAL NOTICE

Because you have

a right to know

Legal Notice to Bidders

The New Lenox Township Highway

Department will be accepting

bids for the following improvements

until 10:00 A.M. October

30, 2018, at which time said bids

will be publicly open and read.

Specifications will be available at

the Highway Department office at

12551 Harvey Drive, New Lenox,

IL, between the hours of 8:00am

and 4:00pm. Please contact the office

at 815-485-6484, prior to pick

up or if you have any questions.

Epoxy Flooring System

This work shall include preparation

and coating of approximately 8000

square feet of concrete shop floor

followed byapplication of epoxy

floor coating as specified. Work to

begin 2 weeks after awarded.

Bidders must abide by the prevailing

wage act. The Highway Commissioner

reserves the right to reject

any and all bids.

Ron Sly

Highway Commissioner

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE ISHEREBY GIVEN that

a public hearing will beheld onthe

Tentative Budget of the NEW LE-

NOX FIRE PROTECTION DIS-

TRICT in the County of Will and

State ofIllinois for the calendar

year beginning on January 1, 2019

and ending onDecember 31, 2019

at the New Lenox Fire Protection

District, located at 261 E. Maple

Street, New Lenox, Illinois onNovember

19, 2018 at 7:00 p.m.

The Tentative Budget for NEW

LENOX FIRE PROTECTION

DISTRICT for said calendar year

ending on December 31, 2019 is

now posted onthe bulletin board of

the said New Lenox Fire Protection

District at the above address and is

conveniently available for public

inspection.

Dated October 18, 2018.

NEW LENOX FIRE

PROTECTION DISTRICT

By:/s/ Thomas DiFiori

Secretary

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

2703 Legal

Notices

NOTICE OF HEARING

BEFORE THE PLAN

COMMISSION OF THE

VILLAGE OF NEW LENOX,

ILLINOIS

NOTICE ISHEREBY GIVEN that

a public hearing will beheld bythe

Plan Commission of the Village of

New Lenox at the New Lenox Village

Hall, 1 Veterans Parkway,

New Lenox, Illinois at7:00 p.m.

on Tuesday, November 6, 2018, at

which time and place the Plan

Commission of said Village will

consider apetition submitted by

Blue Ribbon Self Storage, for a

Special Use for aPreliminary/Final

P.U.D. Plat for approximately

10.975 acres located at the northeast

corner ofGougar Road and

Haven Avenue, P.I.N.

15-08-17-300-013-0000;

The proposed request concerns the

following property:

That part of the southwest quarter

of section 17, township 35 north,

range 11 east ofthe third principal

meridian, described as follows:

commencing atthe southwest corner

of said southwest quarter;

thence north 88degrees 27 minutes

35 seconds east, on the south line

of said southwest quarter, 50.00

feet to the east right of way line of

Gougar Road asdescribed in document

No. R70-12217 and tothe

point of beginning; thence north 01

degree 41 minutes 16 seconds

west, onsaid east right of way line,

148.33 feet to the east right of way

line ofsaid Gougar Road asdescribed

in document No. 1013791;

thence north 00degrees 06 minutes

05 seconds east, on said east right

of way line, 640.67 feet to the

south right ofway line ofF.A. I.

Route 80 as described document

No. 1013791; thence north 88 degrees

01 minute 12seconds east,

on said south right ofway line,

17.18 feet to a point of curvature;

thence northeasterly on a 3929.71

foot radius curve concave northerly,

anarc length of 547.71 feet,

the chord of said curve bears north

84 degrees 01 minute 40 seconds

east, 547.27 feet to the west line of

the parcel of land conveyed by

document No. R92-17838; thence

south 09 degrees 49 minutes 41

seconds east, on said west line,

161.35 feet; thence south 01 degree

32 minutes 25 seconds east, on said

west line, 671.49 feet to the south

line of said southwest quarter;

thence south 88 degrees 27 minutes

35 seconds west, on said south

line, 604.04 feet to the point of beginning,

in Will County, Illinois.

Acopy ofsaid petition may be examined

atthe office of the Community

Development Director, 1

Veterans Parkway, New Lenox, Illinois.

All persons desiring to ap-

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2703 Legal

Notices

pear and be heard for or against

this subject may appear and be

heard thereon.

VILLAGE OF NEW LENOX,

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Robin L. Ellis, AICP

Community Development Director

Dated this 12th day of October,

2018

NOTICE OF HEARING

BEFORE THE PLAN

COMMISSION OF THE

VILLAGE OF NEW LENOX,

ILLINOIS

NOTICE ISHEREBY GIVEN that

a public hearing will beheld bythe

Plan Commission of the Village of

New Lenox, Illinois, at the New

Lenox Village Hall, 1 Veterans

Parkway, New Lenox, Illinois, at

7:00 p.m. onTuesday, November

6, 2018, at which time and place

the Planning Commission of said

Village will consider a petition

submitted by Frank Pretzel for annexation

for an approximate

0.59-acre parcel located at 340

East Joliet Highway, P.I.N.

15-08-22-307-006-0000.

The proposed annexation request

concerns the following property:

That part of the East half ofthe

Southwest quarter of Section 22, in

Township 35 North, Range 11 East

of the Third Principal Meridian,

described as follows: Commencing

atthe Northeast corner of said

Southwest quarter of Section 22,

and running thence North 89 degrees

36 minutes West, along the

North line ofsaid Southwest quarter,

adistance of 560 feet to the

Northwest corner of the premises

conveyed to Susan Snow, aSpinster,

by Warranty Deed recorded

April 25, 1972 as Document Number

R72-10672, being the point of

beginning; thence continuing North

89 degrees 36 minutes West, along

said North line ofthe Southwest

quarter, adistance of 104.41 feet to

the Northeast corner of the premises

conveyed to the New Lenox

State Bank by Deed in Trust recorded

March 19, 1974 as Document

Number R74-06059; thence

at aright angle Southerly, along

the East line of said premises conveyed

Document Number

R74-06059, adistance of 220.78

feet to the Northerly line ofMichigan

Central Railroad; thence South

64 degrees 15 minutes East, along

said Northerly line, adistance of

117.63 feet to the Southwest corner

of said premises conveyed by

Document Number R72-10672;

thence North 00 degrees 00 minutes,

along the West line ofsaid

premises conveyed byDocument

Number R72-10672, adistance of

271.15 feet to the point of beginning,

in Will County, Illinois.

Containing 0.59 acres, more or

less.


newlenoxpatriot.com CLASSIFIEDS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 45

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Acopy ofsaid petition may be examined

atthe office of the Community

Development Director, 1

Veterans Parkway, New Lenox, Illinois.

All persons desiring to appear

and be heard for or against

this subject may appear and be

heard thereon.

VILLAGE OF NEW LENOX,

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Robin L. Ellis, AICP

Community Development Director

Dated this 12th day of October,

2018

NOTICE OF HEARING

BEFORE THE ZONING

BOARD OF APPEALS OF THE

VILLAGE OF NEW LENOX,

ILLINOIS

NOTICE ISHEREBY GIVEN that

a public hearing will beheld bythe

Zoning Board of Appeals of the

Village ofNew Lenox at the New

Lenox Village Hall, 1 Veterans

Parkway, New Lenox, Illinois 7:00

p.m. on Tuesday, November 6,

2018, at which time and place the

Zoning Board of Appeals of said

Village will consider a petition

submitted by Frank Pretzel of 346

East Joliet Highway for aheight

variance for an accessory building

that will be moved tothe 0.62-acre

parcel located at said property,

P.I.N. 15-08-22-307-012-0000.

The proposed request concerns the

following property:

LOT 1 IN THE RE-SUBDIVI-

SION OF LOT 1INF.L. PRET-

ZEL SUBDIVISION, A SUBDI-

VISION OF THAT PART OF

THE EAST HALF OF THE

SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF

SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 35

NORTH, RANGE 11 EAST OF

THE THIRD PRINCIPAL ME-

RIDIAN, ACCORDING TOTHE

PLAT THEREOF RECORDED

AS DOCUMENT NO.

R2004-069069, IN WILL

COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Acopy ofsaid petition may be examined

atthe office of the Community

Development Director, 1

Veterans Parkway, New Lenox, Illinois.

All persons desiring to appear

and be heard for or against

this subject may appear and be

heard thereon.

VILLAGE OF NEW LENOX,

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Robin L. Ellis, AICP

Community Development Director

Dated this 12th day of October,

2018

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46 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot SPORTS

newlenoxpatriot.com

Athlete of the Week

10 Questions

with Justin Ellis

Justin Ellis a senior running

back on the Lincoln-Way

Central football team. During

Week 6 against Champaign-Centennial,

he broke

the single-game rushing

record with 245 yards.

How did you get into

football?

I got into football at a very

young age, at the age of 7 for

the Junior Knights. Growing

up, my dad used to tell

me all these stories about

when he was in high school.

He was a great athlete, he

ran track. Playing football

is something he enjoyed

watching me do and succeed

in, so just a kid looking up

to his father and making him

proud is what got me to play.

What was it like

breaking the singlegame

rushing record?

We had a couple of injured

guys that week, so ultimately,

I was the guy getting

most of the carries. Being

in the zone is one thing, but

having all other guys on the

offense – the line, the receivers

– blocking every play

and setting a new line of

scrimmage makes things a

whole lot easier. It’s not an

individual effort, it’s a whole

offensive achievement.

What’s so exciting

about the Knights’

offense?

It’s just our speed. We’re

not the biggest, but we are

the fastest. If we could get

to the line and line up before

the defense can make their

adjustments, then we’re in

business all game long. We

have all this motion and stuff

going on that it makes it hard

on the defense to pinpoint

where the ball is at any point

of the play. It gives so many

more opportunities for the

other guys to produce. It’s an

offense set up so everybody

can succeed.

What’s one thing

you’ve learned from

coach Jeremy Cordell?

The importance of communication.

That can go

a long way in life, say if I

become a husband one day.

What really makes our offense

click is all about communication

and the aspect

of over-communicating so

everybody knows their assignments,

so we don’t have

any breakdowns.

What’s a highlight play

you envision making?

Realistically, the highlight

play would probably

hurdling somebody because

that’s something I’m capable

of. But the highlight play

that would make my football

career is running somebody

over.

Do you have a pregame

routine?

Me and quarterback Bryce

Hayes pray before kickoff

22nd Century Media File Photo

each game.

Who’s your favorite

teammate?

Probably Drew Parrish.

He’s a smart kid. We’re

friends, we have a lot of classes

together. We’ve played together

since we were 8 years

old for the Junior Knights.

He’s really the leader of that

O-line, so I know I can trust

him and making sure they’re

prepared every game, so we

could win.

What’s something most

people don’t know

about you?

Growing up, my dad, my

younger brother and I, we

all built an airplane. It’s an

RV8. We made it in our garage.

It’s at Morris Airport,

and we have that as a hobby

right now, but aviation is

something I want to do as a

career one day.

How would you create

your ideal running back?

Being a Bears fan, I would

definitely mix Tarik Cohen

and Jordan Howard. The

size of Jordan Howard with

the speed of Cohen, that

would be something I would

consider unstoppable.

If you could change one

thing about football,

what would it be?

I’d give high school football

the ability to celebrate in

the end zone without getting

flagged. We do a bunch of

celebrations in practice. We

row the boat, we bowl, we

play duck, duck goose. Overall,

I don’t think it’s mean, as

long as we’re not taunting the

other team. We’re just high

school kids having fun in a

sport that we love.

Interview by Editor James

Sanchez.

CCL, ESCC to merge for football competition in 2019

Submitted by Chicago

Catholic League and

East Suburban Catholic

Conference

The Chicago Catholic

League and the East Suburban

Catholic Conference

proudly announce the merger

of their leagues for football

competition beginning

with the 2019 season. The

football merger was formalized

after a unanimous vote

by school principals from

both conferences.

School leadership felt

strongly that combining

the football portion of the

leagues would lead to increased

parity among programs,

based on like enrollment,

football participation,

and team success. With

schools playing opponents

more similar to themselves,

the opportunity to garner

success and grow programs

is great. Most importantly,

the two illustrious leagues

share in their Catholic mission,

and put faith formation,

academics, and the maturation

of young men at the

forefront.

Throughout the spring

and summer 2018, a committee

of athletic directors

from each conference came

together to discuss this possibility.

The committee devised

and agreed upon, a formula

which will determine

the divisional placement

of each school. A school’s

male enrollment, football

participation numbers, and

success during the 2017 and

2018 football seasons will

determine the divisional

alignment of the conference.

The new football conference

will consist of the 14

full members of the Chicago

Catholic League (CCL)

and the 10 full members of

the East Suburban Catholic

Conference (ESCC). CCL

members include Brother

Rice High School (Chicago),

De La Salle Institute

(Chicago), DePaul College

Prep (Chicago), Fenwick

High School (Oak Park),

Leo High School (Chicago),

Loyola Academy (Wilmette),

Marmion Academy

(Aurora), Mt. Carmel High

School (Chicago), Montini

Catholic High School (Lombard),

Providence Catholic

High School (New Lenox),

St. Laurence High School

(Burbank), St. Rita High

School (Chicago), St. Ignatius

College Prep (Chicago),

and St. Joseph High School

(Westchester).

The ESCC members are

Benet Academy (Lisle), Carmel

Catholic High School

(Mundelein), Joliet Catholic

Academy (Joliet), Marian

Catholic High School (Chicago

Heights), Marian Central

Catholic High School

(Woodstock), Marist High

School (Chicago), Nazareth

Academy (LaGrange Park),

Notre Dame College Prep

(Niles), St. Patrick High

School (Chicago), and St.

Viator High School (Arlington

Heights).

Further details about the

merger will be announced as

committee work progresses.


newlenoxpatriot.com SPORTS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 47

Girls Volleyball

Inexperienced Knights earn area respect, get No. 6 seed

Central hosts

regional, will either

play Andrew or

Thornton Oct. 23

James Sanchez, Editor

With only one starter back

from last season, Knights

girls volleyball still hasn’t

missed a beat.

Lincoln-Way Central

earned the No. 6 seed in

the Blue Island Sectional,

which includes home-court

advantage as it will host its

own regional Monday, Oct.

22-Thursday, Oct. 25. The

Knights will either play

No. 11-seed Andrew or No.

22-seed Thornton in the regional

semifinals at 6:30

p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 23.

The Knights beat both of

those teams during conference

play.

Despite nearly an entire

new team, Brown still had

high expectations for her

young squad. The Knights

are 20-10, as of Thursday,

Oct. 11.

“It was going to take us a

while; I knew we were going

to start slower, but I knew

the girls are hard workers,

they’re disciplined, and they

do what they’re supposed

to do on the court,” Brown

said.

The Knights remain undefeated

in the SWSC Red

at 5-0 with its last test being

at Lincoln-Way West in

the regular season finale at

5:30 p.m Thursday, Oct. 18.

They’ve maintained quality

play despite Brown tinkering

with her lineup throughout

the year.

Central started the year

with a 6-2 formation, which

features two setters, but

Brown changed it up by

locking in Nicole Ramirez

as the full-time setter in a

5-1 set up. Brooke Condon

moved from the other setter

position to libero, where she

plays on her club team, and

senior Dani Lauer moved

from libero to outside hitter,

where she started on varsity

as a sophomore.

Brown made the move

during the team’s first tournament

at the Plainfield

North Invite.

“I knew right away that

was the lineup we were going

to stick with,” Brown

said.

Condon, a freshman, said

she was nervous about the

position switch, especially in

the middle of a tournament,

but the team helped her

through it. Since then, she

said she’s had a laser focus

on making an impact.

“I have to push my hardest

because there’s always

someone who could take

your spot,” Condon said.

While the back row and

setting duties changed, the

scorers remain in tact. Outside

hitter Katie Barry is

the team’s leading scorer,

but not far behind is middle

Layne Stevens and right side

Nicole Dvorak. Lauer is also

a contributor on the scoring

end, as well as in serve receive.

Brown said she’s been

impressed with Dvorak’s

play as of late, posting several

games with a 700 rating.

To put that in perspective,

Brown said a 400 rating is

considered good for a right

side.

However, Brown admitted

the Knights “are missing that

Terminator,” one who can

put the ball down with ease

and take over games. That’s

because the team’s undersized,

but the Knights have

been able to make up for that

by being scrappier, energetic

and smarter than their opponents.

“We’re much more disciplined,

much more wiser,”

Brown said. “Obviously

Lincoln-Way Central libero Brooke Condon bumps the ball Oct. 10 during the Autumn Knights Invitational hosted by the

Knights. Photos by James Sanchez/22nd Century Media

because we’re not that big,

we’re going to have to have

a high volleyball IQ. So

that was a big portion of

every practice. After every

loss, we discuss what we

could have done different

that would have been wiser.

We’re not going to beat

these teams with our braun,

we’re going to have to beat

them with our brain. And

we’ve come a long way that

way.”

Their style of play led to

winning the Gold Bracket

at the Oak Lawn Invite on

Sept. 15, going 5-0, which

included wins against quality

teams Lincoln-Way West

and Lockport in the semifinal

and championship, respectively.

“We lack confidence and

don’t realize that we could

be as good as we can be,”

Brown said. “That tournament

really turned us

around.”

The Knights are expecting

to host Andrew in the

regional semifinal. Central

won its previous matchup,

Sam Vorderer serves the ball as Dani Lauer (right) looks on.

but it went to three sets (25-

17, 20-25, 25-11).

“I think we let up on them

in the second set,” said

Stevens about their match

against Andrew on Oct. 4.

“I think we expected them to

give us those last few points,

so we let up our intensity.

So if we continue to push

through and continue our aggressiveness,

I think we’ll be

able to take it.”

Condon agreed.

“I feel like we could beat

Andrew if we’re on because

when we’re on, we’re really

good,” she said.


48 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot SPORTS

newlenoxpatriot.com

E L I T E

S P O R T S

upcoming PROGRAMS

B A S E B A L L

Ages 9-18

Oct 30 - Dec 22

For Boys & Girls

Ages 5-7

Nov 10 - Dec 22

F O O T B A L L

Ages 8-14

Nov 10 - Dec 22

LEAGUE

S O F T B A L L

Ages 7-9

Oct 30 - Dec 18

For Boys & Girls

Ages 3-5

Nov 10 - Dec 15

For Boys & Girls

Ages 5-9

Nov 3 - Dec 22

This Week In...

Warriors Varsity

Athletics

Football

■Oct. ■ 19 - at Andrew, 7:15

p.m.

Girls Volleyball

■Oct. ■ 18 - hosts Lincoln-Way

Central, 5:30 p.m.

■Oct. ■ 23 - vs. Richards at

Marian Catholic Regional,

6:30 p.m.

Boys Soccer

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Lincoln-Way

Central Regional Final, if

necessary, 11 a.m.

■Oct. ■ 24 - at Sandburg

Sectional Semifinal, if

necessary, 4:30 p.m.

Girls Tennis

■Oct. ■ 18 - IHSA State

Tournament, TBA

■Oct. ■ 19 - IHSA State

Tournament, TBA

■Oct. ■ 20 - IHSA State Finals,

TBA

Boys Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Andrew

Regional, 10:45 a.m.

Girls Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Andrew

Regional, 10 a.m.

Knights Varsity

Athletics

Football

■Oct. ■ 19 - hosts Thornton

(senior night), 7:30 p.m.

Girls Volleyball

■Oct. ■ 18 - at Lincoln-Way

West, 5:30 p.m.

■Oct. ■ 23 - hosts Andrew or

Thornton (regional semifinal),

6:30 p.m.

Boys Soccer

■Oct. ■ 20 - hosts Lincoln-Way

Central Regional Final, if

necessary, 11 a.m.

■Oct. ■ 24 - at Sandburg

Sectional Semifinal, if

necessary, 4:30 p.m.

Girls Tennis

■Oct. ■ 18 - IHSA State

Tournament, TBA

■Oct. ■ 19 - IHSA State

Tournament, TBA

■Oct. ■ 20 - IHSA State Finals,

TBA

Boys Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Andrew

Regional, 10:45 a.m.

Girls Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Andrew

Regional, 10 a.m.

Girls Swimming and

Diving

■Oct. ■ 18 - at Thornwood, 5

p.m.

■Oct. ■ 19 - at Metea Valley

Invitational (diving), 5 p.m.

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Metea Valley

Invitational (swimming), 10

a.m.

Celtics Varsity

Athletics

Football

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Loyola Academy,

1 p.m.

Girls Volleyball

■Oct. ■ 18 - at Benet Academy,

6 p.m.

■Oct. ■ 20 - vs. Rich South

or Southland College Prep

at Rich Central Regional

Semifinal, 6:30 p.m.

Boys Soccer

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Kankakee

Regional Final, if necessary,

11 a.m.

■Oct. ■ 23 - at Glenbard

South Sectional Semifinal, if

necessary, 6:30 p.m.

Girls Tennis

■Oct. ■ 18 - IHSA State

Tournament, TBA

■Oct. ■ 19 - IHSA State

Tournament, TBA

■Oct. ■ 20 - IHSA State Finals,

TBA

Boys Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Morris Regional,

11 a.m.

Girls Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 20 - at Morris Regional,

10 a.m.

This Week In is compiled by

Editor James Sanchez, james@

newlenoxpatriot.com.

Ages 8-14

Nov 1 - Dec 20

WWW.BJESLOCKPORT.COM

815.221.6000

17130 S. Prime Blvd

Lockport, IL 60441

Girls Volleyball

Lincoln-Way Central 25, 25,

Thornton 7, 8

Nicole Ramirez was the

standout performer in the

Oct. 9 win, registering six

aces and 21 assists. Dani

Lauer (6 kills), Rachel

Kolodziej (5 kills, 1 block),

Jackie Kulinski (3 kills) and

Gillian Underhill (2 aces, 2

digs) also contributed.

Girls Swimming

Lincoln-Way West places

high school highlights

The rest of the week in high school sports

first at Andrew Invite

Delaney Jacobsen was

a winner in the 200 freestyle

and the 500 freestyle.

Amelia Dellamano, Kasey

Fris and Emma Stiglic, respectively,

took the Top 3

spots in the 200 IM. Lea

Moeller won the 50 freestyle.

The 200 freestyle

relay of Dellamano, Fris,

Moeller and Janosek won,

as well as the 400 freestyle

relay of Janosek, Stiglic,

Sydney Mcgann and Abby

Karpluk. The 200 medley

relay of Aleks Sheridan,

Moeller, Dellamano and Fris

placed second, and Molly

O’Donoghue also finished

second in diving. The Warriors

won the invite by more

than 50 points, finishing with

294.5. Riverside-Brookfield

placed second, and Andrew

was third.

High School Highlights are

compiled by Editor James Sanchez,

james@newlenoxpa

triot.com.


newlenoxpatriot.com SPORTS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 49

Girls Volleyball

Warriors talk postseason hopes after win over Willowbrook

Battle-tested

Warriors await

Richards in regional

semifinals

James Sanchez, Editor

While Lincoln-Way West

girls volleyball are the No. 9

seed in the Blue Island Sectional,

don’t let that fool you

because the Warriors still

expect to make noise come

postseason.

“I think we got a pretty

favorable seed,” said coach

Matt Lawrence. “We were

competitive all year. We

made our schedule a little

more difficult this year, and

I thought we had some good

quality wins, and lost some

close ones to really good

teams.”

One of those quality wins

was against Richards – a

squad West will face in the

regional semifinals at 6:30

p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23 at the

Chicago Heights Regional at

Marian Catholic. The Warriors

defeated Richards in

straight sets at the Oak Lawn

Invite on Sept. 15.

The Warriors still have

a sour taste in their mouths

after losing in the regional

semis in two sets to Shepard

last year. Middle hitter Sophia

Wilkes was part of that

injury-riddled season, but

she expects a better showing

this time around as the team

has gotten closer on and off

the court, on top of being

healthier.

“It’s harder to beat the

same team two times,” Wilkes

said. “We know they’re

good, but we’ve beat Richards

before. We know how

to beat them, which makes

us confident. We’re ready.”

The Warriors tuned up

for postseason action at the

two-day Autumn Knights Invitational

hosted by Lincoln-

Sage Dunne goes up for a kill.

Way Central, which started

Oct. 10 and concluded Saturday,

Oct. 13. They opened

up the tournament with a

25-18, 25-16 win over Willowbrook.

West broke open an 8-8

tie score in Game 1 with

kill and an ace from Kirsten

Leitshuh, and a kill from

Sage Dunne in three consecutive

possessions. From

there, West scored four of

the next seven points, which

included two kills from the

middle by Wilkes. Wilkes

added third kill on the final

point to secure the first set.

The middles were the

point of emphasis in Game

2 with Wilkes tacking on

one more, as well as another

from other middle Caroline

Ahern.

“I tried setting the middles

more because I’ve always

wanted to try and get them

the ball,” said setter Hannah

Rubin. “If the passes aren’t

on the net, it’s hard to set the

middles, but against Willowbrook

they were there, so I

set the middles more, which

helped us.”

Also contributing in Set

2 was Brianna Knezz and

her aggressive serves. After

Knezz got a kill to break a

3-3 tie, she went on to score

four straight points from her

serves – two of those being

aces. Wilkes and Leitshuh

also had aces in Set 2.

“If we serve tough – that’s

one of our strong points is

serving – I believe we could

beat any team,” Rubin said.

With a record of 18-11 as

of Oct. 10, Lawrence says

the team is clicking, despite

some lineup tweaks throughout

the year. Dunne filled in

at right side with Ahern shifting

over to the middle, and

Rubin has been the full-time

setter all season after being

in a 6-2 formation last year

with alum Noelle Knezz.

West qualified for the

Gold Bracket at the Oak

Lawn Invite and the Rich

East Invite, as well as the

Silver Bracket in the Plainfield

North Invite with a

star-studded field. Lawrence

said he was most impressed

with the team’s performance

at Rich East due to quality

wins over Loyola Academy

and Chicago Christian –

teams seeded better than the

Warriors in pool play.

“I thought that was a really

good turning point for our

team,” Lawrence said.

If the Warriors get past

Richards on Tuesday, Oct. 23,

they will play in the regional

final against Marian Catholic,

Crete-Monee or Thornwood

at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25,

at Marian Catholic.

Lincoln-Way West senior middle Sophia Wilkes spikes a ball during warmups Oct. 10

before a match against Willowbrook. Photos by James Sanchez/22nd Century Media

Hannah Rubin focuses on setting up a teammate.


50 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot SPORTS

newlenoxpatriot.com

Girls Tennis

Five Knights advance to state after second-place finish

West’s Singh the

first tennis player to

make back-to-back

state appearances

RANDY WHALEN

Freelance Reporter

Sue Schneider was extremely

excited.

The Lincoln-Way Central

girls tennis coach had

every reason to be. Not

only did her team capture a

second straight SouthWest

Suburban Conference Red

Division title this season,

it qualified five people for

the IHSA State Finals and

placed second last weekend

at the Class 2A Lincoln-Way

East Sectional.

The five qualifiers were

the most in Schneider’s

seven seasons as head coach

at the school. Lincoln-Way

West also qualified a singles

player and Lincoln-Way

East has a doubles team advancing

to the IHSA State

Finals. Those are being held

between Thursday, Oct. 18

and Saturday, Oct. 20 at Buffalo

Grove High School and

surrounding sites.

There, the Knights’ top

doubles team of junior

Emma Rimkunas and her

freshman sister, Kara Rimkunas,

along with Central’s

second doubles team of

sophomore Micaela Cesta

and junior Lily Malas, will

be playing. No. 1 singles

player Kiana Sikich, a junior,

will also be making her

second straight appearance.

“I’m so excited for this,

especially for our second

doubles team,” Schneider

said of the unseeded pair of

Cesta and Malas. “They had

a huge win (6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-0)

over Andrew’s top doubles

team [seniors Samantha

Guzik and Haley Kamholz].

They were pumped after

that.

“And Emma and Kara

have just focused from the

start of the season. Their dad

[John Rimkunas] was a sectional

champion at Andrew

[1988 graduate], so they

have a great bloodline. They

just balance each other and

it’s so fun to watch. One of

their goals is to win a couple

of matches at state.”

The Rimkunas sisters only

dropped seven games in

sweeping their four sectional

matches. Because of rain,

the opening round matches

on Friday, Oct. 12, were

moved from East to Andrew

and Homewood-Flossmoor.

The final rounds, on Saturday,

Oct. 13, were played

back at East.

There, the Rimkunas sisters

defeated H-F juniors

Carolyn Page and Maya

Nash 6-1, 6-4 for the title.

Cesta and Malas, who lost

6-3, 6-4 in the semifinals

to Page and Nash, defeated

East juniors Maddie Harper

and Ellie Marion 7-6 (4), 6-2

for third place.

Sikich, who was fourth

in the sectional last year,

placed third this season. After

falling in the semifinals

to the eventual sectional

champion, H-F freshman

Miracle Huckabee, she defeated

Lincoln-Way West

junior Natalie Singh 6-0, 6-2

for third place.

“I’m just really excited

and happy to go a second

year in a row,” Sikich said

of advancing back to state.

“Last year just made me

work harder to get back

there. I just practiced really

hard and I want to go there

and do a lot better.”

Huckabee, who won her

first three matches 6-0, 6-0,

defeated sophomore teammate

Lauren Legardy 6-2,

6-2 in the final.

H-F (30 points) was the

sectional champion. Central

(24) placed second, while

East and West (14 points

apiece) tied for third. Bremen

(8), Andrew (6), Thornton

Fractional South (4),

Thornton Fractional North

(2) and Thornwood (0)

rounded out the 9-team field.

West coach John Cupp,

however, was happy. It was

the best showing for a Warrior

girls tennis team in a

sectional in its 10-year history.

Plus, by virtue of her

fourth-place finish, Singh

qualified for state for the

second straight season. Last

year, she made it to state in

doubles with then senior

Meghan Maynard. Singh is

the first West tennis player,

boys or girls, to go to state

for two consecutive seasons

in school history.

“When I think about it,

that’s so cool,” Singh said of

making school history. “Last

year, I went to doubles with

Meghan at state. But I wanted

to go to state in singles.

I played singles as a freshman,

and I like it so much

more. I played doubles once

in a tournament this season,

otherwise it was all singles.

State wasn’t on my mind

when I started playing singles

again this season. But it

turned out well, and I’m going

to state.”

East was the two-time defending

sectional champion.

But the Griffins graduated

all four of the players on

their state qualifying doubles

team. So this season was sort

of a rebuilding one for East.

Still Harper and Marion will

be at state.

“We did get our top doubles

team thru to state and

I am very proud of Maddie

Harper and Ellie Marion for

holding their No. 4 seed,”

East coach Wes Cooley said.

“They have been doubles

Lincoln-Way Central freshman Kara Rimkunas starts her high-school career with a state

appearance. 22nd century media file photos

Junior Kiana Sikich makes her second straight appearance to state as a singles player.

teammates for several years

and their chemistry makes

them a good doubles team.

“Our No. 1 singles player

[senior] Mia Lamantia and

our No. 2 doubles team

of [junior] Sara Cooley

and [sophomore] Camryn

Mitchell, all fought hard in

the qualifying matches but

got out played in the end.

They should be proud of

their performances as I am.

As a team it was nice to finish

tied for third. Five out of

the six players will return for

next year which is encouraging,

but they must play hard

in the off season to improve.

These other teams are also

young and talented.”


newlenoxpatriot.com SPORTS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 51

Boys Golf

Curran finishes second at state tournament behind SWSC foe

Managing the

course the key

to sophomore’s

3-under finish

James Sanchez, Editor

The 112-man field at the

3A IHSA state tournament

had to hit the rewind button

after Day 1.

Bad weather in the opening

round on Friday, Oct.

12, forced IHSA officials to

suspend play and start fresh

with a one-day tournament

the following day.

“The first day was brutal,”

Lincoln-Way Central coach

Ryan Pohlmann said. “For

the kids, No. 1, it was cold.

I don’t think it got above

40 degrees the first day. It

was snowing hard for about

45 minutes to an hour. The

greens were pretty coated to

where when guys were putting,

the ball was picking up

snow. It was quite an adventure.”

Scores from Day 1 at The

Den at Fox Creek in Bloomington

did not count. Some

golfers completed as many

as 15 holes before play suspended.

Knights No. 1 golfer

Sean Curran was 12 holes

in when play was stopped.

He was in a comfortable

position in 14th place, three

strokes behind the leader.

Pohlmann said Curran

never felt rattled one bit

about having to start over.

“He kind of has that laid

back demeanor and personality,

which is good for

a golfer, but he felt like he

played well the first day and

put himself in a good position,”

Pohlmann said. “For

him, he looked at it as a

one-day tournament, which

gives him as good a shot as

anybody in the tournament

to finish at the top.”

That opportunity came to

Lincoln-Way Central state qualifiers Sean Curran (second place), Brian Sterling (102nd)

and Juney Bai (71st) pose for a picture. Photos Submitted

fruition the following day.

Starting on the back nine at

The Den, Curran played the

first nine holes at 1-under,

despite two bogeys in that

stretch. Playing the final

nine holes, Pohlmann said

Curran knew he was in the

mix for the state title. Curran

birdied hole 2 and saved

par on the par-5 fifth hole

even with hitting his ball

in the water. He followed

that up by birdieing hole 6,

which is arguably the toughest

hole at The Den. Only

four other golfers birdied

that hole.

However, playing ahead

of him was SWSC foe Ben

Sluzas, of Lockport, going

3-under the final two

holes to finish at 4-under

for the tournament. Needing

to go mistake free the

rest of the way, at the par-3

eighth hole, Curran missed

the green, and his chip was

short, giving him a testy,

5-foot par putt, which he

missed. At that point, Curran

knew he had to eagle the

final hole, which was a par-

5, to tie Sluzas. After his

tee shot, he was 210 yards

from the green but shooting

into the wind. The shot went

short of the green, leaving

him an attempt to hole in a

difficult, short pitch shot to

tie. He didn’t convert, but

made his birdie putt after to

finish in second place, one

stroke behind Sluzas.

Pohlmann said he wasn’t

surprised to see Curran,

only a sophomore, contending

for a state title.

“He had played well all

year but hasn’t had that

peak run,” Pohlmann said.

“I knew he was due for a really

low number. Most of the

day, he was hitting a driving

iron. He probably only hit

five drivers throughout the

day. He really controlled the

ball, controlled the course

and showed a maturity that

a sophomore doesn’t usually

have.”

Curran’s teammate Juney

Bai was also in the mix.

The freshman was as high

as 14th place in the early

going at 1-under through

six holes before hitting a

rough stretch. He finished

his first nine holes with a 37

(1-over), but a 45 on the final

nine holes bumped him

down to 71st place.

Pohlman said the stretch

of holes 5-7 at The Den is

called the “Fox Trap,” signifying

its difficulty, which

Bai could not overcome.

However, he’s only a freshman

and has plenty of time

to bounce back.

“He was so poised early

on, but the ‘Fox Trap’ got

him,” Pohlmann said. “He

bogeyed [hole 5], he ended

Lincoln-Way Central golfer Sean Curran was the runnerup

at the 3A IHSA state tournament in Bloomington on

Saturday, Oct. 13.

up making a big number at

8, and at that point, for a

freshman to be able to rally

and bounce back is a difficult

thing, especially after

he was playing so well.”

Senior Brian Sterling

sneaked into the state tournament

by capturing the

final qualifying spot at the

Edwardsville Sectional. He

finished in 102nd place,

shooting an 88.

“Brian just couldn’t putt

today,” Pohlmann said. “He

had one of those rounds. He

had 37 putts, which means

a lot of three putts. Some of

that is the state atmosphere,

some of that is the cold, but

what a way for Brian to finish

off his career with a state

appearance.”

The Knights could have

advanced as a team to state

had they qualified out of

regionals.The Top 4 scores

out of Central’s five qualifying

individuals at the Edwardsville

Sectional on Oct.

8 combined for 321, which

would’ve placed them second

as a team. Top 3 teams at

sectionals advance to state.

Pohlmann sees the positives

out of the unfortunate

team result in the postseason,

noting this will keep

his talented team hungry

going into next year. Aside

from Bai and Curran, starters

Nick Tingley and T.J.

Edmier will also return next

season.

“I don’t get too upset

[about the team not advancing

out of regionals]

because it’s good that the

younger kids face some

adversity,” Pohlmann said.

“I think our guys really are

motivated heading into next

year, and they see the possibilities

that lie ahead.”


52 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot SPORTS

newlenoxpatriot.com

Football

‘Program win’: Knights dash Eagles’ playoff hopes

TIM YONKE, Freelance Reporter

A yard marker wasn’t as

needed as much as a ruler in

the game between Lincoln-

Way Central and host Carl

Sandburg on Friday, Oct. 12.

Although football isn’t

often considered a game of

inches, it was on this particular

night. And it was a

couple of close fourth down

plays that helped Central

seal a 14-11 SouthWest Suburban

Conference victory in

Orland Park.

“Inches matter. Converting

that fourth down at the

end was real huge,” Central

coach Jeremy Cordell.

The Knights moved to

6-2 on the year in advance

of their season finale against

Thornton. Meanwhile, Sandburg’s

hopes for a state playoff

berth ended as the Eagles

fell to 3-5 with the loss.

The game could be boiled

down to three fourth-down

plays that occurred in the

second half.

The first was the gamewinning

score. On fourthand-one

on their own 40, the

Knights’ Justin Ellis caught

a pitch on the right side,

read his blocks perfectly and

raced the rest of the way to

the end zone, erasing Sandburg’s

11-8 halftime lead.

“I knew we needed one

yard and I was just going to

hit it as fast as I could,” Ellis

said. “Joey Rotondi had that

awesome kickout block on

Box Score

the corner and the next thing

I know I’m flying down the

sideline.”

In the tense moments of

the final quarter, Central’s

defense stopped Eagles quarterback

Ben Starcevich on

a fourth down sneak play.

Then, with just 2:25 to play,

the Knights just barely converted

a short fourth down

run that allowed them to run

the clock down to 33 seconds

and seal Sandburg’s fate.

“They were probably half

a football length past on that

one fourth down and we were

half a football length short

on the other,” said Sandburg

Coach Scott Peters.

The first half, particularly

the second quarter, may have

been the Eagles’ best of the

season.

Central opened the scoring

with 55-yard, 11-play touchdown

drive capped by a nifty

12-yard dash by Frank Luce.

It looked like the Knights

were going to fail on the

1 2 3 4 F

L-W Central 0 8 6 0 14

Sandburg 0 11 0 0 11

3 stars:

1. Justin Ellis (LWC) RB

158 rushing yards, 1 TD, 2 pt. conversion

2. Brian Maday (SAN) K

40-yd field goal

3. Ian Troester (LWC) DB

1 interception

two-point conversion before

Ellis, who appeared trapped

on the sideline, reversed his

field and miraculously ran it

in for an 8-0 advantage.

Sandburg came right back

with an impressive 16-play,

74-yard drive that burned

up nearly 10 minutes of

the clock. Starcevich found

wide receiver Mike Bosco

with a 9-yard TD pass and

then hit Rick Maziarka for

the two-point conversion.

Then in a matter of less

than 30 seconds, the Eagles

forced Central to punt.

Sandburg quickly mounted

a short drive to within field

goal range where Brian Maday

converted a 40-yard kick

just before the halftime horn.

“It was a good way to end

the first half,” noted Peters.

“We had the momentum

going into halftime and the

kids were feeling good. We

gave up one big play in the

second half and couldn’t get

anything going offensively

Lincoln-Way Central’s Justin Ellis is off to the races on a 60-yard touchdown run on a

fourth-and-one play in the third quarter in what turned out to be the winning score in a 14-

11 victory over Sandburg on Friday, Oct. 12. Jeff Vorva/22nd Century Media

and that was the difference.”

Sandburg had a golden opportunity

to score midway

through the third quarter. It

came after a bad snap on a

Central punt attempt as the

Knights lost 34 yards as the

ball sailed over the punter’s

head. It set up the Eagles just

13 yards from paydirt.

On the ensuing play, however,

Starcevich’s pass in the

flat was picked off by Central

defensive back Ian Troester.

“When you get a break

you have to take advantage

of it and we didn’t,” Peters

remarked.

It would be the last time

Sandburg would be in

Knights’ territory.

“It was a gritty football

game on a gritty type of

night,” said Cordell, of the

cold, wet weather conditions.

“We found ways to

get the job done, to get some

first downs when we needed

them. The defense came up

big in the second half with

some turnovers. We just kind

of grinded it out.”

The main “grinder” for the

Knights was Ellis, who finished

with 158 yards rushing

on 29 carries.

“Justin put us on his back.

He did a great job,” Cordell

said. “He was banged up in

the third and fourth quarter.

Taped up and came back out

and just played well. He carried

the load. He’s got a huge

heart.”

Ellis was quick to acknowledge

his teammates.

“Our defense made some

phenomenal adjustments

and got stops when we needed

them. It was a program

win. That’s what makes

coach happy,” he said.

“It was a tough loss. It was

Senior Night and our seniors

took it hard,” Peters said.

“But I told them after the

game I was proud of their

effort and the way they competed.”

FOOTBALL

From Page 55

to the Montini 38 on the next

possession, Olson picked off

a pass by junior quarterback

Ryan Manikowski (6-of-15,

1 INT, 77 yards, 5 carries-11

yards).

Still it looked like it might

remain a 10-point game at

halftime. But the Broncos

other quarterback, sophomore

Robert Brazziel, threw

up a Hail Mary pass to the

right corner of the end zone

where senior Matt Ross

came down with it for a 38-

yard TD as time expired.

Senior Scott West’s extra

point kick made it 20-0 at

halftime.

“That’s huge,” Coglianese

said of the half ending

play. “We were down

10 at that point and getting

the ball in the second half...

Then one of those Hail

Marys. Our prayer wasn’t

answered. They had a really

tall receiver out there. I

couldn’t tell what happened,

but we got out-jumped or

out-positioned.”

The Broncos made one

more big play as Fedanzo

found daylight around the

right side and raced in for

a 48-yard touchdown with

5:26 to play in the third

quarter. Providence reached

the Bronco 16 yard line early

in the fourth quarter, but

once again couldn’t punch it

in for points.

The Celtics will end the

regular season by traveling

to Loyola Academy on

Saturday, Oct. 20 for a final

CCL Blue matchup.

“We have to go up to

Loyola and I know everyone

says they’re down a little

bit,” Coglianese said of the

Ramblers, who improved

to 5-3 and 1-2 in the league

with a victory over host St.

Rita last Saturday. “Maybe

they are, but they’re still

Loyola, They’ll be wellcoached.

It’s going to be a

Saturday game, so we’re going

to have our hands full.

We’d like to play well and

get a win heading into the

playoffs.”


newlenoxpatriot.com SPORTS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 53

Football

Defense leads Warriors to secure playoff berth

Sean Hastings

Freelance Reporter

For the second straight

week, the Lincoln-Way West

defense was unbreakable and

eventually the offense kicked

it into high gear and pulled

out the win.

West picked up its second

win in a row after a 26-0 win

over Stagg on the road Friday,

Oct. 12.

Stagg’s second drive of the

game was making a push toward

the end zone, but senior

defensive back Andrew Sherry

stepped in front of Robbie

Hansen’s pass and intercepted

it at the goal line.

“After watching film all

week, it was easy to [get into

position to make the play],”

Sherry said. “It just came to

me and I was able to see it”

Sherry had another interception

later in the game.

This one was a leaping, outstretched,

one-handed grab.

Junior defensive back Johnny

Latek also had an interception

in the fourth quarter.

Latek’s interception came

when Hansen tried to scramble

away, but major pressure

and near sack by senior

defensive lineman Kaidon

Lingle, forced a little floating,

wobbly throw and Latek

grabbed it.

That was the case all night

for the Warrior defense: pressure.

Hansen was 7-17 for 72

yards and rarely looked comfortable

dropping back with

the Warriors on the prowl.

“We have great communication

and a great bond,”

Sherry said. “Together we’re

able to feed off each other

and build off each other’s

energy. If things aren’t going

our way, we just pick it up.”

West had 17 different players

make a tackle in the win.

Senior defensive back Aidan

Tyk and junior linebacker

Griffin Ketelaar each had six

tackles. The Warriors had 10

3 stars

tackles for loss as a team.

Senior defensive lineman

Nate Creech, after dislocating

his hip in week two

against Lincoln-Way Central,

made his return to the lineup

and recorded five tackles.

Getting Creech back made

a strong West defensive front

even stronger.

He is just one of a few Warriors

getting back to full health

after dealing with injuries sustained

early in the season.

“We’re getting healthier,

but we’ve got a long way to

go,” coach Dave Ernst said.

“Donté [Barber)] is getting

healthier each week, we got

Nate Creech back this week

and guys with bumps and

bruises are getting better.”

The defense allowed just

132 yards to Stagg, but it

took time for the offense to

get going after being held

scoreless in the first quarter.

“I’m happy with the guys,”

Ernst said. “We started a little

slow, but we got after it after

that. Guys played hard. Our

sixth win puts us in [the playoffs],

for sure. We’ve got to

feel good where we’re at.”

Playing at West is a special

privilege the Warriors have.

The crowd is packed every

night, the energy is there

and the team has no problem

building off of that.

At Stagg; however, the

crowd for both sides was

smaller and quieter than usual.

But with big plays from

Sherry on defense and two

touchdown runs from junior

running back Caleb Marconi

1 2 3 4 F

West 0 13 6 7 26

Stagg 0 0 0 0 0

Top Performers:

1. Grimm - two rushing TD, 99 rushing yards

2. Marconi - two rushing TD, 155 yards, 32-yard run

3. Sherry - Two interceptions, three tackles

and senior quarterback Greyson

Grimm, West made sure

the only cheering came from

their side.

And that goes for any road

game. When the Warriors

score, it may sound quieter

since cheering is not led by

a thunderous “Chelsea Dagger,”

the Warriors’ touchdown

song.

“We started off slow this

game, but we fought through

adversity,” Marconi said. “It

wasn’t a big crowd and it felt

like it was kind of dead, so we

had to fight it there and pick it

up. Once we got it going, we

started playing West football

again. We’re getting better

each week and we know it.”

Marconi had a big run

down to the five yard line

get called back, but he took

the next snap 20 yards into

the end zone for the score to

make it 19-0. He also scored

later on a three-yard run with

10:12 left in the game.

At the beginning of the

season, the plan was to have

Marconi be on the defense,

but with Barber just starting

to get back into full health,

Marconi has handled the running

back duties.

He rushed for 155 yards on

12 attempts, including a 32-

yard pick up.

“Caleb will be the first to

tell you the fullback and the

tight end and the O-line do a

great job,” Ernst said. “When

we’re running our downhill

stuff he’s unbelievable. He’s

playing great and he’s a punishing

guy and with our O-

Line and his style. With Donté’s

speed, he’s getting more

and more healthy. I think it’s

a great one-two punch.”

Marconi was quick to remember

a quote he heard

from Chris Kyle, the deadliest

sniper in American history,

where he said he was “just a

mokey on a gun” and the sniper

did all the work for him.

“Just behind the O-line and

(senior fullback Dylan) Holstein

and the wide receivers

blocking makes it easier,”

Marconi said. For Chris Kyle

it was like the sniper did it all

for you and that’s how feel,

that they’re all doing it for

me and makes my job easy.”

Grimm ran in the first two

scores in the second quarter

from five and three yards out

to give West a 13-0 lead at

halftime.

Grimm just missed his receivers

on deep passes three

times, over throwing them by

a step or two, but still were

well-thrown balls. His 99

rushing yards and two touchdowns

made up for a few incomplete

passes.

With six wins, the Warriors

are guaranteed a spot in

the playoffs and next week’s

road contest against Andrew

will likely determine the spot

of West’s opening playoff

game. A 7-2 record is usually

good enough to snag a home

game.

Girls Tennis

Celtics trio earns state bid

as team also wins sectional

NL resident is one of

the state qualifiers

James Sanchez, Editor

Providence freshman

Emma Davis is following in

the footsteps of her older sister,

Sophie.

Sophie, a Providence alum

from class of 2018, was an

accomplished tennis player

for the Celtics’ program and

a multi-time state qualifier.

Now Emma, of Mokena, is

carrying the torch, and she’s

already making an impact.

Emma was the No. 1 seed

at the Marian Catholic Sectional

Saturday, Oct. 13 and

proved her worth as the top

Celtics tennis players (left to right) Olivia Goodwin, of

Frankfort; Emma Davis, of Mokena; and Bridget Koval, of

New Lenox, pose for a picture with their sectional medals

Saturday, Oct. 13, at the 1A Marian Catholic Sectional.

Davis won the title at No. 1 singles, and doubles team

Koval and Goodwin was the final doubles team to advance.

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seed, going 4-0 and capturing

the sectional singles title. The

cherry on top was the team

also won sectional championship,

edging out runner-up

Marian Catholic by one point.

Joining Emma at state is

the doubles team of Bridget

Koval, of New Lenox; and

Olivia Goodwin, of Frankfort,

who finished fourth

at state, earning them the

final qualifying spot. Also

contributing to the team’s

sectional title was singles

player Gwen Milas and the

doubles team of Avery Gloss

and Anika Jain, who all won

matches on Saturday but

fell short of qualifying. The

Celtics are coached by Provi

alum Kathleen Kennedy.


54 | October 18, 2018 | The New Lenox Patriot SPORTS

newlenoxpatriot.com

Knights girls golf takes third at state, Bolden earns runner-up

Bolden, Curran

make Top 10 at

state for third

straight year

Steve Millar

Freelance Reporter

“Bri and Grace have always made

the rest of the team better. When

you have such great role models

to look up to, it really elevates the

rest of the team.”

Brian Shannon - Lincoln-Way Central girls golf

coach, on the impact of seniors Bri Bolden and

Grace Curran on the young Knights’ squad

While Lincoln-Way Central

senior golfer Brianne

Bolden experienced déjà

vu Saturday, Oct. 13, at the

Class 2A state finals, Bolden

and her teammates also experienced

something brand

new: lifting a state trophy.

Bolden finished as the

state-runner up by one

stroke for the second

straight season, ending the

two-round event at 3-under

141 at Hickory Point Golf

Club in Forsyth. This time,

though, she led the Knights

to a third-place finish and the

first state trophy in program

history.

Lincoln-Way Central

(624) edged New Trier (627)

for third, finishing behind

St. Charles North (610) and

Barrington (618).

Knights senior Grace Curran

(150) tied for seventh,

and junior Carly Schiene

(164) tied for 46th. Sophomore

Caitlyn Parrish (172),

junior Maddie Pyle (178)

and sophomore Sydney

Miron (184) also contributed

for Central.

“I knew we had to go low

to bring home some hardware,”

Bolden said. “Everyone

did their job. We had a

good talk as a team [Friday]

night. It got everyone

pumped up, and we all came

out and gave it our all.”

The Knights finished playing

while New Trier still had

two golfers on the course,

then had to wait to see they

had earned the trophy.

“I’m really proud of our

whole team for stepping up,”

Central coach Brian Shannon

said. “Our younger girls

work their tails off to get better.

I wish we could’ve sent

Bri and Grace out with a

first-place trophy, but we’re

happy to get this one.”

Bolden’s wait was even

more agonizing than her

teammates. When she finished

her round, a secondplace

finish seemed like a

sure thing as she was three

shots behind Benet’s Lauren

Beaudreau.

Beaudreau, though, double

bogeyed hole 15 and arrived

at the 18th hole with

just a one-shot lead over

Bolden.

Beaudreau hit her second

shot into the greenside

bunker but hit her next shot

within three feet and sank

her par putt to win the state

title.

Bolden, a Missouri recruit,

nonetheless was pleased

with her performance, especially

considering she had

been dealing with a back injury

all week.

“It was the exact same

thing as last year,” Bolden

said. “I waited about the

same amount of time [for

Beaudreau to finish] and everything.

I gave it my all.

“I missed a short putt on

the last hole, so that kind of

hurt me, but I played a lot

better than I expected with

my back.”

Lincoln-Way Central’s Bri Bolden strikes an iron shot Friday, Oct. 12, during opening round

of postseason action at the state tournament in Forsyth. Clark Brooks/Photonews Media

Bolden said her back

was especially bothersome

Friday, when temperatures

dipped into the 30’s and

snow fell, causing many

high scores.

Bolden still managed a

2-over 74. She entered Saturday’s

round seven shots

behind Beaudreau before

putting up a 5-under 67 in

the second round to make a

strong bid for the title.

“My back gets bad when

it’s cold,” Bolden said. “So,

the back nine [Friday], playing

in the snow was ugly. I

still shot a [3-over] 39 on the

back in the worst conditions

I’ve ever played in, so I was

happy with that.

“Lauren [Beaudreau] shot

a 31 on the back. For her to

do that in those conditions,

she deserved to win the state

title. I’ve known her since I

was 7 years old, so I’m happy

for her.”

Curran, meanwhile, rebounded

from a 10-over 82

on Friday to shoot a 4-under

68 on Saturday, rising from

a tie for 39th to a tie for seventh.

“I’m very proud of myself

and the fact that I was able to

bounce back after [Friday],”

Curran said. “I knew our

team was still in it and I was

playing for the team.

“The conditions were

tough [Friday, and I was upset

I wasn’t able to handle

it better. [Saturday], I just

had to leave the fear behind,

swing the clubs and see what

happened.”

Curran, a Minnesota recruit,

made an eagle on the

par-5 11th, her second hole

of the day, to begin her climb

up the leaderboard.

“The eagle was amazing,”

she said. “I hit the green on

two and was lucky enough to

make the 30-foot putt.

“It was awesome, and it

was a great way to kick-start

my round. It gave me momentum

to keep it going.”

Curran and Bolden both

cited Shannon’s pep talk

Friday night for helping

pick the team up after finishing

Friday’s play in sixth

place.

“We talked about how we

had a good day the second

day last year,” Shannon said.

“We knew Friday wasn’t indicative

of our team. There

were much better conditions

[Saturday], and I told the

girls it’s a new day.

“All year, we always seem

to turn it around. If we a bad

round in a dual, or a bad

tournament, we come out the

next day and play well.”

Schiene improved three

strokes from Friday’s round,

firing an 81 Saturday.

“[Friday] was pretty intense,”

she said. “I had never

played in the show before. It

was pretty tough. I was content

with my two rounds and

was glad I was able to help

the team.”

Bolden and Curran each

finished in the Top 10 for the

third straight season.

Bolden took tenth as a

sophomore before her consecutive

runner-up finishes.

Curran won the state title in

2016 and tied for fifth last

season.

Though Shannon is sad to

see his two stars depart, he

knows they’ve helped the

younger girls prepare for

next season.

“Bri and Grace have always

made the rest of the

team better,” he said. “When

you have such great role

models to look up to, it really

elevates the rest of the

team.

“That’s what you want

when you’re a coach, for the

players to push each other

and work hard. This was an

amazing team and it was

great to see them finish so

well.”


newlenoxpatriot.com SPORTS

the New Lenox Patriot | October 18, 2018 | 55

fastbreak

Football

Celtics offense slowed by undefeated Broncos

1st and 3

22nd Century Media

File Photo

Golf stars

1. Juney Bai (above)

The freshman had a

respectable showing

at the IHSA 3A state

tournament, finishing

71st. He was as

high as 14th place

through the first six

holes.

2. Bri Bolden/Grace

Curran

The two seniors

capped off their

careers with another

Top 10 finish at state,

accomplishing that

feat three straight

years. Curran was a

state champ in 2016,

while Bolden was

runner-up back-toback

seasons.

3. Sean Curran

The sophomore

improved from 26th

his freshman year

to runner-up at the

state meet. Curran

birdied hole 6,

which was one of

the toughest holes

at The Den. Only

four other golfers in

the 112-man field

birdied that hole.

RANDY WHALEN

Freelance Reporter

The Providence football

team should surely be playoff

bound again.

The Celtics, however,

don’t have much momentum

heading into the final week

of the regular season.

A week after forfeiting a

game to Mt. Carmel, Providence

was back on the field

last weekend. While the

Celtics scored first, that momentum

didn’t last and they

fell to Montini 27-3 in a Chicago

Catholic League Blue

matchup on Friday, Oct. 12

in New Lenox.

Montini (8-0, 3-0) will

host Brother Rice (8-0, 3-0)

at 7:30 p.m. this Friday to

decide the CCL Blue title.

Providence (5-3, 1-2) will

have at least 50 playoff

After a perfect week, Joe extends his first-place lead

to two games heading into the final week of the

regular season.

Game of the Week

• Lincoln-Way West (6-2) at Andrew (6-2)

Other Games to Watch

• Providence (5-3) at Loyola Academy (5-3)

• Sandburg (3-5) at Homewood Flossmoor (7-1)

• Bolingbrook (7-1) at Lincoln-Way East (8-0)

• Thornton (4-4) at Lincoln-Way Central (6-2)

• Lockport (0-8) at Bradley Bourbonnais (3-5)

• T.F. South (6-2) at Tinley Park (3-5)

LISTEN UP

“If we serve tough – that’s one of our strong points is

serving – I believe we could beat any team.”

Hannah Rubin– Lincoln-Way West setter, on the upcoming girls volleyball

postseason

points and should be fine to

qualify for the postseason

for the 36th time in its history.

But after opening the

season 5-1, the Celtics have

lost two straight.

“I don’t think so,” Providence

coach Mark Coglianese

said when asked if not

playing the previous week

affected his team. “We just

couldn’t hit the big plays,

and they [the Broncos] have

some good athletes. They

made adjustments to stop the

run.”

After forcing a Montini

punt, the Celtics opening

drive started at their own

27 and moved to a first-andgoal

at the Montini nine. Senior

running back Branden

Martus (18 carries, 97 yards)

had six carries for 60 yards

in the march. But the drive

stalled there and they had to

Tune In

Box score

settle for a 29-yard field goal

by freshman Jake Andjelic

with 4:59 left in the first

quarter.

Despite having seven

more possessions, four of

which reached into Bronco

territory, that would be the

last time that Providence

scored.

“It was a nice opening

OUR STAFF’S PREDICTIONS FOR THE AREA GAMES IN WEEK 9

46-8

Joe Coughlin |

Publisher

• Lincoln-Way West 24, Andrew

14. Two solid teams but Warriors’

defense too strong and halts

the Bolts.

• Loyola

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Lincoln-Way East

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Bradley-Bourbonnais

• Tinley Park

44-10

Jeff Vorva |

Sports Editor

• Loyola

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Lincoln-Way East

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Lockport

• T.F. South

Girls Volleyball

6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 23

• Lincoln-Way West will play Richards in the regional

semifinals at Marian Catholic High School.

1 2 3 4 F

Montini 7 13 7 0 27

Providence 3 0 0 0 3

Top Performers:

1. Brenden Martus - Providence, running back. 18 carries

- 97 yards.

2. Ryan Manikowski - Providence quarterback, 6-of-15, 1

INT. 77 yards.

3. Jarell Wright - Providence, wide receiver, 2 catches - 40

yards.

• Lincoln-Way West 14, Andrew 10:

Andrew has been stomped a lot in

recent years by the Warriors. That

shouldn’t happen this year, but still

give the nod to West.

43-11

James Sanchez |

Contributing Editor

• Lincoln-Way West 17, Andrew 13.

Defense secures a home playoff

game for West.

• Loyola

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Lincoln-Way East

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Bradley-Bourbonnais

• T.F. South

drive,” Coglianese said. “We

came out and moved the ball

well, but unfortunately, we

had to settle for a field goal.

We just couldn’t get back on

track after that.

“And he [Martus] is our

bread and butter right now.

We go as he goes. We have

the freshman kid (Aaron

Vaughn, 7 carries - 38 yards)

42-12

Tom Czaja |

Contributing Editor

• Lincoln-Way West 31, Andrew 20.

Both teams looking to end on a

high note for playoff momentum/

seeding, but Warriors show they

are better in all three phases in

this one.

• Loyola

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Lincoln-Way East

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Bradley-Bourbonnais

• T.F. South

Index

48 – This Week In

46 – Athlete of the Week

who will come in and spell

him, but if we get him any

kind of seam, he’s a dangerous

runner. We just got beat

up front especially in the

second half. They kind of

wore us down at the end.”

Montini answered the

field goal with a touchdown

drive as senior Nick Fedanzo

(17 carries,122 yards) scored

from 13-yards out with 2:44

left in the first quarter. Midway

through the second

quarter, the Broncos struck

again. Junior Deontay Bell

(7-of-11 passing, 94 yards)

hit senior Zach Olson streaking

down the middle for a

56-yard touchdown. The

extra point kick went off

the right upright, leaving the

score at 13-3.

After the Celtics advanced

Please see Football, 52

42-12

Heather Warthen |

Chief Operating Officer

• Lincoln-Way West 28, Andrew 21.

Warriors have their work cut out for

them with T-Bolts, but take the W.

• Loyola

• Homewood-Flossmoor

• Lincoln-Way East

• Lincoln-Way Central

• Bradlay-Bourbonnais

• T.F. South

FASTBREAK is compiled by Editor James Sanchez,

james@newlenoxpatriot.com.


new lenox’s Hometown Newspaper | www.newlenoxpatriot.com | October 18, 2018

Grinding

it out

Knights secure

playoff berth,

but it didn’t come

easy, Page 52

Sophomore

sensation

Sean Curran’s hot

round nearly gets

him individual

state title, Page 51

Grace Curran, Bri Bolden finish

accomplished high school golf careers at

state tournament, Page 54

Grace Curran eyes her wedge shot Friday, Oct. 12, during the first round of

the state tournament in Forsyth. Clark Brooks/Photonews Media

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