MSN013119

22ndcenturymedia

Denied

Planning Commission votes down permit for

home that exceeds prior footprint, Page 5

Quality check

SMMUSD parents share concerns with district

regarding post-fire air quality, Page 6

Taking turns

Families get up-close look at various vehicles

during Touch a Truck event, Page 10

MalibuSurfsideNews.com • January 31, 2019 • Vol. 6 No. 16 • $1

A

®

Publication

,LLC

LA County Fire Chief addresses contemptuous crowd

regarding Woolsey Fire response, Page 4

A firetruck drives on Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu on Nov. 11, 2018. Suzy Demeter/22nd Century Media INSET: Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby took

questions during a Saturday, Jan. 26 town hall to discuss fire response in Malibu. Suzanne Guldimann/22nd Century Media


2 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news calendar

malibusurfsidenews.com

In this week’s

surfside news

Photo Op9

Police Reports11

Editorial15

Faith Briefs20

Puzzles23

Home of the Week24

Sports25-28

Classifieds29-31

ph: 310.457.2112 fx: 310.457.0936

Editor

Lauren Coughlin

lauren@malibusurfsidenews.com

Sales director

Mary Hogan

mary@malibusurfsidenews.com

business directory Sales

Kellie Tschopp, 708.326.9170, x23

k.tschopp@22ndcenturymedia.com

Legal Notices

Jeff Schouten, 708.326.9170, x51

j.schouten@22ndcenturymedia.com

Classified Sales

708.326.9170

PUBLISHER

Joe Coughlin, 847.272.4565, x16

j.coughlin@22ndcenturymedia.com

president

Andrew Nicks

a.nicks@22ndcenturymedia.com

EDITORIAL DESIGN DIRECTOR

Nancy Burgan, 708.326.9170, x30

n.burgan@22ndcenturymedia.com

22 nd Century Media

Malibu Surfside News

P.O. Box 6854

Malibu, CA 90264

www.MalibuSurfsideNews.com

Malibu Surfside News

is printed in a direct-to-plate

process using soy-based inks.

circulation inquiries

circulation@22ndcenturymedia.com

“Malibu Surfside News” (USPS #364-790) is

published weekly on Wednesdays by

22nd Century Media, LLC

Malibu Surfside News

P.O. Box 6854

Malibu, CA 90264

Periodicals Postage Paid at Malibu, California offices.

Published by

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

THURSDAY

Kindergarten Round-Up

9:30 a.m. Jan. 31, Webster

Elementary School,

3602 Winter Canyon Road,

Malibu. Prospective parents,

as well as incoming

transitional kindergarten

and kindergarten parents,

may visit and learn more

about the school.

Getting Started with

Scratch

3:30-4:30 p.m. Jan. 31,

Malibu Library, 23519 Civic

Center Way. Learn the

basic tools and concepts for

coding with Scratch, a visual

programming language

created by MIT. Staff from

the LA County Library

MakMo vehicle visits for

this STEM program. For

beginning coders, ages

8-18. For more information,

call (310) 456-6438.

Webster Talent Show

6-8 p.m. Jan. 31, Webster

Elementary School, 3602

Winter Canyon Road, Malibu.

The school will present

its rescheduled talent show.

SATURDAY

Poetry Open Mic

11 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 2,

Malibu Library, 23519 Civic

Center Way. Join local

poets for a morning open

mic hosted by Malibu Poet

Laureate Ricardo Means

Ybarra and featuring Bill

Mohr. Poets — published,

aspiring, or otherwise —

can bring a poem to share

at this program for adults.

Sponsored by the Friends

of the Malibu Library. For

more information, call

(310) 456-6438.

MONDAY

Planning Commission

6:30 p.m. Feb. 4, Malibu

City Hall Council Chambers,

23825 Stuart Ranch

Road. The Malibu Planning

Commission will meet. For

more information, or to

view an agenda, visit www.

malibucity.org.

TUESDAY

Sunset Mixer

5:30-7:30 p.m. Feb. 5,

Glamifornia Style Lounge,

21323 Pacific Coast Highway,

#103, Malibu. The

Malibu Chamber of Commerce

will gather for a

sunset mixer. Admission is

$20 for members, $35 for

non-members and $0 for

first-time attendees. For

reservations, visit www.

Malibu.org.

WEDNESDAY

Garden Club Meeting

9:30 a.m. Feb. 6, Point

Dume Club House, 29500

Heathercliff Drive, Malibu.

Curtis Thomsen will present

“Spring Garden Preparation.”

All are welcome.

For more information, call

(310) 457-3860.

Microphotography for

Teens

3:30-4:30 p.m. Feb. 6,

Malibu Library, 23519

Civic Center Way. Shoot

photographs of microscopic

subjects using a combination

of microscopes and

cellphone cameras. Participants

can bring something

they would like to examine

to this program, for teens

12-18. For more information,

call (310) 456-6438.

Public Safety Commission

5 p.m. Feb. 6, Malibu

City Hall Multipurpose

Room, 23825 Stuart Ranch

Road. The Public Safety

Commission will meet. For

more information, or to

view an agenda, visit www.

malibucity.org.

Intro to Arduino

6-7:30 p.m. Feb. 6, Malibu

Library, 23519 Civic

Center Way. Learn the

basics of building on and

programming an Arduino,

an open-source electronics

platform which enables

users to create interactive

electronic objects, at

this adults program. No

programming experience

needed. For more information,

call (310) 456-6438.

THURSDAY

School Board

5:30 p.m. Feb. 7, Malibu

Correction

Malibu High School

senior basketball player

Buckley Ventress was

misidentified as Justin

Lapinski in the story,

“Turnovers doom MHS

in team’s 54-41 loss,”

which appeared in the

Jan. 17 edition. The

Surfside recognizes

and regrets this error.

City Hall Council Chambers,

23825 Stuart Ranch

Road. The SMMUSD

Board of Education will

meet. To view the agenda,

visit www.smmusd.org/

board/meetings.html.

UPCOMING

Vietnamese Home Cooking

11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday,

Feb. 9, Malibu Library,

23519 Civic Center

Way. Learn how to make

healthy Vietnamese street

foods with Chef Vivien.

This adults program is

limited to 30 participants.

RSVP by calling (310)

456-6438.

Correction

The cause of death

for Debbie Lynn Marie

Robinson Purucker,

whose obituary was

published in the Jan.

10 edition of the

Malibu Surfside News,

was due to a variety

of natural causes

rather than smoke

inhalation, according

to James Baroni, of the

Ventura County Medical

Examiner’s Office.

The Surfside News

recognizes and regrets

this error.

ONGOING

YAP Shows

7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1; 2

p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday,

Feb. 2; 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Sunday, Feb. 3, Malibu

Playhouse, 29243 PCH.

Young Actors Project will

perform “A Wrinkle In

Time” and “Once Upon A

Grapevine.” For tickets,

visit wrinkleintime.bpt.me

and grapevine.bpt.me.


malibusurfsidenews.com News

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 3

malibu city council

Review of City manager, staff ’s fire response considered

michele willer-allred,

Freelance Reporter

The Malibu City Council

unanimously agreed at its

Monday, Jan. 28 meeting

to allocate up to $50,000

to hire an independent investigator

to evaluate the

City manager and staff’s response

to the Woolsey Fire.

Mayor Pro Tem Karen

Farrer and councilmember

Mikke Pierson, of the City’s

Disaster Response and Recovery

Ad Hoc Committee,

were tasked with getting financial

quotes from investigators

who could be hired

by the council at its first

meeting in February.

Separately, the council

decided to have a closed

session meeting later in

February to evaluate City

Manager Reva Feldman’s

performance during the

fire.

Councilman Skylar Peak,

who suggested hiring the

investigator and reviewing

Feldman in response to public

criticism, said the closed

session meeting is the only

way the council can legally

discuss the item.

“There’s been a lot of

different comments that

have flown on social media

and outer space and things,”

Peak said. “I would kind of

guard people that a lot of

that stuff is not true.”

He requested that the

council hire the investigator

“to help the City as it

moves forward as we focus

on the rebuilding process.”

Peak said the evaluation

of the City and Feldman

will help grieving individuals

“that don’t understand

how all the mechanisms in

the city [work].”

“I think those answers

would be better off coming

from someone else rather

than one of us,” he said.

Both Farrer and Pierson

agreed to the evaluation,

but disagreed on the role

of the ad hoc committee,

which is tasked with coordinating

disaster and fire

evacuation preparedness

and making recommendations

to the council on additional

emergency preparedness

actions.

“I think in order to have

community confidence, an

independent review, in my

opinion, is warranted,” Farrer

said.

Peak said the quotes to

hire an investigator should

come from the ad hoc

committee because Farrer

and Pierson were the only

councilmembers not in office

during the fire.

Mayor Jefferson Wagner

also agreed with an independent

evaluation, saying

an in-house one will “appear

to many people that it

was whitewashed.”

“I hear that all the time,

[that it’s whitewashed],” he

said. “ ... I say, let’s do this,

and the glaring issues that

everyone points out to me

every day may be clarified

by an outside resource.”

Mullen took issue when

Peak first used the term

“investigation” to describe

what he would like done.

“I think when you say

investigation, it sounds like

there’s something that needs

to be investigated,” Mullen

said. “I think what we need

to do is, we need to look

at how things worked in a

constructive fashion. So,

when the next giant disaster

comes to town, we’re more

resilient and more ready.”

Mullen added that he believes

a lot of complaints

regarding the fire actually

have nothing to do with the

City manager, but rather

actions by the sheriff’s and

fire departments as well as

California Highway Patrol.

Mullen said that blaming

Feldman for responsibilities

she wasn’t in charge of “have

been very corrosive for the

town, and it’s not an accurate

reflection of her responsibilities

during a disaster.”

Feldman said she didn’t

mind an early performance

evaluation to help “put some

of these things to rest.”

“There are certain things

we could improve upon that

happened during this disaster,”

Feldman responded.

“But I can assure you that

I’m open and welcome to

anyone asking or following

up on anything that did occur.”

The council also unanimously

agreed to appoint

Wagner to represent Malibu

as a member of the Woolsey

Fire Task Force chaired

by Los Angeles County Supervisor

Sheila Kuehl.


4 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news news

malibusurfsidenews.com

Tempers flare at town hall on fire response

Fire chief attends

but is unable to

address all queries

Suzanne Guldimann

Freelance Reporter

Los Angeles County Fire

Chief Daryl Osby offered

assurances for the future

and some clarification on

fire command’s decisionmaking

process during the

Woolsey Fire, but provided

few definite answers to

questions from the audience

at a highly charged community

town hall meeting.

Malibu City Hall was

packed for the Saturday,

Jan. 26 event, with a largely

angry audience that heckled

the speakers and actively

booed Malibu City Manager

Reva Feldman.

Mayor Jefferson Wagner

worked to keep the peace.

“We need to prepare for

when the east end [of Malibu]

burns,” Wagner said.

“I’m with you on this, but

we’ve got to get answers

and we need to do it constructively.”

“To be quite frank, I came

here for this reason, to hear

this,” Osby said. “People

who lost homes, have damaged

homes, are upset. I

want to hear this. There is

not a major incident in my

profession that has gone 100

percent well and it’s obvious

that this didn’t.”

Osby said the main thing

that didn’t go well was a

lack of outside fire support.

He stated that resources

were spread thin because of

the Camp and Hill fires, and

that the county firefighters

were largely on their own.

“We requested a significant

amount of resources

“I can’t answer all the questions,

because I don’t know. If we did

have firefighters out there and

they weren’t engaged, then I am

disappointed.”

Daryl Osby — LA County Fire chief

through mutual aid but,

because of competing incidents,

it was not available,”

he stated. “We had to make

due with what we had. We

didn’t get significant aid until

Day 3. [The fire] got to

Malibu on Day 2.”

Osby described the challenges

the crews faced as

70 mile per hour winds propelled

the fire into Malibu.

“As the fire was coming

over the hill, we couldn’t

get in front of it,” he said.

“And we couldn’t follow

it over the hill. Power lines

were down, there were landslides,

multiple accidents.

We were doing all we could

to get over hill, and sending

people up PCH.”

Mike Sagely, a senior pilot

for LA County Fire Air

Operations, flies the department’s

Sikorsky S-70 Firehawk

helicopters. He stated

that the Woolsey Fire was

unlike anything anyone had

seen before in this area.

“I have been flying a little

over 32 years,” Sagely said.

“These were some of the

most challenging conditions

I’ve seen or probably will

ever see.”

Osby said he made the

decision to implement the

wide-scale, mandatory

evacuation after receiving

news of the high number of

fatalities at the Camp Fire.

“We don’t know how

many fatalities we had, but

we knew it was a significant

amount,” Osby said, adding

that he “owns” the fact that

the decision to evacuate the

entire area came “at the cost

of losing houses.”

“When [the fire] jumped

the 101, that was the signal

to evacuate 250,000 people,”

Osby said.

He described the evacuation

as “not perfect but effective,”

drawing more boos

from the audience.

“In this incident, we lost

three lives [and] lost over

1,000 homes in LA County;

I am deeply saddened by

that, but there were over

57,000 homes that were

saved,” he said, explaining

that the order of priority was

lives, property and only then

environment.

That assertion did little

to assuage the anger of an

audience that included dozens

of Malibu residents who

lost their homes. Nearly

200 questions were submitted

in writing at the start of

the two-hour event. There

was only time to respond

to a small number of them,

although Osby expressed

willingness to return for additional

meetings and said

he would arrange a way for

concerned residents to submit

their questions by email

or on a website.

David Richardson, chief

Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby talks with

attendees of the Saturday, Jan. 26 town hall.

Suzanne Guldimann/22nd Century Media

deputy of emergency operations

for LA County

Fire, rebutted a high-profile

news story that indicated

the response to the Woolsey

Fire was insufficient.

He described the county

fire department’s response

as “robust.” He confirmed,

however, that the department

was unable to obtain

mutual aid.

“We knew we needed

resources,” he said. “The

response was ‘You are not

going to get it.’ Why? Multiple

fires. It was like a kick

in gut.”

Richardson explained

that LA County relies on

a mutual aid system and

blamed cuts to that program

for the lack of firefighters at

the Woolsey Fire.

“In 2003, there were over

1,200 fire engines available,”

he said. “Today there

are under 700, because other

cities have restructured.

Other engines are not available.”

“You may not have seen

firefighters in your area,”

Osby acknowledged, after

being shouted at by the audience

about the lack of crews

in areas like Point Dume.

“That’s true. I can’t answer

why all the resources didn’t

come. We are going to look

at [it in] an after-action review

from the state.”

In response to numerous

accounts from the audience

of fire crews that appeared

unwilling to come to the

aid of residents in areas like

Point Dume, where steep

roads or death-trap conditions

were not an issue,

Osby initially reiterated that

firefighters were “completely

engaged,” but acknowledged

he would take the allegations

seriously.

“Children were fighting

the fire,” one audience

member shouted, recounting

how engines drove past

a burning home without

stopping.

“I am not discounting

what you said,” Osby acknowledged.

“I accept what

you are saying, and we

are going to do a review. I

can’t answer all the questions,

because I don’t know.

If we did have firefighters

out there and they weren’t

engaged, then I am disappointed.”

Looking ahead to rebuilding,

Osby said his department

is committed to doing

“what is reasonable” with

regard to older homes meeting

current fire code.

“We will look at each

property and do what is reasonably

safe,” he said.

When members of the

audience expressed concern

that they need fire department

input before deciding

whether to rebuild, Osby

said he was in discussions

to provide staff to the City.

“Before you have architectural

fees, we will talk to

you,” he responded.

City Councilmember

Skylar Peak suggested that

Osby make someone available

at City Hall who could

help streamline the process

and is qualified to make determinations

about things

like driveway width, turnarounds

and water pressure.

During a brief discussion

of future wildfire prevention,

Osby said he is open

to the idea of more “call”

firefighting crews, highly

trained volunteer firefighters

like the team in Corral

Canyon that formed

after the 2008 Corral Fire,

and who saved numerous

homes during the Woolsey

Fire.

Osby also stated that the

issue of falling water pressure,

because the power

to keep pumps operating

goes down during a disaster,

is being addressed in

Sacramento. A new legislative

measure which would

mandate that all waterworks

most provide backup generators

has the support of the

governor, he said.

Osby made one request

before the meeting ended.

“Your local firefighters

did all they could do,”

he said. “I hope you could

acknowledge that. There

are some things we did

well. I also recognize there

are challenges, lessons

learned.”


malibusurfsidenews.com news

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 5

Malibu Planning Commission

Home application entangled in mansionization debate

Commission

denies application,

requests council

guidance on topic

Michele Willer-Allred

Freelance Reporter

The majority of the Malibu

Planning Commission

recommended denial of

plans for a new residence

on Busch Drive, basing its

decision partly on the belief

that the home is the definition

of “mansionization”

and is inconsistent with the

neighborhood’s character.

At its Tuesday, Jan. 22

meeting, the Planning Commission

voted 4-1, with

Commissioner Jeff Jennings

dissenting, to deny

the Coastal Development

Permit for the construction

of a new 7,350 square-foot,

two-story single-family

residence (including an

attached garage and basement)

at 5939 Busch Drive.

The new, larger

home would replace a

1,596-square-foot, singlestory

home and 474-squarefoot

attached garage destroyed

by the fire in the

rural residential two-acre

zoning district. The original

application dated back

to 2014.

Mansionization is the

practice of building the

largest possible size of

home, often much larger

in comparison to surrounding

dwellings. The practice

can change the character

of neighborhoods and possibly

add traffic and other

impacts.

Planning commissioners

said it can be a large problem

right now in the City

because of all the fire rebuilds,

and they want longoverdue

guidance from the

City Council on the mansionization

issue.

“This issue of large

houses and what’s going to

be built is really important

right now,” said Planning

Commission Chairman

Steve Uhring. “Because,

without some guidance and

some forward vision that

says this isn’t what we want

to be, we can end up having

9,000-square-foot houses

all over Malibu.”

Commissioners urged

the Hubschman Family

Trust, the applicant, to delay

its application until after

a council decision next

month.

City staff is bringing a

recommendation to the

council on Feb. 25 to determine

the policy on mansionization

as well as what

the rules are on how people

should design their home

projects.

A Hubschman Family

Trust representative instead

requested that the Planning

Commission still take a

vote on the rebuild application,

which was originally

submitted to the City in

2014 so the family could

redesign their home. The

Planning Commission’s

decision can be appealed at

the council level.

The denial of the home’s

application by the Planning

Commission also was

based on other factors such

as encroachment into environmentally

sensitive habitat,

but mansionization was

the main factor.

Commissioner John

Mazza said the Planning

Department recommended

the approval of the permit

basically because other

homes in the neighborhood

also are two story, though

the proposed home would

be double the size.

The applicant, in turn,

said the size of the home

isn’t quite twice as big if

you look at other factors,

and that size of the home

should be proportional to

the lot size.

Mazza said the Planning

Commission’s guidance

from the City Council has

been “so vague that I cannot

make a finding that this

is not mansionization due

to the size.”

Uhring said there are

fairly consistent guidelines

in the City’s Municipal

Code and General Plan that

“neighborhood character”

is important and that the

City “shall protect the char-

Please see fire, 11

Tel: 555 555 5555

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PEELER POLES

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6 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news news

malibusurfsidenews.com

SMMUSD parents express air-quality concerns

District stands by

on-campus sensors

Lauren Coughlin, Editor

With the fires and mudslides

behind them, Malibu

students are back in

school, but not all parents

are convinced that is the

best place for their children.

Malibu High School parent

Beth Lucas is one of

what SMMUSD describes

as “a handful” of Malibu

parents who have regularly

expressed post-fire

Whole Foods developers divulge details on vendors, more

Well-attended

Chamber event

offers sneak peek

Barbara Burke

Freelance Reporter

Whole Foods and The

Park at Cross Creek is

not expected to open until

April, but a standingroom-only

crowd at a recent

Sunset Mixer got the

latest scoop on the development

last week.

The Malibu Chamber of

Commerce organized the

event, held Thursday, Jan.

24, at Duke’s Restaurant.

Anchor store Whole

Foods is to be flanked by

four buildings in an openair

layout. Vendors who

plan to open at the Park include

Blue Bottle Coffee,

crystal interactive wellness

gallery Sorenity Rocks and

Doortodoor Cleaners.

Malibuite Howdy

Kabrins, who operated

Howdy’s Taqueria in Malibu

for years, plans to hire

back old employees when

he opens his new restaurant

in the Park.

“This event tonight is

symbolic for me given what

we’ve all been through,”

Kabrins said. “This is all

about resilience and new,

well-deserved starts.”

Further, pizza-maker

Joe D’Amore plans to

open Café D’Amore — a

new restaurant which is to

serve breakfast, lunch, dinner,

beer and wine — and

Barefoot Dreams — an

online venue for cozychic

fashions operated by

Malibuite Stan Cook —

is to open its first brickand-mortar

location at

the site.

“The Whole Foods and

the Park are all about

supporting Malibu and

building our community,”

project developer Steve

Soboroff said as he introduced

some of the vendors.

“In today’s retail environment,

stores need to

be small. The stores in this

project will range between

concerns about air quality

on the Malibu High School

campus.

The district, meanwhile,

stands by the results from

14 air-quality sensors —

which test for carbon monoxide,

nitrogen dioxide,

ozone, particulate matter

less than 10 microns and

particulate matter less than

2.5 microns — it installed

inside and outside of Malibu

schools in December.

The data, however, do

little to assuage the concerns

of Lucas, whose

daughter, Amanda Pierce,

a junior at MHS, reportedly

has experienced

post-fire headaches, a sore

throat, coughing, wheezing

and fatigue while at

Malibu High School.

On Jan. 22, after receiving

texts from her daughter

about not feeling well

on campus, Lucas again

emailed district officials to

ask that they restrict outdoor

activities and keep

the schools’ doors closed.

“This is a complex situation

and I am not convinced

the air monitors are always

reflecting what is actually

happening on campus and

how it is affecting people’s

Whole Foods and The Park at Cross Creek is under

construction at Civic Center Way and Cross Creek Road.

Seth Cheshire/CheshireBeane

health,” wrote Lucas.

Lucas said her daughter

previously had mild seasonal

allergies but now has

an inhaler for the first time

after a doctor’s visit last

week. Two of her daughter’s

friends also have

complained about feeling

sick on campus, she said.

SMMUSD Superintendent

Dr. Ben Drati sent an

email to the community,

stating in part, “Though

the winds were up, all

sources supported the air

quality being good.”

The readings, he explained,

are a combination

500 and 1,000 square feet,

and they will be wide open

with 20-feet ceilings and

30-feet frontages.”

The Park, he said, is

intended to provide a

venue where the community

can gather. It will

feature an amphitheater

and a state-of-the-art,

all-abilities playground

that will enable special

needs and typical children

to engage in healthy

play in a project sponsored

by Charlene Sperber

and her son Richard

Sperber. The playground,

designed by Shane’s Inspiration,

is the first privately

funded all abilities

play venue, according to

Soboroff.

“Malibu has approximately

200 special needs

children and before this

new playground, they

had no place to gather,”

he said. “This will allow

wheelchair access and it

will provide a play venue

for all Malibu children.

of what is reported by the

South Coast Air Quality

Management District, the

Environmental Protection

Agency and SMMUSD’s

sensors.

“Our process of interpreting

the air quality has

been vetted and certified

by a licensed industrial hygienist

and is in line with

SCAQMD/EPA standards

so we stand by the readings,”

Drati wrote. “There

are, however, certain families

that have concerns regarding

blowing soot and

ash so we are limiting outside

activities as much as

The playground has a fire

engine, police car and

lifeguard station because

Malibuites love first responders.”

Lenise Soren, owner of

Sorenity Rocks, will be

in charge of amphitheater

programming, with plans

for fundraisers, Broadway

stage performance readings,

a singer-songwriter

night, a speakers series and

other community-friendly

events.

“The amphitheater is going

to be a game-changer,

both for Malibu and for

the city being a destination

to drive more business to

Malibu,” Soren said.

Soboroff was optimistic

about the project’s future

impact on the economy

and more.

“I hope that the Park

project is an integral and

happy part of Malibu’s renaissance,”

he said. “This

isn’t about another shopping

center. It’s about establishing

a neighborhood

place, and I hope it will

possible during extremely

windy conditions even

with the good air readings.

“Each principal has and

will continue to communicate

with their respective

school community about

the air quality as it pertains

to outdoor activities.”

Malibu High School

parent and activist Jennifer

deNicola, who served

on a committee that talked

about air quality and more

following the fire, shares

Lucas’ concerns.

DeNicola acknowledged

Please see smmusd, 10

prove to be a special place

with a lot of heart for the

people of Malibu during

this city’s rebirth.”

Most attendees shared

Soboroff’s enthusiasm

for the venue. Local Julie

Hoffman, however, had

reservations.

“I am a loyal PC Greens

fan and a fan of Malibu

Kitchen,” Hoffman said.

“Everybody’s got to step

up and support the local

businesses who have supported

Malibu through

thick and thin. We have

four grocery stores in Malibu

and I do not think that

we need another.”

Others felt the project

will be beneficial to Malibu.

“It’s heartwarming to

have this event just more

than two months after the

devastation,” attendee

Nagy Heinein said. “Malibu

has been a little stagnant

since the fire and this

event tonight demonstrates

that it is focusing on revival

now.”


malibusurfsidenews.com malibu

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 7


8 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news malibu

malibusurfsidenews.com

TheCity of Malibu is Here to Help

Ourhearts go out to all those affected by the devastating WoolseyFire. The City is committed

to doing everything possible to help community members with theirimmediate needs, to

provide asmooth process forthosewho lost homes toestablish temporary housing ontheir

property and to rebuild, and to resume normal City services and activities.

NEW -DEBRIS REMOVAL OPERATIONS CENTER OPEN IN CALABASAS TO

ASSIST RESIDENTS

LA County has opened aDebris Removal Operation Center (DROC) in Calabasas where

residents can ask questions and get guidance through the fire debris removal process. The

DROC is located at 26610 Agoura Road, Calabasas (near the 101 Fwy and Las Virgenes Rd)

and is open Monday through Friday 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM and Saturdays 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM.

For more information, call LA County's Woolsey Fire Recovery Hotline at 626-979-5370.

FIRE REBUILD DESK AT MALIBU CITY HALL

Awalk-up counter staffed by aplanner is available during City Hall open hours. Meet one-onone

with aCity planner who can walk residents through the process of getting atemporary

mobile home or trailer placed on their burned property, and help them begin the rebuilding

process.

Location: 23825 Stuart Ranch Road, Malibu, CA 90265

Hours: Mondaythrough Thursday, 7:30 AM –5:30 PM, Fridays 7:30 AM –4:30 PM

CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING FEB. 11 ON CODE AMENDMENTS TO

HELP RESIDENTS REBUILD

During the City Council meeting on Monday, February 11, 6:30 PM at Malibu City Hall, the City

Council will hold apublic hearing to consider amendments to Title 17 (Zoning) of the Malibu

Municipal Code and to the Local Coastal Program. The Council will also review the Planning

Commission’s recommendations to modify standards and procedures to facilitate the

rebuilding of structures damaged or destroyed by the Woolsey Fire and provide relief for the

victims of the fire. Details regarding the amendments are included in the attached notice. For

more information, call the Planning Department at 310-456-2489, ext. 485, or email

mplanning@malibucity.org. The agenda will be posted at least 72 hrs. in advance at

www.MalibuCity.org/AgencaCenter.

LOOK UP YOUR PROPERTY TO CHECK IF HAZ-MAT INSPECTION IS COMPLETE

The inspection and clearance of Household Hazardous Materials from properties burned in the

Woolsey Fire is nearing completion. This must be completed on a property before the owners

can move forward with fire debris removal. If your property has not been inspected, please call

LA County Fire Haz-Mat Division at 323-890-4000. The list of inspected properties and debris

removal information is available at www.MalibuCity.org/Debris.

CHECK THE STATUS OF YOUR APPLICATION FOR DEBRIS

REMOVAL PROGRAMS

Owners of burned propertes can chec on the status of ther applcaton for the state-run fre

debrs removal program (ROE -Rght of Entry form) or ther applcaton for the local fre debrs

removal program onlne at https://dpw.lacounty.gov/epd/WoolseyFire/ApplicationStatus.aspx.

REBUILDING FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs)

The City offers astreamlined process for residents to get back into their homes. Planning &

Environmental Sustainability staff are available to help residents navigate this process. Contact

the Planning at 310-456-2489 x485 or mplanning@malibucity.org, and the Environmental

Sustainability at 310-456-2489 x371 or mbuilding@malibucity.org. For in-person assistance, visit

the Fire Rebuild Desk at City Hall Mon -Thurs, 7:30AM -5:30PM, Fri, 7:30AM -4:30PM. To see the

Frequently Asked Questions about the rebuilding process visit www.malibucity.org/

WoolseyRebuildFAQs.

PUBLIC RECORDS REQUESTS FOR PERMITS &PLANS

TO REBUILD ABURNED HOME

Those rebuilding damaged or destroyed homes may need to request permits, plans and other

records from the City. The City's Permit Search web page has step-by-step instructions at

www.MalibuCity.org/912/Permit-Search.

ALL LEAF BLOWERS BANNED WEST OF MALIBU CANYON

To protect public health from potential hazardous materials in the fire debris and ash,

the City has banned the use of ALL leaf blowers (both gas and electric) in City limits

west of Malibu Canyon Road effective immediately, through August 1, 2019.

PROHIBIDO USAR SOPLADORES DE HOJAS AL OESTE DE MALIBU CANYON

Debido aque los escombros ylas cenizas del fuego ylas estructuras dañadas pueden

contener materiales ypartículas que son peligrosas para la salud ylaseguridad, La

Ciudad de Malibu prohíbe el uso de sopladores de hojas dentro del área de la ciudad al

oeste de Malibu Canyon Road hasta el límite de la ciudad. La prohibicion esta en efecto

inmediatamente yterminara el 1° de agosto del 2019.

SWIMMING POOL GUIDANCE

Discharging pool water to storm drains is prohibited. If apool must be drained because it has

been impacted by smoke and ash, the Civic Center Water Treatment Facility may accept the

water on acase-by-case basis. Learn more at www.MalibuCity.org/WoolseySwimmingPools

AGOURA HILLS DISASTER RECOVERY CENTER (DRC) TO CLOSE ON JAN. 31

The Agoura Hills DRC is scheduled to close permanently on Thursday, January 31. The

Malibu DRC closed on January 18. City staff from the Building &Safety, Environmental

Sustainability, and Planning Departments will continue to be available at City Hall to help

community members with recovery needs.

Phone and OnlineResources

Malibu City Hall main phone: 310-456-2489

Malibu City Fire Rebuild webpage: www.MalibuRebuilds.org

Malibu City Debris Removalwebpage: www.MalibuCity.org/Debris

Malibu City Planning Department questions: mplanning@malibucity.org

Malibu City Planning Department phone: 310-456-2489,ext. 485

Malibu City Building Division questions: mbuilding@malibucity.org

LA County WoolseyFire Recovery webpage: www.LACounty.gov/LACountyRecovers


malibusurfsidenews.com community

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 9

February’s speaker to share spring gardening tips

Submitted by the Malibu

Garden Club

Curtis Thomsen, of the

Los Angeles

Country

Smart

Gardening

Program, is

to speak on

“Spring Garden

Preparation”

at the

Thomsen

next Malibu Garden Club

meeting on Wednesday,

Feb. 6.

The 9:30 a.m. meeting

will be held at the Point

Dume Club House, located

at 29500 Heathercliff Drive

in Malibu.

Thomsen will discuss the

restoration of properties

after the fire, laying out a

garden, composting and efficient

water usage.

Thomsen teaches the

principles of composting

and vermicomposting as

the basis of building good

soil for improved yards and

gardens by recycling organics

generated at home.

His mission for 2019 is to

also reduce the carbon footprint,

bringing the consumer

products that are made in

the U.S. Some of the products

he is introducing are

made locally in California

and made from recycled

products from Los Angeles

and Orange County.

Thomsen is president of

BioContractors, Inc. and

an experienced environmental

planner and manager

with over 28 years

total experience, including

over 22 years in the solid

(recycling, composting,

vermicomposting) and

hazardous waste management

(AB 2464 Hazardous

Waste Reduction, Used Oil

Programs, HHW recycling,

Haz/Mat First Responder)

fields, beginning with Mt.

St. Helens in 1980. More

recently, Thomsen worked

for the County of Los Angeles

implementing the

Countywide Smart Gardening

Program. For the past

21 years, he has worked

on this project that has

been educating the public

on composting, vermicomposting,

grass recycling,

water-wise and fire-wise

gardening reducing solid

waste, improving yards and

gardens, teaching master

gardeners, reducing water

use and increasing productivity

in fruit and vegetable

gardens 20 to 200 percent.

This outreach program for

California residents teaches

the public the basics of recycling

organics to build a

better, sustainable environment

at home, while making

one’s yard safer for the

family.

Photo Op

Sue Parker, of Malibu, shared this image from

Pepperdine in late November.

Want your photo to appear in our newspaper? Email lauren@

malibusurfsidenews.com.

SMMUSD polls community for

new Malibu school’s name

Suggestions can be

made online through

Friday, Feb. 1

Staff Report

The Santa Monica-Malibu

Unified School District

is gathering name suggestions

for the soon-tobe-combined

elementary

school campus in Malibu.

Point Dume Marine Science

School and Juan Cabrillo

Elementary School

are to merge onto the Point

Dume campus this coming

August, and students

at both schools are being

given an opportunity to

share name suggestions in

class. Meanwhile, parents,

staff and community members

can offer their input

online at goo.gl/forms/Ey

l1mwkXTH0tlgk72 now

through 5 p.m. Friday, Feb.

1. No more than one entry

per person is requested.

“All suggestions will be reviewed

and a task force will

consider and select a name

that will be recommended

to the SMMUSD Board of

Education for approval,”

SMMUSD explains. “The

School Naming Task Force

will be comprised of teachers,

classified employees,

students, City leaders, school

board members, district

leadership, community liaison,

and members of Malibu

Schools Leadership Council,

the Malibu Facilities DAC,

Shark Fund and the Malibu

Special Education Foundation.”

Once a name is selected,

students at each school will

play a role in selecting a new

mascot and school colors.

All decisions are expected

to be unveiled at a Board

of Education meeting this

spring.

School News

College admissions

presentation to be held

Crystal Reed, of No

Drama College Counseling,

is to present the

second in her series of

two free college admissions

events on Thursday,

Feb. 7.

The free college admissions

presentation, titled

“What to expect on a college

application,” is open

to local high school juniors

only (no parents or

students from other grades

are permitted).

The presentation will be

Malibu Glass & Mirror 310.456.1844

Come visit our showroom

from 4-5 p.m. at Pico Youth

& Family Center, located

at 715 Pico Boulevard, one

block east of Santa Monica

High School.

Reed, who has been

helping students with the

college admissions process

for more than 15

years, will go through

a live college application

and answer audience

questions.

School News is compiled

by Editor Lauren Coughlin,

lauren@malibusurfsidenews.

com.

Windows and Doors

Showers and MIrrors

Railings and Skylights

Screens and Glass Repair

Additional Services

www.malibuglass.com

fax: 310.456.2594

3547 Winter Canyon, Malibu CA 90265

Licensed Contractor #396181


10 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news news

malibusurfsidenews.com

Pulling out all the stops

Emergency vehicles, more wow little ones at Touch A Truck event

Julian (left) and Liana De La O honk the horn of paramedic squad vehicle #88 during the Saturday, Jan. 26 Touch a

Truck event. Photos by Suzy Demeter/22nd Century Media

Kylie Ivanyi, 5, checks out the cab of a backhoe and

honks the horn.

ABOVE: Three-year-old twins Coleman and Landon

Steurer explore the inside of a backhoe.

LEFT: The free, well-attended event was co-hosted by the

City of Malibu and the Malibu Library.

smmusd

From Page 6

that the district’s sensors

monitor small and invisible

particulates that can

be very harmful, but said

they don’t pick up on the

larger debris that ends up

on campus on windy days.

“Usually with the fire

[the large particulates

are] what you’re going to

see,” deNicola said. “ ...

That has to be called at

the school, because the

machines aren’t going to

pick it up and there’s no

district personnel here [in

Malibu].”

Gail Pinsker, community

and public relations

officer for SMMUSD, explained

in an email to the

Surfside that principals review

the air quality results

and make decisions.

“The Malibu Pathway

Directory and district office

leadership are available

for consultation if

questions by site administrators

arise,” Pinsker said.

“There are frequent communications

between all

on this topic.”

Since the fires, SM-

MUSD’s sensors determined

that an inadequate

air quality (unhealthy for

sensitive groups) existed

on Jan. 11, and the district

canceled outdoor activities

and programs that day.

DeNicola and Lucas

alike expressed concerns

about the days ahead once

debris-removal processes

begin, seeing as many

properties above the high

school burned.

“We need to be very diligent

in being protective of

the staff and the students at

the school,” deNicola said.

SMMUSD states that it

has been in touch with the

City of Malibu regarding

the removal of hazardous

waste and clearing of the

burned buildings.

“Prior to ‘raking’ the

property, the Department

of Public Health must inspect

the property and

permit the removal of hazardous

materials,” a letter

from SMMUSD states.

“The removal of hazardous

materials is to follow

strict guidelines intending

to reduce making the

materials airborne. These

notifications will provide

the information necessary

to adjustments in outdoor

activity if indicated.”

Both Lucas and deNicola

are among supporters of

alternate learning options

such as virtual, interactive

learning or portable classrooms

in an off-campus

location with fewer neighboring

burned properties.

“I get that everyone

wants kids in school,”

deNicola said. “We just

have to be vigilant in making

sure that everyone

is safe so that we’re not

compromising long-term

health for short-term education.”

On Monday, Jan. 28, Lucas

confirmed that she will

be enrolling her daughter

in Oaks Christian School

because of the air quality

issues as well as concerns

over missed classroom

time in the wake of the fire.

“I kind of feel like I’m

hitting a brick wall, and

right now this is a pivotal

and critical year for my

daughter, and she’s ill and

I cant keep her there,” she

said.

The district plans to

continue monitoring air

quality until levels reach

prefire measurements. Updates

are posted by 7 a.m.

on each school’s website.

“We understand there is

some ongoing fear about

the air quality in Malibu,”

Pinkser wrote. “We are doing

everything in our power

to ensure the health and

safety of our students by

taking these daily readings

seriously.”


malibusurfsidenews.com news

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 11

Authorities investigate human

remains found in Malibu hills

Lauren Coughlin, Editor

Human remains reportedly

were found in the late afternoon

of Jan. 21 in the hills of central

Malibu.

Officials, including the Los

Angeles County Sheriff’s

Department Homicide Bureau

and the Los Angeles County

Department of Medical Examiner

- Coroner, responded to Latigo

Canyon Road and Calicut Road

at 9:30 a.m. on Jan. 22. According

to a press release from LASD,

officials were waiting for sufficient

daylight before responding and

beginning their investigation.

Sarah Ardalani, public information

officer for the coroner’s

fire

From Page 5

acter of Malibu’s unique neighborhoods

by discouraging mansionization.”

Jennings said the home being

proposed is in his neighborhood,

which was largely destroyed in the

fire and the neighborhood character

right now is “sort of Berlin

1945.” Right now, he said, nobody

knows what the character of the

neighborhood is going to be like

in the future and what’s going to

be rebuilt there, so it’s difficult to

determine neighborhood character.

In response, Mazza said Malibu

is going to change when all the

homes destroyed in the fire are

rebuilt. He asked, does the City

want “communist modern architecture

in size, or is it rural residential”

when it is rebuilt?

“That’s an extreme example,

but we’re talking about a city

that lost 20 percent of its housing

From jan. 22

office, said the individual’s identity

was unknown as of Friday,

Jan. 25. The deceased’s sex also

was not being released.

“The investigation is ongoing

and there is no additional information

available at this time,” the

LASD press release states.

Anyone with information on the

incident is encouraged to contact

the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s

Department’s Homicide Bureau

at (323) 890-5500. Anonymous

tips also may be provided by calling

(800) 222-8477, through the

“P3 Tips” mobile app, or online

at Lacrimestoppers.org.

For more on this and other Breaking

News, visit MalibuSurfsideNews.com.

stock,” Mazza said. “So, these are

important things.”

“The way I look at it is that the

City got elected to make these

kinds of decisions, not us,” Mazza

said. “And they left us with a

really vague idea what to do. But

the law also requires us to make

a finding that this is consistent

with the Municipal Code, and it

flat out isn’t at this point, in my

opinion.”

Mazza noted that applicants

looking to rebuild their samesize

home on the same lot can be

quickly permitted to do so with

the planning department without

appearing in front of the Planning

Commission. Uhring said he

felt bad for the applicant, who he

believed has done the right thing

with their application over the

years.

“Hopefully, when the City

Council does decide, they may

consider grandfathering people

who have already come forward

with plans and say, ‘Let them

go,’” he said.

Police Reports

Porsche headlights reportedly swiped in Malibu

Two Porsche Panamera S

headlights valued at $4,000 reportedly

were stolen from a vehicle

parked in front of a residence

on Malibu Road, according to a

police report which was filed on

Jan. 18.

The alleged victim said that

he secured his vehicle in front

of his home before the theft,

which occurred between Jan.

17-18.

Jan. 12

• A package containing female

Officials offer disaster unemployment aid, more

Submitted by FEMA

Workers and self-employed

wildfire survivors who lost their

jobs or businesses or had their

work hours substantially reduced

because of the fires, may be eligible

for Disaster Unemployment

Assistance.

In addition, small businesses

that, because of the fires, are

struggling to maintain a reasonable

working capital position

during the recovery period, may

be eligible for a low-interest Economic

Injury Disaster Loan from

the U.S. Small Business Administration.

Disaster Unemployment

Assistance

DUA is funded by the Federal

Emergency Management Agency

and administered by the California

Employment Development

Department. DUA provides temporary

unemployment benefits to

survivors whose job or work-hour

losses, or losses of business, are

a direct result of the wildfire disaster

and who do not qualify for

regular state unemployment insurance

benefits.

To be eligible for DUA, an applicant

must have: worked in, or

was scheduled to begin work in,

Butte, Los Angeles or Ventura

county, but was prevented from

doing so by the wildfire disaster;

been self-employed in or scheduled

to begin self-employment

in, Butte, Los Angeles or Ventura

county, but was prevented from

doing so because of the wildfires;

been unable to work because he/

she was injured as a direct result

of the wildfires; become the

major support of the household,

because the head of the household

died as a direct result of the

wildfires; or lost most of his/her

income or revenue because the

employer or self-employed business

was damaged or destroyed

by the wildfires.

Qualified applicants may receive

assistance of up to $450

per week for a maximum of 27

weeks. DUA applies to losses

beginning the week of Nov. 11,

2018. For more information, or to

apply, visit www.edd.ca.gov/Un

employment/UI_Online_Regis

tration.htm or call (800) 300-5616

between 8 a.m.-12 p.m. Monday

through Friday. The deadline to

apply for this benefit is March 15.

Economic Injury Disaster Loans

Under SBA’s EIDL program,

hormone supplements, valued

at $150, reportedly was stolen

from a residence on Topanga

Beach Drive. The alleged victim

said she was expecting the

package to be delivered at her

home on Jan. 12 via the United

States Postal Service, but

she never received it. An eBay

representative confirmed the

package was delivered, but the

victim said she was never sent

email verification that the package

arrived. She said she waited

a month to report the theft because

she was trying to fix the

issue with eBay, but they ultimately

told her she needed a

police report to get a refund.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Malibu

Surfside News police reports are

compiled from official records on

file at the Los Angeles County Lost

Hills/Malibu Sheriff’s Department

headquarters. Anyone listed in these

reports is considered to be innocent

of all charges until proven guilty in

a court of law.

working capital loans are available

to help small businesses,

small agricultural cooperatives,

small businesses engaged in

aquaculture, and most private

nonprofit organizations of all

sizes to meet their ordinary and

necessary financial obligations

that cannot be met as a direct result

of the disaster. These loans

of up to $2 million are intended

to assist through the disaster

recovery period if the small

business, small agricultural cooperative

or private nonprofit

organization: suffered wildfirerelated

cash flow problems (regardless

of physical damage

to property); needs funds for

working capital to recover from

the disaster’s adverse economic

impact; and is unable to obtain

credit from banks and normal

lending channels.

For more information about

SBA’s EIDL program, contact the

SBA Disaster Assistance Customer

Service Center by calling (800)

659-2955, emailing disastercust

omerservice@sba.gov, or visiting

www.sba.gov/disaster.

Anyone who is deaf or hard-ofhearing

may call (800) 877-8339.

The deadline to apply for the

EIDL program is Aug. 12.


12 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news sound off

malibusurfsidenews.com

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Ride of the Week

An original Von Dutch

bike gets new stripes

Fireball Tim Lawrence

Contributing Columnist

Malibu resident

I’m always amazed

at how the universe

manages to pull things

together based on people’s

passions. And this story

exemplifies that in many

ways.

A longtime friend of

mine, Bob Clark, and

his co-conspirator, Greg

Weier, were minding their

own business back in 1971

when Weier spotted a used

motorcycle on the side of

a trailer park in the Valley.

He consulted Clark and

they went to look at the

bike together.

It was a classic Velocette

owned by a guy who live

in the park itself. After

looking the bike over,

Weier (with some prodding

from Clark), bought

it for $350. The seller was

none other than infamous

pinstriper Kenny Howard,

also known as Von Dutch.

Yes, that Von Dutch.

“He didn’t call himself

Von Dutch at the time,”

Weier said. “But he was

known as a really great

pinstriper.”

Clark and Weier took

the bike home and immediately

began to pull

Bob Clark (left), Greg Weier (middle) and Johnny Martinez

are working together to restore a Von Dutch motorcycle

Weier bought in 1971.

Fireball Tim Lawrence/22nd Century Media

it apart, re-chroming and

painting with the idea of

turning it into a chopper.

But over the next several

years, Weier basically rode

the bike around town and

it eventually went into

storage in the early ’80s.

And there it sat for almost

30 years, in Weier’s garage

collecting dust and getting

covered with a variety of

garage material.

In 2012, Clark and Weier

began to get the bug again

and started tinkering. Over

the next seven years, they

off and on fixed the bike

up. But, now knowing

that it was a Von Dutch

original, the idea of a

chopper waned in light of

a full, original restoration.

And that’s exactly what

they did.

Then, about two months

ago, Clark came to me and

mentioned that the bike

was nearly finished but

needed to get pinstriped.

And that’s when I called

my buddy, master pinstriper

Johnny Martinez from

Ventura.

“Hey, Johnny, wanna

stripe something truly

unique?” I asked.

If he wasn’t wearing his

black glasses, I’m pretty

sure his eyes would have

popped out of his head.

(I’m glad I didn’t see

that.)

And that’s where we

came up with the idea for

Martinez to stripe the tanks

Please see rotw, 15


malibusurfsidenews.com sound off

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 13

Don’t Panic, It’s Organic

Soil replenishment following fire, rain

Andy Lopez

Contributing Columnist

Invisible Gardener

All that beautiful

rain was needed

by the soil. It will

really help in recovery

but, to be sure things come

back healthy, there are

several things one should

be doing.

This goes for anyone

who loves their property,

regardless of if it burned.

Let’s start with the soil.

Everything begins with the

soil, so it is imperative to

provide the soil with the

necessary tools it needs

to function correctly. You

should be applying rock

dust, live compost, organic

fertilizer and an acid mulch

like azalea/gardenia mix.

You should also utilize a

microbial activator. There

are many on the market.

Try Anawalt. Ask them

what they have for organic

fertilizers and microbial

life applications.

I would also go to Green

Thumb in Ventura and

check out all the organic

products they have. While

both carry the same company

brands, Green Thumb

has a bigger selection and

carries some excellent

mycorrhiza products.

You can always get

products from the internet,

too, but you will need to

get live compost from a

local source. Last week, I

mentioned a few, and there

are many. Ventura is a significant

agricultural place,

and there are many sources

here as well. The trick

is to read the labels and

buy the type of fertilizer

that works best with the

plants you are fertilizing.

Right now, it is essential

to use organic fertilization/

remineralization/microbial

applications.

Anything you apply this

month or next will not be

available until the following

months. This especially

holds true for minerals.

Trace minerals need

to be applied in trace

amounts on a regular basis

along with the microbial

support system. They are

called trace minerals for a

reason — if you apply too

much, it becomes toxic.

People have been trained

that if a little is good, more

is better. This is not always

the case. When it comes

to trace minerals, the soil

has trace minerals that are

locked and not available to

the plants. This is primarily

because of chemical

fertilizers and other toxic

sources. Humans are very

destructive to the environment.

I have found that these

minerals are not released

because the army of

microbes that carries out

that task is not there. The

microbes have died.

This is what I mean by

live soil and live compost.

It really is alive with millions

of “little beings,” an

army of workers. Restoring

this army will take time

and patience.

Fires are good for the

soil because it is nature’s

way of restoring carbon to

the soil, along with trace

minerals from plants and

animals consumed by the

fires. The only real difference

is that most often,

when we have a fire, it

is not just trees or animals,

etc. that are burned

down, but also the toxins

not found in nature. This

toxin kills off all living

microbial life, making it

impossible for the carbon

to be available. Generally,

after a fire, the soil is not

entirely dead, and the army

moves in to work on the

carbon and minerals now

available.

The fires also help new

growth in this way. It also

eventually helps everything

from birds to animals.

So, build up healthy

soil, and everything that

grows and depends on it

also will be healthy.

This also is the time to

prune your roses and fruit

trees.

Get organic fertilizer

for roses and one for fruit

trees. They require different

formulations. I talk a

lot about foliar applications

not only because I

have been doing it since

1972, but also because it is

a very important yet oftenmissed

part of gardening

and soil care.

In nature, all plants,

trees, and even humans

and animals are sprayed by

nature in the form of rain.

The rain carries microbial

life, whose job is to help

us absorb the minerals the

water brings. Around now,

you will see in gardening

publications that you

should be spraying your

fruit trees and roses with

a product that will control

various diseases. This has

been the standard approach

since man started making

and selling fertilizers and

pesticides — the logic

being that the sprayings

are part of growth, and you

cannot grow it organically

without the chemical fertilizers

and/or pesticides.

This is a reactive approach

rather than a proactive

one. It is easier to

prevent diseases and pests

than to try to control or

remove them. Guess which

makes more money for

companies?

I never see any gardening

publications (unless

they are organic) telling

folks to spray compost tea

for pests and diseases. An

organic gardener rarely has

pest and disease problems.

The biggest challenge will

be your non-organic nextdoor

neighbor!

You are in luck concerning

compost tea, as there

are many local sources

from which you can buy. If

you make your own compost

and are making it the

right way and it is alive,

you can make compost tea.

Apply a different variation

of the compost tea yearround.

Your compost tea

should be a microbial and

mineral-rich liquid.

Any questions? Email me at

andylopez@invisiblegardener.

com.

Poet’s Corner

Ann Buxie, Malibu resident

A sign in front of a

church asks

if I want more meaning

in my life.

NO. I want less meaning.

Maybe I’ve bitten off

more

than I can chew. Maybe

I admit to a certain contrariness

there’s too much information.

I know what’s good for

me.

I need things the natural

way,

no droned voice telling

me

very important messages

(I hang up immediately)

or correcting my route

from here to there.

Maybe I need to be lost,

today,

on this earth, beneath

this sky

promise filtering through

every every

the way I feel something

when a rainbow appears

or when I smell a mustard

flower

earthy musky nodding

on ripples of air

or when a court of butterflies

and bees

comes to the wild bush

near my window

or when I see the fox

dead

by the roadside, maggots

swarming from her

mouth

and bees looking for

anything sweet

left to suck, reclaiming

her body

the natural way, for

earth’s sake.

I see how life and death

partner,

seamlessly, and weeping

only comes

when life is carelessly

deliberately

squandered.

Want to submit a poem to the

Surfside? Email

Editor Lauren Coughlin at

lauren@malibusurfsidenews.

com.


14 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news sound off

malibusurfsidenews.com

On Common Ground

Knowing when, how to help local seabirds

Heather Henderson

Marine Animal Stranding

Coordinator

California Wildlife Center

Malibu beaches

are beautiful

and have varied

coastal habitats.

Whether visiting for the

first time or taking a daily

walk, you are likely to

view dozens to hundreds

of seabirds, ranging from

shorebird species that

are present year-round to

numerous pelagic species

(those that live primarily

on the open seas) passing

through while migrating,

primarily during the winter

months. Unfortunately,

while viewing these

beautiful animals, we may

observe individuals in

need of assistance.

How do you determine

if they need help? Injuries

are often easy to spot.

They may be entangled

in fishing gear or ocean

trash, are unable to fly,

have visible oil contamination

on the body, or

even have lacerations and

fractures with blood present.

There are, however,

other challenges which are

not as easy to recognize

that a wild aquatic bird

may face, such as malnutrition

and ingestion of

trash or debris.

A juvenile Western grebe — one of several pelagic birds commonly seen in Malibu — is

cared for at the wildlife center. photos by cambria Wells/California Wildlife Center

Shorebirds that are common

to the Malibu area

include brown pelicans,

cormorants, gulls, terns,

egrets, plovers and sandpipers.

Shorebirds forage

at the water’s edge or near

the coastline. They are

able to perch and walk on

land, so it can sometimes

be tricky to determine if

they are injured. A good

rule is that if you approach

a shorebird and it does not

move away to maintain a

safe distance from you, it

is probably not doing well

and would benefit from a

visit to California Wildlife

Center for care.

Pelagic bird species

commonly sighted in Malibu

include loons, grebes,

murres, scoters, fulmars

and petrels. Pelagic birds

only beach themselves

when in trouble. If you

observe a pelagic bird on

the sand, it requires rehabilitative

care to address

the challenge it is experiencing.

While pelagic

species forage and live

exclusively in the ocean,

they should not be pushed

back into the water once

beached. Transporting the

bird to the rehabilitation

facility is essential in order

to give them a second

chance at survival.

May I legally rescue the

injured bird, you may ask?

Yes, as long as you bring

it to a licensed rehabilitation

facility ASAP. This

is fortunate, since the

sheer number of aquatic

birds that will likely need

assistance each year is

more than any rescue

team can respond to in a

timely manner. Although

not all animals are able to

recover from the ailment

they are faced with, in

general, the sooner that an

injured animal arrives at

a specialized rehabilitation

facility, the better the

chance of recovering.

When you spot the bird,

call the CWC hotline

at (310) 458-9453 and

choose option 2. Take a

photo of the bird. Our

technician will confirm

the species and guide you

through the next steps.

If you are able and

willing to transport the

injured bird to our center,

the following tips should

be followed in order to

keep you and the aquatic

bird safe:

• Cover the animal with

a towel or T-shirt. At least

cover their head in order

to minimize stress, however,

covering more of

the body will aid in safer

handling.

• Hold the bird at hip

level. Most sea birds have

pointy and sharp bills. It

is their primary weapon to

use against predators, so

hip level is safest for the

rescuer.

• Place the bird in a

box or carrier that has a

secured top with plenty of

air holes. When possible,

line the bottom of the box

with a towel or sheet in

order to cushion their keel

bone.

• Keep warm.

Brown pelicans, a common shorebird, may be ill if they

allow humans to get too close.

Loons also are among pelagic bird species found in the

Malibu area. California Wildlife Center

• Limit activity (including

talking) around the

bird to avoid unnecessary

stress.

We thank everyone who

reports and transports ailing

wildlife to California

Wildlife Center!

On Common Ground is a

monthly column written by

various California Wildlife

Center employees. CWC, a

nonprofit located in Calabasas,

cares for injured wildlife

in Malibu and beyond.


malibusurfsidenews.com sound off

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 15

Social snapshot

Top Web Stories

from MalibuSurfsideNews.com as of Monday,

Jan. 28

1. SoulCycle Malibu event to equally support homeless

youth, fire victims

2. Planning Commission: Commissioners deny fire

rebuild 4-1, citing mansionization concerns

3. Authorities investigate human remains found in

Malibu

4. LA County Fire Chief addresses contemptuous crowd

at town hall meeting

5. Home of the Week: 6375 Gayton Place, Malibu

Become a member: malibusurfsidenews.com

From the Editor

One week, 500 words to go

Lauren Coughlin

lauren@malibusurfsidenews.com

This past holiday

season in Malibu

was tough on many,

but there were glimpses of

joy, kindness and strength

despite the challenges so

many in the community are

facing.

Now, Valentine’s Day

is on deck, and we’re

carrying on with one of

our personal favorites:

the Surfside’s How We

Met contest. As seemed

to be the case with many

of the holiday traditions

and festivities held in

Malibu, we hope it can

offer some joy and remind

that the best things in life

are not things, but rather

the people we surround

ourselves with.

Malibu lovebirds now

have one week left to

enter, with the contest

deadline being 5 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 7.

For those who are unfamiliar,

we just ask that

you write the story, in 500

words or less, of how you

and your significant other

met and email it to lauren

@malibusurfsidenews.

com. Submissions should

include a photo of the couple,

as well as your names

and a phone number at

which we can reach you.

In our Feb. 14 edition,

we will share the winning

story, and the couple also

will receive a one-night

stay in a king premier

oceanfront guest room at

Malibu Beach Inn (22878

Pacific Coast Highway) as

well as a $150 gift certificate

to Geoffrey’s (27400

PCH).

We’ve read some truly

powerful and beautiful

stories over the past

couple years, but we know

there are more just waiting

to be told. Plus, a declaration

of your love in the

local newspaper beats any

Hallmark card out there if

you ask me.

Any questions? Feel

free to contact me at laur

en@malibusurfsidenews.

com or (310) 457-2112

ext. 1.

Malibu Surfside News

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the opinions of the author. Pieces from

22nd Century Media are the thoughts of the company as a whole.

Malibu Surfside News encourages readers to write letters to Sound Off.

All letters must be signed, and names and hometowns will be published.

We also ask that writers include their address and phone number

for verification, not publication. Letters should be limited to 400

words. Malibu Surfside News reserves the right to edit letters. Letters

become property of Malibu Surfside News. Letters that are published

do not reflect the thoughts and views of Malibu Surfside News. Letters

can be mailed to: Malibu Surfside News, P.O. Box 6854

Malibu, CA 90264. Fax letters to (310) 457-0936 or email

news@malibusurfsidenews.com.

California Strong posted Jan. 21:

“Happy MLK Day! The California Strong Planning

Committee is hard at work. Applications for

financial aid are open at ca-strong.com - spread

the word!”

Like Malibu Surfside News: facebook.com/malibusurfsidenews

The California Department of Transportation (@

CaltransHQ) posted Thursday, Jan. 24:

“#ThowbackThursday On this date in 1848,

James W. Marshall discovered gold at Coloma

on the American River, sparking the Gold Rush.

#DidYouKnow that the California state highway

route sign is shaped in honor of a Gold Rush

miner’s shovel?”

Follow Malibu Surfside News: @malibusurfsidenews

rotw

From Page 12

and fender at last weekend’s

Wheels and Waves

here in Malibu. Martinez

did his job with about 30

people watching, blasting

music and, yes, with his

black specs on. It was a

sight to behold.

This week, the final

stripes will be placed and

full assembly of the bike

will begin. According to

Clark and Weier, with their

schedules — Clark is a

sculptor in the film industry

and Weier is a contractor

— the bike should

come together over the

next few months. And if it

turns out half as good as I

expect, it should command

a pretty penny at auction.

How many original Von

Dutch bikes are out there?

Who knows, but this one is

spectacular.

The goal is to tour the

bike through the museums

and shows to get the word

out, let people see it and

maybe let a few select

people ride it. But one

thing is for sure. We can

thank Clark and Weier for

securing a piece of motorcycle

history — a memory

we can all appreciate and

one that may get us looking

through our garages to

see what we might have

missed.

Good on ya, boys!

Want to be featured in Ride of

the Week? Send Fireball an

email at askfireball@fireball

tim.com.



A Very

Important

Date


16 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news malibu

malibusurfsidenews.com


Spoonful of

sugar Malibu’s Sugardust

Bakery strives

to make desserts

satisfying without too

much sugar, Page 18

Back on

deck Malibu High

to perform previously

canceled musical,

‘Spring Awakening,’

Page 22

malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | malibusurfsidenews.com

Community members honor local fire heroes, more at barbecue, Page 19

Malibu residents who were recognized as local heroes during the fire gather for a group photo at the Saturday, Jan. 26 Malibu Strong Community Barbecue.

Maile Mason/22nd Century Media


18 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news dining out

malibusurfsidenews.com

The Dish

Sugardust Bakery caters to locals’ sweet tooth

Barbara Burke

Freelance Reporter

Festive, fanciful baked

delights grace the countertop

in the kitchen of Alexandra

“Zan” McDougall’s

home-based bakery.

“One of the compliments

that I get most frequently

with regard to my desserts

is that they’re not overly

sweet,” said McDougall, a

Malibu resident. “As much

as I like sugar, ‘too sweet’

is cloying. If the filling and

the cake and the frosting

are all too sweet, it is too

much and, therefore, I cut

down the sugar from every

recipe.”

When Malibu Surfside

News visited, McDougall

made a red and white, chocolate

gingerbread cake with

milk chocolate filling and

white chocolate drizzle. The

gorgeous creation – almost

too pretty to cut into – costs

$75 and serves 12 people.

McDougall grew up baking

with her mother, grandmother

and great-grandmother.

“My mother was flamboyant,

fancy and flashy

Sugardust Bakery

Phone: (310) 463-5459

Email:

sugardustbakery@

yahoo.com

Instagram:

sugardustmalibu

with her baking,” Mc-

Dougall said. “But my

grandmother and greatgrandmother,

Emma, were

practical and utilitarian in

their baking, and I learned

very different skills from all

three of them.”

McDougall’s culinary

creations strike a balance

between practicality and artful

flair. Many of her cakes

cost $4 per slice, but her favorite

things to bake include

incredible creme brulee and

pots de crème — custard

wonders often served in ramekins

at fancy schmancy

parties.

McDougall’s Pinot Noir

chocolate truffles ($15 a

dozen) make for a perfect,

quick dessert that can grace

even the finest table.

For those thinking ahead

to school and sports team

Malibu Newsstand

24 years in Business. Still A thing.

We carry -

- Magazines: New and Vintage,

Foreign and Domestic!

- Drinks! Candy & Snacks!

- Malibu Souvenirs and Ephemera!

- Irreverent Diatribes! Books!

- Digital Community Advertising!

Items like tweets and blogs,

but in print form!

- Beach Equipment! Plus more!

This chocolate gingerbread bundt cake ($60) is filled with

vanilla bean pastry cream and topped with chocolate

ganache and sugared cranberries.

parties, as well as to Valentine’s

Day, McDougall’s

carefully curated cookies

are a good option ($3.50 to

$4.50 each), and she makes

her own tasty sprinkles ($5

a bag).

“I serve a lot of parents

wanting to give something

special to their kids, whether

they be in area schools

or in college,” McDougall

said. “My dessert bars and

Malibu Newsstand 23717 ½ Malibu Rd. in the Colony Shopping Center | 310.456.1519 | Malibu.newsstand@gmail.com

cookies are good options.”

McDougall is a conservationist

and a thoughtful

baker.

“All my products are ethically

sourced and are fair

trade, especially chocolate,

because, if you don’t buy

organic chocolate, you’re

buying slave chocolate,”

she said. “I also do a great

vegan marble cake for $5 a

slice.”

Items may be picked up

in Malibu, and customers

looking to have baked

goods delivered receive

their first delivery for free.

After that, local deliveries

cost between $10-$15, depending

on the size of the

order. Deliveries to outlying

areas cost $20.

Zan’s customers have

plentiful compliments for

the local baker and her

products.

“My favorite baked goods

come from Zan at Sugardust

Bakery,” said Corie Tappin.

“She’s my go-to for any

special event or holiday because

her decorated almond

Alexandra McDougall, of Sugardust Bakery, proudly

displays a chocolate gingerbread cake ($75), with milk

chocolate filling and white chocolate drizzle. Photos by

Barbara Burke/22nd Century Media

shortbread cookies are not

only beautiful, but delicious

– they have just the right

combination of crunchy and

soft.”

McDougall can tailor her

creations to fit any taste or

need, including those of

Tracy Park, who is diabetic.

“Zan comes up with the

most delicious, sugar-free,

low carb desserts that are so

great that I don’t even feel

like I’m missing out,” Park

said. Park also shared how

McDougall’s creations have

been received by her guests.

“I brought one of Zan’s

chocolate ganache cakes

with candied cranberries

to a party and guest Siulan

Cantor said, ‘It tastes

like it came straight from

a European bakery, like it

has a pedigree; this baker

has some royal baking lineage!’”

The dense, dark chocolate

cake ($60) features gingerbread

cake with milk chocolate

vanilla bean pastry

cream, a chocolate ganache

and sugared cranberries.

“Zan’s cakes are stunning,”

Tappin said. “Whether

it’s a flag cake for the

Fourth of July or a basketball

cake for a kid’s birthday

or a buche de noel, they are

all a delight.”


malibusurfsidenews.com life & arts

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 19

Camaraderie, commiseration drive community barbecue

Barbara Burke

Freelance Reporter

The Malibu Strong Community

Barbecue “celebrated

Malibu’s resilience and

expressed the community’s

appreciation to those brave

citizens who saved many

homes by putting out fires

and hotspots,” explained

organizer Terry O’Rourke,

a native of Point Dume.

As the crowd gathered

Saturday, Jan. 26, at Point

Dume Club, neighbors

greeted one another and

busied themselves arranging

dishes, starting the barbecue

and setting tables.

“The event tonight shows

that when the community

comes together, it makes us

stronger because Malibu is

very resilient,” Gino Cordos

said. “Now, we just

have to deal with the situation,

work hard and keep

rebuilding our lives.”

Wolcott Sprague agreed.

“When my neighbor Terry

told me that he wanted to

have this event to show our

appreciation to those who

stayed here and saved houses,

my wife and I got right

on the phone to contact the

guys who were patrolling

the Point Dume clubhouse

while the fires raged,” he

said. “It’s a wonderful thing

to gather here to celebrate

someone who has literally

saved your home.”

Sprague pointed to Jeff

Shafer who, along with

Howard Ferguson and a

few others, managed to

prevent the devastation at

the trailer park from being

worse.

Attendees who stayed in

Malibu during the evacuation

recounted how the

unpredictable inferno was

faster and stronger than any

fire in memory, and how

the winds incessantly blew

embers that started hotspots

and set structures on fire.

“Firefighters just

couldn’t make a stand in

this fire anywhere,” Shafer

said. “It came down the

canyons like a freight train,

moving at 60 miles per

hour and 1,800 feet a minute,

and almost every time

they tried to get ahead of it,

it was just too late because

the fire was that fast and

strong.”

Shafer recounted how

the fire on Wandermere

Road, which borders the

canyon that cuts through

Point Dume, “was raging at

the size of football fields a

minute.”

Noting how horrific the

damage to Point Dume

was, Ferguson emphasized

that the devastation could

have been much worse. He

noted that he, Shafer and

two others stayed behind in

the Point Dume clubhouse

community.

“Frankly, we got a little

lucky because of a bit of a

fluke,” Ferguson said. “We

got a little bit of help from

the wind patterns late on

the first night of the fire,

about 11:30 p.m., and if

that had not happened, we

would have most likely lost

all of the trailer park.”

In the end, three trailers

at the end of the park were

totaled, Ferguson recalled.

Amidst posters listing

the names of “Malibu’s

heroes” who stayed during

the evacuation and contributed

to fighting the fire, a

documentary produced by

Adam O’Rourke showed

haunting images of the fire

as Ben E. King’s “Stand by

Me” played in the background.

Community barbecue organizers (left to right) Adam

O’Rourke, Terry O’Rouke, Margaret Maglione, Wolcott

Sprague, Barbara Fish, Sal Fish, Caroline Thomas, Jim

McGowan, Audrey Shubin and Gemma Rose pose for a

photo Saturday, Jan. 26, during the event held at the Point

Dume Club of Malibu. Maile Mason/22nd Century Media

Steven Moak, a thirdgeneration

Malibu native

and a firefighter by trade,

first heard of the Woolsey

Fire when he got word

that Seminole Springs was

aflame.

“When I got to Seminole

Springs, my sister’s house

was burned down,” he said.

“That’s when this fire got

personal.”

Moak and others held the

fire at bay in many parts of

Point Dume.

“My wife, who is originally

from the Philippines

and who had never experienced

anything like this,

joined me as we fought all

night to defend our home,”

O’Rourke said. “When the

morning came, I gave my

wife a diploma and made

her a captain on the front

line. If we ever have another

fire, she’ll be ready and

say ‘Let’s go and fight this;

let’s put our boxing gloves

on.’”

Karen Goddard shared a

book of photos recounting

her family’s evacuations

and how her husband, Larry,

stayed behind and saved

their home.

“First, one of my daughters

evacuated from Westlake,

bringing two little

ones to the house on the

night Nov. 8,” Goddard

said. “Then, at 2:30 a.m.

the next day, my other

daughter was evacuated

from Thousand Oaks and

we ended up having six

little ones under the age of

6 at our home.”

Goddard thumbed

through the book, showing

pictures of the trauma that

her family experienced.

On Nov. 11, Goddard returned

to find that her husband

had saved their home.

“6.3 miles, 94 floors,

16,354 steps,” stated an image

from her husband’s activity

tracker app.

“He fought long and hard

during those first hours, going

from our lower property

to the attic,” Goddard said.

“See, here’s a video of a

coyote running across our

property for its life and look,

see these pictures showing

how my husband and son

and son-in-law fought hard

to save property and to help

save neighbors’ properties

as well.”

Goddard’s book showed

images of flash flood warnings

after the fire and how

three weeks post-fire, huge

trees were blown over in

the wind and rolled down

the canyon hillsides, still

smoldering from fire that

had been retained in their

roots.

“That was amazing,”

Goddard said. “I’ve never

seen anything like that before

— the trees were on fire

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20 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news faith

malibusurfsidenews.com

Faith Briefs

Malibu Presbyterian Church (3324

Malibu Canyon Road, 310-456-1611)

Big Game Party

2:30-6 p.m. Sunday, Feb.

3. Watch the game. The

church will have chips and

drinks. Bring a snack or

appetizer to share. Contact

Joel Dunn at jdunn@mali

bupres.org for more information.

Father-Daughter

Valentine’s Dance

5-8 p.m. Saturday, Feb.

9. Join for an “Alice in

Wonderland” themed Valentine’s

Day dance. Tickets

are $40. To register, visit

malibupres.org/dance.

Sunday Worship Services

10:15 a.m. Sundays

Malibu Jewish Center and Synagogue

(24855 Pacific Coast Highway, 310-

456-2178)

Men’s Club Super Bowl

Screening

3-7 p.m. Feb. 3

Torah Study

10 a.m. Saturdays, with

Rabbi Michael Schwartz.

Open to all.

Baby & Me Class

9:30-11 a.m. Thursdays.

The synagogue hosts weekly

classes where babies and

toddlers are welcome to

explore the school through

puppets, music, sensory

play and more. There will

be a weekly discussion

pertaining to babies and

toddler’s beginning years.

Religious School

3:45-6:30 p.m. Tuesdays

Tuesday Mamas

4 p.m. Tuesdays

Malibu United Methodist Church (30128

Morning View Drive, 310-457-7505)

Support Group

Anyone impacted by the

fire who is in need of support

may call the church’s

office or email the Listening

Post at TheListening

PostMalibu@gmail.com to

arrange a support group appointment.

Co-Dependents Anonymous

7:30-9 p.m. Mondays.

By the time one reaches

co-dependents anonymous,

they have lost touch

with themselves by focusing

on another. This meeting

begins with an affirmation

of each individual’s

own authenticity and attendees

write on their experience

with one of the 55

traits. Members then share

what they’ve written or

pass, then have open sharing.

For more information,

contact risk2change@

gmail.com.

Malibu Music and Art Youth

Group

3-5:30 p.m. every Monday.

The Malibu Music and

Art Youth Group, supervised

by Devon Meyers,

will meet in the Mayhugh

Education Center Community

Room located next

to the Malibu Methodist

parking lot. The group is

open to local middle and

high school students, interested

in the arts, free of

charge. Students are welcome

to bring their instruments

and imagination and

play, write, collaborate,

sing and jam with fellow

students. Photography and

art students are welcome,

too. For more information,

contact Devon Meyers

at (310) 442-9380 or

email devonmeyerspro

ject@gmail.com.

Alateen Meeting

10 a.m. Saturdays, Alateen

meeting

Yoga with Jodi

6:30 p.m. Mondays and

Wednesdays.

AA Meetings

6:30 p.m. Sundays; noon

and 7 p.m. Mondays and

Tuesdays; noon and 7:30

p.m. Wednesdays; noon

and 6:30 p.m. Thursdays;

noon and 8 p.m. Fridays;

noon and 5 p.m. Saturdays.

Bible Kids

3-4:30 p.m. Tuesdays

for kindergarten through

second-grade children;

3-4:30 p.m. Thursdays for

third through fifth-grade

children. Bible Kids is an

after-school child care program.

Al Anon Meetings

7:30 p.m. Thursday and

10 a.m. Saturday

Sunday Worship

10:30-11:30 a.m., Sundays.

Child care available.

Children’s program held

during worship.

St. Aidan’s Episcopal Church (28211

Pacific Coast Highway, 310-457-7966)

Sacred Yoga

7:15-8:15 p.m. Thursdays.

Class with Liz

Krystofik.

Contemplative Worship

8 a.m. Sundays

Traditional Worship

10 a.m. Sundays

Martial Arts

4-7 p.m. Mondays,

Wednesdays, Thursdays.

Class with Kurt Lampson.

Sunday School

10-11 a.m. Sundays.

Chabad of Malibu (22943 Pacific Coast

Highway, 310-456-6588)

Evening Shabbat Services

7:30 p.m. Fridays.

Saturday Services

9 a.m., Kabbalah on

the Parsha; 10 a.m. Shabbat

service; 11 a.m. Words

from the Rabbi & Torah

Reading; 12:30 p.m. Kiddush

lunch

Sunday Services

9 a.m.

Parent and Me Program

9:30-10:30 a.m. Tuesdays.

This program is held

at Gan Malibu Preschool,

22933 PCH. For more information,

call (310) 456-

6573 or email sarah@gan

malibu.com.

Our Lady of Malibu Church (3625 Winter

Canyon Road, 310-456-2361)

Centering Prayer

8:30 a.m. second and

fourth Thursdays

Learn About Catholicism

Join for an informal

meeting with no obligation

over a cup of coffee or tea.

The group meets on Sundays

and shares stories of

faith and community. Contact

the rectory office for

meeting times.

AA Meetings

6:30 p.m. Mondays,

Sheridan Hall.

Narcotics Anonymous

7:30 p.m. Tuesdays,

Sheridan Hall.

OLM Book Club

6:30 p.m. Second Tuesdays.

This club meets to

discuss short stories.

Morning Bible Class

10:30 a.m.-noon Thursdays,

Lower Conference

Room.

Men’s AA Meetings

6 p.m. Fridays, Okoneski

Room.

University Church of Christ (24255

Pacific Coast Highway, 310-506-4504)

A cappella Service

10:15 a.m. Sundays, in

Elkins Auditorium

Instrumental Service

5 p.m. Sundays, in

Stauffer Chapel

Adult Bible Class

9 a.m. Sundays, in Payson

Library

Children and Youth Bible

Classes

9 a.m. Sundays, various

locations

Waveside Church (6955 Fernhill Drive,

310-774-1927)

Sunday Worship

10:10 a.m., children’s

ministry

Wednesday Home Groups

6:30 p.m. at various locations.

Call for locations.

Vintage Church (Webster Elementary

School, 3602 Winter Canyon Road,

310-395-9961)

Sunday Service

4-5:30 p.m. Sundays,

with children’s ministry

Calvary Chapel Malibu (30237 Morning

View Drive, 424-235-4463)

Service

10 a.m. Sundays

First Church-Christ Scientist (28635

Pacific Coast Highway, 310-457-7767)

Wednesday Meetings

8 p.m. Wednesdays. Testimony

meetings include

readings from the Bible and

“Science and Health with

Key to the Scriptures.”

Have an event for faith briefs?

Email lauren@malibusurfside

news.com. Information is due

by noon on Thursdays one

week prior to publication.

In Memoriam

Barbara Ann

Bick

Barbara

Ann Bick,

M.D., 77,

of Malibu,

died Nov. 27,

2018. Bick

Bick was born in

Brooklyn, New York, on

May 27, 1941. She graduated

from Lincoln High

School, Barnard University

and New York Medical

College. After graduation,

she earned a fellowship

degree in hematology/

oncology at Columbia

University Medical Center

and was chief medical

resident at Cedars-Sinai

Medical Center, where

she met her husband,

cardiologist-author Dr.

James S. Forrester. She

practiced oncology at Cedars-Sinai

before moving

to practice internalmedicine

in Malibu and preventive

medicine at Pritikin

Longevity in Santa

Monica.

A lover of the beach,

Bick lived in Malibu for

the past 48 years. She is

survived by her husband,

their son, radiologist Justin

Bick-Forrester M.D.,

of Malibu, and her brother,

chef Michael Bick, of

Danbury, Connecticut.

Have someone’s life you’d

like to honor? Email lauren

@malibusurfsidenews.com

with information about a

loved one who was a part of

the Malibu community.


malibusurfsidenews.com malibu

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 21


22 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news life & arts

malibusurfsidenews.com

MHS readies for delayed presentation of ‘Spring Awakening’

Show rated ‘PG-14’

Staff Report

Malibu High School’s

fall musical, “Spring

Awakening,” which was

previously scheduled to

occur Nov. 15-17, is back

on track and set to take the

stage Feb. 1-3.

Shows will take place

at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1,

and Saturday, Feb. 2, and

at 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 3,

at Malibu High School,

30215 Morning View

Drive.

The production, which is

rated “PG-14” for explicit

content and language,

will star Malibu High

School seniors William

Hammond, as the cool

guy, Melchior, and Claire

Anneet, as the innocent

Wendla.

“Spring Awakening”

includes heavy topics including

death, abuse, sex,

abortion, suicide and more,

and High School Theatre

Arts Director Jodi Plaia

said the students have embraced

the show’s serious

themes.

“The story of teenagers

coming of age and wanting

to be seen and heard in

a world where adults are

sort of the ones in charge

is very relevant to teens

in high school,” Plaia previously

told the Surfside

News in November.

“Spring Awakening”

has received eight Tony

Awards, including Best

Musical.

Tickets, which may

be purchased at malibu.

smmusd.org, are $25 for

adults, and $15 for students

and seniors.

RIGHT: Malibu High School

seniors William Hammond

(left) and Claire Anneet

are to take the stage Feb.

1-3 as the lead characters

in MHS’ performances of

“Spring Awakening.” Jodi

Plaia/Malibu High School

barbecue

From Page 19

and that’s in the rain weeks

later.”

As the evening came to

an end, attendees expressed

gratitude.

“It was great that Terry

O’Rourke was gracious

enough and took the time

to help coordinate this

event to bring many community

members together

who stayed to help during

the fire,” attendee Quentin

Lilly said. “They stayed to

help and to stand our ground

against the fires in our Malibu

neighborhoods.

“We were very fortunate

to have a committed group

of neighbors on Bonsall

Drive who worked together

to protect our homes over

multiple days. Clearly, we

would have lost our homes

if their community efforts

were not put forward.”

As attendees left, packets

of seeds donated by Trancas

Nursery sat in a basket at

the exit with an accompanying

placard that summed

up the evening’s sentiments.

The placard simply stated:

“From ashes to flowers; together

let’s bring the bloom

back to Malibu.”

Going rate

Malibu Sales and Leases | Week of Jan. 18 - 24

Type ADDRESS LP S.P. D.O.M. ST Date Br/BA

Lease 6457 Zuma View Place #139 $7,500/month $7,500/month 42 1/18/19 3B/3B

Lease 21439 Pacific Coast Highway $15,000/month $15,000/month 268 1/21/19 3B/4B

Lease 6133 Ramirez Canyon Road $10,450/month $10,450/month 14 1/22/19 5B/4B

Lease 29500 Heathercliff Road #184 $9,000/month $8,000/month 6 1/22/19 3B/4B

Lease 28851 Boniface Drive $10,000/month $10,000/month 21 1/24/19 4B/2B

Lease 3858 Malibu Country Drive $25,000/month $35,000/month 24 1/24/19 4B/6B

Statistics provided by Bobby LehmKuhl with 4 Malibu Real Estate. Information gathered from Combined

L.A./Westside MLS, Inc. is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Contact Bobby at (310) 456-0220,

Info@4Malibu.com or visit www.4Malibu.com.

MALIBU. TOGETHER IS BETTER.

As a Malibu resident and property owner for 50 years and Malibu

Realtor for the last 30 years, I lost several properties in the Recent

Fires and am going through the rebuilding process with you. If you

would like to discuss any aspect of your Malibu property, please give

me a call. Together we are better.

TERRY and GWEN LUCOFF 310-924-1045

BRE# 0112504


malibusurfsidenews.com puzzles

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 23

Surfside puzzler CROSSWORD & Sudoku

This is more than your average crossword. The Surfside Puzzler features clues pertaining to Malibu each week.

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

Across

1. Friend

4. Arum lily

9. Honeycomb parts

14. Dusk, to Donne

15. Pleasant way to

walk

16. Excite

17. Mule kin

18. Pageant winner

20. Immaculate

22. Assist illegally

23. In view

27. World famous

rum brand

32. Vehicle’s speed

maintainer

34. ____ new world

record

35. Tragedy

36. Epiphanies

39. “ER” personnel

41. Negative question

42. Hurting

43. Not us

45. Celeb who is a

big Lakers fan and

lives in Malibu

50. Beauty pageant

wear

51. Gizmos

54. Scarf material

57. Of hearing

58. UN has this role

65. Chinese philosophy

66. Neuters, as a

horse

67. Former Mrs.

Trump

68. Go wrong

69. Select group

70. “Mulholland

Drive” director

71. One kind of

bread

Down

1. Bird bills

2. Take in again

3. How some scripts are written

4. Net alternative

5. Singer-songwriter DiFranco

6. Much of “Deck the Halls”

7. One of the Simpsons

8. Kuwaiti or Qatari

9. El Greco, by birth

10. Ballad’s end?

11. Year in Nero’s reign

12. “March of the Penguins”

director Jacquet

13. Pool locale

19. Exec’s note

21. Black, viscous liquid

24. Kiss

25. Deception

26. Cornerstone abbr.

28. Old Fords

29. Anemia fighter

30. Sack

31. Einstein’s birthplace

33. Fifth largest planet

36. Diminutive battery size

37. Bar sounds

38. Cross of Egypt

40. Like show horses

41. “___ Excited” (Pointer

Sisters hit)

42. Sleepers, for short

44. “All over the world” singers,

for short

46. Most avant-garde

47. Avoided serious injury

48. ___meter (measures distance

traveled)

49. Yak, yak, yak

52. A personal journal

53. Serrate

55. Eye, at the Eiffel Tower

56. Tax

58. Golf tour

59. Wriggler

60. “I am the greatest” boxer

61. Saving option

62. Move across

63. Abbr. in a business letter

64. Cheerleader cry

How to play Sudoku

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that has

been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3 squares.

To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must

contain each of the numbers 1 to 9.

LEVEL: Medium

Sudoku by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

answers

Rosenthal Tasting Room

(18741 Pacific Coast

Highway, Malibu; 310-

456-1392)

■ ■12:30-9 p.m. Saturday,

Feb. 2: live music

starting with Bryan

Meyers; Azteca food

truck

■ ■12:30-9 p.m. Sunday,

Feb. 3: live music

starting with 3 For

Rent; Humble Crust

pizza truck

Malibu Playhouse

(29243 Pacific Coast

Highway, Malibu, 310-

447-8245)

■ ■7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1:

“A Wrinkle In Time,”

$20 adults and $10

students

■ ■2 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday,

Feb. 2: “Once

Upon A Grapevine”,

“A Wrinkle In Time,”

$20 adults and $10

students

■ ■11 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Sunday, Feb. 3: “Once

Upon A Grapevine”,

“A Wrinkle In Time,”

$20 adults and $10

students

Ollie’s Duck & Dive

(29169 Heathercliff

Road #102, Malibu;

310-589-2200)

■ ■Every Friday and Saturday

night: live music

The Sunset

(6800 Westward Beach

Road, Malibu; 310-589-

1007)

■ ■4 p.m. Sunday: local

DJ

Moonshadows

(20356 Pacific Coast

Highway, Malibu; 310-

456-3010)

■ ■7 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday

and Saturday; 3-9 p.m.

Sunday: Live DJ

Duke’s Malibu Restaurant

(21150 Pacific Coast

Highway, Malibu; 310-

317-0777)

■ ■4 p.m.-close. Friday:

Aloha Hour with Hawaiian

dancers

To place an event in The

Scene, email lauren@mali

busurfsidenews.com.


24 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news real estate

malibusurfsidenews.com

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Agent’s Brokerage:

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22611 Pacific Coast

Highway, Malibu


Back on track

Pepperdine hurdler recoups from

injury, thrives at invitational in

New Mexico, Page 26

On the sidelines

Surfside chats with MHS basketball

player Erin Muldoon for

Athlete of the Week, Page 28

malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | malibusurfsidenews.com

Goalie Ben Silbar (in

pink) is recognized

on the Sharks’ senior

night Friday, Jan. 25, in

Malibu.

Suzy Demeter/22nd

Century Media

Sharks boys soccer team stays optimistic as tough season winds down, Page 27


26 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news sports

malibusurfsidenews.com

Women’s Track and Field

Tongco back ‘stronger than ever’

Michal Dwojak

Assistant Editor

Caila Tongco felt relieved

when she crossed the finish

line of the 60-meter hurdles

at the Dr. Martin Luther

King Jr. Invitational hosted

by New Mexico.

The Pepperdine women’s

track and field runner had

just broken her own school

record for the second time

that day with a time of 9.21

seconds, but she didn’t really

worry about that. More

importantly, the invitational

was the first time the sophomore

competitively raced

for the Waves since missing

most of her outdoor season

last year because of an injury.

When she crossed the finish

line of the final hurdles

race, she knew she was

back.

“I felt like I needed this

meet a lot to help boost my

confidence,” Tongco said. “It

felt good to know that coming

back I’m stronger than

ever, and I worked hard to

get me where I’m at now.”

Tongco has battled injuries

since her senior year

of high school when she

ruptured her Achilles tendon.

The injury forced her

to miss the rest of her high

school career and delayed

her training ability until

mid-October of her freshman

season.

She returned in full force

during the indoor portion

of her first year, when she

broke the school record in

the 60 hurdles at 9.46 seconds,

but she battled another

setback. The top of her

previously injured foot hurt

after her first outdoor meet

of the season, and she found

out she suffered a mild

stress fracture.

Pepperdine University sophomore Caila Tongco, pictured

last season, recently broke her school record in the

60-meter hurdles twice in one day.

Jeff Golden/Pepperdine Athletics

She missed the rest of the

season after reaching success

early.

“It left me very, very hungry.”

Tongco said. “I was

so bummed to find out that

I couldn’t compete for the

rest of the season, it was

devastating.”

While she was still

around the team and felt

close with her teammates, it

wasn’t totally the same. She

didn’t travel with the Waves

since she couldn’t compete,

which at times made her

feel left out or isolated. She

felt discouraged at times

having to always focus on

coming back from an injury

— she hadn’t run a full season

since her junior year of

high school.

Tongco worked at getting

back to her right mindset

after battling adversity with

her injury. She continued to

work and ran with her club

team back at home to keep

herself in shape and find

that motivation that helped

make her a top runner in

high school.

But during her battle, she

went through a process that

helped her fall in love with

the sport again.

“Track has always been

something that’s been a passion

for me,” Tongco said.

“Just keeping that passion

alive. That’s one of the pros

of being injured is you regain

that love for your sport. Once

it’s taken away from you, it

helps you regain and regrow

your love for the sport.”

So, when she came back

to running in New Mexico,

she didn’t think about her

return too much because

she knew she’d make herself

nervous. Her first race

back was the 200-meter

open, which she wasn’t too

focused on since she just

wanted to get back to collegiate

racing — she set a

personal record in the 200.

She went on to break the

school record in the 60,

but that wasn’t too impressive

to Tongco. That number

wasn’t her own PR in

the race, which only makes

her hungrier to get back out

there and break the record

each time she races.

“I know that I am not as

fast as I can be,” Tongco

said. “I know breaking the

record is just the stepping

stone of where I want to be

for the rest of the upcoming

meets. I carried that hunger

into this year.”

She’s just relieved to be

back.

Pepperdine Athletics

Ross leads men’s basketball past Saint Mary’s

Colbey Ross scored

11 of his career-high 29

points in overtime to help

lift the Pepperdine men’s

basketball team to an 84-

77 victory over visiting

Saint Mary’s on Saturday,

Jan. 26, in West Coast

Conference action.

Kameron Edwards added

a season-high 24 points

to help the Waves improve

to 10-11 overall and 3-4 in

the WCC, while dropping

the favored Gaels to 13-9

and 4-3.

In the first half, Pepperdine

led 18-15 but an 8-0

Gaels run made it 23-18.

They took their biggest

lead of the game at 29-23

and 31-25, but the Waves

scored the final seven

points of the second half

to go into the break with a

32-31 lead.

The Gaels hit their first

six shots of the second

half and went up by four

a couple of times, but an

8-0 run with five points

by Smith gave Pepperdine

the lead back at 49-45. The

Waves’ lead grew as large

as nine at 59-50 with nine

minutes left after two Ross

free throws.

Saint Mary’s rallied,

however, eventually taking

the lead back at 67-

66 with 2 1/2 minutes

left. Ross made two free

throws with 1:54 to go to

put Pepperdine in front 68-

67. It stayed that way until

This Week In...

SHARKS ATHLETICS

Girls Water Polo

■Jan. ■ 31 - host Santa Paula,

3:15 p.m.

PEPPERDINE ATHLETICS

Men’s Basketball

SMC’s Ford scored with

22 seconds left. On Pepperdine’s

final possession,

Ross made one of two free

throws to tie the game with

six seconds left. SMC had

a chance to win but committed

an offensive foul in

the final second.

Ross scored the Waves’

first six points of overtime.

After he made two free

throws, an Edwards lay-up

made it 77-72 with 1:30

left. SMC drew within two

points after a Ford 3-pointer

but Ross came right

back with a basket. After

Ford made two free throws

to cut Pepperdine’s lead

to 79-77 with 53 seconds

left, Ross came up big

again, sinking a 3-pointer

from the top of the key.

The Waves got a defensive

stop, and then Edwards

iced the game with two

free throws with three seconds

left.

Pepperdine outscored

SMC 15-8 in the overtime

period.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Robinson-Bacote nets

another career-high game

Yasmine Robinson-

Bacote had her fourth career

30-point game as the

Waves fell to Pacific 78-67

in Stockton Saturday, Jan.

26.

The Waves (11-8, 5-4

WCC) could not seem to

find a rhythm against the

■Jan. ■ 31 - at Portland,

7 p.m.

Women’s Basketball

■Jan. ■ 31 - host San Diego,

7 p.m.

Track

■Feb. ■ 1 - at Jackson’s Nike

Tigers (13-6, 6-3 WCC),

who were deadly from the

field.

Pacific started the

game scoring the first

four points, followed by

a nine-point run to take a

14-2 lead. Thanks to seven

points from Robinson-Bacote,

the Waves ended the

first quarter on a 14-7 run.

Pacific led 22-18 after the

first 10 minutes of play. In

the second quarter, Robinson-Bacote

picked up right

where she let off, scoring

all 16 of the Waves’ points

in the quarter. Pacific led

40-34 going into the second

half of the game.

In the third quarter, the

Waves came out hot, scoring

the first seven points of

the half to take their first

lead of the game at 42-40.

The Tigers retook the lead,

and would not give it back

in the quarter, taking a 57-

54 lead into the final 10

minutes of the game. The

Waves tied the game at 57

two minutes into the fourth

quarter, but a 6-0 run from

the Tigers put the game

out of reach, as Pacific led

by as many as 13 points,

eventually winning by 11.

Information from Pepperdine

University and

www.pepperdinewaves.

com. Compiled by Assistant

Editor Michal Dwojak,

m.dwojak@22ndcentury

media.com.

Boise Invitational

Women’s Tennis

■Feb. ■ 1 - host California,

1:30 p.m.

Men’s Volleyball

■Feb. ■ 6 - host BYU,

7 p.m.


malibusurfsidenews.com sports

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 27

With heads up, seniors, Sharks move forward

Boys soccer team

winless in league

but starting to jell

Ryan Flynn

Freelance Reporter

A trying season for Malibu

boys soccer is winding

down.

There are three games remaining

on the schedule for

the 1-8-1 Sharks, who thus

far are winless in league.

The fires led to a late start

for soccer and took away

valuable practice time, as

they did for all of Malibu’s

teams. Playing catch-up all

year has had an effect on

this senior-laden team, but

the boys in teal and black

have done their best to keep

their heads up.

“It’s been a rough season,”

senior Harry Lang

said. “The fire left us stirred

up mentally and screwed

up our schedule big time.

We haven’t been able to

have even half the practices

we were supposed to, we

had basically no preseason

and league has been even

tougher.

“But, we are making due

with what we have. The

team has really started to

come together recently, but

the season is almost over so

now we are just trying to

enjoy what’s left of it.”

Close losses have defined

the season for Malibu. Of

their eight losses, half have

come by just one goal. The

team is currently on a seven-game

losing streak, but

especially of late the scores

have been very close. It is

too little, too late for Malibu,

but the makings of a

good season were here, if

not for circumstances outside

their control.

Lang said that the teammates

have relied on one

another to get through this

tough season. The leadership

of senior captains Ben

Lansbury, Mo McDonnell

and goalkeeper Ben Silbar

have been especially important.

“They are all great leaders

and give the rest of

my teammates and I tactical

information as well as

making sure everyone is

happy,” Lang said.

On Friday, the Sharks

celebrated senior night

and dropped a 4-2 game to

league opponent Fillmore.

It is an uncommon position

for Malibu, which is coming

off back-to-back 10-

win seasons under coach

Ignacio Rodriguez. The

production has been there

for key players, however.

Entering Friday night’s

Harry Lang tries to gather the loose ball as the Sharks face Fillmore Friday, Jan. 25, in Malibu. Suzy Demeter/22nd

Century Media

game, Silbar had 72 saves

on the season. Lansbury

entered the game with 24

career goals and eight assists.

His scoring ability

will surely be missed when

he graduates this spring.

The team will have five

returning juniors and four

sophomores, so while this

is the end of the run for

stalwarts like Lansbury,

McDonnell and Silbar, the

reinforcements are coming

for Malibu soccer next

year. The team is looking to

finish off the year on a high

note.

“We have three games

left and we are looking to

win all of them or at least

play well, create a lot of

good chances and play

good defense,” Lang said.

Bidding adieu

Seniors on this year’s MHS

boys soccer team are:

Garret Le, Alex Jemelian,

Luke Wong, Harry Lang,

Simon Johnson, Gianni

Otero, Ben Silbar*, Mo

McDonnell* and Ben

Lansbury.*

* denotes senior captains

Seniors on the Malibu High School boys soccer team

gather for a photo. Suzy Demeter/22nd Century Media


28 | January 31, 2019 | Malibu surfside news sports

malibusurfsidenews.com

Athlete of the Week

10 Questions

with Erin Muldoon

Girls Water Polo

Musketeers outmaneuver Malibu

Maischoss nets 2 for Malibu, Sharks fall 12-2

Erin Muldoon, 17, is a junior

who plays basketball

for Malibu High School.

How did you first get

into basketball?

I started playing in the

Malibu City League at a

very young age. However,

I really got into the sport

when Russ Purtell formed

an all girls travel team to

play in the CYBA league

during middle school.

What do you enjoy

about the game?

I enjoy the fast pace of

the game and being part of

a team. I love how everyone

works together.

Is there any pro or

college athlete you’ve

tried to model your

game after?

I really like the way

[Golden State Warriors

guard] Steph Curry plays.

He’s always creating space

for his shots, which I want

to incorporate in my games.

As a point guard,

what do you try to

do to keep everyone

involved?

I try to always look for

space and get the ball to the

people with a good shot. I

like to drive the lane and

pass it out to open players

as well as work the post.

What is your favorite

place to eat in Malibu?

I love eating at Bui Sushi.

I’m obsessed with their

edamame.

Who has the best

nickname on the team?

Amelia Goudzwaard

definitely has the best nickname.

We all call her ‘Pip,’

which actually came from

softball.

What are your goals

this season?

My goal for this season

is the same as every other

season, which is to always

improve as a team, as well

as work on individual

skills.

What are your hobbies

outside basketball?

22nd Century Media File Photo

I enjoy hanging out with

friends and going to see

movies.

Who were your role

models growing up?

I’d say my parents because

they work so hard.

They’ve always been there

for me and I really appreciate

everything they’ve done

for me.

If you could have one

superpower, what

would it be?

I would love to be able

to teleport because I could

travel instantly to any

place I wanted and I could

see all kinds of different

places.

Interview by Freelance Reporter

Ryan Flynn

Malibu High School girls water polo player Lauren Maischoss takes aim Thursday, Jan.

24, as the Sharks take on the Moorpark Musketeers. Maischoss scored twice in the

second quarter to make the score 8-2. Photos by Suzy Demeter/22nd Century Media

A heavily defended Luna Salinas shoots as the Sharks face Moorpark in Malibu.


malibusurfsidenews.com classifieds

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 29

6703 Legal Notices

CITY OF MALIBU

PUBLIC NOTICE

The City of Malibu is now accepting applications for the General Fund Grant Program, which provides funding

for nonprofit organizations located within Malibu that provide services of benefit to the residents of the

community. Applications will be accepted through March 29, 2019. Those organizations eligible for this program

will be considered for funding by the City Council in June, 2019. To obtain an application, call Parker

Davis at Malibu City Hall, 310-456-2489 ext. 287, or visit our City website at

www.MalibuCity.org/GeneralFund

/s/:Lisa Soghor

Lisa Soghor, Assistant City Manager

Publish Date: January 31, 2019

Attention all business

& professional services!

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6702 Public

Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATE-

MENT FILE NUMBER: 2018319696

ORIGINAL FILING. This statement was

filed with the County Clerk of LOS ANGE-

LES on 12/26/2018. The following person is

doing business as KELTECH, 8700

PERSHING DRIVE UNIT 2309, PLAYA

DEL REY, CA 90293. The full name of registrant

is: ERIC KELLEY, 8700 PERSHING

DRIVE UNIT 2309, PLAYA DEL REY, CA

90293. This business is being conducted by:

an Individual. The registrant commenced to

transact business under the fictitious business

name listed above: 12/2018. /s/:ERIC KEL-

LEY, ERIC KELLEY, OWNER, KELTECH.

This statement was filed with the County

Clerk of LOS ANGELES County on

12/26/2018. NOTICE: THIS FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT EX-

PIRES FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE IT

WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE

COUNTY CLERK. A NEW FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST

BE FILED PRIOR TO THAT DATE. The

filing of this statement does not of itself

authorize the use in this state of a fictitious

business name statement in violation of the

rights of another under federal, state, or common

law (see Section 1441et seq., Business

and Professions Code). MALIBU SURF-

SIDE NEWS to publish 01/10/2019,

01/17/2019, 01/24/2019, 01/31/2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATE-

MENT FILE NUMBER: 2019001111

ORIGINAL FILING. This statement was

filed with the County Clerk of LOS ANGE-

LES on 01/02/2019. The following person is

doing business as MAAM, 815 MORAGA

DR, LOS ANGELES, CA 90049 (Articles of

Incoporation: 4222104). The full name of

registrant is: MORAGA ADVERTISING

AND MARKETING INC, 815 MORAGA

DR, LOS ANGELES, CA 90049 (State of Incoporation:

CA). This business is being conducted

by: a Corporation. The registrant

commenced to transact business under the

fictitious business name listed above:

12/2018. /s/:SANDY MILO, SANDY MILO,

CEO, MORAGA ADVERTISING AND

MARKETING INC. This statement was filed

with the County Clerk of LOS ANGELES

County on 01/02/2019. NOTICE: THIS FIC-

TITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

EXPIRES FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE

IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE

COUNTY CLERK. A NEW FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST

BE FILED PRIOR TO THAT DATE. The

filing of this statement does not of itself

authorize the use in this state of a fictitious

business name statement in violation of the

FICTITIOUS rights of another BUSINESS under federal, NAME state, STATE- or common

law FILE (see Section NUMBER: 1441et seq., 2019002818 Business

MENT

ORIGINAL and Professions FILING. Code). This MALIBU statement SURF- was

filed SIDEwith NEWS the County to publish Clerk of LOS 01/10/2019, ANGE-

LES 01/17/2019, on 01/04/2019. 01/24/2019, The01/31/2019

following person is

doing business as PLAN FOR GOOD, 279

REDONDO AVE, LONG BEACH, CA

90803. The full name of registrant is: JENNI-

FER ALLEN, 279 REDONDO AVE, LONG

BEACH, CA 90803. This business is being

conducted by: an Individual. The registrant

commenced to transact business under the

fictitious business name listed above:

01/2019. /s/:JENNIFER ALLEN, JENNIFER

ALLEN, OWNER, PLAN FOR GOOD. This

statement was filed with the County Clerk of

LOS ANGELES County on 08/29/2018. NO-

TICE: THIS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

NAME STATEMENT EXPIRES FIVE

YEARS FROM THE DATE IT WAS FILED

IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY

CLERK. A NEW FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

NAME STATEMENT MUST BE FILED

PRIOR TO THAT DATE. The filing of this

statement does not of itself authorize the use

in this state of a fictitious business name

statement in violation of the rights of another

under federal, state, or common law (see Section

1441et seq., Business and Professions

Code). MALIBU SURFSIDE NEWS to publish

01/17/2019, 01/24/2019, 01/31/2019,

02/07/2019

6702 Public

Notices

Statement of Abandonment of Use of Fictitious

Business Name

Previous File No: 2018203152

Current File No: 2019002104

Name of Business: PARTICLES

11629 Fireside Drive, Whittier, CA 90604

State of California, County of Los Angeles

The following person has abandoned the use

of the Fictitious Business name:

IVONNE TIU, 11629 FIRESIDE DRIVE,

WHITTIER, CA 90604

The fictitious business name referred to

above was filed on 08/10/2018 in the county

of LOS ANGELES

Registered owners: IVONNE TIU, 11629

FIRESIDE DRIVE, WHITTIER, CA 90604

This business is conducted by an Individual

/s/IVONNE TIU, IVONNE TIU, OWNER,

PARTICLES

This statement was filed with the County

Clerk of Los Angeles County on 01/02/2019

MALIBU SURFSIDE NEWS to publish

01/17/2019, 01/24/2019, 01/31/2019,

02/07/2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATE-

MENT FILE NUMBER: 2019006959

ORIGINAL FILING. This statement was

filed with the County Clerk of LOS ANGE-

LES on 01/09/2019. The following person is

doing business as OVERBOARD MAN-

AGEMENT, 7917 YORKTOWN AVE, LOS

ANGELES, CA 90045. The full name of registrant

is: MATTHEW PARRISH, 7917

YORKTOWN AVE, LOS ANGELES, CA

90045. This business is being conducted by:

an Individual. The registrant has not yet commenced

to transact business under the fictitious

business name listed above. /s/:MAT-

THEW PARRISH, MATTHEW PARRISH,

OWNER, OVERBOARD MANAGEMENT.

This statement was filed with the County

Clerk of LOS ANGELES County on

01/09/2019. NOTICE: THIS FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT EX-

PIRES FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE IT

WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE

COUNTY CLERK. A NEW FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST

BE FILED PRIOR TO THAT DATE. The

filing of this statement does not of itself

authorize the use in this state of a fictitious

business name statement in violation of the

rights of another under federal, state, or common

law (see Section 1441et seq., Business

and Professions Code). MALIBU SURF-

SIDE NEWS to publish 01/17/2019,

01/24/2019, 01/31/2019, 02/07/2019

NOTICE OF HEARING TO CONDUCT

ENTERTAINMENT-GEN. W/DANCE,

ANNUAL DANCE & HEALTH

SPA/CLUB

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT AP-

PLICATION HAS BEEN MADE TO THE

LOS ANGELES COUNTY BUSINESS LI-

CENSE COMMISSION TO CONDUCT

ADDRESS OF PREMISES: 327 S. LATIGO

CYN RD., MALIBU, CA 90265

NAME OF APPLICANT: THE GUESTOL-

OGY GROUP, INC. / GARRETT GERSON

DATE OF HEARING: 02/20/2019

TIME OF HEARING: 09:00 A.M.

``ANY PERSON HAVING OBJECTIONS

TO THE GRANTING OF THE LICENSE

MAY, AT ANY TIME PRIOR TO THE

DATE ABOVE NAMED, FILE WITH THE

BUSINESS LICENSE COMMISSION HIS

OBJECTIONS IN WRITING GIVING HIS

REASONS THEREFOR, AND HE MAY

APPEAR AT THE TIME AND PLACE OF

THE HEARING AND BE HEARD RELA-

TIVE THERETO``

OFFICE OF THE COMMISSION:

BUSINESS LICENSE COMMISSION

500 W. TEMPLE STREET, RM 374

LOS ANGELES, CA 90012

CN956724 Jan 17,24,31, 2019

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6702 Public

Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATE-

MENT FILE NUMBER: 2019010139

ORIGINAL FILING. This statement was

filed with the County Clerk of LOS ANGE-

LES on 01/11/2019. The following person is

doing business as FLYING DUTCHMAN

CANNABIS, 909 W TEMPLE STREET,

APT 614, LOS ANGELES, CA 90012. The

full name of registrant is: FLYING DUTCH-

MAN CANNABIS LLC; FLYING DUTCH-

MAN GREENHOUSES, LLC; FLYING

DUTCHMAN TOURING & EDUCATION,

LLC, 909 W TEMPLE STREET, APT 614,

LOS ANGELES, CA 90012-4444. This business

is being conducted by: a Limited Liability

Company. The registrant has not yet commenced

to transact business under the fictitious

business name listed above. /s/:BOB

DE GROOT, BOB DE GROOT, CEO, FLY-

ING DUTCHMAN GREENHOUSES, LLC.

This statement was filed with the County

Clerk of LOS ANGELES County on

01/11/2019. NOTICE: THIS FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT EX-

PIRES FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE IT

WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE

COUNTY CLERK. A NEW FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST

BE FILED PRIOR TO THAT DATE. The

filing of this statement does not of itself

authorize the use in this state of a fictitious

business name statement in violation of the

rights of another under federal, state, or common

law (see Section 1441et seq., Business

and Professions Code). MALIBU SURF-

SIDE NEWS to publish 01/24/2019,

01/31/2019, 02/07/2019, 02/14/2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATE-

MENT FILE NUMBER: 2019010377

ORIGINAL FILING. This statement was

filed with the County Clerk of LOS ANGE-

LES on 01/14/2019. The following person is

doing business as BIRTH AND BEAUTY;

LEONA DARNELL PHOTOGRAPHY, 633

1/2 E CYPRESS AVE, BURBANK, CA

91501 . The full name of registrant is:

LEONA DARNELL, 633 1/2 E CYPRESS

AVE, BURBANK, CA 91501. This business

is being conducted by: an Individual. The

registrant has not yet commenced to transact

business under the fictitious business name

listed above. /s/:LEONA DARNELL,

LEONA DARNELL, OWNER, BIRTH

AND BEAUTY; LEONA DARNELL PHO-

TOGRAPHY. This statement was filed with

the County Clerk of LOS ANGELES County

on 01/14/2019. NOTICE: THIS FICTI-

TIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

EXPIRES FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE

IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE

COUNTY CLERK. A NEW FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST

BE FILED PRIOR TO THAT DATE. The

filing of this statement does not of itself

authorize the use in this state of a fictitious

business name statement in violation of the

rights of another under federal, state, or common

law (see Section 1441et seq., Business

and Professions Code). MALIBU SURF-

SIDE NEWS to publish 01/24/2019,

01/31/2019, 02/07/2019, 02/14/2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATE-

MENT FILE NUMBER: 2019014297

ORIGINAL FILING. This statement was

filed with the County Clerk of LOS ANGE-

LES on 01/16/2019. The following person is

doing business as TOLLROASTING.COM,

5051 W. JEFFERSON BLVD, LOS ANGE-

LES, CA 90016. The full name of registrant

is: CITY BEAN, INC., 5051 W. JEFFER-

SON BLVD, LOS ANGELES, CA 90016.

This business is being conducted by: a Corporation.

The registrant commenced to transact

business under the fictitious business

name listed above: 08/2018. /s/:GARY SAL-

ZER, GARY SALZER, PRESIDENT, CITY

BEAN, INC. This statement was filed with

the County Clerk of LOS ANGELES County

on 01/16/2019. NOTICE: THIS FICTI-

TIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

EXPIRES FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE

IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE

COUNTY CLERK. A NEW FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST

BE FILED PRIOR TO THAT DATE. The

filing of this statement does not of itself

authorize the use in this state of a fictitious

business name statement in violation of the

rights of another under federal, state, or common

law (see Section 1441et seq., Business

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATE-

MENT FILE NUMBER: 2019014297

ORIGINAL FILING. This statement was

filed with the County Clerk of LOS ANGE-

LES on 01/16/2019. The following person is

doing business as TOLLROASTING.COM,

5051 W. JEFFERSON BLVD, LOS ANGE-

LES, CA 90016. The full name of registrant

is: CITY BEAN, INC., 5051 W. JEFFER-

SON BLVD, LOS ANGELES, CA 90016.

This business is being conducted by: a Corporation.

The registrant commenced to transact

business under the fictitious business

name listed above: 08/2018. /s/:GARY SAL-

ZER, GARY SALZER, PRESIDENT, CITY

BEAN, INC. This statement was filed with

the County Clerk of LOS ANGELES County

on 01/16/2019. NOTICE: THIS FICTI-

6702 Public

Notices

TIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

EXPIRES FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE

IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE

COUNTY CLERK. A NEW FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST

BE FILED PRIOR TO THAT DATE. The

filing of this statement does not of itself

authorize the use in this state of a fictitious

business name statement in violation of the

rights of another under federal, state, or common

law (see Section 1441et seq., Business

and Professions Code). MALIBU SURF-

SIDE NEWS to publish 01/31/2019,

02/07/2019, 02/14/2019, 02/21/2109

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATE-

MENT FILE NUMBER: 2019019397

ORIGINAL FILING. This statement was

filed with the County Clerk of LOS ANGE-

LES on 01/23/2019. The following person is

doing business as SPARROW CAFE, 23847

STUART RANCH RD, MALIBU, CA

90265 (Organization Number:

200717810037). The full name of registrant

is: MALIBU RACQUET CLUB, LLC,

23847 STUART RANCH RD, MALIBU,

CA 90265 (State of Organization: DE). This

business is being conducted by: a Limited Liability

Company. The registrant commenced

to transact business under the fictitious business

name listed above: 03/2017. /s/:ERIK

M. BLACKMORE, ERIK M. BLACK-

MORE, MANAGER, MALIBU RACQUET

CLUB, LLC. This statement was filed with

the County Clerk of LOS ANGELES County

on 01/23/2019. NOTICE: THIS FICTI-

TIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

EXPIRES FIVE YEARS FROM THE DATE

IT WAS FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE

COUNTY CLERK. A NEW FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT MUST

BE FILED PRIOR TO THAT DATE. The

filing of this statement does not of itself

authorize the use in this state of a fictitious

business name statement in violation of the

rights of another under federal, state, or common

law (see Section 1441et seq., Business

and Professions Code). MALIBU SURF-

SIDE NEWS to publish 01/31/2019,

02/07/2019, 02/14/2019, 02/21/2019

Buy It!

SELL It!

FIND It!

in the

CLASSIFIEDS

708.326.9170


malibusurfsidenews.com classifieds

Malibu surfside news | January 31, 2019 | 31

FREE FREE FREE

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