Grove School Renewal Charter FINAL Version - 2019

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The Charter of

The Grove School

A California Public Charter School

Original Charter granted July 1999

Charter Petition renewed August 2004, July 2009, and January

2014

Current Renewal Petition submitted December 5, 2018 to

Redlands Unified School District

For Charter Term: July 1, 2019 – June 30, 2024


Table of Contents

Charter Renewal Petition 2019: Affirmations and Declaration ...................................................... v

Introduction and Executive Summary ............................................................................................ 1

Accomplishments from Previous Charter Term (2014-2018) .....................................................3

Charter Renewal Criteria .............................................................................................................6

Element 1: The Grove School Educational Program .................................................................... 17

The Grove School’s Mission, Vision and Values ......................................................................17

Targeted Student Population ......................................................................................................18

Attendance .................................................................................................................................20

What it means to be an Educated Person in the 21st Century ...................................................22

Description of How Learning Best Occurs ................................................................................27

Course Requirements by Year or Level .....................................................................................39

Effectiveness of the Montessori Instructional Design for Learning ..........................................45

Serving Special Student Populations .........................................................................................47

Student Support and Intervention Programs at TGS .................................................................61

Charter School Annual Goals and Actions to Achieve State Priorities .....................................65

Charter Schools Serving High School Students ........................................................................66

Element 2: Measurable Student Outcomes ................................................................................... 69

Goals, Actions, and Measurable Outcomes Aligned with Eight State Priorities .......................69

How pupil outcomes will address state content and performance standards .............................69

Student Academic Achievement Outcomes ..............................................................................71

Objective Means of Measuring Growth .....................................................................................73

Exit Outcomes ............................................................................................................................74

Applying Data ............................................................................................................................74

Element 3: Methods for Measuring Student Progress .................................................................. 76

Methods of Assessment .............................................................................................................76

Element 4: Governance Structure ................................................................................................. 83

Board of Directors .....................................................................................................................83

Board Meetings and Duties ........................................................................................................84

Parent Participation ....................................................................................................................85

Organization Chart .....................................................................................................................86

Element 5: Employee Qualifications ............................................................................................ 87

Administrators ...........................................................................................................................87

Instructional Staff ......................................................................................................................87

Adjunct Faculty and Non-Core Course Instructors ...................................................................88

Support Staff and Other Personnel ............................................................................................88

Employee Evaluation Procedures ..............................................................................................88

Professional Development .........................................................................................................88

Employee Rights ........................................................................................................................88

Element 6: Health and Safety Procedures ..................................................................................... 89

Element 7: Racial and Ethnic Balance .......................................................................................... 94

Element 8: Admissions Policies and Procedures .......................................................................... 95

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Element 9: Financial Audits .......................................................................................................... 98

Element 10: Pupil Suspension and Expulsion Procedures ............................................................ 99

A. Grounds for Suspension and Expulsion of Students ...........................................................101

B. Enumerated Offenses ..........................................................................................................101

C. Suspension Procedure .........................................................................................................109

D. Authority to Expel ...............................................................................................................110

E. Expulsion Procedures ..........................................................................................................110

F. Special Procedures for Expulsion Hearings Involving Sexual Assault or Battery Offenses111

G. Record of Hearing ...............................................................................................................112

H. Presentation of Evidence .....................................................................................................112

I. Written Notice to Expel ........................................................................................................113

J. Disciplinary Records ............................................................................................................113

K. No Right to Appeal .............................................................................................................113

L. Expelled Pupils/Alternative Education ...............................................................................113

M. Rehabilitation Plans ............................................................................................................113

N. Readmission ........................................................................................................................113

O. Notice to Teachers ..............................................................................................................114

P. Special Procedures for the Consideration of Suspension and Expulsion of Students with

Disabilities ...............................................................................................................................114

Element 11: Employee Retirement Systems ............................................................................... 118

Element 12: Public School Attendance Alternatives .................................................................. 119

Element 13: Employee Return Rights......................................................................................... 120

District Employees ...................................................................................................................120

Element 14: Dispute Resolution Procedures............................................................................... 121

Disputes Between the Charter School and the District ............................................................121

Internal Disputes ......................................................................................................................122

Element 15: Closure Procedures ................................................................................................. 123

Miscellaneous Charter Provisions ............................................................................................... 125

A. Budgets and Financial Reporting ........................................................................................125

B. Administrative Services ......................................................................................................126

C. Facilities ..............................................................................................................................126

D. Potential Civil Liability Effects ..........................................................................................126

E. Insurance .............................................................................................................................127

F. Oversight .............................................................................................................................127

iii


Appendix A: CDE DataQuest/CAASPP Reports

Appendix B: Enrollment and Outreach Plan

Appendix C: 2018-19 Annual Calendar

Appendix D: Montessori and CCSS Alignment Samples

Appendix E: Memorandum of Understanding between TGS and RUSD regarding Special

Education Services

Appendix F: Intervention and Referral Process Chart

Appendix G: LCAP

Appendix H: TGS Schoolwide Learner Outcomes

Appendix I: California Dashboard Report and Local Indicators

Appendix J: SARC

Appendix K: Parent Survey Results for 2018 and 2017

Appendix L: Sample Transcript and Trimester Grade Report

Appendix M: Articles of Incorporation, Corporate Bylaws, and Conflict of Interest Code

Appendix N: Job Description for the Head of School

Appendix O: TGS Organizational Chart

Appendix P: Emergency Procedures

Appendix Q: TGS’s Comprehensive Complaint Policies

Appendix R: Projected Budget, Financial Projections and Cash Flow

Appendix S: TGS Lease Agreements

Appendix T: Certificate of Liability Insurance

iv


Charter Renewal Petition 2019:

Affirmations and Declaration

As the authorized lead petitioner, I, Benedict Moudry, hereby certify that the information

submitted in this petition for renewal of a California public charter school, The Grove School

(“TGS,” “Grove,” or the “Charter School”), which is located within the boundaries of the

Redlands Unified School District (“RUSD” or the “District”) and authorized by Redlands

Unified School District, is true to the best of my knowledge and belief; I also certify that this

renewal petition does not constitute the conversion of a private school to the status of a public

charter school; and, I understand that if awarded the charter renewal, TGS will follow any and all

federal, state, and local laws and regulations that apply to TGS, including but not limited to the

following:







The Charter School shall meet all statewide standards and conduct the student

assessments required, pursuant to Education Code Section 60605, and any other

statewide standards authorized in statute, or student assessments applicable to students in

non-charter public schools. [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(c)(1)]

The Grove High School declares that it shall be deemed the exclusive public school

employer of the employees of TGS for purposes of the Educational Employment

Relations Act. [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(b)(6)]

The Charter School shall be non-sectarian in its programs, admissions policies,

employment practices, and all other operations. [Ref. Education Code Section

47605(d)(1)]

The Charter School shall not charge tuition. [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(d)(1)]

The Charter School shall admit all students who wish to attend TGS, unless the Charter

School receives a greater number of applications than there are spaces for students, in

which case it will hold a public random drawing to determine admission. Except as

required by Education Code Section 47605(d)(2), admission to the Charter School shall

not be determined according to the place of residence of the student or his or her parents

within the State. Preference in the public random drawing shall be given as required by

Education Code Section 47605(d)(2)(B)(i)-(iv). In the event of a drawing, the chartering

authority shall make reasonable efforts to accommodate the growth of the Charter School

in accordance with Education Code Section 47605(d)(2)(C). [Ref. Education Code

Section 47605(d)(2)(A)-(C)]

The Charter School shall not discriminate on the basis of the characteristics listed in

Section 220 (actual or perceived disability, gender, gender expression, gender identity,

nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other characteristic that

is contained in the definition of hate crimes set forth in Section 422.55 of the Penal Code,

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including immigration status, or association with an individual who has any of the

aforementioned characteristics). [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(d)(1)]










The Charter School shall adhere to all provisions of federal law related to students with

disabilities including, but not limited to, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973,

Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the Individuals with

Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004.

The Charter School shall meet all requirements for employment set forth in applicable

provisions of law, including, but not limited to credentials, as necessary. [Ref. Title 5

California Code of Regulations Section 11967.5.1(f)(5)(C)]

The Charter School shall ensure that teachers in the Charter School hold a Commission

on Teacher Credentialing certificate, permit, or other document equivalent to that which a

teacher in other public schools are required to hold. As allowed by statute, flexibility will

be given to non-core, non-college preparatory teachers. [Ref. Education Code Section

47605(l)]

The Charter School shall at all times maintain all necessary and appropriate insurance

coverage.

The Charter School shall, for each fiscal year, offer at a minimum, the number of minutes

of instruction per grade level as required by Education Code Section 47612.5(a)(1)(A)-

(D).

If a pupil is expelled or leaves the Charter School without graduating or completing the

school year for any reason, the Charter School shall notify the superintendent of the

school district of the pupil’s last known address within 30 days, and shall, upon request,

provide that school district with a copy of the cumulative record of the pupil, including

report cards or a transcript of grades, and health information. If the pupil is subsequently

expelled or leaves the school district without graduating or completing the school year for

any reason, the school district shall provide this information to the Charter School within

30 days if the Charter School demonstrates that the pupil had been enrolled in the Charter

School. [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(d)(3)]

The Charter School may encourage parental involvement, but shall notify the parents and

guardians of applicant pupils and currently enrolled pupils that parental involvement is

not a requirement for acceptance to, or continued enrollment at, the Charter School. [Ref.

Education Code Section 47605(n)]

TGS shall maintain accurate and contemporaneous written records that document all

pupil attendance and make these records available for audit and inspection. [Ref.

Education Code Section 47612.5(a)(2)]

TGS shall, on a regular basis, consult with its parents and teachers regarding the Charter

School's education programs. [Ref. Education Code Section 47605(c)]

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TGS shall comply with any applicable jurisdictional limitations to the locations of its

facilities. [Ref. Education Code Sections 47605 and 47605.1]

TGS shall comply with all laws establishing the minimum and maximum age for public

school enrollment. [Ref. Education Code Sections 47612(b) and 47610]

TGS shall comply with all applicable portions of the Elementary and Secondary

Education Act (“ESEA”), as reauthorized and amended by the Every Student Succeeds

Act (“ESSA”).

TGS shall comply with the Public Records Act.

TGS shall comply with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

TGS shall comply with the Ralph M. Brown Act.

TGS shall meet or exceed the legally required minimum number of school days. [Ref.

Title 5 California Code of Regulations Section 11960]

vii


Introduction and Executive Summary

With the support and approval of Redlands Unified School District (RUSD), The Grove School

was first chartered as a The Grove High School in 1999 by a passionate group of parents and

community members who wanted to bring the opportunity of a Montessori education to

adolescents in the Inland Empire. From its inaugural community of 37 9 th and 10 th graders, the

school has grown to offer the full spectrum of adolescent education (7 th -12 th grades) to 230

students.

This growth has been matched physically. From an initial classroom, to a full high school

building, to two campuses and 9 acres of farmland, the school has come to fully embody Dr.

Maria Montessori’s vision for adolescent education. Her vision was to help children and young

adults find what is necessary for their individual development, and to participate in real-life

experiences to learn



What it means to live a fulfilled life in the company of others

What it means to exercise freedom of choice while taking responsibility for the impact of

their actions on the well-being of their local and global community

The RUSD has been instrumental in supporting the success of The Grove School. We see The

Grove School as a compliment to the excellent middle and high schools already present in

Redlands, nurturing individuals and families looking for an alternative form of education that

meets their needs and passions. Unique characteristics of The Grove School include

The opportunity to learn on a working farm and participate in agricultural programs

such as Future Farmers of America. Students interested in agricultural science and

economics have raised animals from chickens to pigs to cows over the years, many of

which win awards at county fairs.

The opportunity to practice entrepreneurial skills in a real-world setting. The Grove

farm is a functioning business run by students. Produce grown and harvested by students

is sold within the local community from restaurants to Gerrard’s grocery store. Running

of The Grove School Farmers Market is also supported by the students.

The opportunity to participate in project-based learning. Project-based learning is a

key component of the curriculum at The Grove School and serves to meet adolescents’

developmental need for community and social learning.

The Grove School is especially appreciative of the RUSD’s support in continuing to approve its

charter as the school grew to encompass the VanGrouw Dairy as well as its development of the

historic Barton Schoolhouse. This growth was key to building and strengthening the foundation

of The Grove School’s unique programming.

We feel that The Grove School continues to be a model for a successful charter school/district

partnership. We look forward to continuing to partner with the RUSD for the next charter

renewal period in supporting the success of the students and families who choose The Grove

School for middle and high school.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 1 of 127


To better understand The Grove School’s programs, it is helpful to understand some key

principles about Montessori education.

Montessori Educational Philosophy for Adolescents

“Our principle concern must be to educate humanity—the human beings of all nations—in order

to guide it toward seeking common goals. We must turn back and make the child our principal

concern. The efforts of science must be concentrated on him, because he is the source of and the

key to the riddles of humanity.” (Dr. Montessori, Education and Peace)

Dr. Maria Montessori (1870-1952) was one of the first female physicians in Italy. Shortly after

she graduated from University of Rome, she chose to apply her medical and anthropological

training to study how humans learn. Dr. Montessori studied children in all conditions (poor,

privileged, developmentally delayed/living in institutions) throughout the world, and discovered

universal principles underlying their development:

Children have a natural desire and drive to learn.

Children absorb all aspects of their culture and civilization without effort or fatigue.



If given the freedom to explore and make choices, children are self-motivated to learn.

This desire to learn through self-discovery will continue throughout their lifetime if

nurtured.

Her research and work with children grew into an educational approach that applies the child's

natural developmental stages as the framework for their education.

Key features of Montessori programs for all ages:

A “Prepared Adult” (educator) who is knowledgeable of the developmental stage of the

children, young adults, and adults that they are interacting with.

A “Prepared Environment” that is beautiful, ordered, and designed for multi-age

groupings, containing activities that respond to the specific needs of the age group. The

prepared environment encompasses both classrooms and outdoor spaces.

Key features of Montessori programs for adolescents:

Montessori education at the adolescent level changes dramatically from earlier ages to respond to

the very different needs of adolescents based on the significant psychological, emotional, and

social changes that happen during the transition from childhood to adulthood. Features include:

Learning in a social setting, working with others often, to focus and satisfy the

adolescent’s natural drive to be social.

Helping children follow their interests and passions to develop strong skills in academics,

leadership, self-discipline, responsibility, independence, and initiative.

Learning in an agricultural setting (preferably a farm) to help children understand the

symbiotic relationship of humans to the land and to practice practical, applied studies.

Opportunities for learning economics through producing items to sell or learning services

and hospitality skills to learn about working in a community



Working with and learning from a variety of adults in an apprenticeship model.

Opportunities to be away from home to develop more independent practical skills, socialemotional

skills, and a healthy psychological foundation.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 2 of 127


We extend an open invitation the RUSD board to visit The Grove School campus to see this

model of adolescent education in action.

Accomplishments from Previous Charter Term (2014-2018)

Academics, Learning, and Co-Curricular

Increased enrollment 3-5% annually, growing from 200 to 230 students

Average Daily Attendance increased from 95% to 96%

o Maintaining average chronic absenteeism rate over four years of less than 3%

Maintaining average suspension rate over four years of less than 1%

Graduation Rate Average from 2014-2018 = 99.4%

o 2014 = 100%

o 2015 = 97%

o 2016 = 100%

o 2017 = 100%

o 2018 = 100%

Post-Secondary Statistics of Graduates from 2015-2018

o 57.5% of graduates enrolled in a four-year college

o 27.5% of graduates enrolled in a two-year college

Graduation statistics by year from 2015-2018:

o 2015 - 28 graduates (one non-graduate), 19 students (68%) enrolled into a 4-yr, 8

students (29%) enrolled into a 2-yr, 1 no record

o 2016 - 32 graduates, 19 enrolled into a 4-yr (59%, 6 into a 2-yr (19%), 1 mission,

6 no record

o 2017 - 28 grads, 17 enrolled into a 4-yr (61%), 8 into a 2-yr (29%), 1 military, 2

no record

o 2018 - 24 graduates, 10 enrolled into a 4-yr (42%), 8 into a 2-yr (33%), 6 no

record

Implementation of new Schoolwide Learner Outcomes

o 81% of students earned a proficient rating or above on portfolios and student led

conference presentations with new Schoolwide Learner Outcomes

Support of Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Students

o Improved math scores overall by 64.3 points and English Language Arts (“ELA”)

by 77.5 points from 2016-2017 according to CA Dashboard Fall 2017

o No suspensions from 2014-2018

o 100% graduation rate from 2014-2018

o 36.4% indicated as College / Career ready according to CA Dashboard Fall 2017

Support of Hispanic Students

o Improved math scores overall by 45.6 points and English Language Arts by 32.2

points from 2016-2017 according to CA Dashboard Fall 2017

o No suspensions from 2014-2017

High achievement on SAT for 12 th graders in 2017-2018

o 100% met English Language Arts benchmarks

o 83% met Math benchmarks

National Merit Scholarship Achievement

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o 2018 = 2 Semi-Finalists and 2 Commended Scholars

o 2017 = 1 Finalist Scholar, 1 National Hispanic Recognition Scholar

o 2015 = 3 Commended Scholars

Increased percentage of students scoring 3+ on Advanced Placement Tests

o 2014 = 66% 2015 = 78% 2016 = 96% 2017 = 93% 2018 = 92%

11% of graduates were Advanced Placement Scholars in 2018

Created system for identifying low performing students in math and supporting them with

specialized classes

Added honors classes for 9-12 grade students in seven different classes

Added Advanced Placement Biology and Government classes

Added afterschool study hall and tutoring available for all students for 1.5 hours four

days a week

Created a system for using the Mathematics Diagnostic Testing Project (“MDTP”) that

was designed by the California State University system

Improved quality of all Key Experiences and Programs by setting clear expectations,

adding training for faculty, and providing support and supervision

o Orientation Week and Campouts, Winterims/Creative Academic Week-long

Experiences (“CAWE”), Mentoring, Senior Projects, Capstone Projects, and

Project Week

Added an orientation class for new students (16 hours) and teachers (3 hours) about the

critical elements of Grove, as well as the Montessori educational philosophy and

practices

Improved arts programs and offerings

o Added instrumental music and choir

o Enhanced visual arts program with ceramics studio

o Added arts performances—additional theater performance, new arts show, and

music performances three times a year

Improved athletics program by hiring an athletics director

o Added 2 high school sports

o Added 3 middle school sports

o Increased athletic involvement by more than 40%

Created new weeklong enrichment experience for high school students which required

more student input and control with clear connections to improved learning objectives

Partnered with the Armantrout Montessori Education Foundation to host a summer

program for young adolescents (students entering grades 7-9)

Continued Career Technical Education (CTE) skills development through wood shop,

metal shop, welding, blacksmithing, and agriculture integrated with the Montessori

curriculum

Facilities

Improved facilities on Farm Campus and High School

o Completed capital campaign raising more than $200,000 from parents and more

than $250,000 from community members such as the San Manuel Band of

Mission Indians

o Implemented renovation of the farmhouse annex, the school entrance, and the

ceramics studio

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 4 of 127


Completed full renovation of the Barton School House

Partnered with the City of Redlands to add the crosswalk spanning Orange Avenue

Improved quality of furniture overall and matching furniture in 14 of 15 classrooms

Finances

Continued financial stability with fund balance of more than 10% while completing

significant capital improvements and increasing academic, arts, and athletic offerings

Personnel and Professional Development

Added key leadership positions (Program Coordinator, Level Coordinators) and a

communications position

Created salary schedule and increased pay for teachers

Created system for all teachers to have four hours of preparation time each week

Strong and responsive counseling program for students and parents, including contracting

with a private counseling group to support the needs of students and parents

Facilitated hosting the Association Montessori International Adolescent Orientation at

The Grove School, making it the only place to host the course in the United States

outside of the traditional location of the Hershey Farm School in Ohio.

o Supported six of eight eligible Grove teachers to attend the training

Agricultural Program Achievements

Successfully awarded agriculture incentive grant for two plus years

Students attended National FFA conference in 2015

Students attend the California State FFA conference annually

Students have been voted High Desert Section FFA officers four out of the last five years.

Successful breeding and raising of annual Boar goat herd.

Annual raising of market hogs for showing and sale at the San Bernardino County fair or

through private sales

Initiated a market calf program at the school with the successful raising, showing, and

sale of calves

Continued development of the Grove School orchard with citrus, stone fruit, and figs.

Completion of a rabbit project

Market garden and row crops maintained and expanded for use in school kitchen, sale to

local restaurants, sale to Gerrard’s grocery store, and sale at the weekly farmer’s market

Partnerships and Accreditations

Western Association of Schools and Colleges (“WASC”) Six Year Accreditation (2015)

and successful mid-term review (2017)

Increased parent involvement by more than 10% (as reported on parent surveys)




High level of parent satisfaction with overall program and all aspects of the school

Developed and deepened positive relationships with the RUSD administration, the RUSD

school board, the City of Redlands, Esri, the Wildlands Conservancy (Oak Glen), and

Redlands Conservancy

Department meetings for 16 hours each year

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 5 of 127


Increased percentage of full time teachers at The Grove School who hold theh Montessori

Orientation credential by 36%, to 71%

Improved the reputation of The Grove School within the Montessori community locally,

nationally, and internationally by hosting professional development workshops and

conferences. The Grove School leaders have been invited to speak at national and

international conferences in 2016, 2017, and 2018

Created a partnership with Claremont Graduate School’s Psychology department to

evaluate autonomy support and independent learning at The Grove School

Charter Renewal Criteria

Evidence of Meeting Charter Renewal Standards Pursuant to Education Code Section

47607(b) and the California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Section 11966.4(a)(1)

Education Code Section 47607(b) requires that a charter school must meet at least one of the

following renewal criteria prior to receiving a charter renewal:

1) Attained its Academic Performance Index (API) growth target in the prior year or in two

of the last three years both schoolwide and for all groups of pupils served by the charter

school.

2) Ranked in deciles 4 to 10, inclusive, on the API in the prior year or in two of the last

three years.

3) Ranked in deciles 4 to 10, inclusive, on the API for a demographically comparable school

in the prior year or in two of the last three years.

4) The entity that granted the charter determines that the academic performance of the

charter school is at least equal to the academic performance of the public schools that the

charter school pupils would otherwise have been required to attend, as well as the

academic performance of the schools in the school district in which the charter school is

located, taking into account the composition of the pupil population that is served at the

charter school.

5) Has qualified for an alternative accountability system pursuant to Education Code

Section 52052.

The following shall serve as documentation confirming that the Charter School meets the

statutory criteria required for renewal as set forth in Education Code Section 47607(b)(1)-(4)

(Also see Appendix A: CDE DataQuest/CAASPP Reports):

*Note on Testing Data:

Assembly Bill 1808 amended Education Code Section 52052(f) to allow schools that utilized the

former API to apply the 2013 growth calculation for those purposes, and to use alternative

measures that show increases in pupil academic achievement for all groups of pupils schoolwide

and among numerically significant pupil subgroups for purposes of Education Code Section

47607(b)(1)-(3).

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 6 of 127


Analysis of the Most Recent API Calculation

Legal Requirements for Charter Renewal

Education Code Section 47607(b) – Charter School Must Meet at Least ONE Criteria for

Renewal

Renewal Criteria

Criteria Met

Attained its Academic Performance Index (API) growth target in the

prior year or in two of the last three years, both school wide and for all

groups of pupils served by the charter school.

Ranked in deciles 4 to 10, inclusive, on the API in the prior year or in

two of the last three years.

Ranked in deciles 4 to 10 inclusive, in the API for a demographically

comparable school in the prior year or in two of the last three years.

The entity that granted the charter determines that the academic

performance of the charter school is at least equal to the academic

performance of the public schools that the charter school pupils would

otherwise have been required to attend, as well as the academic

performance of the schools in the school district in which the charter

school is located, taking into account the composition of the pupil

population that is served at the charter school.

Has qualified for an alternative accountability system pursuant to

subdivision (h) of Education Code Section 52052

(Source: CDE DataQuest, accessed October 30, 2018)

Yes; most recent API (2013) is

870; met growth targets

schoolwide and for all

subgroups

See below for analysis of

alternative measures of

increases in academic

achievement

See below for analysis of

alternative measures of

increases in academic

achievement

Yes; see below

Not Applicable

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Analysis of Comparison Schools Data

The Grove School California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress

(“CAASPP”) Scores, 2015-18: Percentage of Students Meeting or Exceeding Standards

The Grove School – Grades 7, 8, and 11

Demographic Assessment 2015 2016 2017 2018 Average

Schoolwide ELA 74% 72% 69.90% 68.10% 71%

Math 57% 54% 45.63% 39.65% 49%

Hispanic or Latino ELA 48% 59% 73.68% 40% 55%

Math 16% 21% 47.37% 30% 29%

White ELA 75% 78% 67.21% 72.22% 73%

Math 66% 65% 39.34% 37.5% 52%

Economically

Disadvantaged

ELA 52% 50% 71.43% 38.89% 53%

Math 35% 25% 28.57% 27.78% 29%

The Grove School – Grade 7 and 8 Averaged Together*

Demographic Assessment 2015 2016 2017 2018 Average

Schoolwide ELA 66% 65% 67.13% 65.49% 66%

Math 59% 56% 45.73% 38.12% 50%

The Grove School – Grade 11*

Demographic Assessment 2015 2016 2017 2018 Average

Schoolwide ELA 75% 92% 79.16% 75.01% 80%

Math 51% 50% 45.84% 43.75% 48%

*The Grove School does not have enough students within any subgroup at a grade level to report

results for any subgroup. This means that The Grove School schoolwide data will have to be

used in comparing results to schools within Redlands Unified School District.

Due to a fairly small number of students in 11 th grade, of an average of 35 students, a few

students and their individual CAASPP results can change the schoolwide test results

dramatically. This can be seen in the 2016 results, where the percentage increased 17% from

2015 and then decreased 13% in 2017. Another example of abnormal changes in results due to

small numbers of students is in the Economically Disadvantaged subgroup where the percentage

of students meeting the standard fluctuates up 20% and then down 30% within three years. With

smaller numbers of students, it often makes it challenging, if not inaccurate, to generalize some

of the results to the how TGS is doing as a whole school. This is why it is important to look at

three or four year averages, in order to get a larger sample size from which to work.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 8 of 127


Comparison Schools That the Grove School Students Would Otherwise be Required to

Attend

Cope Middle School

Demographics Schoolwide 2015 2016 2017 2018 Average

Assessment

Schoolwide ELA 33% 62% 60.64% 59.97% 54%

Math 44% 55% 44.75% 43.89% 47%

Hispanic or ELA 43% 51% 48.27% 46.63% 47%

Latino

Math 26% 29% 29.29% 17.07% 25%

White ELA 70% 72% 68.82% 71.04% 70%

Math 58% 57% 56.71% 54.27% 56%

Economically ELA 46% 51% 47.07% 46.74% 48%

Disadvantaged Math 30% 32% 31.11% 30.55% 31%

Clement Middle School

Demographic Schoolwide 2015 2016 2017 2018 Average

Assessment

Schoolwide ELA 41% 45% 44.30% 50.37% 45%

Math 58% 32% 29.91% 30.40% 38%

Hispanic or Latino ELA 34% 40% 38.41% 44.76% 39%

Math 26% 27% 23.63% 22.85% 25%

White ELA 54% 59% 56.28% 61.33% 58%

Math 43% 41% 40.21% 47.19% 43%

Economically ELA 32% 38% 35.8% 42.03% 37%

Disadvantaged Math 25% 25% 23.23% 23.59% 24%

Redlands Senior High School

Demographic Schoolwide 2015 2016 2017 2018 Average

Assessment

Schoolwide ELA 77% 76% 79.66% 81.64% 79%

Math 44% 45% 52.68% 57.44% 49%

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 9 of 127


Comparison of Four-Year Averages between Middle Schools:

Percentage of Students Meeting or Exceeding Standards for CAASPP

Demographic

Schoolwide

Assessment

Grove

(7, 8, & 11 grade)

Cope

(6-8 grade)

Clement

(6-8 grade)

Schoolwide ELA 71% 54% 45%

Math 49% 47% 38%

Hispanic or Latino ELA 55% 47% 39%

Math 29% 25% 25%

White ELA 73% 70% 58%

Math 52% 56% 43%

Economically

ELA 53% 48% 37%

Disadvantaged

Math 29% 31% 24%

In comparing the four-year averages for students meeting or exceeding the standards for

CAASPP, the percentage of students from TGS who meet or exceed the standard for CAASPP,

as a whole group and for every sub-group, are above or similar than the comparative schools.

Comparison of Four-Year Average between Grove and Redlands Senior High:

Percentage of Students Meeting or Exceeding Standards for CAASPP

Demographic

Schoolwide Grove

Redlands Senior High

Assessment (11 th grade)

(11 th grade)

Schoolwide ELA 80% 79%

Math 48% 49%

In comparing the four-year averages for students meeting or exceeding the standards for

CAASPP, the percentage of students from TGS who meet or exceed the standard for CAASPP,

as a whole group are similar to the comparative school.

Comparison Schools That Are Demographically Similar in the District

Cope School and Redlands Senior High School are the schools that are the most similar

demographically to The Grove School. The scores are reported above in the section comparing

scores for a school that students otherwise would be attending.

Alternative Measures of Success

All students in grades 8-11 at TGS take the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT),

including all students in subgroups. There are less than 2% of the students who opt out of taking

the PSAT annually. TGS students have scored well in the PSAT, specifically when comparing

data to California averages, national averages, and district averages (when available). The

percentage of 8 th and 9 th grade students at TGS who meet the benchmark is 40% points higher

than the state average in ERW and 20% points higher in Math. In 10 th and 11 th grade, the

percentage of TGS students who meet the benchmark are 12-14% points higher than the state

average in ERW and 1% point higher in Math.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 10 of 127


This data supports the goal to improve performance on mathematics tests with the percentage of

students meeting the benchmark being significantly lower than the ERW percentages, yet similar

to the state and district results when comparing results for all students in a grade level.

PSAT Results for 2017

Percentage of students who met the benchmarks for English Reading and Writing

8 th Grade 9 th Grade 10 th Grade 11 th Grade

The Grove School 83% 82% 65% 73%

Redlands Unified NA NA 61%* 87%**

California 43% 43% 53% 59%

United States & World 54% 57% 63% 68%

Percentage of students who met the benchmarks for Mathematics

8 th Grade 9 th Grade 10 th Grade 11 th Grade

The Grove School 43% 49% 32% 37%

Redlands Unified NA NA 34%* 61%**

California 26% 27% 31% 36%

United States & World 37% 40% 40% 46%

*There were 1534 students in the 10 th grade who completed the PSAT, which is likely most of

the 10 th graders within RUSD. This would be a comparative score since all students at TGS take

the PSAT.

**There were 604 students in 11 th grade who completed the PSAT, which is around one-third of

the 11 th graders within RUSD. This would not be a comparative score since not all District 11 th

grade students took the PSAT, whereas all 11 th grade students at TGS took the PSAT.

Scholastic Aptitude Test (“SAT”) Data

There are a high percentage of students at TGS who meet the SAT benchmarks in ELA and Math

annually with an average of 84% of TGS 12 th grade students completing the SAT. TGS students

also consistently outperform RUSD, San Bernardino County and California students on the SAT.

These high scores are especially impressive when considering that an average of 84% of TGS

12 th grade students complete the test, compared to less than 50% of the 12 th grade students in

RUSD, San Bernardino County and California who complete the SAT. This indicates that TGS

is doing very well in preparing a much larger percentage of its students for college.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 11 of 127


SAT Results 2017-2018

Name

Grade

12

Enrollment

No.

Tested

No. Mtg

Current

ELA

Benchmark

No. Mtg

Previous

ELA

Benchmark

Total

No.

Meeting

ELA

Benchmarks

Percent

Mtg ELA

Benchmarks

No. Mtg

Current

Math

Benchmark

No. Mtg

Previous

Math

Benchmark

Total

No.

Meeting

Math

Benchmarks

Percent

Mtg

Math

Benchmarks

Grove 28 24 17 7 24 100.00

%

13 7 20 83.33%

Redlands

Unified

San

Bern.

County

Statewide

1,861 865 669 50 719 83.12% 465 47 512 59.19%

32,139 13,261 8,973 223 9,196 69.35% 5,601 185 5,786 43.63%

484,169 221,433 144,893 15,103 159,996 72.25% 98,504 13,887 112,391 50.76%

2015-2016

2014-2015

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 12 of 127


2013-2014

Advanced Placement Test Results

TGS offers Advanced Placement (“AP”) classes to 11 th and 12 th grade students annually, and

students may choose to complete AP exams annually. AP exams are scored on a scale of 1 to 5

with five being the top score and a score of three demonstrating proficiency. TGS students have

improved their scores over the past four years and are currently maintaining over 90% of the

students earning scores of three or above. See the chart below for details.

Additional Justification for Charter Renewal

Analysis of Charter Renewal Criteria – Student Subgroups

Education Code Section 47607(a)(3) states: The authority that granted the charter shall consider

increases in pupil academic achievement for all groups of pupils served by the charter school

(defined as “a numerically significant pupil subgroup, as defined by paragraph (3) of subdivision

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 13 of 127


(a) of Section 52052.” EC §47607(a)(3)(B)) as the most important factor in determining whether

to grant a charter renewal.

Suspension Rate

Grove

Redlands Senior Cope

Clement

High

All Students 0.5% 2.7% 5.0% 3.2%

Socioeconomically 0.0% 3.5% 7.2% 3.6%

Disadvantaged

Hispanic / Latino 0.0% 4.1% 6.3% 4.1%

White 0.8% 1.2% 3.5% 0.9%

TGS is a very safe school with a few serious discipline issues annually. Students in our

numerically significant subgroups are usually not involved in the more serious discipline

situations. The percentage of students being suspended annually is incredibly low as

demonstrated in the above table.

Graduation Rate

Grove

Redlands Senior

High

All Students 100% 95.9%

Socioeconomically

Disadvantaged

100% 93.5%

Hispanic / Latino 100% 97.3%

White 100% 94.7%

TGS has 100% of its students graduate annually. Students in subgroups also have a 100%

graduation rate. TGS does an excellent job in supporting all students to graduate from high

school.

LCAP Achievements – Highlights from 2017-2018

Goal #1 – Document skill and knowledge objectives for each subject

Develop six-year schoolwide competency objectives, and a six-year plan to achieve the

competency objectives within each academic discipline that align with Montessori education.

Six of seven eligible teachers completed the Montessori Orientation to Adolescent

Studies in 2018

99% of parents and guardians attended student led conferences

Average Daily Attendance increased to 96%

The new Schoolwide Learner Outcomes were implemented in all classes and used in

student led conferences and portfolios

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 14 of 127


Goal #2 – Improve learning environments

Create learning environments that follow the principles of Montessori education and support the

specific needs of each discipline.



The Barton School House was opened, adding four new classrooms with the flexibility of

transforming the classrooms into one large assembly space

A ceramic studio was added to the learning environment for the visual arts program

Goal #3 – Identify and support students with academic challenges

and students seeking more challenges

To improve student learning, engagement and preparation for college and life Grove will create

and implement an action plan to support students through appropriately challenging courses,

opportunities, and materials for either “low-performing” or “high-performing” students.

*Grove will identify students as “high” or “low” performing through a data review that includes

performance on key assessments (SBAC, PSAT, summative class assessments), work

completion, grades in classes, and attendance.



Identification system and process was implemented to identify high and low performing

students

Created honors classes for students to increase opportunity for academic challenge

Goal #4 – Increase the understanding of Montessori education

and Grove’s mission, vision and values

Increase the understanding of Montessori educational philosophy, the school’s mission, vision,

and values, as well as the practical information and work related to being a member of The

Grove School and a community centered on working with adolescents.





Orientation class for all new students was implemented

Over 80% of new families attended the New Family Orientation in August

Increased professional development about Grove’s Key Experiences for teaching faculty

Added a staff retreat to support development of cohesive professional relationships and

work on specific professional development goals for the year

WASC Goal Achievements from 2015-2017

The LCAP and WASC goals are mostly aligned, but the achievements that are different are

identified below:




Provide each teacher with four hours of preparation time each week

Contract with outside counseling service to provide additional social, emotional, and

mental health support for students

Moved middle school core classes to the morning to support more focused academic time

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 15 of 127


Developed rotation of courses to enable more consistent planning by students and the

school counselor

Established new positions to support improved academic standards (Program

Coordinator) and outdoor learning facilities (Farm Coordinator)

Added one part time English teacher, one part-time science teacher, one part-time social

science teacher, one part-time choir teacher, one part-time athletic director

Increased number of mentors for middle school students

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 16 of 127


Element 1: The Grove School

Educational Program

Governing Law: The educational program of the charter school, designed, among other things,

to identify those whom the charter school is attempting to educate, what it means to be an

“educated person” in the 21 st century, and how learning best occurs. The goals identified in that

program shall include the objective of enabling pupils to become self-motivated, competent, and

lifelong learners. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(A)(i).

The annual goals for the charter school for all pupils and for each subgroup of pupils identified

pursuant to Section 52052, to be achieved in the state priorities, as described in subdivision (d)

of Section 52060, that apply for the grade levels served, or the nature of the program operated,

by the charter school, and specific annual actions to achieve those goals. A charter petition may

identify additional school priorities, the goals for the school priorities, and the specific annual

actions to achieve those goals. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(A)(ii).

If the proposed charter school will serve high school pupils, the manner in which the charter

school will inform parents about the transferability of courses to other public high schools and

the eligibility of courses to meet college entrance requirements. Courses offered by the charter

school that are accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges may be

considered transferable and courses approved by the University of California or the California

State University as creditable under the “A” to “G” admissions criteria may be considered to

meet college entrance requirements. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(A)(iii).

The Grove School’s Mission, Vision and Values

Mission

The Grove School is a public Montessori community that guides adolescents in their work of

self-construction, as they become engaged and respectful world citizens.

Vision

The Grove School relies on the framework for adolescent education defined by Maria

Montessori. At the core of her vision is the expectation that students will “pass from one stage of

independence to a higher [one], by means of their own activity, through their own effort or will.”

The Grove School’s unique, rich, safe, challenging, relevant and comprehensive program is

valued as a vital part of Redlands heritage and legacy. All members of our community model

respect and clear communication in order to foster collaboration and cooperation.

Grove’s student-centered model allows students to practice the principle of freedom with

responsibility. Montessori’s vision of Erdkinder underlies our program, providing a prepared

farm environment for students to engage in purposeful and meaningful work that helps lead them

towards independence through real-life challenges. This work has to engage the hands, they need

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 17 of 127


to be active, moving, be physically involved. At the same time they need to be engaging their

intellect in the same task, to plan what their activity is, to analyze the best way to carry it out, to

test it, use trial and error to work towards mastery. At the high school level, students in Grove

classrooms will work with skilled and dedicated teachers who use project-based instruction,

frequent group work, and real-life application of concepts to prepare students for the challenges

of university education. Grove teaching is based on intrinsic motivation; providing a rigorous

curriculum with high expectations for individual achievement.

A Grove student will be the architect of her own future; learning from peers and teachers how to

live an authentic life beyond perceived boundaries.

We Value









Creation of curious, observant, flexible, confident, courageous and independent citizens

Contributions to community through internships

Community Partnerships

Adults modeling responsible, optimistic adulthood where everyone pursues work with

passion

Efforts to make the world a better place than when we entered it

Prepared environments that allow students to learn and appreciate stewardship of the

natural world

A community that respects all members as agents for change and promoters of peace

Post-secondary education

Targeted Student Population

Student Enrollment and Grade Levels Served

The Grove School currently serves 230 students in grades 7 through 12. The Grove Middle

School program consists of grades 7 through 9, while the High School consists of grades 10

through 12. TGS anticipates serving approximately 230-250 students annually with the

possibility of continued slow growth to a higher number of students over time, if such growth is

determined to support TGS in meeting its mission and vision. The exact enrollment capacity will

be determined annually by Grove’s governing board (see Enrollment and Outreach Plan in

Appendix B).

Student Demographics

In accordance with the requirements of the Charter Schools Act of 1992, TGS shall continue to

maintain an open enrollment policy. However, TGS will also be particularly interested in

attracting students who potentially hold the following abilities, capabilities, and interests:

1. Interested and capable in having more autonomy in their education to follow their

interests in a more inquiry project-based model

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 18 of 127


2. Interested in and capable of learning in a social setting and building a strong and wellfunctioning

community

3. Desire to do and learn practical and manual work that demonstrates new knowledge and

skills

4. Working in collaboration to learn and improve themselves and the community

5. Restoring and resolving problems and issues with other people directly

2018-2019 TGS Student Demographics (Race and Ethnicity)

Ethnic Codes Female Male Total Percent

Hispanic or Latino 36 22 58 25.11%

700 – White (non-

Hispanic)

66 64 130 56.28%

200 – Asian (non-

Hispanic)

14 8 22 9.52%

300 – Pacific

Islander

1 0 1 0.43%

400 – Filipino 3 2 5 2.16%

600 – Black 2 2 4 1.73%

Multi-Ethnic 5 6 11 4.76%

TOTALS 127 104 231

2017-2018 Enrollment by Ethnicity from Data Quest

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 19 of 127


2014-2018 TGS Student Demographics (Race and Ethnicity)

(CDE Data Quest – Accessed 9/10/2018)

Student Sub-Groups

Sub-groups have stayed consistent at TGS over the past five years. The most fluctuation is in the

socioeconomically disadvantaged group. This may be attributed to accepting more ninth grade

students and giving a high priority to students who live in the attendance area of the local

elementary school (Mission Elementary).

Sub group 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019

English Learners 4 4 2 4 4

Foster Youth 0 0 0 0 0

Homeless 7 10 5 2 1

Migrant Youth 0 0 0 0 0

Students with Disabilities 29 24 22 25 28

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 42 56 34 35 37

All Students 212 214 216 224 231

Attendance

School year, academic calendar, number of school days, and instructional minutes

The school year begins one or two weeks before Labor Day depending on when winter and

spring break are scheduled. There are three longer breaks in the school year: Fall, Winter, and

Spring. Fall break occurs the third week of November, Winter Break is usually the last week of

December and the first week of January, and Spring Break is usually the third week of March.

TGS uses trimesters for its academic calendar to allow for flexibility for its enrichment classes

and arts and physical education and health class rotation for 7th and 8th graders.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 20 of 127


Grove offers 180 school days each year and 65,400 instructional minutes in the 2018-2019

school year, and intends to offer the same number of school days and instructional minutes for

the next charter term.

2018-2019 Annual Calendar

School Starts at 8:00 AM

School Ends at 3:00 PM

2018-2019 Annual Calendar – Important Dates

August 23

Back to School Night

August 27

First Day of School

August 29-31

Middle School Camp Out

October 18–20

Student Led Conferences

November 19 Fall Break (1 week) , End of Trimester 1

November 28-30

High School Camp Out

Dec. 24 – Jan. 4

Winter Break (2 weeks) - NO SCHOOL

January 7

In-service - NO SCHOOL

January 8

School Resumes (Wednesday)

March 7 – 14

CAWE / Winterim

March 15 (4-6 PM)

Presentations by CAWE / Winterim Groups

March 18-22

Spring Break = (1 week) - NO SCHOOL, End of

Trimester 2

May 22 – 24

Student Led Conferences

June 13 Last Day of School, End of Trimester 3

A copy of the 2018-19 annual calendar is attached as Appendix C.

Weekly Schedule

The weekly schedule is a mix of conventional schedule, block scheduling, mini-courses and

mentorship.

Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

7:30 AM Faculty Arrives

8:00 AM Morning Meeting

8:15 AM Class 1 Class 1 Class 3 Class 5 Class 1

9:15 AM Class 2 Class 2

10:15 AM Class 3 Class 2 Mentorship Class 6 Class 3

11:15 AM Class 4 Class 4

12:15 PM LUNCH

1:00 PM Class 5 Mini-Course 1 Class 4 Mini-Course 2 Class 5

2:00 PM Class 6 Class 6

2:55 PM Classes End and Cleaning / Restoration of Environments Begins

3:00 PM Students Get Picked Up

3:15 PM Middle School Students = Study hall (ends at 4:30 pm)

High School Students = Study hall (ends at 4:30 pm) or parking lot for pick up

3:30 PM Faculty Day Officially Over

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 21 of 127


Attendance expectations and requirements

TGS has an attendance policy and it is in the TGS School Handbook

What it means to be an Educated Person in the 21st Century

California is a member of the Partnership for 21st Century State Leadership Network that helps

prepare students for Common Core State Standards and Career Readiness Standards.

As stated on the California Department of Education (“CDE”) website (https://www.cde.ca.gov/

eo/in/cr/p21cskls.asp):

The P21 Framework was developed to help practitioners integrate skills into the teaching of core

academic subjects. The Partnership has developed a unified, collective vision for learning known

as the Framework for 21st Century Learning. This Framework describes the skills, knowledge,

and expertise students must master to succeed in work and life: it is a blend of content

knowledge specific skills, expertise, and literacies. The essential skills for success in today’s

world include the following:

Learning and Innovation Skills (The Four C’s: Critical thinking, Communication,

Collaboration, and Creativity)

Life and Career Skills

Information, Media, and Technological Skills

These skills are learned across the expanded core subjects, essential for all students in the 21st

Century. These include:

English, Reading, or Language Arts

World Languages

Arts

Mathematics

Economics

Science

Geography

History

Government and Civics

In addition to these subjects, the Partnership for 21st Century Skills believes schools must move

to include not only a focus on mastery of core skills, but also promote understanding of academic

content at much higher levels by weaving 21st Century interdisciplinary themes into core

subjects. 21st Century Themes include:

Global Awareness

Financial, Economic, Business, and Entrepreneurial Literacy

Civic Literacy

Health Literacy

Environmental Literacy

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 22 of 127


Enabling students to become self-motivated, competent, lifelong learners

TGS believes an educated person in the 21 st century is someone who is liberally educated in

academic subjects, who knows who they are as a person, and who understands how their

individual interests and skills can be used to improve their community for the betterment of

society. They will also learn how to be motivated and confident as well as think critically, work

collaboratively, and communicate effectively.

As a scholar, each individual should be proficient in all disciplines, specifically social studies,

mathematics, science, languages, and the arts. Because educated individuals are members not

only of a local community but a global society, they should be proficient in at least one other

language in addition to English.

As an athlete, each individual should be able to pursue appropriate physical challenges and hold

knowledge of the fundamentals of safe and healthy living and lifestyle.

As a citizen, each individual must understand the framework of our constitutional democracy and

the rights and responsibilities of each citizen in the democratic process, as well as an awareness

of important political issues.

As a community member, an educated person is able to collaborate with others, cooperate on

projects, and knows how to provide meaningful service to others.

Finally, as a member of an increasingly technical and information-based world, each individual

should be competent with using digital and electronic technology.

TGS seeks to assist all of its students to become well educated according to these criteria by

providing developmentally appropriate activities and challenges for each student to experience

and master. In accordance with Montessori theory, TGS endeavors to provide learning

environments where students may freely choose to engage in activities appropriate to their

intrinsic motivation to learn. These experiences will encourage and promote the gaining of skills

and competencies, confidence, and knowledge, that will enable students to master the outcomes

listed above.

TGS is committed to the objective of enabling its students to become self-motivated, competent,

and lifelong learners. TGS’s educational program is designed to promote individual initiative,

critical thinking, and community awareness in its students. Specific tools to bring about this selfmotivated

learning development include:

Individualized tutoring and learning in small group settings

Student-initiated off-campus learning opportunities

Community service and internship project requirements

Biannual portfolio review

Senior project requiring demonstration of skills and knowledge

TGS also recognizes that access to and use of technology is essential to preparing students for

post-secondary education as well as for productive positions in the business and professional

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 23 of 127


world. TGS has therefore adopted and is implementing a comprehensive technology plan that

includes the following elements:

Plan for the acquisition of appropriate software, hardware, and internet capability

Plan for the implementation of computers in the educational programs

Plan for student competencies in computer literacy

Plan for the use of computer technology in core instructional activities

Appropriate safeguards for the use of and access to information databases

Specific tools to bring about this self-motivated learning development include:

Relevant and meaningful curriculum aligned to California state standards

Individualized tutoring and learning in small group settings

Student-initiated off-campus learning opportunities

Community service and internship project requirements

Biannual portfolio review for all students

Projects requiring demonstration of skills and knowledge

Age appropriate language and citizenship requirements

Academic skills and qualities important for an educated person

In 2017, TGS wrote new Schoolwide Learner Outcomes (“SLOs”) to replace the previous

Expected Schoolwide Learner Results (“ESLRs”). The new outcomes are explained and

documented below:

Outcomes and Expectations for a Grove Graduate

“For this would result in a valorization of his personality, in making him feel himself capable of

succeeding in life by his own efforts and on his own merits, and at the same time it would put him

in direct contact with the supreme reality of social life.”-- Montessori, Maria. From Childhood

to Adolescence. Clio Press. 2005. Pgs. 102-103.

In preparation for adult life, Grove students will pursue activities that enhance their capabilities

through work that is done in the classroom, on the land, and in the student community, with the

guidance of experts and specialists. This work can be understood through the student’s psychic

development, community involvement, creative expression, physical expression, and conscious

actions to prepare for life after Grove.

A Grove graduate actively participates in their psychic (academic) development.

As a scholar, a Grove graduate is able to connect knowledge in the areas of social studies,

mathematics, science, languages, and the arts.

A Grove graduate constructs knowledge through inquiry-based, cross-curricular activities

and assignments.

As members of not only a local community, but a global society, a Grove graduate is

knowledgeable in at least one language other than English.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 24 of 127


Evidence / Artifacts

Students will:

Determine and understand Key Vocabulary.

Successfully Analyze Texts, Problems, Artifacts and Situations, from Multiple

Perspectives.

Successfully Synthesize Information from various sources and disciplines.

Defend a Position with evidence and properly cite their evidence.

Reflect on Successes and Failures and create goals to further their development.

A Grove graduate is an active community member

As a community member, a Grove graduate connects a combination of academic pursuits

with meaningful experiences in the school, local, and global communities, and

understands that this pursuit is necessary to provide the greatest benefit to society and

themselves.

A Grove graduate understands that to be an active community member, they need to

actively pursue opportunities to work with experts and specialists.

A Grove graduate knows that participating in community service is necessary to have a

well-functioning community.

Evidence / Artifacts

Students will:

Provide examples of their service and participation in community-oriented service and

events.

Actively take steps to pursue career interests.

Demonstrate awareness of community issues.

A Grove graduate expresses ideas creatively

A Grove graduate understands that creative expression is an important part of the human

experience.

A Grove graduate actively cultivates an appreciation for, and skill sets in, different forms

of artistic and creative self-expression.

Evidence / Artifacts

Students will:

Effectively and creatively communicate when presenting information.

Create and use a variety of tools to complete a project.

Creatively relate concepts and ideas through multiple perspectives.

Express emotions and ideas through original creations.

A Grove graduate is involved in physical expression

A Grove graduate understands the importance of physical activity and healthy living.

A Grove graduate actively pursues a healthy and active lifestyle.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 25 of 127


Evidence / Artifacts

Students will:

Create a personal plan for better physical health.

Actively pursue activities that allow for physical expression.

A Grove graduate is prepared for life as an adult

A Grove graduate demonstrates what it means to have economic and social

independence.

A Grove graduate is prepared for life after high school beyond academic requirements.

A Grove graduate has set goals and designed a plan to achieve them.

A Grove graduate is skilled at creating and being peace.

Evidence / Artifacts

Students will:

Demonstrate an understanding of financial independence and entrepreneurial endeavors.

Demonstrate an understanding of social independence.

Demonstrate good study habits and practices.

Create goals and design a plan to achieve them.

Demonstrate an understanding of how their actions and plans will make a more peaceful

world.

Non-academic skills and qualities important for an educated person

In the documentation above for Partnership for 21st Century Skills, the following non-academic

skills and qualities are identified as being important:

Learning and Innovation Skills (The Four C’s: Critical thinking, Communication,

Collaboration, and Creativity)

Life and Career Skills

Information, Media, and Technological Skills

TGS agrees that the skills that P21 lists are important non-academic skills and qualities. TGS

also focuses on creating opportunities for students to learn and develop the following skills in

order to be an educated person and this list is supported in multiple studies related to skills

employers and colleges view as important or lacking in current graduates:

Leadership

Work ethic

Initiative, self-motivation, drive

Planning and organizing

Time management

Listening, compassion, understanding multiple perspectives

Responsibility, dependability

Flexibility

Sense of humor

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 26 of 127


Description of How Learning Best Occurs

Instructional Design

TGS seeks to educate adolescent students using the Montessori approach as developed by Dr.

Maria Montessori during the first half of the 20th century.

The Montessori approach is most familiar for younger children; however, Dr. Montessori was

interested in the full continuum of childhood. For 12 to 18-year-olds, Dr. Montessori noted that

adolescents are in a special stage of life, on the threshold of adulthood. Because of this, the

environment should reflect all aspects of adult life, providing children with the opportunities to

not only pursue academic interests, but also to participate in real adult practical work in a social

setting as close to a real society as possible. Through experiences of everyday life and its

responsibilities, adolescents practice what it takes to become a contributing member of a wider

society. This experience includes an initiation into economics and an understanding of its

importance for everyday life. Another important aspect of the environment is that it should put

the adolescents in close contact with nature to instill an appreciation and understanding of the

symbiotic relationship between people and the planet on which we live and are a part of.

This instructional design is structured with three aspects: the adult (facilitator), the

child/adolescent (learner), and the learning environment (classroom, outdoors, community, land,

etc.). This type of natural or organic education where students have freedom to move, freedom to

choose work, and freedom to collaborate, requires a tremendous amount of structure to support

these freedoms to allow for engaged learning.

This model recognizes the needs of secondary-age students to engage in what Dr. Montessori

called, “a rigorous course of academic study” combined with meaningful, hands-on experiences

and, for the younger students, daily work outdoors. Montessori believed that a combination of

intellectual and hands-on activities was the best curriculum for the dynamic stages of adolescent

development.

Specific tools to bring about this self-motivated learning development include:

Relevant and meaningful curriculum aligned to California state standards (including the

Common Core State Standards, Next Generation Science Standards, and History-Social

Science Frameworks)

Projects requiring demonstration of skills and knowledge

Problems to solve that require new knowledge and practical skills to address the issue at

the school, on the campus, or in the local community

Engagement through opportunities of self-expression

Opportunities for production and exchange on campus or with the local community

Age appropriate language and citizenship requirements

Individualized micro-lessons and learning in small group settings

Student-initiated off-campus learning opportunities

Community service and internship project opportunities

Biannual portfolio review for all students

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 27 of 127


The emphasis on freedom with responsibility in Montessori education for adolescents supports

the development of children’s executive functioning, which has been proven by research to be

one of the most crucial requirements for college and career readiness, and life as a successful

contributing member of society. Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child calls

adolescence “a vital ‘window of opportunity’ for building core life skills—and for practitioners

to provide support.” Research compiled by UNICEF shows that “a growing body of scientific

knowledge shows that experience and environment also combine with genetics to shape the

brains of adolescents. This presents a second, crucially important window of opportunity to

influence the development of children’s brains – and thus, their futures.” (Emphasis added.) For

research related to adolescent development, TGS recommends the UNICEF study titled The

Adolescent Brain: A second window of opportunity - A Compendium (available for download at

https://reliefweb.int/report/world/adolescent-brain-second-window-opportunity-compendium as

of November 2018).

TGS will provide students with the opportunity to develop and maintain their individual potential

by allowing them to explore a wide range of interests. Students will do so within a small school

environment with access to the resources of the greater community. TGS provides a stable and

committed learning environment with long-term, individualized attention for each student. The

faculty is held accountable for ensuring that TGS students achieve the high academic and

community standards set for them.

TGS also recognizes that access to and use of technology is essential to preparing students for

post-secondary education as well as for productive positions in the business and professional

world.

Following the Montessori educational model, students may pursue a combination of traditional

and non-traditional high school curricula within a small school environment, provided they meet

the core subject requirements listed below. Students will also combine their academic pursuits

with meaningful experiences through internships with professionals in the community, local

businesses, research organizations, and academic communities.

Each student will work under the guidance of an assigned teacher (the student’s mentor) to

design a course of study that contains both material of personal interest and core course work.

Students will also be members of small learning groups on the campus. Working with their

mentor, students will be responsible for recruiting guest teachers and specialists and also for

arranging additional, off-site learning. Mentors will help students set goals, support their social

and emotional development, meet state and post-secondary requirements, and make reasonable

progress toward graduation. Core subjects will be offered on campus by credentialed faculty

(teachers). Students will also have opportunities to study off-site with field specialists or on

alternate campuses, such as local colleges and universities for the high school students or

internships and service opportunities for junior high school students.

Students will also participate in the Montessori tradition of community service at different points

in their educational experience. Working with the guidance of their mentors, students will design

community-based experiences on the farm or in the local community that will help them meet

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 28 of 127


their individual competency goals. These experiences will be assessed as part of each student’s

biannual competency review.

A senior project will serve to synthesize and focus the student’s secondary experience while

providing a venue for the demonstration of skills and knowledge. A panel consisting of the

student’s mentor, other educators, and community members will review this project.

TGS Curriculum

Dr. Montessori’s Plan of Study and Work for Adolescents (12-18 Year olds)

Dr. Montessori’s writings about the adolescent level are consolidated into a simple chart (below)

to see the general plan of study for the adolescent level. The chart is divided into two aspects:

Practical Considerations of Social Organization, and Educational Syllabus.

The Practical Considerations of Social Organization are a list of aspects that will bring students

into contact with social situations that will help them engage in meaningful learning. TGS has

elements of each of these practical considerations, but not always in totality or at the ideal level.

Specifically, TGS does not have a residential program, but it does have opportunities for students

to travel together on multi-day trips, go on camping trips, or stay late at school for evening

events.

The Educational Syllabus is a list of curriculum topics with a slant towards progression of

humanity with the lens of positivity and optimism to encourage engagement, initiative, and

contribution to the community. It is important to note that the term “moral education” is in

reference to character education and how the individual can follow their own interests that are

also supportive of and responsible to the community.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 29 of 127


Dr. Maria Montessori’s Plan of Study and Work for 12-18 Year Olds

A. Practical Considerations of Social Organization B. Educational Syllabus









Prepared Environment (work that requires

new knowledge and practical skills to

complete for benefit of school and/or local

community)

o Physical Environment/Occupations as

Materials

Residence for Young People/Their Community

Homes (community building, learning

independence from parents/guardians)

o Practical Life Skills, Jobs Required in a

Household/House Cleaning and

Chores/ Domestic Arrangement

o Organizing for Comfort and Order

Farm (applied science, math, & other subjects)

o Organic Produce and Livestock

o Natural Resource Management

o Machine Use and Maintenance

o House and Building Maintenance

o Trail and Woodlot Maintenance

Store (business and entrepreneurial

experience)

o Shop of Produce/Goods

o Commerce and Exchange

o Craft Production

Guesthouse / Rental Business (business and

entrepreneurial experience)

Museum of Machinery (understand history of

technology)

Adolescents

o 12–18 years or 12–15 years/15–18

years

Adults (as materials in the environment for

adolescents to learn from about being an

adult)

o House Parents

o Teachers Living There

o Visiting Teachers

o Technical Instructors

o Workmen and Work Women

o Parents / Guardians

1. Self-Expression

a. Music

b. Language

c. Art

2. Psychic Development

a. Moral Education

b. Mathematics

c. Language

3. Preparation for Adult Life

a. The Study of the Earth and Living

Things

(geology, geography including

prehistoric periods, biology,

cosmology, botany, zoology,

physiology, astronomy, and

comparative anatomy)

b. The Study of Human Progress and the

Building Up of Civilization

(physics, chemistry, mechanics,

engineering, and genetics integrated

into the history of science and

technology—“supranature” )

c. The Study of the History of Humanity

(scientific discoveries, geographical

explorations, relation of humans to the

environment, contact between

different peoples, war, religion,

patriotism, a detailed study of one

period, the life of one person, the

present day and nation, law and

government, literature)

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 30 of 127


Broad outline of curriculum content

Students at all levels will be expected to gain proficiency in the following core subjects:

Mathematics: Students must demonstrate the ability to reason logically and to understand

arithmetic, algebraic and geometric concepts, and other practical and theoretical mathematical

concepts.

Social Studies: Students explore the history of humanity in relation to life’s purpose. Students

must demonstrate an understanding of historical, economic, and geographic concepts and possess

a basic knowledge of the world’s diverse cultures, and must have a working knowledge of civics,

government, and American history.

Languages: Students must demonstrate strong communication skills including reading, writing,

and listening skills. Students must understand and appreciate literature from various periods and

cultures. Students will gain proficiency in at least one language in addition to English.

Science: Students will utilize research and inquiry methods to demonstrate and understand major

concepts underlying biology, environmental science, chemistry, physics, and earth science, in

addition to their own areas of interest.

Arts: Students will cultivate an appreciation for and/or skill in one or more forms of artistic self

expression (e.g., music, choir, literary/visual/studio arts, drama, dance, etc.).

These core subject areas will be further subdivided into a list of specific skills in each of the

above areas at different skill levels and depending on individual course of study. These specific

skill-level standards will align with California state content and performance standards, including

the Common Core State Standards (“CCSS”), Next Generation Science Standards (“NGSS”),

History-Social Science Framework, English Language Development (“ELD”) Standards, and

any other applicable state content standards (hereinafter, collectively “State Standards”).

Students will take all state-mandated standardized assessments, including the California

Assessment of Student Performance and Progress Assessments (“CAASPP”), which includes the

Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (“SBAC”) tests, California Science Test (“CAST”),

California Alternate Assessments (“CAAs”), the English Language Proficiency Assessments for

California (“ELPAC”), the Physical Fitness Testing (“PFT”), and any other applicable statemandated

standardized assessments and schoolwide assessments.

Students graduating from the high school are expected to meet or exceed the entrance

requirements for college or university, including the “A-G requirements” of the University of

California. In addition to attaining specific content areas and skill-level standards, students will

also demonstrate overall progress toward graduation readiness through a series of portfolio and

competency reviews at both the junior and senior high school levels.

To best serve our students and community, TGS will continue to examine and refine its list of

core subjects over time to reflect the Charter School’s mission and any changes in state or local

standards that affect this mission. In addition, students will be required to satisfactorily complete

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 31 of 127


other such core courses that TGS Governing Board deems appropriate. Staff and/or the Grove

School Governing Board will periodically review college entrance requirements and state

standards to determine which changes shall be introduced to the core curriculum.

Students will meet or exceed state expectations for scores on standardized tests.

Signature Practices

Scheduling

Grove operates on a modified block schedule, with 6 periods of core classes, one block of

mentoring per week, and two blocks of Minicourses. This schedule supports students having

time to work in-depth, learn by doing, work collaboratively, connect with local experts, and work

on interdisciplinary projects. The schedule also can be flexed and altered for whole school events

that help to build the community at TGS.

Mentoring

All teachers are assigned 12-20 students to mentor each year. Mentoring consists of supporting

the assigned group of mentees in their academic, personal, and professional development.

Mentoring consists of:

Supporting students in academic, community (social), civic (community

service/internship), health-related (athletic), and technological (skill building and

organizational) goals

Interfacing with parents, other faculty, and the adult world when necessary, always

remembering to foster independence

Imparting information

Guiding goal setting

Monitoring progress and intervening when necessary

Celebrating successes



Advocating when necessary (special services, discipline, academic interventions)

Providing enrichment and resources, sharing personal experiences, and encouraging

exploration of new opportunities and options

Student Led Conferences

All student complete two conferences annually with their mentor, parents or guardians, and

invited community members, such as friends or extended family. The conferences are led by the

students, with the students giving a presentation about their work and progress in classes and in

the community, as well as goal setting in the fall conference and a review of their goals at the

spring conference. More information about Student Led Conferences is in Element 2.

Interdisciplinary Projects

Twice a semester an alternate schedule will be run, for a time period of two consecutive weeks.

During this time, six hours of each week will be dedicated to students completing Humanities

and Occupation Projects. These project weeks are designed to increase student participation in

interdisciplinary projects. Students will be able to spend more uninterrupted time exploring

topics of interest and creating artifacts demonstrating a deeper understanding of subject matter

and application of ideas by working through the scientific process.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 32 of 127


Humanities Projects involve academic research from multiple academic disciplines (Math,

Science, Foreign Language, Literature, Social Studies, and Arts) which results in understanding

an issue or problem.

Occupations Projects involve an academic study of a specific problem, related to a school

discipline, that also addresses an issue concerning economic independence, a national or global

issue that has a local connection, or aspect of the “farm” that results in completing a plan of

action. An artifact or record of actions will be completed.

The schedule is designed to have a minimum impact on regular scheduled classes, and the

project weeks are designed to replace some classroom projects. For example, a student may have

a large project in math, history, and science at the same time because of the enrollment in 6

classes. The project week would combine the goals and objects of these multiple large projects

and provide school time to complete them.

Minicourses

Minicourses are a 1 unit elective course designed by teachers and students to expand students’

interest in specific subject matter and to allow for greater physical and creative expression. With

the modified block schedule, whole school events can be added during the week without taking

time away from core classes.

Minicourses are one of the keys for TGS to meet its mission as a Montessori school for

adolescents. They are significant because they allow for TGS to bring in outside experts, involve

parents in classes, students to have more control of their education, students to have a truly broad

education with depth, teachers to share their passions and topics of interests, and students to take

on the role of teaching classes with teachers giving them authentic responsibility.

Winterim and Creative Academic Week-long Experiences

Each spring Grove students participate in week-long intensive studies that culminate with a

demonstration day to which the whole community is invited.

Middle school students help design week-long intensive studies called Winterims. Staff take the

lead in the organization and planning of Winterims. The purpose of a Winterim is to provide an

opportunity for students to gain experience in leadership, event and project planning, budgeting,

collaboration, and intense study. Winterims can include outside experts, interdisciplinary

objectives, staff and student accountability, and travel. The Winterim includes 5-7 full days of

continuous activities during the last two weeks of trimester 2, and a presentation of

knowledge/skill and/or a demonstration of activity to the whole community on the last day of

Winterim week.

High school students (grade 10-12) participate in courses they help to design called Creative

Academic Weeklong Experience. The ideas for these one-unit courses come from both students

and faculty members. The CAWEs are collaboratively designed by a small group of students

with a faculty member. The purpose of a CAWE is to provide an opportunity for students to gain

experience in leadership, event and project planning, budgeting, collaboration, and intense study.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 33 of 127


Each CAWE is required to spend time away from campus and work with an outside expert in a

field of study related to the topic of the CAWE. A CAWE will include outside experts,

interdisciplinary objectives, staff and student accountability, travel outside the local area, 12

hours of class sessions serving as project weeks for Trimester 2, 5-7 days of continuous activities

during the last two weeks of Trimester 2, a presentation of knowledge/skill and/or a

demonstration of activity to the whole community, and the completion of an academic paper that

demonstrates mastery of the interdisciplinary objectives.

Montessori Education and the CCSS Curriculum

Montessori pedagogy supports a developmental approach to learning and includes many

elements that naturally lend themselves to align with the Common Core State Standards. These

include:

Multi-age groupings that foster peer teaching and learning

Long, uninterrupted blocks of work time

Choice of activity

Hands on materials

Cooperative learning and peer teaching

Authentic topics and problem-based learning

Interdisciplinary teaching and learning

At the center of Montessori theory are beliefs that support CCSS concepts. These include the

following:

Each student is valued as a unique individual

Students are recognized as having individual learning styles, and activities are designed

with these in mind

Students are free to learn at their own pace, guided by a teacher

Order, coordination, concentration, and freedom are valued in Montessori classrooms

Daily routines and choice support the student’s emerging “self-regulation” without

rewards, praise or punishment

There is a deeply held belief in the ability of the student to “educate oneself” through trial

and error and discovery

In Montessori curriculum, the natural developmental proclivity of the adolescent toward

socialization is valued with a strong emphasis on community.

There is a three-year age span in many activities and classes that creates a natural vertical

spiral in the curriculum.

Material is taught and re-presented at different levels and accessible at the student’s own

level of understanding.

Mentoring between students is valued and modeled, which naturally builds confidence.

The dignity and respect for the students translates to a non-competitive learning

environment where each person’s success is important to the whole and conflicts can be

resolved thoughtfully.

Montessori students enjoy freedom within limits, which builds intrinsic motivation and selfcontrol.

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Teachers strive to reinforce student’s internal satisfaction with their work.

Montessori teachers use Socratic methods that reinforce a student’s natural curiosity and

desire to learn for the sake of learning.

Students are supported to become active seekers of knowledge and to pursue their own

answers to their own questions.

Students are active participants in deciding what knowledge to seek and how they will

seek it.

Students have access to research tools to broaden the possibilities for self-learning.

Self-correction and self-assessment are integral to the program.

Students learn to look critically at their own work and to recognize, correct, and learn

from their errors.

Students become comfortable giving and accepting constructive feedback and see

collaboration as a positive way to solve academic and social problems.

TGS’s curriculum and instructional practices are aligned with the State Standards.

See Appendix D for Montessori and CCSS alignment samples (scope and sequence) for English

Language Arts and Mathematics.

College and Career Readiness

The Montessori approach requires students to demonstrate independence through choice, open

exploration, and self and peer-correction.

Students build strong content knowledge across a wide range of subject matter in

academic and applied subjects including sciences, arts, communication, practical life

activities, mathematics, and language.

Students use technology as a tool for learning and are able to self-regulate, explore, and

self-teach new applications as they arrive.

Students are open, respectful, and accepting of diversity in all of its forms, having

worked in constantly changing small groups with mixed ages and abilities.

Through presentation-based demonstrations of knowledge, students learn to respond to

varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline.

Group problem solving with multi-age and multi-ability groups reinforces adaptive

communication skills.

Critical thinking tasks promote the value of evidence and foster curiosity.



Strategic use of technology and digital media encourage self-initiated research strategies.

Use of primary sources as well as trips outside the classroom help promote understanding

and appreciation of diverse cultural perspectives.

Description of Instructional Approaches and Strategies

A basic structure for lessons and learning process in Montessori education is called the “Three-

Period Lesson structure.” It is similar to the conventional structure of a lesson in that it starts

with an anticipatory set, progresses to a didactic lesson, then provides time for students to work

individually or in groups followed by a check-in at the end of a class for understanding of the

objective for the lesson. The Three-Period Lesson is different in that it lasts for a whole unit, a

set of weeks, an individual week or even just one day. It depends on the decision of the teacher.

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The Three-Period Lesson Overview

1 st Period = captivating

introduction that generates

interest and questions,

invitation to work

2 nd Period = exploration,

experimentation, and

investigation of topic in general

and area of interest for individual

student

3 rd Period = Presentation of

knowledge and skills that student

has gained, as well as

interdisciplinary connections and

opportunities for further study

The three-period lesson should balance collective learning, individual learning, and provide an

opportunity to contribute work to the community.

1st Period – Engagement of student is priority, achieved through sensorial experience, engaging

problem to investigate, topic that is developmentally important, sweeping story to give overview

of topic and issues.

2nd Period – Teacher creates opportunities for the student to choose something that is

interesting to them and take responsibility for their learning. They will manipulate and develop

the knowledge or skills related to the topic (project or hands-on manipulation). Student

manipulates knowledge (often within the context of solving a problem or creating a project).

3rd Period – Student demonstrates knowledge (assessment). This can be through a written

exam, a presentation, or the creation of a physical piece of work. (Examples include a student

solving r=d/t problems on a test or as part of a project demonstration, or a student presenting

multimedia running project to a group, etc.)

Other Instructional Approaches and Strategies

Problem and Project Based Learning

Inquiry Based Learning

Cooperative Learning

Student choices in their work

Peer teaching and collaborative learning

Character Education

Socratic Seminar

Authentic assessments - Community partnerships and connections

Structured Debates - structured academic debates, structured academic controversy

Self and peer evaluation of work

Formative assessments

Presentations to community members

Unit Plans for Each Class

Teaching faculty are expected to create unit plans for each unit in their classes. The unit structure

is outlined below. The unit plans connect to the Schoolwide Outcomes and the Three-Period

Structure.

Unit Plans: Overview of Requirements for Unit Plans for Teachers

Required Aspects

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 36 of 127


Title of Unit

Length of Unit (in weeks)

Essential or Guiding Questions

Main topics covered

Learning Objectives

Key concepts learned

Brief explanation for:

Introductory Lessons (1st period lessons) the first day and throughout the unit

Work students choose (2nd period) and work they are required to complete

How students will demonstrate what they know (3rd period)

Examples of how schoolwide objectives will be used throughout unit

Students will create questions.

Students will determine and understand Key Vocabulary.

Students will successfully Analyze Texts, Problems, Artifacts and Situations, from Multiple Perspectives.

Students will analyze change over time.

Students will successfully Synthesize Information from various sources.

Students will Defend a Position with evidence and properly cite their evidence.

Students will Effectively Communicate when presenting information.

Students will Reflect on Successes and Failures.

Students will Create and Evaluate Project Plans and use a Variety of Tools to complete a project.

SAMPLE Unit Plan - Chart Style

Title of Unit:

Essential / Guiding Questions:

Key Concepts:

Learning Objectives:

Length of Unit:

Main Topics:

Key Vocabulary:

Assessments:

Outline of Three-Period Structure

First Period - Introductory Experiences

Second Period - Choice Work

Third Period - Evidence of Learning

Description of Learning Setting

TGS runs a site-based educational program on two campuses that are across the street from each

other. TGS leases 9.5 acres of land from the City of Redlands that has five buildings that are old

farm buildings and an historic schoolhouse. The buildings were renovated to be educational

buildings. It also leases one building from Montessori in Redlands, a private Montessori school.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 37 of 127


The main learning environments for TGS are its farm and its consistent connections to the local

community. Students work and manage the farm campus and often connect their work to the

local community and larger society. On the farm campus, students put their hands-on history,

experience an evocative and romantic view of nature, have the opportunity for scientific

exploration and discovery, apply mathematics, and create a vision of a sustainable future.

The farm is not just a farm; it is a learning material that engages the mind, hand, and heart

through authentic experiences. The farm supports adolescents in:

learning content,

learning about themselves,

developing important social and working skills,

connecting to their community

building knowledge, practical skills, and self-confidence,

developing through practice the critical soft skills like communication, collaboration,

perseverance, critical thinking, problem solving, multidiscipline approach

learning about finance and business

being civically minded and experienced in contributing to a community

living a healthy life: physically, nutritionally, mentally, and emotionally

These learning environments assist students in learning the State Standards in a way that inspires

students to learn and construct themselves through work and experiences to become their best

selves within a caring and supportive community.

The high school students have most of their classes in the one building leased from Montessori in

Redlands. The high school students have the ability to go back to the farm to support and enrich

their learning in all subjects and they are more exposed to how subject matter content is

important to authentic projects and/or problems in a multidiscipline approach. High school

classes also make regular connections with contemporary global, national and local issues to help

students understand the relevance of the subject matter. They access and use the local area of

Redlands and southern California when it is appropriate and supportive of student learning.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 38 of 127


Course Requirements by Year or Level

7 th and 8 th Grade Curriculum

Social Science English Math Science World Language

& Arts

Year

1

World History

Paleoanthropology

and Neolithic

Revolution

Ancient

Civilizations

Old World /

Classical Age

Empires

Feudalism &

Religion

Trade and

Technology

Renaissance &

Reformation

Scientific

Revolution &

Enlightenment

Reading for

Literature and

Informational Texts

Key Ideas and

Details

Craft & Structure

Integration of

Knowledge and

Ideas

Range of Reading

and Level of Text

Complexity

Writing

Text types and

purposes

(journaling,

essay, etc.)

Production and

distribution of

writing

(techniques and

revision)

Research to build

and present

knowledge (note

taking, sources,

etc.)

Range of writing

Math 7

Rations and

Proportional

Relationships

Number

System -

Operations

with rational

numbers -

operations

with fractions,

decimals,

percentages

Expressions

and Linear

Equations

Geometry

Measurement

Introduce

Statistics and

Probability

Introduce

working with

variables

Patterns

Logic

Life Science

From Molecules to

Organisms:

Structures and

Processes

Heredity:

Inheritance and

Variation of Traits

Biological

Evolution: Unity

and Diversity

Earth and Space

Science

Earth’s Place in

the Universe

Physical Science

Matter and its

Interactions

Intro to Art

Intro to Music

Intro to Theater

Woodshop

Metal Shop

Business

Physical

Education (PE)

Speaking and

Listening

Comprehension

and Collaboration

Presentation of

Knowledge and

Ideas

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 39 of 127


Social Science English Math Science World Language

& Arts

Year

2

American History

Age of Exploration

Native American

History & Culture

Colonial America &

Revolutionary War

Civil War, Slavery,

& Reconstruction

Industrial

Revolution

20 th Century

Contemporary

Issues

Reading for

Literature and

Informational Texts

Key Ideas and

Details

Craft & Structure

Integration of

Knowledge and

Ideas

Range of Reading

and Level of Text

Complexity

Writing

Text types and

purposes (poetry,

essay, story, etc.)

Production and

distribution of

writing

(techniques and

revision)

Research to build

and present

knowledge (note

taking, sources,

etc.)

Range of writing

Pre-Algebra

The Number

System –

Expressions

and Linear

Equations

Functions

Geometry –

including

Pythagorean

Theorem

Statistics and

Probability –

bivariate data

Applications

through

graphing

- OR -

Algebra 1

Life Science

Ecosystems:

Interactions,

Energy, and

Dynamics

Physical Science

Motion and

Stability: Forces

and Interactions

Waves and Their

Applications in

Technologies for

Information

Transfer

Engineering,

Technology and

Application to

Science*

Science &

Engineering

Practices*

Crosscutting

Concepts*

Intro to Art

Intro to Music

Intro to Theater

Woodshop

Metal Shop

Business

PE

*Addressed and presented each year

Speaking and

Listening

Comprehension

and Collaboration

Presentation of

Knowledge and

Ideas

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 40 of 127


9 th Grade Curriculum

Social Science English Math Science World Language &

Arts

Human Geography

Human and Physical

geography

Geography of each

continent and key

countries (e.g US,

Canada, Mexico &

Latin America)

Population

Culture

Politics and

Boundaries

Agricultural Land

Use

Industrialization and

Economic

Development

Urban Environment,

Land Use and

Economic

Development

English 9

Reading for

Literature and

Informational Texts

Key Ideas and

Details

Craft & Structure

Integration of

Knowledge and

Ideas

Range of Reading

and Level of Text

Complexity

Writing

Text types and

purposes (poetry,

essay, story, etc.)

Production and

distribution of

writing

(techniques and

revision)

Research to build

and present

knowledge (note

taking, sources,

etc.)

Range of writing

Algebra 1

Number and

Quantity

Algebra

Functions

Statistics and

Probability

Quadratics

Application Theory

Biology

Living Things

Cells

Genetics

Evolution

Ecosystems

Anatomy

Animal Husbandry

Agricultural Science

College Prep Art

Ceramics

Choir

Spanish I

Speaking and

Listening

Comprehension

and Collaboration

Presentation of

Knowledge and

Ideas

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 41 of 127


High School Curriculum (10 th -12 th Grade)

English

3 Years (college prep)

Math

2 Years (college prep)

Science

2 Years (college prep)

Social Studies

2-3 Years (college prep)

(depends on completing

Human Geography 9 th gr)

World Language

3 Years (college prep)

Fine Arts

1 year (college prep)

Health

1 Semester

PE

2 Years

Internship/Service

English – 10 (World Literature), Honors English 10

English – 11 (American Literature), EAP English

AP English/ Language and Composition, AP English /Lit

Practical Math, Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2,

Pre-Calculus, Statistics

Environmental Science (Regular, Honors or Agricultural)

Chemistry (Regular, Honors or Agricultural), Physics

AP Environmental Science, AP Biology, AP Physics

World History (Regular or Honors), American History (rotational)

Government and Economics (rotational)

AP U.S. History (rotational)

AP American Government & Politics (rotational)

Spanish I,II, III

College Prep Art, Studio Art or Ceramics

Drama / Theater, 3-D Design or AP Art

Choir

Health

PE at TGS

Participation in Athletic Teams

Off Campus PE

Work Study

Internship coordination

Electives

Senior Project

Woodshop

Metal Shop

Culinary Arts

This culminating project reflects a student’s interests, abilities and

potential and includes writing, and product or service components.

REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION.

*Requirements can be altered for students with IEP or 504 plans in place.

Social Sciences

o 9 th grade = Human Geography (optional)

o 10 th grade = continue with World History every year

o 11 th and 12 th grades = will take Government and Economics in 2017-2018 an

2019-2020, as well as AP Government and US History in 2018-2019 and 2021-

2022, along with AP US History.

Science

o 2015-2016 = Chemistry, AP Chemistry, AP Biology, Agricultural Biology

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 42 of 127


o 2016-2017 = Physics and AP Physics, AP Environmental Science, Agricultural

Environmental Science, Agricultural Chemistry

o 2017-2018 = Chemistry, Honors Chemistry, AP Biology, Veterinary Science,

Agricultural Biology, Environmental Science (10th grade), Biology (9th grade)

o 2018-2019= Physics, Physics Honors, AP Environmental Science, Biology (9th

grade), Environmental Science (10th grade), Agricultural Chemistry, Agricultural

Environmental Science

o 2019-2020= Chemistry, Honors Chemistry, AP Biology, Veterinary Science,

Agricultural Biology, Environmental Science (10th grade), Biology (9th grade)





English Language Arts

o 2015-2016 = English 9, 10th World Literature, 11th US Literature, 12th EAP, AP

Literature

o 2016-2017 = English 9, 10th World Literature, 11th US Literature, 12th EAP, AP

Language

o 2017-2018 = English 9 or English 9 Honors, 10th World Literature, 11th & 12th

EAP, AP Literature

o 2018-2019= English 9 or English 9 Honors, 10th World Literature, 11th & 12th

EAP, AP Composition

o 2019-2020= English 9 or English 9 Honors, 10th World Literature, 11th & 12th

EAP, AP Literature

Art

o 2015-2016 = Art College Preparatory, Ceramics, Studio Art, AP Art, Choir

o 2016-2017 = Design, Ceramics, Studio Art, AP Art, Choir

o 2017- Art CP, Ceramics, Studio Art, AP Art, Choir offered yearly

Foreign Language

o Spanish 1, 2 and 3 offered yearly- AP Spanish dependent on student interest

Mathematics

o 2015-2016 = Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus AB

o 2016-2017 = Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus AB

o 2017-2018 = Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, AP Calculus AB

o 2018-2019= Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, Statistics

o 2019-2020= Algebra 1, Geometry, Algebra 2, Pre-Calculus, Statistics

*In 2018, TGS decided to offer Statistics instead of AP Calculus in order to serve more of its

students, specifically students wanting to take four years of math.

There will be more structure for schedules for 9 and 10 grade students to meet graduation

th th

requirements. Sample schedules:

9 th grade = English 9, math, Spanish 1, Health & PE, Biology or Ag Biology, elective

10 th grade = English 10, math, Spanish 2, Environmental Science, World History, elective

Honors tracks for select classes for grades 9-12.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 43 of 127


Grove has added Honors tracks in English 9 and Chemistry for the 2017-2018 school

year.

The honors tracks are intended to provide additional academic challenge for students

seeking a more rigorous level of study and to prepare them for taking Advanced

Placement classes.

Grove will evaluate how these classes are working during the 2017-2018 school year and

decide on keeping or adding classes for future years with the goal of having a standard set

of honors tracks for specific classes as part of the academic options for students.

Graduation Requirements

TGS’s graduation requirements for all students include the following:

225 credits

A passing average score of 70% or above earns 3.33 credits per trimester.

AP classes for juniors

and seniors only.

English

4 years college prep

Mathematics

3 years college prep

Lab Science

3 years college prep

Social Studies

3 years college prep

Foreign Language

2 years college prep

Visual and Performing

Arts

1 year college prep

Health

1 semester

PE

2 years

Electives

Senior Project

English 9, Honors English 9,

English 10, Honors English 10,

English 11

EAP (English 12)

Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II,

Pre-Calculus

Biology, Honors Biology,

Environmental Science, Honors Env. Science

Chemistry, Physics

Chemistry Honors, Physics Honors

Agricultural Environmental Science,

Agricultural Biology, Agricultural Chemistry

Human Geography, Honors Human Geography

World History, Honors World History

United States History, US Government & Economics

Spanish I, Spanish II, Spanish III

Drama, Design I, Art CP, Studio Art,

Ceramics, Music: Choir

PE class, participation in Grove athletics,

or off campus PE

Economics, Veterinary Science, Culinary Arts, Work

Experience

Completion is required for graduation.

AP English Literature

AP English Language

AP Calculus AB

AP Biology

AP Environmental

Science

AP Physics 1

AP US History

AP US Gov. & Politics

AP Studio Art: 2-D

Design

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 44 of 127


Effectiveness of the Montessori Instructional Design for Learning

The Montessori educational method of instruction explained above, along with the farm site as a

laboratory and educational material, work together to form an effective educational setting

because of how it meets the needs of the targeted student populations. The educational practices

that are currently being promoted as most effective are the same or similar to the Montessori

educational practices.

An example of current best practices of educating middle school students as promoted by the

Association for Middle Level Education is listed below. They are a list of key practices for

middle school education. TGS follows every one of these practices because they are

developmentally appropriate and, therefore, fit with the Montessori approach to education.

The Association for Middle Level Education (“AMLE”) promotes the following as their This We

Believe statement of keys to educating young adolescents:

To become a fully functioning, self-actualized person, each young adolescent should . . .

Become actively aware of the larger world, asking significant and relevant questions

about that world and wrestling with big ideas and questions for which there may not be

one right answer.

Be able to think rationally and critically and express thoughts clearly.

Read deeply to independently gather, assess, and interpret information from a variety of

sources and read avidly for enjoyment and lifelong learning.

Use digital tools to explore, communicate, and collaborate with the world and learn from

the rich and varied resources available.

Be a good steward of the earth and its resources and a wise and intelligent consumer of

the wide array of goods and services available.

Understand and use the major concepts, skills, and tools of inquiry in the areas of health

and physical education, language arts, world languages, mathematics, natural and

physical sciences, and the social sciences.

Explore music, art, and careers, and recognize their importance to personal growth and

learning.

Develop his or her strengths, particular skills, talents, or interests and have an emerging

understanding of his or her potential contributions to society and to personal fulfillment.

Recognize, articulate, and make responsible, ethical decisions concerning his or her own

health and wellness needs.

Respect and value the diverse ways people look, speak, think, and act within the

immediate community and around the world.

Develop the interpersonal and social skills needed to learn, work, and play with others

harmoniously and confidently.

Assume responsibility for his or her own actions and be cognizant of and ready to accept

obligations for the welfare of others.

Understand local, national, and global civic responsibilities and demonstrate active

citizenship through participation in endeavors that serve and benefit those larger

communities.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 45 of 127


Essential Attributes

To guide and support students in their quest to achieve these goals, Association for Middle Level

Education affirms that educational programs for young adolescents must be:

Developmentally responsive: using the distinctive nature of young adolescents as the

foundation upon which all decisions about school organization, policies, curriculum, instruction,

and assessment are made.

Challenging: ensuring that every student learns and every member of the learning community is

held to high expectations.

Empowering: providing all students with the knowledge and skills they need to take

responsibility for their lives, to address life’s challenges, to function successfully at all levels of

society, and to be creators of knowledge.

Equitable: advocating for and ensuring every student’s right to learn and providing

appropriately challenging and relevant learning opportunities for every student.

These four essential attributes of successful middle level education can be realized and achieved

best through programs and practices that are in line with the following 16 characteristics. These

characteristics or qualities, while identified independently, are interdependent and need to be

implemented in concert.

Characteristics

To comprehend their breadth and focus, the characteristics are grouped in three general

categories:

Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Characteristics

Educators value young adolescents and are prepared to teach them.

Students and teachers are engaged in active, purposeful learning.

Curriculum is challenging, exploratory, integrative, and relevant.

Educators use multiple learning and teaching approaches.

Varied and ongoing assessments advance learning as well as measure it.

Leadership and Organization Characteristics

A shared vision developed by all stakeholders guides every decision.

Leaders are committed to and knowledgeable about this age group, educational research,

and best practices.

Leaders demonstrate courage and collaboration.

Ongoing professional development reflects best educational practices.

Organizational structures foster purposeful learning and meaningful relationships.

Culture and Community Characteristics

The school environment is inviting, safe, inclusive, and supportive of all.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 46 of 127


Every student’s academic and personal development is guided by an adult advocate.

Comprehensive guidance and support services meet the needs of young adolescents.

Health and wellness are supported in curricula, school-wide programs, and related

policies.

The school actively involves families in the education of their children.

The school includes community and business partners.

Research studies and extensive, cumulative, empirical evidence have confirmed that when

programs implement these characteristics over time, higher levels of student achievement and

improved overall development of students result.

Supporting Research

Richard Lerner – Positive Youth Development

Ryan and Deci – Self-Determination Theory

Human’s Three Basic Needs:

o Competence – the need to be effective in dealing with one’s environment

o Autonomy – need to control the course of their lives

o Relatedness – need to have close, affectionate relationship with others

Serving Special Student Populations

Students with Disabilities

The Charter School shall comply with all applicable state and federal laws in serving students

with disabilities, including, but not limited to, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (“Section

504”), the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and the Individuals with Disabilities

Education Improvement Act (“IDEA”).

The Charter School shall be categorized as a public school of the District in accordance with

Education Code Section 47641(b), unless and until it makes verifiable written assurances that it

will participate as a local educational agency (“LEA”) in a state approved Special Education

Local Plan Area (“SELPA”) in conformity with Education Code Section 47641(a).

The Charter School shall comply with all state and federal laws related to the provision of special

education instruction and related services and all SELPA policies and procedures; and shall

utilize appropriate SELPA forms.

The Charter School shall be solely responsible for its compliance with Section 504 and the ADA.

The facilities to be utilized by TGS shall be accessible for all students with disabilities.

TGS’s Section 504 compliance coordinator is the Program Coordinator.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 47 of 127


TGS provides experiential instruction for its special education students on an individualized

basis through full inclusion, collaborative and Specialized Academic Instruction (“SAI”) models

with additional support where appropriate.

Measurable outcomes will be tied to the State Standards through implementation of standardsbased

formative and summative assessments and outcomes. These will be included when

appropriate in the student’s Individualized Education Program (“IEP”) in benchmarks and goals.

Also see below, “Charter School Annual Goals and Actions to Achieve State Priorities.”

TGS will contract for medical support for Grove’s special needs students who require medical

support, including:

Credentialed nursing services

Annual screening for scoliosis, hearing, and vision

Paraprofessional assistance when necessary

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act

The Charter School recognizes its legal responsibility to ensure that no qualified person with a

disability shall, on the basis of disability, be excluded from participation, be denied the benefits

of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any program of TGS. A student who has a

physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, has a

record of such an impairment, or is regarded as having such an impairment, is eligible for

protections under Section 504.

A 504 team will be assembled by the 504 Coordinator (Program Coordinator) and shall include

the parent/guardian, the student (where appropriate) and other qualified persons knowledgeable

about the student, the meaning of the evaluation data, placement options, and accommodations.

The 504 team will review the student’s existing records; including academic, social and

behavioral records, and is responsible for making a determination as to whether an evaluation for

504 services is appropriate. If the student has already been evaluated under the IDEA but found

ineligible for special education instruction or related services under the IDEA, those evaluations

may be used to help determine eligibility under Section 504. The student evaluation shall be

carried out by the 504 team, which will evaluate the nature of the student’s disability and the

impact upon the student’s education. This evaluation will include consideration of any behaviors

that interfere with regular participation in the educational program and/or activities. The 504

team may also consider the following information in its evaluation:

Tests and other evaluation materials that have been validated for the specific purpose for

which they are used and are administered by trained personnel.

Tests and other evaluation materials including those tailored to assess specific areas of

educational need, and not merely those which are designed to provide a single general

intelligence quotient.

Tests are selected and administered to ensure that when a test is administered to a student

with impaired sensory, manual or speaking skills, the test results accurately reflect the

student’s aptitude or achievement level, or whatever factor the test purports to measure,

rather than reflecting the student’s impaired sensory, manual or speaking skills.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 48 of 127


The final determination of whether the student will or will not be identified as a person with a

disability is made by the 504 team in writing and notice is given in writing to the parent or

guardian of the student in their primary language along with the procedural safeguards available

to them. If during the evaluation, the 504 team obtains information indicating possible eligibility

of the student for special education per the IDEA, a referral for assessment under the IDEA will

be made by the 504 team.

If the student is found by the 504 team to have a disability under Section 504, the 504 team shall

be responsible for determining what, if any, accommodations or services are needed to ensure

that the student receives a free and appropriate public education (“FAPE”). In developing the

504 Plan, the 504 team shall consider all relevant information utilized during the evaluation of

the student, drawing upon a variety of sources, including, but not limited to, assessments

conducted by TGS’s professional staff.

The 504 Plan shall describe the Section 504 disability and any program accommodations,

modifications or services that may be necessary.

All 504 team participants, parents, guardians, teachers and any other participants in the student’s

education, including substitutes and tutors, must have a copy of each student’s 504 Plan. The site

administrator will ensure that teachers include 504 Plans with lesson plans for short-term

substitutes and that he/she review the 504 Plan with a long-term substitute. A copy of the 504

Plan shall be maintained in the student’s file. Each student’s 504 Plan will be reviewed at least

once per year to determine the appropriateness of the Plan, needed modifications to the plan, and

continued eligibility.

Services for Students under the “IDEA”

TGS and the District shall continue to work together to provide special education and related

services for TGS’s students in accordance with state and federal law, and with the specific

delineation of duties as described in the Memorandum of Understanding that has been mutually

agreed upon by TGS and the District.

Included in Appendix E, please find the current Memorandum of Understanding between TGS

and RUSD regarding Special Education Services.

Overview

TGS will adhere to all laws affecting individuals with exceptional needs, including all provisions

of the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Improvement Act of 2004, Section 504 of the

Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. All students will be given equal

access to the school, regardless of disabilities, and TGS will not discriminate against any student

based on his or her disabilities. TGS shall not require the modification of an Individualized

Education Program (IEP) or 504 Plan as a condition of enrollment at the charter school.

Commitment to Serving Students with Special Needs

TGS recognizes the importance of providing educational opportunities to all students regardless

of physical challenges or special needs. To that end, the school pledges to work in cooperation

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 49 of 127


with the SELPA and Redlands Unified School District, as needed, ensure that students enrolled

in TGS are served in accordance with applicable federal and state laws. TGS shall follow all

policies and procedures of the SELPA.

The TGS dedicated staff shall follow the IDEA/IDEIA guidelines (IDEA, 1997/IDEIA 2004) by

(1) having high expectations for students with disabilities and ensuring them access to the

general education curriculum to the maximum extent possible, (2) strengthening the role of

parents and ensuring that families have meaningful opportunities to participate in their child’s

education, (3) coordinating the IDEIA requirements with other school improvement efforts to

ensure that students benefit from those efforts as well as other special education and related

services, aids, and supports in the regular classroom whenever possible, (4) providing incentives

for whole-school approaches and pre-referral interventions to reduce the need to label children to

obtain services, and (5) focusing resources on teaching and learning while reducing paperwork

and requirements that do not assist in improving educational results.

TGS shall provide planned staff development activities and participate in available appropriate

SELPA trainings to support access by students with disabilities to the general education

classroom, general education curriculum, integration of instructional strategies, curriculum

adaptations to address the diverse learner, and interaction with non-disabled peers. Timely

communications between the RUSD’s special education personnel and TGS teachers and staff

will ensure that all who provide services to a student with disabilities are knowledgeable of the

content of the student’s IEP. All students will receive educational services in the least restrictive

environment (LRE). Removal from regular classes is to occur only when the student cannot be

successfully educated in that setting even with the assistance of supplemental aides and services.

The TGS educational program will be appropriate to meet the student’s individual needs.

Staffing

All special education services at TGS shall be delivered by individuals or agencies qualified to

provide special education services as required by the California Education Code and the IDEA.

TGS staff shall participate in SELPA in-service training relating to special education.

TGS shall be responsible for the hiring, training, and employment of site staff necessary to

provide special education services to its students, including, without limitation, special education

teachers, paraprofessionals, and resource specialists. TGS shall ensure that all special education

staff hired or contracted by TGS is qualified pursuant to SELPA policies, as well as meet all

legal requirements. TGS shall be responsible for the hiring, training, and employment of itinerant

staff necessary to provide special education services to TGS students, including, without

limitation, speech therapists, occupational therapists, behavioral therapists, and psychologists.

Notification and Coordination

TGS shall follow SELPA policies as they apply to all SELPA schools for responding to

implementation of special education services. TGS shall adopt and implement policies relating to

all special education issues and referrals.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 50 of 127


Identification and Referral

TGS shall have the responsibility to identify, refer, and work cooperatively in locating TGS

students who have or may have exceptional needs that qualify them to receive special education

services. TGS shall implement SELPA policies and procedures to ensure timely identification

and referral of students who have, or may have, such exceptional needs. A pupil shall be referred

for special education only after the resources of the regular education program have been

considered, and where appropriate, utilized.

TGS shall follow SELPA child-find procedures to identify all students who may require

assessment to consider special education eligibility and special education and related services in

the case that general education interventions do not provide a free appropriate public education

to the student in question.

Assessments

The term “assessments” shall have the same meaning as the term “evaluation” in the IDEA, as

provided in Section 1414, Title 20 of the United States Code. TGS shall determine what

assessments, if any, are necessary and arrange for such assessments for referred or eligible

students in accordance with applicable law. TGS shall obtain parent/guardian consent to assess

TGS students.

Information gathered will be used as tools to determine the student’s disability, eligibility for

services, and determining the nature and extent of required services. Assessment procedures will

be conducted in the student’s primary language, and an interpreter will be provided if needed.

The types of assessments that may be used for determining eligibility for specialized instruction

and services will include, but are not limited to:

Individual testing

Teacher observations

Interviews

Review of school records, reports, and work samples

Parent input

Unless conflicting with SELPA or RUSD policies and procedures, TGS will follow the following

assessment guidelines.

Parents or guardians of any student referred for assessment must give their written

consent for the school to administer the assessment.

The assessment will be completed and an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meeting

held within 60 days of receipt of the parent’s written consent for assessment.

The student must be evaluated in all areas related to his/her suspected disability.

Assessments must be conducted by a person with knowledge of the student’s suspected

disability and administered by trained and knowledgeable personnel and in accordance

with any instructions provided by the producer of the assessments. Individually

administered tests of intellectual or emotional functioning must be administered by a

credentialed school psychologist.

Assessments must be selected and administered so as not to be racially, culturally, or

sexually discriminatory.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 51 of 127


Assessments will be delivered in the student’s primary language, and a qualified

interpreter will be provided if needed.

Assessment tools must be used for purposes for which the assessments or measures are

valid and reliable.

Assessments will be adapted as necessary for students with impaired sensory, physical, or

speaking skills.

A multidisciplinary team will be assembled to assess the student, including a teacher

knowledgeable in the disability.

Determination of Eligibility

Upon completion of the assessment, an IEP team will be assembled to review the results of the

assessment and determine the student’s need for special education. This meeting will be the

determination meeting. TGS will be responsible for scheduling, coordinating, and facilitating

the IEP meeting. Educators and school psychologists qualified to interpret test results will

present the assessment data at the IEP meeting. A nurse might also be a part of a determination

meeting, if needed. Parents will be provided with written notice of the IEP meeting, and the

meeting will be held at a mutually agreeable time and place.

IEP Meetings

TGS shall arrange and notice the necessary Individualized Education Program (“IEP”) meetings.

IEP team membership shall be in compliance with state and federal law. TGS shall be

responsible for having the following individuals in attendance at the IEP meetings: the Executive

Director and/or the TGS designated representative with appropriate administrative authority as

required by the IDEA; the student’s special education teacher; the student’s general education

teacher if the student is or may be in a regular education classroom; the student, if appropriate;

the student’s parent/guardian; and other TGS representatives who are knowledgeable about the

regular education program at TGS and/or about the student. TGS shall arrange for the attendance

or participation of all other necessary staff that may include, but are not limited to, an appropriate

administrator to comply with the requirements of the IDEA, a speech therapist, psychologist,

resource specialist, and behavior specialist; and shall document the IEP meeting and provide

notice of parental rights.

IEP Development and Implementation

TGS understands that the decisions regarding eligibility, goals/objectives, program, services,

placement, and exit from special education shall be the decision of the IEP team, pursuant to the

IEP process. Programs, services and placements shall be provided to all eligible TGS students in

accordance with the policies, procedures and requirements of the SELPA and State and Federal

law.

Every student who is assessed by TGS will have an IEP that documents assessment results and

eligibility determination for special education services.

TGS will ensure that all aspects of the IEP and school site implementation are maintained. TGS

will provide modifications and accommodations (outlined within each individual’s IEP) in the

general education environment taught by the general education teacher. Students at the school

who have IEP’s will be served in the Least Restrictive Environment (“LRE”).

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 52 of 127


As part of this responsibility, TGS shall provide parents with timely reports on the student’s

progress as provided in the student’s IEP at least as frequently as report cards are provided for

TGS’s non-special education students. TGS shall also provide all home-school coordination and

information exchange. TGS shall also be responsible for providing all curriculum, classroom

materials, classroom modifications, and assistive technology.

Each student who has an IEP will have an IEP team that oversees the IEP development,

implementation, and progress of the student. All decisions concerning the special education

programs and services to be provided to a student with a disability are to be made by the IEP

team. The IEP team must include at least the following members:

The parent or guardian of the student for whom the IEP was developed

The student, if appropriate

The Principal/Assistant Principal or administrative designee

At least one special education teacher

A general education teacher, usually the mentor, who is familiar with the curriculum

appropriate to the student



A District Special Education Representative, if needed

If the child was recently assessed, the individual who conducted the assessment or who is

qualified to interpret the assessment results, usually the school psychologist

Other people familiar with the student may be invited as needed. TGS views the parent/guardian

as a key stakeholder in these meetings and will make every effort to accommodate parents’

schedules and needs so that they will be able to participate effectively on the IEP team. The

school will provide an interpreter if necessary to ensure that all parents/guardians understand and

can participate in the IEP process. If a parent cannot attend an IEP meeting, the school will

ensure his/her participation using other methods, such as conferencing by telephone or meeting

at the parent’s home.

A copy of the IEP will be given to the parent in accordance with state laws and District policies.

Upon the parent’s or guardian’s written consent, the IEP will be implemented by TGS and the

SELPA in which TGS is a member.

Upon the parent’s/guardian’s written consent, the IEP will be implemented by TGS. The IEP will

include all required components and be written on RUSD forms.

The student’s IEP will include the following:

A statement of the student’s present levels of academic achievement and functional

performance

The rationale for placement decisions

The services the student will receive and the means for delivering those services

A description of when services will begin, how often the student will receive them, who

will provide them, and where they will be delivered

Measurable annual goals and short-term objectives focusing on the student’s current level

of performance

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 53 of 127


A description of how the student’s progress toward meeting the annual goals will be

measured and monitored and when reports will be provided

Accommodations necessary to measure the academic achievement and functional

performance of the pupil on state and district assessments

IEP meetings will be held according to the following schedule:

Yearly to review the student’s progress and make any necessary changes

Every three years to review the results of a mandatory comprehensive reevaluation of the

student’s progress

After the student has received a formal assessment or reassessment

When a parent or teacher feels that the student has demonstrated significant educational

growth or a lack of anticipated progress (consistent with state and federal law, IEP

meetings will be held within 30 days of a parent’s request)

When an Individual Transition Plan (“ITP”) is required at the appropriate age

When TGS seeks to suspend or remove the student for a period of 10 days or more for the

same behavior, in order to determine if the student’s misconduct was a manifestation of

his/her disability

Interim and Initial Placements of New Charter School Students

TGS shall comply with Education Code Section 56325 with regard to students transferring into

TGS within the academic school year. In accordance with Education Code Section 56325(a)(1),

for students who enroll in TGS from another school district within the State, but outside of the

SELPA with a current IEP within the same academic year, TGS shall provide the pupil with a

free appropriate public education, including services comparable to those described in the

previously approved IEP, in consultation with the parent, for a period not to exceed thirty (30)

days, by which time TGS shall adopt the previously approved IEP or shall develop, adopt, and

implement a new IEP that is consistent with federal and state law.

In accordance with Education Code Section 56325(a)(2), in the case of an individual with

exceptional needs who has an IEP and transfers into TGS from a district operated program under

the same special education local plan area of TGS within the same academic year, TGS shall

continue, without delay, to provide services comparable to those described in the existing

approved IEP, unless the parent and TGS agree to develop, adopt, and implement a new IEP that

is consistent with federal and state law.

For students transferring to TGS with an IEP from outside of California during the same

academic year, TGS shall provide the pupil with a free appropriate public education, including

services comparable to those described in the previously approved IEP in consultation with the

parents, until TGS conducts an assessment pursuant to paragraph (1) of subsection (a) of Section

1414 of Title 20 of the United States Code, if determined to be necessary by TGS, and develops

a new IEP, if appropriate that is consistent with federal and state law.

IEP Review

The IEP team will formally review the student’s IEP at least once per year to determine how the

IEP is meeting his/her needs. In accordance with IDEA regulations, the IEP team will also

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 54 of 127


conduct a formal review of the IEP once every three years, in which the student is reassessed and

the IEP is reviewed as part of an overall comprehensive reevaluation of the student’s progress.

If a parent or faculty member feels the student’s educational needs are not being met, they may

request a reassessment or a review of the IEP by the IEP team at any time during the year via

written notice to the school. Once the request is received, TGS will have 30 days, not including

vacations greater than five days, to hold the IEP meeting.

English Learners

TGS will meet all applicable legal requirements for English Learners (“EL”), including longterm

English Learners or English Learners at risk of becoming long-term English Learners, as it

pertains to annual notification to parents, student identification, placement, program options, EL

and core content instruction, teacher qualifications and training, reclassification to fluent English

proficient status, monitoring and evaluating program effectiveness, and standardized testing

requirement. TGS will implement policies to assure proper placement, evaluation, and

communication regarding ELs and the rights of students and parents.

Home Language Survey

TGS will administer the home language survey upon a student’s initial enrollment into TGS (on

enrollment forms).

English Language Proficiency Assessment

All students who indicate that their home language is other than English will be tested with the

English Language Proficiency Assessments for California (“ELPAC”). The ELPAC has four

proficiency levels (Level 4: well developed; Level 3: moderately developed; Level 2: somewhat

developed; and Level 1: minimally developed) and is aligned with the 2012 California ELD

Standards.

The ELPAC consists of two separate assessments:

Initial Assessment (“IA”)

The ELPAC IA is used to identify students as either an English Learner, or as fluent in English.

The IA is administered only once during a student’s time in the California public school system

based upon the results of the home language survey. The locally scored IA will be the official

score. The IA is given to students in grades K–12 whose primary language is not English to

determine their English proficiency status.

Summative Assessment (“SA”)

ELs will take the SA every year until they are reclassified as fluent English proficient. The

ELPAC SA is only given to students who have previously been identified as an EL based upon

the IA results, in order to measure how well they are progressing with English development in

each of the four domains. The results are used as one of four criteria to determine if the student is

ready to be reclassified as fluent English proficient, to help inform proper educational placement,

and to report progress for accountability.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 55 of 127


Both the ELPAC SA and IA are paper–pencil assessments administered in seven grade spans—

K, 1, 2, 3–5, 6–8, 9–10, and 11–12. In kindergarten and grade 1, all domains are administered

individually. In grades 2–12, the test is administered in groups, exclusive of speaking, which is

administered individually.

Testing times will vary depending upon the grade level, domain, and individual student. Both

the ELPAC IA and SA are given in two separate testing windows through the school year.

The IA testing window will be year-round (July 1–June 30). Any student whose primary

language is other than English as determined by the home language survey and who has not

previously been identified as an English Learner by a California public school or for whom there

is no record of results from an administration of an English language proficiency test, shall be

assessed for English language proficiency within 30 calendar days after the date of first

enrollment in a California public school, or within 60 calendar days before the date of first

enrollment, but not before July 1 of that school year.

The SA testing window will be a four-month window after January 1 (February 1–May 31). The

English language proficiency of all currently enrolled English Learners shall be assessed by

administering the test during the annual assessment window.

TGS will notify all parents of its responsibility for ELPAC testing and of ELPAC results within

thirty days of receiving results from the publisher. The ELPAC shall be used to fulfill the

requirements under the Every Student Succeeds Act for annual English proficiency testing.

Reclassification Procedures

Reclassification procedures utilize multiple criteria in determining whether to classify a pupil as

proficient in English, including, but not limited to, all of the following:

Assessment of language proficiency using an objective assessment instrument including,

but not limited to, the ELPAC.

Participation of the pupil’s classroom teachers and any other certificated staff with direct

responsibility for teaching or placement decisions of the pupil to evaluate the pupil’s

curriculum mastery.

Parental opinion and consultation, achieved through notice to parents or guardians of the

language reclassification and placement including a description of the reclassification

process and the parents opportunity to participate, and encouragement of the participation

of parents or guardians in the reclassification procedure including seeking their opinion

and consultation during the reclassification process.

Comparison of the pupil’s performance in basic skills against an empirically established

range of performance and basic skills based upon the performance of English proficient

pupils of the same age that demonstrate to others that the pupil is sufficiently proficient in

English to participate effectively in a curriculum designed for pupils of the same age

whose native language is English.

Strategies for English Learner Instruction and Intervention

TGS is committed to using a comprehensive curriculum model for English Learners that is

research-based, compatible with State Standards, and that complements and supports Montessori

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 56 of 127


methods using observation, hands-on experiences, student driven discovery, and formative

assessment. This model draws on the material provided by Sheltered Instruction Observation

Protocol (“SIOP”) as well as University of Nebraska “Cultural Links” and the Affective Filter

work done by Stephen Krashen at the University of Southern California. The model will

continue to evolve and take advantage of cutting edge research and best practices in

implementing State Standards for English Learners.

Preparation

Clearly defined content objectives for students

Clearly defined language objectives for students

Content concepts appropriate for age and educational background

Supplementary materials used to a high degree, making the lesson clear and meaningful

(e.g., graphs, models, visuals)

Adaptation of content (e.g., text, assignment) to all levels of student proficiency

Meaningful activities that integrate lesson concepts (e.g., surveys, letter writing,

simulations, constructing models) with language practice opportunities for reading,

writing, listening, and/or speaking

The Building Background Knowledge

Concepts explicitly linked to students’ background experiences

Links explicitly made between past learning and new concepts

Key vocabulary emphasized (e.g., introduced, written, repeated, and highlighted for

students to see)

The Comprehensible Input component of the SIOP Model has the following elements

Speech appropriate for students’ proficiency level (e.g., slower rate, careful enunciation,

and simple sentence structure for beginners)



Clear explanation of academic tasks

A variety of techniques used to make content concepts clear (e.g., modeling, visuals,

hands-on activities, demonstrations, gestures, body language)

Strategies

Ample opportunities for students to use strategies

Consistent use of scaffolding techniques throughout lesson, assisting and supporting

student understanding

A variety of question types used, including those that promote higher-order thinking

skills throughout the lesson (e.g., literal, analytic, and interpretive questions)

Interaction

Frequent opportunities for interactions and/or discussion between teacher/student and

among students that encourage elaborated responses about lesson concepts

Grouping configurations support language and content objectives of the lesson

Sufficient wait time for student response

Ample opportunities for students to clarify key concepts

Practice and Application

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Hands-on materials and/or manipulatives for students to practice using new content

knowledge

Activities for student to apply content and language knowledge in the classroom

Activities that integrate all language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking)

Lesson Delivery

Content objectives clearly supported by lesson delivery

Language objectives clearly supported by lesson delivery

Students engaged approximately 90-100% of the period

Pacing of the lesson appropriate to the students’ ability level

Review and Assessment

Comprehensive review of key vocabulary

Comprehensive review of key content concepts

Regular feedback to students on their output

Assessment of student comprehension and learning of all lesson objectives (e.g., spot

checking, group response) throughout the lesson

Monitoring and Evaluation of Program Effectiveness

The Charter School evaluates the effectiveness of its education program for ELs by:

Adhering to Charter School-adopted academic benchmarks by language proficiency level

and years in program to determine annual progress.

Monitoring teacher qualifications and the use of appropriate instructional strategies based

on program design.

Monitoring student identification and placement.

Monitoring parental program choice options.

Monitoring availability of adequate resources.

In compliance with ESSA, TGS shall monitor students reclassified as English proficient

(“RFEP”) for four (4) years.

Addressing Students with Mental Health Challenges

TGS contracts with outside counseling services to provide additional support for the mental and

emotional well-being of students. During 2016 to 2018, Grove contracted with Creative Insight

Counseling. Creative Insight Counseling offered free workshops for middle school students and

high school students during the school day. Students completed an anonymous survey at the

beginning of the school year to determine the topics that are most relevant to the students. The

topics were: understanding your emotions, grades & perfectionism, and online media. TGS will

continue to work with outside counseling services, which may include Creative Insight

Counseling or another counseling group, to support the social, emotional, and psychological

needs of the students.

The school counselor is available for students during the school day. The school counselor also

provides parents with resources, such as counselors, therapists, and low-cost options. If students

are a danger to themselves, the crisis team is called to do a thorough suicide assessment.

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Students returning from hospitalization meet with the counselor, mentor and/or the

administration and 504 plans are put in place if necessary.

Students Achieving Substantially Above Grade Level Expectations

All students at TGS receive progress reports at regular intervals (in addition to trimester reports).

These reports are also distributed to the student’s mentors. All students complete pre-flective and

reflective essays to evaluate goals and design individual strategies for achieving them. These are

shared with parents, peers and community members during student led conferences. All students

in grades 8-11 take the PSAT each fall to help identify students’ academic strengths and

challenges.

In 10 th and 12 th grades, students who are making progress toward graduation will meet with a

college counselor or administrator to make post-secondary plans and design individualized

strategies for achieving personal goals.

Students who would benefit from further challenges are encouraged to attend University of

California, Riverside Program for Accelerated High School Students during the summer months.

UC (or other college level) courses can be used to supplement regular courses.

TGS also offers a series of SAT prep courses throughout the year and is collaborating with

BeCollegeWise.com to provide test prep throughout the school year.

In 2017, Grove added two new honors classes for students in grades 9-12 and added five more in

2018 to support students who are looking for increased academic challenges. These classes are

not separate sections of classes, they are groups of students within regular classes and it is the

teacher’s responsibility to differentiate the expectations and work for those students who are

taking the class at an honors level. Some examples of instructional strategies teachers use to

differentiate expectations and workload are:

Determine prior knowledge with a pre-test

Provide more challenging readings/texts with separate expectations or seminars for those

readings

Support students to challenge themselves with more advanced and complex topics or

resources when given the opportunity to choose their work

Provide opportunities for students to design their work and projects when appropriate so

they can follow their interests

Separate lessons that focus on more complicated and in-depth material

Find opportunities to work with outside experts (professors from local colleges and

universities, ESRI employees with GIS, etc.)

Assign projects and assignments that have more higher order thinking required

Ask questions that require clear analysis and synthesis and often connect to real world

situations

Allow for students seeking more challenge to work together on projects

Encourage goal setting and self-assessment

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TGS identifies students working substantially above grade level in 7 th grade and discusses the

possibility of advancing from 7 th grade to 9 th grade. TGS has found this to be developmentally

appropriate at times supporting the student in staying challenged academically, as well as

connected socially.

Students Achieving Substantially Below Grade Level Expectations

Interventions are provided at TGS for students who are experiencing difficulties in their

academic performance. Many issues can be addressed, including attendance, truancy, poor

classroom performance, low motivation, substance abuse, family problems, and mental health.

Resource providers gather written information, interview students, parents/guardians, coaches,

evaluate and assess problems, provide diagnostic services and suggest alternatives for

improvement to the student and parents. Students may also seek help through a teacher, staff

member, counselor, administrator, or mentor.

All students at TGS receive progress reports at regular intervals (in addition to final trimester

reports). These reports are also distributed to the student’s mentors. An intervention will be

scheduled in cases where a student is underperforming, including:

performing below his or her ability as perceived by the mentor

exhibiting failure to thrive behaviors (low attendance, disruptive behavior or lack of

participation or preparation for class)

failing to pass a core or pre-college class with a C- or above

These interventions are progressive and generally proceed according to the following format:

1. Mentor meets with student to discuss and counsel regarding performance Mentor

strategizes with student

a. Mentor intervenes with student and other teachers to provide new strategies for

success (accommodations, study skills, organizational options, etc.)

b. Mentor informs parent of strategies and interventions

c. Mentor reviews progress and decides if they have been successful (if not, mentor

moves to step two)

2. Mentor, Parent, Teachers and/or Student meet to find alternative solutions

a. Mentor strategizes with student, administrators, other teachers and parents to

provide solutions and strategies (peer tutoring, after school tutorials, behavioral

strategies, natural and logical consequences, technological interventions, etc.)

b. Outside agencies, experts and consultants (i.e. counselor) may be contacted to

help with intervention. (All Student Study Team (“SST”) meetings include follow

ups to evaluate strategy success)

3. If repeated interventions prove unsuccessful, parents, teachers or students may suggest

further evaluation, testing or placement options. This may include:

a. Psycho-educational testing

b. Medical evaluation

c. Individual or family counseling

d. Modifications to curriculum

e. Exploration of alternative placements

See Appendix F for the Intervention and Referral Process Chart

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Student Support and Intervention Programs at TGS

Mentoring

Each Grove student is assigned a mentor teacher who monitors their academic progress weekly.

The mentor is the person who often first identifies when a student is struggling. The following

components of the Grove’s mentor program are also described in the Grove’s Mentor Handbook:

A Grove mentor is a student’s “go to” person. In the absence of a homeroom teacher the mentor

is especially acquainted with students in his/her mentor group. The relationship between the

mentor and his or her student is one of advisor, experienced supporter and guide. Mentors help

students by encouraging behaviors and habits of mind that work for them and letting them know

when they are wrong. Mentors help their students set appropriate goals and then coach them to

achieve these goals.

Attendance and Mentors

Mentors take roll daily and record and report absences on roll sheets to the main office by 8:15.

Students and parents must clear all absences by a phone call or personal contact with an

administrator. Whenever possible, this contact should occur on the day of the absence or the day

immediately following the absence. A written note from a parent or guardian must accompany

the student back to school. Absences of more than ten days, or chronic truancy will be referred to

the SART board and local truancy authority. It is a student’s responsibility to arrange for makeup

work following any type of absence. Teachers require at least 24 hours to prepare make-up

work following a request by the student or parent.

Counseling Services and Mentors

All students are encouraged to use their mentor for discussing or resolving academic, social,

emotional, career, and personal issues that are considered low in scale or seriousness. For more

serious or higher scale issues, students will be referred to the school counselor who will meet

with the student and his/her family to support the student. Appointments to see a counselor are

made to accommodate their schedule and are available to every student. The school counselor,

mentors, teachers or TGS administrator can assist students in educational planning,

social/personal development, and career planning.

Mentor Tasks

A mentor is responsible for being aware of all aspects of a student’s needs, beyond just their

academics. As such, TGS requests the following from its mentors:

Check your students’ transcripts and cumulative files, including the new family meeting

notes for any students who are new to TGS

Know your students’ birthdays and acknowledge them

Know about his or her family and any life details the student feels comfortable sharing

Share any professional/educational/ or details about your discipline with your students

that you feel comfortable sharing



Interact with his or her other teachers as an advocate, intercessor and/or collaborator

Be eager and enthusiastic when it comes to informing parents about your students’

progress (or lack of progress)

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Orientation Week – Get to know your mentors

Each year, students and mentors have the opportunity to get to know each other during an

orientation week. Some of the key goals of the orientation week include the following:

Goal setting discussion





Transcript Check

Level focus for upcoming assessments

o Sophomores (Upcoming PSAT given on the second Wednesday of October for

Sophomores and Juniors)

o Attendance at College recruiting sessions on and off campus

o Juniors (Registering all Juniors for SAT/ACT - Grove is now a test site)

• Upcoming scholarship workshop with Counselor (evening meeting)

• EAP (Explain to students and parents the importance of this portion of

STAR testing)

o Seniors – Favorite Five (top five colleges you want to attend)

• Letter of recommendation

Pre-flective “Essays”: Setting goals for the year for each of the Schoolwide Outcomes:

o Psychic (Academic) Development

o Active Community Member

o Creative Expression

o Physical Expression

o Preparation for Adult Life

Mentors can ask students to

o Write an essay

o Write a set of bullet points

o Do a presentation

o Or have a discussion

Set short- and long-term goals

Determine and write down both short- and long-term goals for portfolio presentations. Shortterm

goal examples include:

Do better in math by handing in ALL homework and taking careful notes (be ready to

check on this)

Become more physically active

Eat nutritionally

Take part in a club or athletic team

Take a leadership role in an aspect of TGS (ASB mentor Group Rep, Club leader, etc.)

Learn to use a specific digital technology application

The goals can be shared with the mentor, a person in the mentor group, and/or the whole group.

Sharing of goals is important because it increases the likelihood of meeting the goals.

Academic Content Support

Students who are struggling academically are identified by teachers and mentors and brought to a

roundtable discussion (which is a weekly “student issues” agenda item for teachers at level

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meetings). Teachers, including the student’s mentor, brainstorm ideas and strategies and discuss

possible interventions. Sometimes this meeting leads to an individual Student Study Team

meeting where parents, student and teachers are in attendance to create a plan for interventions

and their implementation.

Montessori Curriculum Support

Grove provides for students who are struggling with Montessori curriculum in a number of ways

including:

TGS offers two family orientations, one in May and another in August

Provide parents with multiple opportunities to participate in Montessori Parent education,

including events on weekends and evenings

Increased parent communication, including weekly written communication and/or online

progress notes from teachers

Increased scaffolding and supervision which diminishes as students demonstrate

independence (i.e. preferential seating)

Clearly defined physical and behavioral boundaries – verbally and in writing

Written behavior contracts

Peer intervention, shadowing and mentoring

Increased family involvement including parent participation in field trips, classroom

activities, etc.

Digital Technology

Students at Grove have access to school laptops throughout the day (they are “checked out” and

returned at the end of the day). Struggling students have access to take home laptops on an asneeded

basis. The Charter School provides site-based internet for all students and teachers.

School Information System

The Aeries School Information System is accessible by students and parents online. Aeries

provides students and parents with an online gradebook, access to see previous, current and

upcoming assignments, links to Google classroom, Google classroom websites, documents

related to assignments, disciplinary notes, and graduation progress with credits.

Parents and guardians receive an email from TGS twice a trimester to inform them that grades

and evaluation of student work in Aeries has been updated and they should take time to review it

with their adolescent.

All Grove students (and their teachers) have a Grove Google email account and access to the full

Google suite of applications. Teachers and students use this tool to communicate, send drafts of

work and provide ongoing feedback for work in progress.

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After School Tutoring/Work Sessions

TGS offers after school study hall from 3:15-4:30 on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and

Thursday throughout the school year that is staffed by a credentialed teacher. All teachers are

available until 3:30 pm by their contract to assist students academically.

Individual Student Study Team Meeting

At this meeting, the student, parent(s), mentor, and teachers develop a plan for intervention.

Interventions might include schedule changes, seating assignment changes, Montessori

curriculum modifications, accommodations for testing, alternative readings, supplemental

reading, tutoring, peer tutoring, technology (online texts, audio books, large print screens, etc.),

homework contracts, take home texts (to be kept at home), or other accommodations deemed

necessary.

Teacher Preparation

Teachers will develop student support and interventions aligned to the State Standards and the

Local Control and Accountability Plan (“LCAP”) during in-service week and monthly in-service

sessions. Strategies for students who are struggling will be discussed and planned at weekly level

meetings as well.

Academic Probation

Students at TGS have the right to pursue an education within a community of self-directed,

independent learners. To create such an environment, TGS will annually review each student’s

ability to work within and foster the presence of this learning community. A student who fails to

complete attendance or academic requirements of TGS may be placed on academic probation. A

mandatory meeting of the student, the student’s mentor, other teachers, parents and

administrative staff will then take place to develop an individualized, structured plan (“probation

plan”) to help the student become more successful. The probation plan will include clear written

and verbal guidelines showing how the student can improve academic performance and remove

himself or herself from academic probation.

A student on academic probation will be subject to at least two additional mandatory meetings

with the student’s parents and Charter School administration to review the student’s progress or

lack thereof on his or her probation plan. One of these mandatory meetings is held usually within

3-5 weeks after the student receives his/her probation plan, to determine if the modifications are

working and adjust the probation plan if necessary. The second mandatory meeting is held at the

end of the school year to discuss options for remediation, retention, or other educational

programs that align with the academic needs of the student. These may include: on-line classes

for grade recover, credit recovery from a variety of sources, including Edgenuity, BYU Online

and UC Scout. In some cases, teachers volunteer to offer students 1:1 summer remediation using

independent study contracts and in person as well as on-line meetings. Students and their

families also have the option of accessing the District’s AAA Academy and other (fee based)

summer schools.

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Parent Education

Based on the demographics of the community, TGS is focused on serving many first generation

college goers. As such, Grove offers a variety of parent education options including but not

limited to: annual lectures and guest speakers on a variety of topics for instance Steven Hughes

on Brain Research, Sir Kenneth Robinson on creativity in Montessori education, Laurie Ewert

Krocker on land based learning, and David Kahn on adolescent development to ensure that

parents are appropriately informed and given the necessary tools to support their children’s goals

to not only enter, but succeed in college.

All parents are introduced to expectations for college entrance through a series of workshops

offered annually by our PPS College Counselor. Academic expectations, testing requirements

and study habits are covered as well as application and financial aid issues. Parent Education

Workshops include two or more annual Free Application for Federal Student Aid (“FAFSA”)

Workshops and an annual private colleges and applications workshop for help with the Common

App and College Scholarship Service (“CSS”). These are well attended by parents.

Teacher Training and Professional Development

Teachers at TGS will meet and prepare for the school year for five days prior to the beginning of

each school year using time for:

Collaboration

Guest speakers

Trainings and workshops

Curriculum alignment and preparation

In addition, teachers have the opportunity to attend Montessori and other training annually to

help meet new curricular expectations.

Charter School Annual Goals and Actions to Achieve State

Priorities

Pursuant to Education Code Sections 47605(b)(5)(A)(ii) and 47605(b)(5)(B), a reasonably

comprehensive description of the Charter School’s annual goals and actions, both schoolwide

and for each subgroup of pupils, in and aligned with the Eight State Priorities as described in

Education Code Section 52060(d), can be found in the Charter School’s LCAP. Each of these

goals addresses the unique needs of all students attending the Charter School, including our

numerically significant student subgroups. The metrics associated with these goals help the

Charter School to ensure that these specific subgroups are making satisfactory progress, and are

provided with necessary additional supports made possible by additional funds from the Local

Control Funding Formula.

The current LCAP is on file with the District and is also available on our website at

(http://www.thegroveschool.org/lcap/) and/or in Appendix G. The Charter School shall annually

update and develop the LCAP in accordance with Education Code Section 47606.5 and shall use

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 65 of 127


the LCAP template adopted by the State Board of Education. The Charter School reserves the

right to establish additional and/or amend school-specific goals and corresponding assessments

throughout the duration of the charter term through the annual LCAP update. The Charter School

shall submit the LCAP to the District and County Superintendent of Schools annually on or

before July 1, as required by Education Code Section 47604.33.

The LCAP and any revisions necessary to implement the LCAP shall not be considered a

material revision to the charter, and shall be maintained by the Charter School at the school site.

Overview of 2018-2019 LCAP

TGS identified three LCAP goals for the 2018-2019 school year. The goals are listed below

along with the stakeholder involvement in the LCAP process. For more details see TGS’s

LCAP, attached as Appendix G.

Goal 1: Prepare students for life and college by creating a developmentally optimal learning

environment for adolescents that align with the principles of Montessori education, state

standards, and Common Core

Goal 2: Maintain and improve the physical learning environments and overall facility following

the principles of Montessori education, supporting the specific needs of each discipline, and are

clean and safe

Goal 3: Create a positive school community where all stakeholders are respected, valued,

supported and feel safe; as well as understand the school’s mission, vision, and values as a

Montessori school

Stakeholder Involvement in LCAP Process

Parent and student surveys in fall and spring, including school climate and class

evaluation

Formal LCAP meetings for Parents will be held before the Parent Teacher Group

meetings in November and March

Formal LCAP meetings for faculty and staff held in December and April

LCAP was discussed at all board meetings in the spring and reviewed drafts in April and

June

Charter Schools Serving High School Students

TGS received a full six-year WASC accreditation in 2015 and passed the mid-term WASC visit

in 2017. TGS will renew its WASC accreditation in 2021. All academic high school courses at

TGS are University of California (“UC”)/California State University (“CSU”) approved as

meeting the “a-g” requirements for admission, thus ensuring their transferability to other public

high schools, pursuant to Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(A)(iii).

TGS resubmits course changes and additions annually for UC/CSU approval and notifies

UC/CSU of the courses being offered in a given academic year. TGS is also an Advanced

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Placement School with an approved AP course list, which is updated annually. The secondary

course requirements are designed to encourage all graduates of TGS to meet or exceed

University of California Course Requirements for admissions. The transferability of coursework

to other institutions and the eligibility of courses to meet A-G requirements is listed in the School

Handbook, is discussed at every parent education night regarding the high school, and at the

initial orientation meeting for new families.

Student transcripts are available to students and their parents/guardians upon request with

reasonable notice or at the time a student exits TGS.

Description of Identifying Students

TGS reviews student progress monthly with mentors of students and the school counselor

reviewing grades and missing assignments. When a student is identified by a teacher, mentor,

school counselor or Head of School as having challenges being successful, then a Student Study

Team meeting is held. The meeting can be called by anyone, but is usually called by Charter

School personnel. The people in attendance are: the student’s mentor, parents/guardians, the

student, and any other person important to the student’s success. The mentor or administrator

documents the meeting digitally and the meeting follows the format below:

Student

Strengths

Current Information &

Accommodations

Area of

Concerns and

Questions

Brainstorms and Choice

Strategies, Modifications,

Actions

Responsibility

Who? When?

The SST decides on strategies, modifications, and actions and identifies a person or people

responsible for each one. These strategies, modifications, and actions will be put into place

immediately. The SST will also set a review meeting date to review the progress of the student

with the new strategies, modifications, and actions in place. Some examples of strategies,

modifications, and actions are: weekly check ins with mentor, going to study hall after school,

seating placement in class, check on use of planner daily or weekly, and mentor and student

emailing parent/guardian with explanation of work completed and work due.

This process will continue according to TGS’s IEP Referral Process and could result in referring

for special education assessments. See chart below for a timeline of the IEP Referral Process.

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Timeline &

Documentation

0 days

5 days:

Email Parents

intervention Plan

15 days:

Schedule SST

20 days:

Schedule SST

25 days:

Hold first SST Meeting

(can be without

administration)

40 days:

Schedule SST

45 days:

Hold second SST

Meeting

(Admin present -

Admin Coordinator will

schedule)

*Note - Timeline may be sped up for a more severe case

60 calendar days:

Referral for Special

Education

Evaluation and

Determination

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Element 2: Measurable Student

Outcomes

Governing Law: The measurable pupil outcomes identified for use by the charter school. “Pupil

outcomes,” for purposes of this part, means the extent to which all pupils of the charter school

demonstrate that they have attained the skills, knowledge, and attitudes specified as goals in the

charter school’s educational program. Pupil outcomes shall include outcomes that address

increases in pupil academic achievement both schoolwide and for all groups of pupils served by

the charter school, as that term is defined in subparagraph (B) of paragraph (3) of subdivision

(a) of Section 47607. The pupil outcomes shall align with the state priorities, as described in

subdivision (d) of Section 52060, that apply for the grade levels served, or the nature of the

program operated, by the charter school. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(B).

Goals, Actions, and Measurable Outcomes Aligned with Eight

State Priorities

Pursuant to Education Code Sections 47605(b)(5)(A)(ii) and 47605(b)(5)(B), a reasonably

comprehensive description of the Charter School’s annual goals, actions and measurable

outcomes, both schoolwide and for each subgroup of pupils, in and aligned with the Eight State

Priorities as described in Education Code Section 52060(d), can be found in the Charter School’s

LCAP. Each of these goals addresses the unique needs of all students attending the Charter

School, including our numerically significant student subgroups. The metrics associated with

these goals help the Charter School to ensure that these specific subgroups are making

satisfactory progress, and are provided with necessary additional supports made possible by

additional funds from the Local Control Funding Formula.

The current LCAP is on file with the District and is also available on our website at

www.thegroveschool.org/lcap and/or in the Appendix G. The Charter School shall annually

update and develop the LCAP in accordance with Education Code Section 47606.5 and shall use

the LCAP template adopted by the State Board of Education. The Charter School reserves the

right to establish additional and/or amend school-specific goals and corresponding assessments

throughout the duration of the charter term through the annual LCAP update. The Charter School

shall submit the LCAP to the District and County Superintendent of Schools annually on or

before July 1, as required by Education Code Section 47604.33.

The LCAP and any revisions necessary to implement the LCAP shall not be considered a

material revision to the charter, and shall be maintained by the Charter School at the school site.

How pupil outcomes will address state content and performance

standards

Students at all levels will be expected to gain proficiency in the following core subjects:

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Mathematics: Students must demonstrate the ability to reason logically and to understand

arithmetic, algebraic and geometric concepts and other practical and theoretical mathematical

concepts.

Social Studies: Students explore the history of humanity in relation to life’s purpose. Students

must demonstrate an understanding of historical, economic and geographic concepts and possess

a basic knowledge of the world’s diverse cultures, and must have a working knowledge of civics,

government and American history.

Languages: Students must demonstrate strong communication skills including reading, writing

and listening skills. Students must understand and appreciate literature from various periods and

cultures. Students will gain proficiency in at least one language in addition to English.

Science: Students will utilize research and inquiry methods in order to demonstrate and

understand major concepts underlying biology, environmental science, chemistry, physics and

earth science, in addition to their own areas of interest.

Arts: Students will cultivate an appreciation for and/or skill in one or more forms of artistic selfexpression

(e.g., music, choir, literary/visual/studio arts, drama, dance, etc.).

These core subject areas will be further subdivided into a list of specific skills in each of the

above areas at different skill levels and depending on individual course of study. These specific

skill-level standards will include the California State content and performance standards.

Students will take all required state assessments, in addition to other schoolwide assessments.

Students graduating from the high school are expected to meet or exceed the entrance

requirements for college or university including the “A-G requirements” of the University of

California. In addition to attaining specific content areas and skill-level standards, students will

also demonstrate overall progress toward graduation readiness through a series of portfolio and

competency reviews at both the junior and senior high school levels.

To best serve our students and community, TGS will continue to examine and refine its list of

core subjects over time to reflect TGS’s mission and any changes in state or local standards that

affect this mission. In addition, students will be required to satisfactorily complete other such

core courses that TGS Governing Board deems appropriate. Staff and/or TGS Governing Board

will periodically review college entrance requirements and state standards to determine which

changes shall be introduced to the core curriculum.

Students will meet or exceed state expectations for scores on standardized tests.

Physical Fitness: In compliance with the State Board of Education’s Physical Fitness Testing

requirements, TGS tests all students in the 7th and 9th grades and adheres to the state standards

of the Healthy Fitness Zone (“HFZ”). TGS administers the following tests on an annual basis:

1 mile run

Curl-up

Push up

Trunk lift

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 70 of 127


Shoulder stretch

Body mass index (BMI)

Student Academic Achievement Outcomes

Student Achievement Data

The CAASPP test results (http://caaspp.cde.ca.gov/) are grouped according to achievement in

meeting the standard for the test. The groups are identified by numbers 1-4 in the charts below.

1 = Far Below Standard 3 = Met Standard

2 = Nearly Met Standard 4 = Exceeded Standard

The tables below show the percentage of students from each grade within each of the numbered

categories. The tables are also highlighted so that a group of students in a grade level can be

tracked longitudinally, in order to evaluate progress over the course of 7 th through 11 th grade.

CAASPP Results English Language Arts Percentages Rounded

2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results

Grade 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

7 18 21 45 16 10 23 48 20 7 26 48 17 15 19 51 15

8 5 24 41 30 24 14 46 16 13 18 52 15 20 15 49 17

11 9 16 44 31 0 8 42 50 16 4 33 45 6 19 34 41

Total 11 21 43 25 13 16 46 26 11 18 46 23

Analysis of English Language Arts Results

Comparing the data of the CAASPP results it can be seen that as students move from 7 th to 8 th

grade their scores remain fairly similar and consistent. For the only group of students who have

results from 8 th and 11 th grade (Class of 2019), their scores increased slightly with 5% more

students meeting or exceeding the standard for the test.

CAASPP Results Mathematics Percentages Rounded

2015 Results 2016 Results 2017 Results 2018 Results

Grade 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4

7 24 21 24 32 5 35 25 35 17 41 24 17 32 26 34 8

8 11 27 30 32 32 16 16 35 18 31 23 26 40 25 30 5

11 36 12 36 15 19 31 31 19 37 16 4 41 19 38 25 19

Average 23 20 30 27 18 27 23 31 22 32 19 26

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Analysis of Math Results

Comparative data of the class of 2020 (7 th grade in 2015, 8 th grade in 2016) shows a significant

decrease in the percentage of students scoring in the “Standard Met” category (score = 3) and an

increase in the percentage of students scoring in the “Far Below Standard” category (score = 1).

The Class of 2021 shows a significant decrease in the percentage (-9%) of students scoring in the

“Exceeds Standard” category (score = 4) between 2016 and 2017, with a significant increase

(+13%) in students scoring in the “Far Below Standard” category (score = 1). The 2017 results

indicate students struggled most in concepts and procedures in the math section, which is

consistent with student achievement statewide. Please see above section titled “Challenges and

Plans to Address Them” on page 6 for a discussion of TGS’s plans to address the decline in math

scores.

Early Assessment Program (EAP – an indicator for college readiness)

In compliance with state requirements, all 11 th grade students at TGS take the Smarter Balanced

Summative Assessments for ELA and mathematics each spring. These assessments are

administered as part of the CAASPP, and serve as an indicator of readiness for college-level

coursework in English and mathematics and are used by the California State University and

participating California Community Colleges to determine EAP status. (See

https://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/gs/hs/eapindex.asp.)

Again, due to small sample size TGS has available, it is helpful to look at the four year average.

Results from 11 th Grade CAASPP

Demographic Assessment 2015 2016 2017 2018 Average

Schoolwide ELA 75% 92% 79.16% 75.01% 80%

Math 51% 50% 45.84% 43.75% 48%

2018



2017



2016



75% Met or Exceeded Standard for ELA CAASPP, indicating they are ready for College

entry level exams.

44% Met or Exceeded Standard for Mathematics CAASPP indicating they are ready for

College entry level exams.

79% Met or Exceeded Standard for ELA CAASPP, indicating they are ready for College

entry level exams.

46% Met or Exceeded Standard for Mathematics CAASPP indicating they are ready for

College entry level exams.

92% Met or Exceeded Standard for ELA CAASPP, indicating they are ready for College

entry level exams.

51% Met or Exceeded Standard for Mathematics CAASPP indicating they are ready for

College entry level exams.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 72 of 127


2015



50% Met or Exceeded Standard for ELA CAASPP indicating they are ready for College

entry level exams.

51% Met or Exceeded Standard for Mathematics CAASPP indicating they are ready for

College entry level exams.

Objective Means of Measuring Growth

See assessment results for CAASPP, PSAT, SAT and AP in the Charter Renewal Criteria section

and Student Academic Achievement Outcomes above.

Mentoring Program and Student Led Conferences

As discussed in Element 1, all teachers are assigned 12-20 students to mentor each year in their

academic, personal and professional development.

Through the mentoring program, students’ growth is evaluated by the use of Student Led

Conferences. Twice a year, students give a formal presentation to their mentor, parent/guardian

and a peer. In this presentation students reflect on their performance in the school outcomes and

discuss their goals. Presentations are held over one full day and two half days in both October

and May. Mentors are expected to be on campus during conference times; students need only

attend their conference. This is not a time for parents to ask questions, or hold a parent teacher

conference; however, strategies that will help the student achieve their goals may be discussed.

Students are to bring in artifacts that demonstrate their progress. All audience members of each

conference complete a Student Led Conference Rubric for the presenter. The rubric is based on

the evidence and artifacts students present for each of the schoolwide outcomes. Mentors record

the score of the rubric they completed on a shared Google document, accessible to TGS

administration and other teachers, to help monitor progress and growth.

Student Led Conferences Scores

School

Average

Score

Preparation

Articulation and

Communication

Academic Community Civic Athletic Technology Goals

Total

Score

Fall 2015 3.46 3.33 3.39 3.28 2.93 3.18 3.26 3.31 25.81

Spring

2016 3.39 3.37 3.42 3.45 2.94 3.14 3.45 3.33 21.31

Fall 2016 3.34 3.24 3.36 3.17 2.73 2.99 3.03 3.17 24.34

Spring

2017 3.26 3.29 3.36 3.21 2.62 2.99 2.92 3.19 23.16

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 73 of 127


Beginning in the Fall of 2017 and Spring of 2018, a new rubric was used to assess the student led

conferences, to reflect new student outcomes developed through the 2015 WASC accreditation.

EP (4) - Exceptional - Demonstrates knowledge and skill beyond proficiency in the

outcome

PR (3)- Proficient - Demonstrates proficiency in outcome

BP (2)- Below Proficient - Does not demonstrate adequate proficiency in the outcome,

but is progressing towards proficiency

NC (1)- Not completed - Did not show artifact or provide discussion for the outcome

Fall 2017 and Spring 2018 SLC

Middle

F2017

Middle

S2018

High

F2017

High

S2018

MS/HS

F2017

MS/HS

S2018

A Grove graduate actively participates in their

psychic (academic) development. 2.8 3.28 2.9 3.45 2.85 3.365

A Grove graduate is an active community

member. 2.7 3.23 3.2 3.41 2.95 3.32

A Grove graduate expresses ideas creatively. 3 3.29 2.9 3.26 2.95 3.275

A Grove graduate is involved in physical

expression. 3 3.19 3.2 3.28 3.1 3.235

A Grove graduate is prepared for life as an

adult. 2.8 3.04 2.9 3.04 2.85 3.04

Professionally Dressed (CR or NC) 2.9 N/A 3 N/A 2.95 N/A

Community Member Present (CR or NC) 2.4 N/A 2.9 N/A 2.65 N/A

Student is prepared for presentation

(prepared and organized statements,

technology is arranged, etc) (CR or NC) 3.6 N/A 3.7 N/A 3.65 N/A

Exit Outcomes

Schoolwide Learner Outcomes (see above or Appendix H): Measured by Student led

conferences, project weeks, and academic rubrics.

Students will meet or exceed state expectations for scores on standardized tests.

Students will meet all graduation requirements to earn a high school diploma from The Grove

School.

Applying Data

To improve student learning, engagement, and preparation for college and life, TGS creates and

implements an action plan to support students who struggle to complete the UC A-G curriculum,

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 74 of 127


score below proficiency on key assessments, and/or do not show improvement on key

assessments, and/or are failing classes in 7 th and 8 th grade.

A Google sheet is created and updated with data collected from the MDTP website, so that

performance can be monitored, compared and independent results can be easily accessed.

TGS ensures its staff receives MDTP training with UCSD staff to implement and interpret

MDTP results. TGS teachers and administration used the information collected to help determine

class placement and necessary intervention.

Data indicates a need to increase or improve services for low socioeconomic students

1. Through the better identification of students who are designated as low-income and better

use of data from MDTP, PSAT, and CAASPP, we are able to create targeted

interventions for students who are identified by determined measures as “low

performing” as well as low-income.

6. The middle school will implement a more structured organization and planner system to

help students stay organized and build their executive functioning skills. Help with

executive function skills is an identified need of low socioeconomic students.

7. Grove will identify lower income students at the beginning of the school year and track

their academic progress through classes monthly with the school counselor and the

mentors.

8. Students will be directed to specific tutoring during after school study hall to further help

with identified deficits.

9. Math and English support mini-courses as targeted interventions will also be used.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 75 of 127


Element 3: Methods for Measuring

Student Progress

Governing Law: The method by which pupil progress in meeting those pupil outcomes is to be

measured. To the extent practicable, the method for measuring pupil outcomes for state

priorities shall be consistent with the way information is reported on a school accountability

report card. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(C).

Assurances TGS shall meet all statewide standards and conduct all state-mandated assessments,

including the CAASPP, which includes the SBAC tests, California Science Test, California

Alternate Assessments, the English Language Proficiency Assessments for California, the

Physical Fitness Test, and any other applicable state-mandated standardized assessments and

schoolwide assessments.

To the extent practicable, the method for measuring pupil outcomes for state priorities shall be

consistent with the way information is reported on a school accountability report card.

Methods of Assessment

TGS uses a combination of formative assessments, authentic performance assessments, and more

traditional evaluative and summative assessments to document learners’ progress towards

defined outcomes. A variety of assessments are needed to provide acceptable evidence of

learners’ understanding. These assessments are driven by our curriculum and instructional

practices. Our Montessori educational approach to learning cannot be measured with traditional

or standardized assessments alone. The majority of learner assessment is ongoing, and used to

document and address learners’ skills, knowledge, behavior and progress across a wide variety of

curriculum areas (English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Second

Language, PE, etc.). As described above, assessment tools include all required state and federal

assessments. These assessments are based on State Standards and other locally developed

standards, and are tied to specific achievement targets. Assessments include, but are not limited

to, portfolios, projects, performances, exhibitions, tests, and self-reflection (see full list below).

Assessments created by TGS may be adjusted from year to year based on stakeholder and site

discussions, but the rubrics align with the Schoolwide Outcomes and/or State Standards. This

alignment allows TGS to review data and make comparisons with previous years.

Ongoing formal and authentic assessments are driven by our curriculum and instructional

practices. Our Montessori educational approach to learning cannot be measured with traditional

or standardized assessments alone. Assessments include, but are not limited to, portfolios,

projects, performances, exhibitions, tests, and self-reflection. They are used to evaluate progress

across a wide variety of curriculum areas (English Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social

Studies, Second Language) and address progress in cognitive and social-emotional skills.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 76 of 127


TGS regularly sends teachers to Montessori workshops, conferences and five week intensive

course to train new teachers and continues to support experienced teachers to develop planning

and assessment skills around Montessori educational practices.

TGS uses objective means of assessment that are frequent, sufficiently detailed and demonstrate

students are making satisfactory progress towards proficiency in the TGS Schoolwide Outcomes,

completion of UC A-G requirements, and progress towards graduation. This progress is

measured by school created rubrics, teacher made assessments, and state created tests.

Assessments, and the outcomes themselves, may be modified over time for learners with either

an IEP or 504 Plan and learners with other special needs, performance standards and assessments

will be adapted as appropriate in accordance to their plans.

Assessments, Purpose, Grade Level and Timeline



Classroom assessments (All grades, ongoing throughout the year)

o TGS will measure outcomes in core subjects according to competency goals

outlined in the State Standards for individual subjects. In addition, students must

demonstrate mastery in all core subjects. “Mastery” within a course subject is

determined by teacher created assessments and assignments that utilize both

summative and formative evaluation practices. These practices allow teachers to

adjust lessons in order to assist students in reaching “mastery” within course

subjects. “Mastery” is defined as evaluations and grades of 70% or better in all

year-end competency reviews, portfolios, and tests.

o Performance standards and assessments for students with special needs will be

adapted as appropriate to their Individualized Education Plans. Performance

standards and assessments for English Learners will be adapted in accordance

with the ELD Standards and ELPAC results.

o TGS will assess portfolios with rubrics according to school-wide standards with

input from teachers across all content areas.

PSAT (PSAT 8/9 for Grades 8 and 9; and NMSQT for Grades 10 and 11, October)

o All students in grades 8-11 have the opportunity to take the PSAT and/or NMSQT

each fall. The results of the assessment are used to assess student progress on

college preparation and to identify students who need specific academic support

and those who are capable of more challenging academic work.

SAT (Grades 11 and 12, Trimester 1)

o TGS offered students the opportunity to take the SAT at school for the first time

in October 2018 with the intention of helping more students take the SAT,

specifically students with disabilities, English learners, low income, and

homeless.


CAASPP (Grades 7,8, 11; April)

o Students complete CAASPP testing in April of each year for all required

CAASPP tests.

Mathematic Diagnostic Testing Project (all students enrolled in math classes, Trimester 2

and Trimester 3)

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 77 of 127


o All students enrolled in math classes complete the MDTP for their specific class

at the beginning of Trimester 2 and the end of Trimester 3. The results show how

much of the content each student is learning and math skills they are retaining for

the math class in which they are enrolled.

Student Led Conference portfolios and presentations (all students, October and May)

o Students complete a Student Led Conference in October and May of each year. At

the conference, students give a formal presentation that is similar to an annual

review meeting in the professional work world. The students present to their

parents/guardians, mentor, and invited guests. In both conferences each year,

students reflect on their work in general and their performance in each of the areas

of the Schoolwide Outcomes. At the conference in October, students set goals for

themselves for the year. At the conference in May, students reflect on their year

overall and the goals they set for themselves. Mentors share their reflections and

evaluation of the students work and development and all audience members can

ask questions or ask for clarification.

Interdisciplinary Project Sessions (all students, twice a trimester)

o Students participate in an interdisciplinary project for two weeks that addresses an

area of interest of the student. Students work collaboratively to investigate a topic

and learn and practice the skills necessary to take action related to the topic.

Students will produce a final product at the end of each project week that will

demonstrate the new knowledge and skills learned related to their topic of choice.

Portfolio with Rubrics:

o Students will maintain a comprehensive portfolio of work in each area of study

which demonstrates progress in skill and acquisition of knowledge. The portfolio

will contain the student’s reflective writing about his or her learning experiences,

along with evidence of competency gained. Portfolios with rubrics have been

standardized and developed for both the middle and high school levels. Portfolios

may be comprised of mixed media, or power point presentations, including slides,

tapes or videotapes that document the student’s learning experiences. Portfolios

will be reviewed by mentors, parents and students during Student Led

Conferences, and are a prerequisite for matriculation and graduation.

Capstone Project (Grade 9, Trimester 2 and 3)

o The Capstone Project allows a student to demonstrate mastery of both a specific

topic and the relation of this topic to the broader subjects of English, math,

science, and social studies and serves as a summative expression of what a student

has learned during their middle school experience. The Capstone Project will also

demonstrate the student’s analytical and interpretive skills to examine a world

problem and suggest community responses on a local level.

Senior Project (Grade 12, all year and presented by June 1)

o The Senior Project is a graduation requirement. Students must spend at least 40

hours on the project, complete research, involve community members, and make a

contribution to a community. Students write an academic paper answering an

interdisciplinary question related to their Senior Project and present their project

to TGS community.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 78 of 127


Assessments for Schoolwide Outcomes

Schoolwide Outcomes

A Grove graduate actively participates in their psychic

(academic) development.

A Grove graduate is an active community member.

A Grove graduate expresses ideas creatively.

A Grove graduate is involved in physical expression.

A Grove graduate is prepared for life as an adult.

Assessment(s)

CAASPP, PSAT, MDTP, Classroom

Assessments, Completion of UC A-G

Requirements

Student Led Conference

A-G Art Requirement, Project Week,

Student Led Conferences

P.E., Graduation, Student Led

Conferences

Student Led Conferences

Data Analysis and Reporting

The TGS data team consists of the Head of School, Program Coordinator, School Counselor and

teachers by department as needed. The team members work collaboratively to review assessment

data to improve instruction. Important goals of these teams are:

Collecting and analyzing data

Comparing student outcomes across grade levels where resources are both identical and

different

Enhancing professional development opportunities targeting student outcomes and

student needs

Providing ongoing feedback about student assessment results and progress to students

and their parents

Reviewing and developing all classroom curriculum and instruction with a focus on

intervention, EL, socially disadvantaged students, and students with disabilities.

TGS reviews data on an ongoing basis due to the multiple measures for student learning and

development of skills. The teaching faculty meets weekly by middle school and high school

level. Teachers use this time to discuss students’ academic progress and behavior issues, plan

upcoming events, review data, communicate about school happenings, get feedback and make

sure teachers are informed, prepared and supported. Additionally, TGS has five full days of inservice

the week before school starts each August and six minimum days annually for

professional development. TGS uses this time for reviewing data, improving instructional

practices, collaborative planning, and use the data to improve learning. The Head of School

participates in all in-service meetings during minimum days and attends the middle and high

school level meetings regularly.

TGS uses Aeries to track and monitor students’ progress using the formative and summative

assessments in classes as well as the variety of assessments detailed above. Data for individual

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 79 of 127


students is available to all families and students throughout the year at any time through the

Aeries Gradebook application.

The Head of School, Program Coordinator, School Counselor and teachers regularly analyze

student data to identify strengths and weaknesses and create action plans for instruction and

determine areas for intervention for individual students, as well as subgroups, whole classes,

grade levels and schoolwide to help fuel continuous improvements at every level.

The Head of School presents student achievement data and other metrics (attendance, behavior,

survey results, etc.) to TGS Board and the Parent Teacher Group twice a year. These groups

review the data to assess whether TGS is meeting its annual goals and what additional resources

or changes may be needed to ensure the Charter School’s success, specifically through the LCAP

process. Through individual report cards, school newsletters/website, Board meeting agendas

and minutes and other “official” documents (including the LCAP, the School Accountability

Report Card (“SARC”), survey results, etc.) the Charter School distributes information about the

Charter School’s progress, successes and challenges to all stakeholders. Attached as Appendices

I, J and K are TGS’s California Dashboard Report and Local Indicators, SARC, and Parent

Survey Results for 2018 and 2017.

Teacher‐created formative and summative assessments will inform daily and weekly lesson

planning. Teachers will meet in content‐area and level teams to review data generated from

regular student work. These meetings will take place during level meetings, faculty in-service,

and department meetings. This data analysis will help ensure that all students are progressing

toward mastery, and will allow teachers to adjust lessons and assignments to address students’

needs.

The Head of School monitors the progress of all subgroups (particularly language learners and

special education students), and patterns of academic achievement that may indicate declining

progress or inequitable outcomes among different subgroups. Any problematic data trends will

be directly addressed through meetings with individual teachers, departments, levels, and

through the examination of policies or curriculum that may be contributing to declining

achievement or inequities.

All student achievement data and student information is kept in the Aeries school information

system and is available for reporting purposes, including the SARC. Student achievement data

will be disaggregated annually to clearly identify the academic performance of students by

numerically significant subgroups including but not limited to ethnicity, gender, English Learner,

socio‐economically disadvantaged students, and students with disabilities.

Grading, Progress Reporting, and Promotion/Retention

TGS has always used narrative evaluations for student work for 7 th and 8 th grade students. The

purpose behind narrative evaluations is to help students and parents focus on a student’s growth,

improvement and learning of material instead of just focusing on a letter grade. Grove works on

a “growth mindset.” This means we focus on how a student is growing and developing over time,

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 80 of 127


and take time to review individual work, not just focusing on summarizing months or an entire

year of work with a simple letter grade.

Exceptional (EP) = work that is truly uncommon and an exception to the norm, when a student

goes far above the standard level of work (for themselves and their grade level). We hope

students will strive to find one or two topics and work each trimester in each class that interest

them enough to put the uncommon effort and attention into the work.

Proficient (PR) = work that demonstrates the standard level of skill or knowledge for

themselves and their grade. This will be the most commonly used mark and will act as a simple

check for some of the work by students.

Below Proficient (BP) = work that demonstrates a student is below the standard level for

themselves and/or their grade level.

Not Completed (NC) = when the teacher has no record of the student’s work.

The following scale will be used when determining grades for 9th through 12th grade

students:

Mark % GPA* Mark % GPA* *Add one point for Honors and Advanced

Placement Classes

A+ 98-100 4.0 C+ 77-79 2.3

**Credit only for students with an IEP or 504 plans.

A 93-97 4.0 C 73-77 2.0

A- 90-92 3.6 C- 70-72 1.6

B+ 87-89 3.3 D+** 67-69 1.3

B 83-86 3.0 D** 63-66 1.0

B- 80-82 2.6 D-** 60-62 0.6

Competency Review

Teachers will finalize their grade reports at the end of each trimester and students will receive a

report card and credits earned. These reports will become part of the student’s permanent record

and used to determine a student’s placement on academic probation, if applicable.

Please see Appendix L for a sample transcript, trimester grade report, and progress report.

Semi-Annual Self-Evaluation (Pre-flective and Reflective Essays with conferences)

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 81 of 127


Students at the middle and high school levels will perform a semi-annual self-evaluation along

guidelines developed by the core teachers. This will become part of the student’s permanent

record.

Students graduating from the high school are expected to meet or exceed the entrance

requirements for college or university including the “A-G requirements” of the University of

California. In addition to attaining specific content areas and skill-level standards, students will

also demonstrate overall progress toward graduation readiness through a series of portfolio and

competency reviews at both the junior and senior high school levels.

Accommodations for Students with Special Needs and English Learners

When giving standardized exams and other formal assessments, TGS will provide all students

with special needs with accommodations listed on their IEP. These accommodations often

include testing in a separate room, extra time, and the opportunity to take breaks. The same

philosophy will be applied with EL students and the accommodations they are offered.

Continuous Improvement

TGS is committed to using student performance data to refine and improve the educational

program. TGS is also committed to continually improving its student evaluation process to match

its Montessori educational approach. As outlined above, teachers have many different

opportunities to discuss multiple measures of student progress and collaborate to improve

lessons, unit plans, and assessments.

Students and their families are integrated into the learning process through availability and

communication of student data. They are invited to attend student led conferences, presentations

to the Parent Teacher Group, and TGS Board meetings related to assessment data and are

encouraged to share individual feedback during the presentations.

In order to assure students are making progress towards mastery in courses, progress reports are

sent out three times during a trimester. Students review their progress in courses with assigned

mentors throughout the trimester, and when students are in danger of not achieving 70% mastery,

then relevant faculty members can hold a SST meeting at which strategies can be implemented to

provide extra support to assist the student in achieving mastery. These meetings and methods can

involve, but are not limited to: classroom teachers, mentors, counselors, special education staff,

and administrators. Teachers also inform parents/guardians three weeks prior to the end of the

term if their student is in danger of failing a class. If a student fails to achieve mastery at the end

of a grading term within a course subject, a SST will work to determine a plan of action to

recovery missing academic credits.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 82 of 127


Element 4: Governance Structure

Governing Law: The governance structure of the charter school, including, but not limited to,

the process to be followed by the charter school to ensure parental involvement. Education Code

Section 47605(b)(5)(D).

TGS is a directly funded independent charter school and is operated by The Grove High School,

a California Non-Profit Public Benefit Corporation, pursuant to applicable California law.

TGS operates autonomously from the District, with the exception of the supervisory oversight as

required by statute and other contracted services as may be negotiated between the District and

TGS. Pursuant to Education Code Section 47604(c), the District shall not be liable for the debts

and obligations of TGS, operated by a California non-profit benefit corporation, or for claims

arising from the performance of acts, errors, or omissions by TGS as long as the District has

complied with all oversight responsibilities required by law.

Attached, as Appendix M please find The Grove High School’s Articles of Incorporation,

Corporate Bylaws, and Conflict of Interest Code.

Board of Directors

TGS is governed by a corporate Board of Directors (“Board” or “Board of Directors”) according

to its adopted corporate bylaws, which shall align with the terms of this charter.

The Board of TGS is currently composed of a minimum of nine (9) and a maximum of fifteen

(15) directors, including at least the following:

1. Two (2) parents/guardians of currently enrolled students. These positions shall be elected

by the Parent Advisory Committee.

2. One (1) member of the post-secondary educational community. This position shall be

elected by majority vote of the Board.

3. Two (2) Teachers. These positions shall be elected by the Faculty Advisory Committee.

4. One (1) Community Member. This position shall be elected by majority vote of the

Board.

5. Charter School Administrator (Head of School)

A minimum of one director shall hold a Montessori credential.

One representative of the District may, at the District’s sole discretion, serve as a director on the

Board in accordance with Education Code Section 47604(b).

Each director shall hold office unless otherwise removed from office in accordance with the

corporate bylaws for three (3) years and until a successor director has been appointed or elected

as required by the position. Terms are renewable for an additional three (3) year term upon

invitation of and approval by a majority of the Board.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 83 of 127


The current Board includes the following members:

Name Category Current Term

Lisa Kensok Chairperson/Parent July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2021

Wendy Blumel Vice-Chair/Community July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2021

Ben Moudry President/Head of School July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2019

Doug Claflin Finance Chair/Parent July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019

Andy Schadwinkel

Secretary/Parent

Representative/Post-Secondary July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2021

Position to be elected by

Parent Advisory Committee. Parent Representative July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2021

Don Berry Parent July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2021

Michael Paisner Parent July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2021

Mark Sigman Community July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2021

Anke Pilz High School Representative July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2020

Beth Elliott-Hora Middle School Representative July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2021

In the upcoming charter renewal period, the Board expects to review and revise Board

composition requirements to remove employees of TGS as directors, in accordance with best

practices.

Board Meetings and Duties

All Board meetings shall be conducted according to the terms and procedures of the Ralph M.

Brown Act (Government Code Section 54950 et seq.), including the timely notice of all Board of

Directors’ meeting agendas on TGS’s website and at the Charter School’s main office, pursuant

to Government Code Section 54954.2(a). The Board of Directors is fully responsible for the

operation and fiscal affairs of TGS including but not limited to the following:

Hire, supervise, evaluate, discipline, and dismissal of the Head of School of TGS.

Approve all contractual agreements.

Approve and monitor the implementation of general policies of TGS. This includes

effective human resource policies for career growth and compensation of the staff.







Approve and monitor TGS’s annual budget and budget revisions.

Act as a fiscal agent. This includes, but is not limited to, the receipt of funds for the

operation of TGS in accordance with applicable laws and the receipt of grants and

donations consistent with the mission of TGS.

Contract with an external independent auditor to produce an annual financial audit

according to generally accepted accounting practices.

Establish operational committees as needed.

Regularly measure progress of both student and staff performance.

Involve parents and the community in school-related programs.

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Execute all applicable responsibilities provided for in the California Corporations Code.

Engage in ongoing strategic planning.

Approve the school calendar and schedule of Board meetings.

Participate in the dispute resolution procedure and complaint procedures when necessary.

Approve charter amendments as necessary and submit requests for material revisions as

necessary to the District for consideration.

Approve annual independent fiscal audit.

Appoint an administrative panel or act as a hearing body and take action on

recommended student expulsions.

Any action by the Board of Directors can only take place at a duly agendized meeting. In

accordance with Education Code Section 47604.32(a)(4), the District is responsible for

monitoring the fiscal condition of TGS.

TGS has adopted a Conflict of Interest Code which complies with the Political Reform Act,

Corporations Code Conflicts of Interest rules, and which shall be updated with any charter

school specific conflicts of interest laws or regulations. As noted above, the Conflict of Interest

Code is attached within Appendix M.

The Head of School

The Head of School is the leader of TGS. The Head of School ensures that the curriculum is

implemented to maximize student-learning experiences. The Head of School must report directly

to TGS Board of Directors, and s/he is responsible for the orderly operation of TGS and the

supervision of all employees in TGS.

See Appendix N for a full job description for the Head of School.

Parent Participation

TGS supports the parents, faculty, and students to maintain advisory committees to the

Governing Board.

TGS currently has a Parent Advisory Committee (“PAC”), which is the governing body of the

Parent-Teacher Group (“PTG”) of The Grove School. The parents or guardians of all students

enrolled in the Charter School, and all faculty and staff, are automatically members of the PTG.

The PAC is elected by the PTG and is comprised of 6-10 voting members. These include the

following:

President

Vice-President

Secretary

Treasurer

Members at large, up to four. Currently: Chairperson of Fundraising/SCRIP

Two Parent Representatives to The Grove School Board of Directors.

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The PAC represents the parent community and its needs to the administration and the governing

board. The PAC works with the Charter School administration to ensure that student needs are

equitably met, that facilities are safe and provide equal access, and that communication between

school and home is effective and frequent. The PAC shares ideas and concerns with the

administration and the governing board twice a month at the PTG and Board Meetings which are

attended by both PAC representatives and the Head of School.

In addition, parents/guardians are strongly encouraged to volunteer at the Charter School. This

volunteer service takes many forms: classroom/office volunteer hours, facilities maintenance,

board or committee work, field trip supervision, etc. TGS’s goal is to empower parents in the

educational process as partners in their children’s education. Parents are encouraged to become

active in developing their students’ learning plans and in assisting to develop TGS’s curriculum,

evaluation process, and other programs. No child will be excluded from TGS or school activities

due to the failure of his or her parent or legal guardian to volunteer. In addition, TGS also

consults with the PAC regularly regarding TGS’s educational program and policies.

Organization Chart

A copy of the TGS Organizational Chart is attached as Appendix O.

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Element 5: Employee Qualifications

Governing Law: The qualifications to be met by individuals to be employed by the charter

school. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(E).

Administrators

Head of School

The Head of School at TGS possesses leadership abilities and a comprehensive educational

vision that is consistent with TGS’s commitment to the Montessori educational method.

TGS’s Head of School must possess a California State Administrative credential or demonstrate

a combination of education and experience that are equivalent to this credential. It is also

preferred that the Head of School have attended Montessori Adolescent Training. Administrative

duties will encompass both the junior and senior high school programs. Please see Appendix N

for a copy of the Head of School’s job description.

Instructional Staff

Core/College Prep Teachers

TGS shall hire and employ a teaching staff who hold California teaching credentials, permits, or

other appropriate documentation issued by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing in

accordance with Education Code Section 47605(l). These documents shall be maintained on file

at TGS and shall be subject to periodic inspection by the District. Teachers will be educators

with an understanding of Montessori education and a genuine interest in self-directed learning.

These teachers will demonstrate proven, in-depth knowledge of the needs of adolescent students.

Each student will be assigned a mentor teacher who will be responsible for overseeing the

student’s academic progress and who will monitor all grading and matriculation decisions for

that student. These teachers will teach core subjects, which at a minimum will include the

subjects of social studies, mathematics, sciences, languages, and the arts. Individuals who do not

hold a valid teaching credential of an appropriate type shall not teach core or college preparatory

courses.

Instructional Aides

Instructional aides who assist teachers and other certificated personnel in instructing reading,

writing, and mathematics shall meet all applicable legal requirements under Education Code

Section 45330, and shall demonstrate at least one of the following:

(1) Completion of at least two years of study at an institution of higher education;

(2) Possession of an associate’s degree or higher; or

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(3) Through a local or state assessment, that is appropriate to the responsibilities to be

assigned to the instructional aide, knowledge of, and ability to assist in, instructing

reading, writing, and mathematics.

Adjunct Faculty and Non-Core Course Instructors

Non-core course teachers and adjunct faculty are professionals and/or experts in their field. They

also possess the willingness and the expertise to impart their knowledge to secondary school age

students. These individuals include, but are not limited to, professors, interns and emeriti from

local universities; local business people; professional artists; writers; scientists; and health-care

professionals. In accordance with Education Code Section 47605(l), TGS acknowledges it is the

intent of the Legislature that charter schools be given flexibility with regard to credentialing

requirements for instructors of non-core, non-college preparatory courses.

Support Staff and Other Personnel

TGS retains and employs non-instructional staff members including secretarial, technological,

agricultural, nutritional, and accounting personnel who possess the experience and expertise

appropriate for the position as outlined in TGS’s staffing plan and personnel policies.

Employee Evaluation Procedures

The Charter School Board has established policies and procedures for the performance

evaluations of faculty and staff. The purpose of these performance evaluations is to promote

greater accountability, which may lead to beneficial changes in professional practice and

improved student achievement.

Professional Development

Each year, as a function of the annual evaluation process, faculty and staff outline goals and

work with Charter School administration to create a professional development plan. The plan

may include training or attendance at Montessori conferences, orientations or courses and/or

other outside training (e.g. AP training or courses in instructional methodology or technology).

In addition, the Charter School provides a week of “in-service” training and hosts outside experts

in technology, curriculum and instruction, and special services as well as an annual safety

training.

Employee Rights

TGS personnel, including teachers, shall be at-will employees of TGS and may be subject to

termination at any time with or without cause and with or without notice. TGS Employee

Handbook sets forth the basis for personnel discipline. Nothing in the Employee Handbook shall

be construed as providing any employee with a permanent position with TGS.

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Element 6: Health and Safety

Procedures

Governing Law: The procedures that the charter school will follow to ensure the health and

safety of pupils and staff. These procedures shall require all of the following:

(i) That each employee of the charter school furnish the charter school with a criminal

record summary as described in Section 44237.

(ii) The development of a school safety plan, which shall include the safety topics listed in

subparagraphs (A) to (H), inclusive, of paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 32282

and procedures for conducting tactical responses to criminal incidents.

(iii)That the school safety plan be reviewed and updated by March 1 of every year by the

charter school.

Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(F).

TGS has adopted and implemented a comprehensive set of health, safety and emergency

policies. TGS’s health and safety policies and procedures will be kept on file for review, and

staff will be trained annually on these policies and procedures. These policies have been

developed in consultation with the Charter School's insurance carriers and address the following:

Procedures for Background Checks

Employees and contractors of TGS will be required to submit to a criminal background check

and to furnish a criminal record summary as required by Education Code Sections 44237 and

45125.1. Applicants for employment must submit two sets of fingerprints to the California

Department of Justice for the purpose of obtaining a criminal record summary. The Charter

School shall not hire any person, in either a certificated or classified position, who has been

convicted of a violent or serious felony except as otherwise provided by law, pursuant to

Education Code Sections 44830.1 and 45122.1. The Head of School of TGS shall monitor

compliance with this policy by evaluating personnel records and report to TGS Board of

Directors on a regular basis. The Board Chairperson shall monitor the fingerprinting and

background clearance of the Head of School. Volunteers who will volunteer outside of the direct

supervision of a credentialed employee shall be fingerprinted and receive background clearance

prior to volunteering without the direct supervision of a credentialed employee. TGS will comply

with all applicable legal requirements for handling all confidential information obtained from the

Department of Justice, pursuant to Education Code Section 44237(n).

Tuberculosis Risk Assessment and Examination

Employees, and volunteers who have frequent or prolonged contact with students, will be

assessed and examined (if necessary) for tuberculosis prior to commencing employment and

working with students, and for employees at least once each four years thereafter, as required by

Education Code Section 49406.

Role of Staff as Mandated Child Abuse Reporters

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All employees will be mandated child abuse reporters and will follow all applicable reporting

and training laws, the same policies and procedures used by the District. The Charter School

shall provide mandated reporter training to all employees annually in accordance with Education

Code Section 44691.

Facility Safety

TGS shall comply with Education Code Section 47610 by either utilizing facilities that are either

compliant with the Field Act or compliant with the California Building Standards Code. TGS

agrees to test sprinkler systems, fire extinguishers, and fire alarms annually at its facilities to

ensure that they are maintained in an operable condition at all times. TGS shall conduct fire drills

as required under Education Code Section 32001, and in conjunction with the District (if at

District facilities). Current Grove facilities as well as the refurbishment of the Barton School

House are compliant with the American with Disabilities Act, local building / safety codes,

zoning, and asbestos screening laws.

Emergency Preparedness and Procedures

TGS shall adhere to an Emergency Procedures Handbook drafted specifically to the needs of the

school site in conjunction with law enforcement and the Fire Marshal. The Emergency

Procedures Handbook is included in Appendix P.

TGS has put in place procedures to ensure the safety of all students in an emergency. TGS trains

teachers annually on how to respond in the event of an emergency, and the Charter School holds

fire and lockdown drills throughout the school year. Instructions are posted in each classroom for

fire and earthquake emergencies and lockdown procedures. Specific procedures for different

types of emergencies are outlined in the Protocols for Emergency Situations section of the Staff

Handbook.

Each and every room has an emergency/first aid box with supplies and emergency protocols. All

staff certify and recertify every other year with the American Red Cross CPR and First Aid

training.

In the case of an emergency, TGS will first ensure the safety of students and faculty, then will

communicate with families. TGS will inform parents and guardians about the emergency as soon

as possible through email, text, website, and social media, and inform parents through email,

text, website, and social media when it is safe for students to be released, and how and where

students will be released from campus.

Immunizations

All enrolled students who receive classroom-based instruction will be required to provide records

documenting immunizations as is required at public schools pursuant to Health and Safety Code

Sections 120325-120375, and Title 17, California Code of Regulations Sections 6000-6075. All

rising 7 th grade students must be immunized with a pertussis (whooping cough) vaccine booster.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 90 of 127


Medication in School

TGS will adhere to Education Code Section 49423 regarding administration of medication in

school. The Charter School will adhere to Education Code Section 49414 regarding epinephrine

auto-injectors and training for staff members. TGS has an on-call contract with a registered nurse

who has trained staff members in administration of medication but does not have a health care

staff member who administers medication to students. There are two designated health clerks for

TGS, one at each campus.

All medicine (prescription and over-the-counter) will be kept in the school office in a secured

cabinet. All medication to be given to the student must have a completed “Authorization for

Administration of Medication” form signed by a medical provider. All Medication must be in the

original labeled container as dispensed or in the manufacturer’s labeled container. Annual

renewal of authorization is required.

For students who need to carry an inhaler or epi-pen with them, TGS requires a completed

“Authorization to Self-Administer Medication at School” form signed by both medical provider

and parents. Annual renewal of authorization is required.

Vision, Hearing, and Scoliosis

Students will be screened for vision, hearing and scoliosis. TGS will adhere to Education Code

Section 49450, et seq., as applicable to the grade levels served by TGS.

Diabetes

TGS will provide an information sheet regarding type 2 diabetes to the parent or guardian of

incoming 7 th grade students, pursuant to Education Code Section 49452.7. The information sheet

shall include, but shall not be limited to, all of the following:

1. A description of type 2 diabetes.

10. A description of the risk factors and warning signs associated with type 2 diabetes.

11. A recommendation that students displaying or possibly suffering from risk factors or

warning signs associated with type 2 diabetes should be screened for type 2 diabetes.

12. A description of treatments and prevention methods of type 2 diabetes.

13. A description of the different types of diabetes screening tests available.

Suicide Prevention Policy

The Charter School shall maintain a policy on student suicide prevention in accordance with

Education Code Section 215.

Nutritionally Adequate Free or Reduced Price Meal

The Charter School shall provide each needy student, as defined in Education Code Section

49552, with one nutritionally adequate free or reduced-price meal, as defined in Education Code

Section 49553(a), during each school day.

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California Healthy Youth Act

The Charter School shall teach sexual health education and human immunodeficiency virus

(“HIV”) prevention education to students in grades 7-12, at least once in junior high or middle

school and at least once in high school, pursuant to the California Healthy Youth Act (Education

Code Section 51930, et seq.).

Comprehensive School Safety Plan

The Charter School shall adopt a Comprehensive School Safety Plan, to be reviewed and

updated by March 1 of every year, which shall include, but not be limited to: (1) an assessment

of the current status of school crime committed on Charter School facilities and at Charter

School-related functions; and (2) identifying appropriate strategies and programs that will

provide or maintain a high level of school safety and address the Charter School’s procedures for

complying with applicable laws related to school safety, which shall include the development of

all of the following pursuant to Education Code Section 32282(a)(2)(A)-(J):

child abuse reporting procedures



routine and emergency disaster procedures

policies for students who committed an act under Section 48915 and other Charter

School-designated serious acts leading to suspension, expulsion, or mandatory expulsion

recommendations

procedures to notify teachers of dangerous students pursuant to Education Code Section

49079

a discrimination and harassment policy consistent with Education Code Section 200






provisions of any schoolwide dress code that prohibits students from wearing “gangrelated

apparel,” if applicable

procedures for safe ingress and egress of pupils, parents, and employees to and from the

Charter School

a safe and orderly environment conductive to learning

the rules and procedures on Charter School discipline

procedures for conducting tactical responses to criminal incidents

Blood-borne Pathogens

TGS shall meet state and federal standards for dealing with blood borne pathogens and other

potentially infectious materials in the work place. The Board shall establish a written infectious

control plan designed to protect employees and students from possible infection due to contact

with blood borne viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (“HIV”) and hepatitis B

virus (“HBV”).

Whenever exposed to blood or other bodily fluids through injury or accident, staff and students

shall follow the latest medical protocol for disinfecting procedures.

Drug Free/Alcohol Free/Smoke Free Environment

TGS shall function as a drug, alcohol and smoke free workplace.

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TGS supports abstinence by all students so that they can reach their full physical, intellectual,

emotional, and social potential. Any use of alcohol, mind-altering drugs, tobacco, or vaporizers

will be seen as evidence that students no longer wish to be involved in TGS program and will

render students eligible for expulsion. In addition to expulsion from the program, TGS will

comply with the law by notifying law enforcement authorities if such use or possession occurs.

Comprehensive Anti-Discrimination and Harassment Policies and Procedures

TGS is committed to providing a school that is free from discrimination and sexual harassment,

as well as any harassment based upon the actual or perceived characteristics of race, religion,

creed, color, gender, gender identity, gender expression, nationality, national origin, ancestry,

ethnic group identification, genetic information, age, medical condition, marital status, sexual

orientation, sex and pregnancy, physical or mental disability, childbirth or related medical

conditions, military and veteran status, denial of family and medical care leave, or on the basis of

a person’s association with a person or group with one or more of these actual or perceived

characteristics, or any other basis protected by federal, state, local law, ordinance or regulation.

TGS has developed a comprehensive policy to prevent and immediately remediate any concerns

about discrimination or harassment at TGS (including employee to employee, employee to

student, student to student, and student to employee misconduct). Misconduct of this nature is

very serious and will be addressed in accordance with the Charter School’s comprehensive antidiscrimination

and harassment policies. Please see Appendix Q for a copy of TGS’s

comprehensive complaint policies.

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Element 7: Racial and Ethnic

Balance

Governing Law: The means by which the charter school will achieve a racial and ethnic balance

among its pupils that is reflective of the general population residing within the territorial

jurisdiction of the district to which the charter petition is submitted. Education Code Section

47605(b)(5)(G).

TGS will offer open enrollment to all students regardless of the characteristics listed in

Education Code Section 220 (actual or perceived disability, gender, gender expression, gender

identity, nationality, race or ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, or any other characteristic that

is contained in the definition of hate crimes set forth in Section 422.55 of the Penal Code,

including immigration status, or association with an individual who has any of the

aforementioned characteristics). TGS will endeavor to recruit a diverse student population from

Redlands and the surrounding community. It is also TGS’s intention that its students understand

and value its mission and be committed to its instructional and operational philosophy.

To achieve a racial and ethnic balance that is reflective of the general population residing within

the territorial jurisdiction of the District, TGS will implement a student recruitment strategy that

includes the following:

An enrollment timeline and process that allows a broad-based recruiting and application

process.

Distribution of promotional and informational material designed to inform and promote

TGS to diverse racial and ethnic groups in the District.

Distribution of promotional and informational materials to a broad variety of community

groups and agencies that serve the various racial, ethnic, and interest groups represented

in the District.

In addition, students in the attendance boundaries of Mission Elementary School, a very racially

and ethnically diverse area in the District, are given preference in TGS’ lottery as described in

Element 8 below.

See Appendix B for the complete Enrollment and Outreach Plan. The Head of School shall

review student demographic data on a regular basis to ensure the Charter School is meeting its

commitment to a racial and ethnic balance and make recommendations to the Board of Directors,

as necessary, regarding adjustment of the above recruitment strategies.

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Element 8: Admissions Policies and

Procedures

Governing Law: Admission policies and procedures, consistent with [Education Code Section

47605] subdivision (d). Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(H).

TGS will be nonsectarian in its programs, admission policies, and all other operations, and will

not charge tuition nor discriminate against any student based upon any of the characteristics

listed in Education Code Section 220.

TGS shall admit all pupils who wish to attend the Charter School. No test or assessment shall be

administered to students prior to acceptance and enrollment into TGS. TGS will comply with all

laws establishing minimum and maximum age for public school attendance in charter schools.

Admission, except in the case of a public random drawing, shall not be determined by the place

of residence of the pupil or his or her parent or legal guardian within the state. In accordance

with Education Code Sections 49011 and 47605(d)(2)(B)(iv), admission preferences shall not

require mandatory parental volunteer hours as a criterion for admission or continued enrollment.

Public Random Drawing

The Charter School shall require students who wish to attend the Charter School to complete an

application. Applications will be accepted during a publicly advertised open enrollment period

each year for enrollment in the following school year. Following the open enrollment period

each year, applications shall be counted to determine whether any grade level has received more

applications than availability. In the event that this happens, the Charter School will hold a

public random drawing (or “lottery”) to determine admission for the impacted grade level, with

the exception of existing students, who are guaranteed admission in the following school year.

TGS has established an annual recruiting and admissions cycle, which shall include reasonable

time for all of the following: 1) outreach, 2) voluntary orientation and informational briefings for

parents and students, 3) admissions application period, 4) an admissions lottery if necessary, and

5) enrollment. The Charter School will fill vacancies or openings that become available after this

process through the use of a wait list established from the admissions lottery, as described below.

In the event that the number of students seeking admission exceeds the Charter School’s

maximum enrollment, admission preferences in the lottery shall be given to the following

students in the following order:

1. Children of TGS faculty* who are residents of the District

2. Children of TGS faculty* who are not residents of the District

3. Siblings of students admitted to or attending TGS who are residents of the District

4. Siblings of students admitted to or attending TGS who are not residents of the District

5. Students who are currently enrolled in Mission Elementary School and students who

reside in the Mission Elementary School attendance area (for purposes of the SB 740

Charter School Facility Grant Program)

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6. Students with upper elementary (grades 4-6) transcripts from a Montessori school who

are residents of the District. The Montessori school must be accredited and have a

demonstrated affiliation with national Montessori bodies including, but not limited to,

Association Montessori Internationale (“AMI”), the American Montessori Society

(“AMS”), and Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education (“MACTE”).

7. Students with upper elementary (grades 4-6) transcripts from a Montessori school who

are not residents of the District. The Montessori school must be accredited and have a

demonstrated affiliation with national Montessori bodies including, but not limited to,

AMI and AMS, or whose teachers have an AMI, AMS, or diploma from a MACTE

accredited school.

8. Residents of the District

9. All other applicants

The Charter School and the District agree to adhere to the requirements related to admission

preferences as set forth in Education Code Section 47605(d)(2)(B)(i)-(iv).

*“Faculty” is defined as full-time teaching faculty/staff who work 30 hours or more per week at

TGS.

Typically, TGS receives applications in excess of the number of spaces available. In early

Spring, TGS conducts its lottery for admission to the Charter School for the following academic

year. To be part of the lottery, a family must complete an application. The application must be

completed and turned into TGS no later than 5:00 p.m. by the deadline set in March of the

current academic year. Each completed application will be assigned a number.

The Board of Directors will take all necessary efforts to ensure lottery procedures are fairly

executed.

Before the public lottery, each completed lottery packet is checked for completeness and to place

the student in the correct preference. Placement is independently verified by two office staff

members. The student names are entered into a spreadsheet in preference order and by grade

level; this spreadsheet is then sent to the accountant, who does an additional check for siblings

and employee preferences. The accountant then alphabetizes the list under each preference and

assigns each student in each grade level a number, and prints cards for each student with number

and name.

The lottery is conducted in public. Anyone from the community may attend the lottery. The

lottery process is explained before drawing begins, and any questions are answered both before

and after the drawing. The numbered list of names of students who have entered the lottery is

also available for inspection.

The accountant uses numbered chips that correspond to the numbers assigned to each student to

draw names. Within each grade level, students will be drawn from pools beginning with all

applicants who qualify for the first preference category, and shall continue with that preference

category until all vacancies within that grade level have been filled. Chips are placed in an

opaque container in front of attendees in order of grade level and preference. The container is

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 96 of 127


shaken, and the chips are drawn by another person designated by the Head of School and

displayed clearly to the lottery attendees while the accountant reads the name associated with

that number. The person drawing the chips has no personal stake in the lottery.

The corresponding name card is taped to a numbered board in draw order, and a handwritten list

is also kept of the lottery draw. If there are more students in a grade level than there are spaces

available, the drawing continues and students are placed on a wait list in draw order, until all

lottery entrants for that grade level have been placed on the wait list.

After the lottery, photographs are taken of the list of names on the board, and compared to and

kept with the handwritten list. These records are scanned and shared between the accountant and

the lottery office staff, and kept in the accountant’s files and high school office files for the fiscal

year.

Students who are selected for enrollment in the lottery are informed by letter within three days of

the lottery. Students who are on the wait list are also informed within three days, as described

below, and given their position on the list.

If a student is pulled from the waiting list, families are notified of their student's available place

at Grove twice via telephone and twice via email over the course of three days. If no response is

received, we send a letter notifying the family. After one week, if no response if received from

that family, we move to the next name on the list.

Public random drawing rules, deadlines, dates and times will be communicated in the application

form and on the Charter School’s website. Public notice for the date and time of the public

random drawing will also be posted once the application deadline has passed. The Charter

School will also inform all applicants and interested parties of the rules to be followed during the

public random drawing process via mail or email at least two weeks prior to the lottery date.

Upon admission to the Charter School, prospective students and their parents/guardians must

agree to the following:






To participate in an informational orientation meeting regarding the Charter School at

which time its educational mission and student and parental duties and responsibilities

will be discussed.

All required application materials must be returned to the Charter School in a timely

manner.

The student must take responsibility for his or her education and be an independent and

self-motivated learner while at school.

The student must uphold the conditions detailed in the Student Handbook and as set forth

in the voluntary informational orientation meeting.

Both student and parent/guardian must complete a written contract with the Charter

School and agree to follow its rules and be committed to its goals, objectives and mission

statement.

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Element 9: Financial Audits

Governing Law: The manner in which annual, independent, financial audits shall be conducted,

which shall employ generally accepted accounting principles, and the manner in which audit

exceptions and deficiencies shall be resolved to the satisfaction of the chartering authority.

Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(I).

An annual independent financial audit of the books and records of TGS will be conducted as

required by Education Code Sections 47605(b)(5)(I) and 47605(m). The books and records of

TGS will be kept in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and as required

by applicable law, the audit will employ generally accepted accounting procedures. The audit

shall be conducted in accordance with applicable provisions within the California Code of

Regulations governing audits of charter schools as published in the State Controller’s K-12 Audit

Guide.

The Finance Committee of the Grove Board will select an independent auditor through a request

for proposal format. The auditor will have, at a minimum, a CPA and educational institution

audit experience and will be approved by the State Controller on its published list as an

educational audit provider. To the extent required under applicable federal law, the audit scope

will be expanded to include items and processes specified in applicable Office of Management

and Budget Circulars.

The annual audit will be completed and forwarded to the District, the County Superintendent of

Schools, the State Controller, and to the CDE by the 15 th of December of each year. The Head of

School, along with the audit committee, will review any audit exceptions or deficiencies and

report to TGS Board of Directors with recommendations on how to resolve them. The Board will

submit a report to the District describing how the exceptions and deficiencies have been or will

be resolved to the satisfaction of the District along with an anticipated timeline for the same.

Audit appeals or requests for summary review shall be submitted to the Education Audit Appeals

Panel (“EAAP”) in accordance with applicable law.

The independent financial audit of TGS is a public record to be provided to the public upon

request.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 98 of 127


Element 10: Pupil Suspension and

Expulsion Procedures

Governing Law: The procedures by which pupils can be suspended or expelled from the charter

school for disciplinary reasons or otherwise involuntarily removed from the charter school for

any reason. These procedures, at a minimum, shall include an explanation of how the charter

school will comply with federal and state constitutional procedural and substantive due process

requirements that is consistent with all of the following:

(i) For suspensions of fewer than 10 days, provide oral or written notice of the charges

against the pupil and, if the pupil denies the charges, an explanation of the evidence that

supports the charges and an opportunity for the pupil to present his or her side of the

story.

(ii) For suspensions of 10 days or more and all other expulsions for disciplinary reasons,

both of the following:

(I) Provide timely, written notice of the charges against the pupil and an

explanation of the pupil’s basic rights.

(II) Provide a hearing adjudicated by a neutral officer within a reasonable

number of days at which the pupil has a fair opportunity to present testimony,

evidence, and witnesses and confront and cross-examine adverse witnesses, and

at which the pupil has the right to bring legal counsel or an advocate.

(iii) Contain a clear statement that no pupil shall be involuntarily removed by the charter

school for any reason unless the parent or guardian of the pupil has been provided

written notice of intent to remove the pupil no less than five school days before the

effective date of the action. The written notice shall be in the native language of the pupil

or the pupil’s parent or guardian or, if the pupil is a foster child or youth or a homeless

child or youth, the pupil’s educational rights holder, and shall inform him or her of the

right to initiate the procedures specified in clause (ii) before the effective date of the

action. If the pupil’s parent, guardian, or educational rights holder initiates the

procedures specified in clause (ii), the pupil shall remain enrolled and shall not be

removed until the charter school issues a final decision. For purposes of this clause,

“involuntarily removed” includes disenrolled, dismissed, transferred, or terminated, but

does not include suspensions specified in clauses (i) and (ii). Education Code Section

47605(b)(5)(J).

The Charter School maintains a comprehensive set of policies, which reflect the expectations for

student behavior and academic progress. Expectations regarding attendance, mutual respect,

substance abuse, violence, safety and work habits are clearly defined in the Charter School

Student Handbook. Upon enrollment, each student will read the Handbook and agree in writing

to abide by it. The Charter School will notify the District of any expulsions and will include

suspension and expulsion data in its annual performance report.

Suspension and Expulsion Policy and Procedures

This Pupil Suspension and Expulsion Policy has been established to promote learning and

protect the safety and wellbeing of all students at the Charter School. In creating this policy, the

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Charter School has accounted for the safety and health of the Charter School’s staff, visitors, and

students, and reviewed Education Code Section 48900 et seq. which describes the noncharter

schools’ list of offenses and procedures to establish its list of offenses and procedures for

suspensions and expulsions. The language that follows closely mirrors the language of Education

Code Section 48900 et seq. The Charter School is committed to annual review of policies and

procedures surrounding suspensions and expulsions and, as necessary, modification of the lists of

offenses for which students are subject to suspension or expulsion.

When the Policy is violated, it may be necessary to suspend or expel a student from regular

classroom instruction. This policy shall serve as the Charter School’s policy and procedures for

student suspension and expulsion and it may be amended from time to time without the need to

amend the charter so long as the amendments comport with legal requirements. Charter School

staff shall enforce disciplinary rules and procedures fairly and consistently among all students.

This Policy and its Procedures will be printed and distributed as part of the Student Handbook

and will clearly describe discipline expectations. The Charter School ensures that non-English

speaking parents/guardians and students are informed of the Charter School’s disciplinary

policies, procedures, and their due process rights during a 90-minute orientation meeting upon

enrollment, followed up by a Parent Advisory Committee-developed group forum at the

beginning of the year. Translators are also available for these meetings.

Corporal punishment shall not be used as a disciplinary measure against any student. Corporal

punishment includes the willful infliction of or willfully causing the infliction of physical pain on

a student. For purposes of the Policy, corporal punishment does not include an employee’s use of

force that is reasonable and necessary to protect the employee, students, staff or other persons or

to prevent damage to school property.

The Charter School administration shall ensure that students and their parents/guardians are

notified in writing upon enrollment of all discipline policies and procedures. The notice shall

state that this Policy and Procedures are available on request at the Charter School’s main office.

Suspended or expelled students shall be excluded from all school and school-related activities

unless otherwise agreed during the period of suspension or expulsion.

A student identified as an individual with disabilities or for whom the Charter School has a basis

of knowledge of a suspected disability pursuant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education

Improvement Act of 2004 (“IDEIA”) or who is qualified for services under Section 504 of the

Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (“Section 504”) is subject to the same grounds for suspension and

expulsion and is accorded the same due process procedures applicable to general education

students except when federal and state law mandates additional or different procedures. The

Charter School will follow all applicable federal and state laws including but not limited to the

California Education Code, when imposing any form of discipline on a student identified as an

individual with disabilities or for whom the Charter School has a basis of knowledge of a

suspected disability or who is otherwise qualified for such services or protections in according

due process to such students.

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No student shall be involuntarily removed by the Charter School for any reason unless the parent

or guardian of the student has been provided written notice of intent to remove the student no

less than five schooldays before the effective date of the action. The written notice shall be in the

native language of the student or the student’s parent or guardian or, if the student is a foster

child or youth or a homeless child or youth, the student’s educational rights holder, and shall

inform him or her of the basis for which the pupil is being involuntarily removed and his or her

right to request a hearing to challenge the involuntary removal. If a parent, guardian, or

educational rights holder requests a hearing, the Charter School shall utilize the same hearing

procedures specified below for expulsions, before the effective date of the action to involuntarily

remove the student. If the student’s parent, guardian, or educational rights holder requests a

hearing, the student shall remain enrolled and shall not be removed until the Charter School

issues a final decision. As used herein, “involuntarily removed” includes disenrolled, dismissed,

transferred, or terminated, but does not include removals for misconduct which may be grounds

for suspension or expulsion as enumerated below.

A. Grounds for Suspension and Expulsion of Students

A student may be suspended or expelled for prohibited misconduct if the act is related to school

activity or school attendance occurring at any time including but not limited to: a) while on

school grounds; b) while going to or coming from school; c) during the lunch period, whether on

or off the school campus; d) during, going to, or coming from a school-sponsored activity.

B. Enumerated Offenses

1. Discretionary Suspension Offenses. Students may be suspended for any of the following

acts when it is determined the pupil:

a) Caused, attempted to cause, or threatened to cause physical injury to another

person.

b) Willfully used force or violence upon the person of another, except self-defense.

c) Unlawfully possessed, used, or otherwise furnished, or was under the influence of

any controlled substance, as defined in Health and Safety Code Sections 11053-

11058, alcoholic beverage, or intoxicant of any kind.

d) Unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any controlled substance as

defined in Health and Safety Code Sections 11053-11058, alcoholic beverage or

intoxicant of any kind, and then sold, delivered or otherwise furnished to any

person another liquid substance or material and represented same as controlled

substance, alcoholic beverage or intoxicant.

e) Committed or attempted to commit robbery or extortion.

f) Caused or attempted to cause damage to school property or private property,

which includes but is not limited to, electronic files and databases.

g) Stole or attempted to steal school property or private property, which includes but

is not limited to, electronic files and databases.

h) Possessed or used tobacco or products containing tobacco or nicotine products,

including but not limited to cigars, cigarettes, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes,

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smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew packets and betel. This section does not prohibit

the use of his or her own prescription products by a pupil.

i) Committed an obscene act or engaged in habitual profanity or vulgarity.

j) Unlawfully possessed or unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any

drug paraphernalia, as defined in Health and Safety Code Section 11014.5.

k) Disrupted school activities or otherwise willfully defied the valid authority of

supervisors, teachers, administrators, other school officials, or other school

personnel engaged in the performance of their duties.

l) Knowingly received stolen school property or private property, which includes

but is not limited to, electronic files and databases.

m) Possessed an imitation firearm, i.e.: a replica of a firearm that is so substantially

similar in physical properties to an existing firearm as to lead a reasonable person

to conclude that the replica is a firearm.

n) Harassed, threatened, or intimidated a student who is a complaining witness or

witness in a school disciplinary proceeding for the purpose of preventing that

student from being a witness and/or retaliating against that student for being a

witness.

o) Unlawfully offered, arranged to sell, negotiated to sell, or sold the prescription

drug Soma.

p) Engaged in, or attempted to engage in, hazing. For the purposes of this

subdivision, “hazing” means a method of initiation or preinitiation into a pupil

organization or body, whether or not the organization or body is officially

recognized by an educational institution, which is likely to cause serious bodily

injury or personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm to

a former, current, or prospective pupil. For purposes of this section, “hazing” does

not include athletic events or school-sanctioned events.

q) Made terroristic threats against school officials and/or school property, which

includes but is not limited to, electronic files and databases. For purposes of this

section, “terroristic threat” shall include any statement, whether written or oral, by

a person who willfully threatens to commit a crime which will result in death,

great bodily injury to another person, or property damage in excess of one

thousand dollars ($1,000), with the specific intent that the statement is to be taken

as a threat, even if there is no intent of actually carrying it out, which, on its face

and under the circumstances in which it is made, is so unequivocal, unconditional,

immediate, and specific as to convey to the person threatened, a gravity of

purpose and an immediate prospect of execution of the threat, and thereby causes

that person reasonably to be in sustained fear for his or her own safety or for his

or her immediate family’s safety, or for the protection of school property, which

includes but is not limited to, electronic files and databases, or the personal

property of the person threatened or his or her immediate family.

r) Committed sexual harassment, as defined in Education Code Section 212.5. For

the purposes of this section, the conduct described in Section 212.5 must be

considered by a reasonable person of the same gender as the victim to be

sufficiently severe or pervasive to have a negative impact upon the individual’s

academic performance or to create an intimidating, hostile, or offensive

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 102 of 127


educational environment. This section shall apply to pupils in any of grades 4 to

12, inclusive.

s) Caused, attempted to cause, threatened to cause or participated in an act of hate

violence, as defined in subdivision (e) of Section 233 of the Education Code. This

section shall apply to pupils in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive.

t) Intentionally harassed, threatened or intimidated school personnel or volunteers

and/or a student or group of students to the extent of having the actual and

reasonably expected effect of materially disrupting class work, creating

substantial disorder and invading the rights of either school personnel or

volunteers and/or student(s) by creating an intimidating or hostile educational

environment. This section shall apply to pupils in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive.

u) Engaged in an act of bullying, including, but not limited to, bullying committed

by means of an electronic act.

1) “Bullying” means any severe or pervasive physical or verbal act or conduct,

including communications made in writing or by means of an electronic act,

and including one or more acts committed by a student or group of students

which would be deemed hate violence or harassment, threats, or intimidation,

which are directed toward one or more students that has or can be reasonably

predicted to have the effect of one or more of the following:

i. Placing a reasonable student (defined as a student, including, but is

not limited to, a student with exceptional needs, who exercises

average care, skill, and judgment in conduct for a person of his or

her age, or for a person of his or her age with exceptional needs) or

students in fear of harm to that student’s or those students’ person

or property.

ii. Causing a reasonable student to experience a substantially

detrimental effect on his or her physical or mental health.

iii. Causing a reasonable student to experience substantial interference

with his or her academic performance.

iv. Causing a reasonable student to experience substantial interference

with his or her ability to participate in or benefit from the services,

activities, or privileges provided by the Charter School.

2) “Electronic Act” means the creation or transmission originated on or off

the schoolsite, by means of an electronic device, including, but not limited

to, a telephone, wireless telephone, or other wireless communication

device, computer, or pager, of a communication, including, but not limited

to, any of the following:

i. A message, text, sound, video, or image.

ii. A post on a social network Internet Web site including, but not

limited to:

(a) Posting to or creating a burn page. A “burn page” means an

Internet Web site created for the purpose of having one or

more of the effects as listed in subparagraph (1) above.

(b) Creating a credible impersonation of another actual pupil

for the purpose of having one or more of the effects listed

in subparagraph (1) above. “Credible impersonation”

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means to knowingly and without consent impersonate a

pupil for the purpose of bullying the pupil and such that

another pupil would reasonably believe, or has reasonably

believed, that the pupil was or is the pupil who was

impersonated.

(c) Creating a false profile for the purpose of having one or

more of the effects listed in subparagraph (1) above. “False

profile” means a profile of a fictitious pupil or a profile

using the likeness or attributes of an actual pupil other than

the pupil who created the false profile.

iii. An act of cyber sexual bullying.

(a) For purposes of this clause, “cyber sexual bullying” means

the dissemination of, or the solicitation or incitement to

disseminate, a photograph or other visual recording by a

pupil to another pupil or to school personnel by means of

an electronic act that has or can be reasonably predicted to

have one or more of the effects described in subparagraphs

(i) to (iv), inclusive, of paragraph (1). A photograph or

other visual recording, as described above, shall include the

depiction of a nude, semi-nude, or sexually explicit

photograph or other visual recording of a minor where the

minor is identifiable from the photograph, visual recording,

or other electronic act.

(b) For purposes of this clause, “cyber sexual bullying” does

not include a depiction, portrayal, or image that has any

serious literary, artistic, educational, political, or scientific

value or that involves athletic events or school-sanctioned

activities.

3) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (1) and (2) above, an electronic act shall

not constitute pervasive conduct solely on the basis that it has been

transmitted on the Internet or is currently posted on the Internet.

w) A pupil who aids or abets, as defined in Section 31 of the Penal Code, the

infliction or attempted infliction of physical injury to another person may be

subject to suspension, but not expulsion, except that a pupil who has been

adjudged by a juvenile court to have committed, as an aider and abettor, a crime

of physical violence in which the victim suffered great bodily injury or serious

bodily injury shall be subject to discipline pursuant to subdivision (1)(a)-(b).

x) Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished any knife unless, in the case of possession

of any object of this type, the student had obtained written permission to possess

the item from a certificated school employee, with the Head of School or

designee’s concurrence.

2. Non-Discretionary Suspension Offenses: Students must be suspended and recommended

for expulsion for any of the following acts when it is determined the pupil:

a) Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished any firearm, explosive, or other dangerous

object unless, in the case of possession of any object of this type, the students had

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 104 of 127


obtained written permission to possess the item from a certificated school

employee, with the Head of School or designee’s concurrence.

b) Brandishing a knife at another person.

c) Unlawfully selling a controlled substance listed in Health and Safety Code

Section 11053, et seq.

d) Committing or attempting to commit a sexual assault or committing a sexual

battery as defined in Education Code Section 48900(n).

3. Discretionary Expellable Offenses: Students may be recommended for expulsion for any

of the following acts when it is determined the pupil:

a) Caused, attempted to cause, or threatened to cause physical injury to another

person.

b) Willfully used force or violence upon the person of another, except self-defense.

c) Unlawfully possessed, used, sold or otherwise furnished, or was under the

influence of any controlled substance, as defined in Health and Safety Code

Sections 11053-11058, alcoholic beverage, or intoxicant of any kind.

d) Unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any controlled substance as

defined in Health and Safety Code Sections 11053-11058, alcoholic beverage or

intoxicant of any kind, and then sold, delivered or otherwise furnished to any

person another liquid substance or material and represented same as controlled

substance, alcoholic beverage or intoxicant.

e) Committed or attempted to commit robbery or extortion.

f) Caused or attempted to cause damage to school property or private property,

which includes but is not limited to, electronic files and databases.

g) Stole or attempted to steal school property or private property, which includes but

is not limited to, electronic files and databases.

h) Possessed or used tobacco or products containing tobacco or nicotine products,

including but not limited to cigars, cigarettes, miniature cigars, clove cigarettes,

smokeless tobacco, snuff, chew packets and betel. This section does not prohibit

the use of his or her own prescription products by a pupil.

i) Committed an obscene act or engaged in habitual profanity or vulgarity.

j) Unlawfully possessed or unlawfully offered, arranged, or negotiated to sell any

drug paraphernalia, as defined in Health and Safety Code Section 11014.5.

k) Knowingly received stolen school property or private property, which includes

but is not limited to, electronic files and databases.

l) Possessed an imitation firearm, i.e.: a replica of a firearm that is so substantially

similar in physical properties to an existing firearm as to lead a reasonable person

to conclude that the replica is a firearm.

m) Harassed, threatened, or intimidated a student who is a complaining witness or

witness in a school disciplinary proceeding for the purpose of preventing that

student from being a witness and/or retaliating against that student for being a

witness.

n) Unlawfully offered, arranged to sell, negotiated to sell, or sold the prescription

drug Soma.

o) Engaged in, or attempted to engage in hazing. For the purposes of this

subdivision, “hazing” means a method of initiation or preinitiation into a pupil

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 105 of 127


organization or body, whether or not the organization or body is officially

recognized by an educational institution, which is likely to cause serious bodily

injury or personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm to

a former, current, or prospective pupil. For purposes of this section, “hazing” does

not include athletic events or school-sanctioned events.

p) Made terroristic threats against school officials and/or school property, which

includes but is not limited to, electronic files and databases. For purposes of this

section, “terroristic threat” shall include any statement, whether written or oral, by

a person who willfully threatens to commit a crime which will result in death,

great bodily injury to another person, or property damage in excess of one

thousand dollars ($1,000), with the specific intent that the statement is to be taken

as a threat, even if there is no intent of actually carrying it out, which, on its face

and under the circumstances in which it is made, is so unequivocal, unconditional,

immediate, and specific as to convey to the person threatened, a gravity of

purpose and an immediate prospect of execution of the threat, and thereby causes

that person reasonably to be in sustained fear for his or her own safety or for his

or her immediate family’s safety, or for the protection of school property, which

includes but is not limited to, electronic files and databases, or the personal

property of the person threatened or his or her immediate family.

q) Committed sexual harassment, as defined in Education Code Section 212.5. For

the purposes of this section, the conduct described in Section 212.5 must be

considered by a reasonable person of the same gender as the victim to be

sufficiently severe or pervasive to have a negative impact upon the individual’s

academic performance or to create an intimidating, hostile, or offensive

educational environment. This section shall apply to pupils in any of grades 4 to

12, inclusive.

r) Caused, attempted to cause, threatened to cause or participated in an act of hate

violence, as defined in subdivision (e) of Section 233 of the Education Code. This

section shall apply to pupils in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive.

s) Intentionally harassed, threatened or intimidated school personnel or volunteers

and/or a student or group of students to the extent of having the actual and

reasonably expected effect of materially disrupting class work, creating

substantial disorder and invading the rights of either school personnel or

volunteers and/or student(s) by creating an intimidating or hostile educational

environment. This section shall apply to pupils in any of grades 4 to 12, inclusive.

t) Engaged in an act of bullying, including, but not limited to, bullying committed

by means of an electronic act.

1) “Bullying” means any severe or pervasive physical or verbal act or conduct,

including communications made in writing or by means of an electronic act, and

including one or more acts committed by a student or group of students which

would be deemed hate violence or harassment, threats, or intimidation, which are

directed toward one or more students that has or can be reasonably predicted to

have the effect of one or more of the following:

i. Placing a reasonable student (defined as a student, including, but is not

limited to, a student with exceptional needs, who exercises average care,

skill, and judgment in conduct for a person of his or her age, or for a

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 106 of 127


person of his or her age with exceptional needs) or students in fear of harm

to that student’s or those students’ person or property.

ii. Causing a reasonable student to experience a substantially detrimental

effect on his or her physical or mental health.

iii. Causing a reasonable student to experience substantial interference with

his or her academic performance.

iv. Causing a reasonable student to experience substantial interference with

his or her ability to participate in or benefit from the services, activities, or

privileges provided by the Charter School.

2) “Electronic Act” means the creation or transmission originated on or off the

schoolsite, by means of an electronic device, including, but not limited to, a

telephone, wireless telephone, or other wireless communication device, computer,

or pager, of a communication, including, but not limited to, any of the following:

i. A message, text, sound, video, or image.

ii. A post on a social network Internet Web site including, but not limited to:

(a) Posting to or creating a burn page. A “burn page” means an

Internet Web site created for the purpose of having one or more of

the effects as listed in subparagraph (1) above.

(b) Creating a credible impersonation of another actual pupil for the

purpose of having one or more of the effects listed in subparagraph

above. “Credible impersonation” means to knowingly and without

consent impersonate a pupil for the purpose of bullying the pupil

and such that another pupil would reasonably believe, or has

reasonably believed, that the pupil was or is the pupil who was

impersonated.

(c) Creating a false profile for the purpose of having one or more of

the effects listed in subparagraph (1) above. “False profile” means

a profile of a fictitious pupil or a profile using the likeness or

attributes of an actual pupil other than the pupil who created the

false profile.

iii. An act of cyber sexual bullying.

(a) For purposes of this clause, “cyber sexual bullying” means the

dissemination of, or the solicitation or incitement to disseminate, a

photograph or other visual recording by a pupil to another pupil or

to school personnel by means of an electronic act that has or can be

reasonably predicted to have one or more of the effects described

in subparagraphs (i) to (iv), inclusive, of paragraph (1). A

photograph or other visual recording, as described above, shall

include the depiction of a nude, semi-nude, or sexually explicit

photograph or other visual recording of a minor where the minor is

identifiable from the photograph, visual recording, or other

electronic act.

(b) For purposes of this clause, “cyber sexual bullying” does not

include a depiction, portrayal, or image that has any serious

literary, artistic, educational, political, or scientific value or that

involves athletic events or school-sanctioned activities.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 107 of 127


3) Notwithstanding subparagraphs (1) and (2) above, an electronic act shall not

constitute pervasive conduct solely on the basis that it has been transmitted on the

Internet or is currently posted on the Internet.

w) A pupil who aids or abets, as defined in Section 31 of the Penal Code, the

infliction or attempted infliction of physical injury to another person may be

subject to suspension, but not expulsion, except that a pupil who has been

adjudged by a juvenile court to have committed, as an aider and abettor, a crime

of physical violence in which the victim suffered great bodily injury or serious

bodily injury shall be subject to discipline pursuant to subdivision (3)(a)-(b).

x) Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished any knife unless, in the case of possession

of any object of this type, the student had obtained written permission to possess

the item from a certificated school employee, with the Head of School or

designee’s concurrence.

4. Non-Discretionary Expellable Offenses: Students must be recommended for expulsion

for any of the following acts when it is determined pursuant to the procedures below that

the pupil:

a) Possessed, sold, or otherwise furnished any firearm, explosive, or other dangerous

object unless, in the case of possession of any object of this type, the students had

obtained written permission to possess the item from a certificated school

employee, with the Head of School or designee’s concurrence.

b) Brandishing a knife at another person.

c) Unlawfully selling a controlled substance listed in Health and Safety Code

Section 11053, et seq.

d) Committing or attempting to commit a sexual assault or committing a sexual

battery as defined in Education Code Section 48900(n).

If it is determined by the Administrative Panel and/or Board of Directors that a student has

brought a fire arm or destructive device, as defined in Section 921 of Title 18 of the United

States Code, on to campus or to have possessed a firearm or dangerous device on campus, the

student shall be expelled for one year, pursuant to the Federal Gun Free Schools Act of 1994. In

such instances, the pupil shall be provided due process rights of notice and a hearing as required

in this policy.

The term “firearm” means (A) any weapon (including a starter gun) which will or is designed to

or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive; (B) the frame or

receiver of any such weapon; (C) any firearm muffler or firearm silencer; or (D) any destructive

device. Such term does not include an antique firearm.

The term “destructive device” means (A) any explosive, incendiary, or poison gas, including but

not limited to: (i) bomb, (ii) grenade, (iii) rocket having a propellant charge of more than four

ounces, (iv) missile having an explosive or incendiary charge of more than one-quarter ounce,

(v) mine, or (vi) device similar to any of the devices described in the preceding clauses.

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C. Suspension Procedure

Suspensions shall be initiated according to the following procedures:

1. Conference

Suspension shall be preceded, if possible, by a conference conducted by the Head of

School or his/her designee with the student and his or her parent and, whenever practical,

the teacher, supervisor or Charter School employee who referred the student to the Head

of School or designee.

The conference may be omitted if the Head of School or designee determines that an

emergency situation exists. An “emergency situation” involves a clear and present danger

to the lives, safety or health of students or Charter School personnel. If a student is

suspended without this conference, both the parent/guardian and student shall be notified

of the student’s right to return to school for the purpose of a conference.

At the conference, the pupil shall be informed of the reason for the disciplinary action

and the evidence against him or her and shall be given the opportunity to present his or

her version and evidence in his or her defense, in accordance with Education Code

Section 47605(b)(5)(J)(i). This conference shall be held within two (2) school days,

unless the pupil waives this right or is physically unable to attend for any reason

including, but not limited to, incarceration or hospitalization. No penalties may be

imposed on a pupil for failure of the pupil’s parent or guardian to attend a conference

with Charter School officials. Reinstatement of the suspended pupil shall not be

contingent upon attendance by the pupil’s parent or guardian at the conference.

14. Notice to Parents/Guardians

At the time of the suspension, an administrator or designee shall make a reasonable effort

to contact the parent/guardian by telephone or in person. Whenever a student is

suspended, the parent/guardian shall be notified in writing of the suspension and the date

of return following suspension. This notice shall state the specific offense committed by

the student. In addition, the notice may also state the date and time when the student may

return to school. If Charter School officials wish to ask the parent/guardian to confer

regarding matters pertinent to the suspension, the notice may request that the

parent/guardian respond to such requests without delay.

15. Suspension Time Limits/Recommendation for Expulsion

Suspensions, when not including a recommendation for expulsion, shall not exceed five

(5) consecutive school days per suspension. Upon a recommendation of expulsion by the

Head of School or his/her designee, the pupil and the pupil’s guardian or representative

will be invited to a conference to determine if the suspension for the pupil should be

extended pending an expulsion hearing. In such instances when the Charter School has

determined a suspension period shall be extended, such extension shall be made only

after a conference is held with the pupil or the pupil’s parents, unless the pupil and the

pupil’s parents fail to attend the conference.

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This determination will be made by the Head of School or designee upon either of the

following: 1) the pupil’s presence will be disruptive to the education process; or 2) the

pupil poses a threat or danger to others. Upon either determination, the pupil’s suspension

will be extended pending the results of an expulsion hearing.

D. Authority to Expel

As required by Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(J)(ii), students recommended for expulsion

are entitled to a hearing adjudicated by a neutral officer to determine whether the student should

be expelled. The procedures herein provide for such a hearing and the notice of said hearing, as

required by law.

A student may be expelled either by the neutral and impartial Charter School Board of Directors

following a hearing before it or by the Charter School Board of Directors upon the

recommendation of a neutral and impartial Administrative Panel, to be assigned by the Board of

Directors as needed. The Administrative Panel shall consist of at least three members who are

certificated and neither a teacher of the pupil nor a member of the Charter School Board of

Directors. Each entity shall be presided over by a designated neutral hearing chairperson. The

Administrative Panel may recommend expulsion of any student found to have committed an

expellable offense, and the Board of Directors shall make the final determination.

E. Expulsion Procedures

Students recommended for expulsion are entitled to a hearing to determine whether the student

should be expelled. The hearing shall be held within thirty (30) school days after the Head of

School or designee determines that the pupil has committed an expellable offense.

In the event an Administrative Panel hears the case, it will make a recommendation to the Board

for a final decision whether to expel. The hearing shall be held in closed session (complying with

all pupil confidentiality rules under FERPA) unless the Pupil makes a written request for a public

hearing in open session three (3) days prior to the date of the scheduled hearing.

Written notice of the hearing shall be forwarded to the student and the student’s parent/guardian

at least ten (10) calendar days before the date of the hearing. Upon mailing the notice, it shall be

deemed served upon the pupil. The notice shall include:

1. The date and place of the expulsion hearing;

16. A statement of the specific facts, charges and offenses upon which the proposed

expulsion is based;

17. A copy of the Charter School’s disciplinary rules which relate to the alleged violation;

18. Notification of the student’s or parent/guardian’s obligation to provide information about

the student’s status at the Charter School to any other school district or school to which

the student seeks enrollment;

19. The opportunity for the student and/or the student’s parent/guardian to appear in person

or to employ and be represented by counsel or a non-attorney advisor;

20. The right to inspect and obtain copies of all documents to be used at the hearing;

21. The opportunity to confront and question all witnesses who testify at the hearing;

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2. The opportunity to question all evidence presented and to present oral and documentary

evidence on the student’s behalf including witnesses.

F. Special Procedures for Expulsion Hearings Involving Sexual

Assault or Battery Offenses

The Charter School may, upon a finding of good cause, determine that the disclosure of either

the identity of the witness or the testimony of that witness at the hearing, or both, would subject

the witness to an unreasonable risk of psychological or physical harm. Upon this determination,

the testimony of the witness may be presented at the hearing in the form of sworn declarations

that shall be examined only by the Charter School or the hearing officer. Copies of these sworn

declarations, edited to delete the name and identity of the witness, shall be made available to the

pupil.

1. The complaining witness in any sexual assault or battery case must be provided with a

copy of the applicable disciplinary rules and advised of his/her right to (a) receive five

days’ notice of his/her scheduled testimony, (b) have up to two (2) adult support persons

of his/her choosing present in the hearing at the time he/she testifies, which may include a

parent, guardian, or legal counsel, and (c) elect to have the hearing closed while

testifying.

2. The Charter School must also provide the victim a room separate from the hearing room

for the complaining witness’ use prior to and during breaks in testimony.

3. At the discretion of the entity conducting the expulsion hearing, the complaining witness

shall be allowed periods of relief from examination and cross-examination during which

he or she may leave the hearing room.

4. The entity conducting the expulsion hearing may also arrange the seating within the

hearing room to facilitate a less intimidating environment for the complaining witness.

5. The entity conducting the expulsion hearing may also limit time for taking the testimony

of the complaining witness to the hours he/she is normally in school, if there is no good

cause to take the testimony during other hours.

6. Prior to a complaining witness testifying, the support persons must be admonished that

the hearing is confidential. Nothing in the law precludes the entity presiding over the

hearing from removing a support person whom the presiding person finds is disrupting

the hearing. The entity conducting the hearing may permit any one of the support persons

for the complaining witness to accompany him or her to the witness stand.

7. If one or both of the support persons is also a witness, the Charter School must present

evidence that the witness’ presence is both desired by the witness and will be helpful to

the Charter School. The person presiding over the hearing shall permit the witness to stay

unless it is established that there is a substantial risk that the testimony of the

complaining witness would be influenced by the support person, in which case the

presiding official shall admonish the support person or persons not to prompt, sway, or

influence the witness in any way. Nothing shall preclude the presiding officer from

exercising his or her discretion to remove a person from the hearing whom he or she

believes is prompting, swaying, or influencing the witness.

8. The testimony of the support person shall be presented before the testimony of the

complaining witness and the complaining witness shall be excluded from the courtroom

during that testimony.

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9. Especially for charges involving sexual assault or battery, if the hearing is to be

conducted in public at the request of the pupil being expelled, the complaining witness

shall have the right to have his/her testimony heard in a closed session when testifying at

a public meeting would threaten serious psychological harm to the complaining witness

and there are no alternative procedures to avoid the threatened harm. The alternative

procedures may include videotaped depositions or contemporaneous examination in

another place communicated to the hearing room by means of closed-circuit television.

10. Evidence of specific instances of a complaining witness’ prior sexual conduct is

presumed inadmissible and shall not be heard absent a determination by the entity

conducting the hearing that extraordinary circumstances exist requiring the evidence be

heard. Before such a determination regarding extraordinary circumstance can be made,

the witness shall be provided notice and an opportunity to present opposition to the

introduction of the evidence. In the hearing on the admissibility of the evidence, the

complaining witness shall be entitled to be represented by a parent, legal counsel, or other

support person. Reputation or opinion evidence regarding the sexual behavior of the

complaining witness is not admissible for any purpose.

G. Record of Hearing

A record of the hearing shall be made and may be maintained by any means, including electronic

recording, as long as a reasonably accurate and complete written transcription of the proceedings

can be made.

H. Presentation of Evidence

While technical rules of evidence do not apply to expulsion hearings, evidence may be admitted

and used as proof only if it is the kind of evidence on which reasonable persons can rely in the

conduct of serious affairs. A recommendation by the Administrative Panel to expel must be

supported by substantial evidence that the student committed an expellable offense. Findings of

fact shall be based solely on the evidence at the hearing. While hearsay evidence is admissible,

no decision to expel shall be based solely on hearsay. Sworn declarations may be admitted as

testimony from witnesses of whom the Board or Administrative Panel determines that disclosure

of their identity or testimony at the hearing may subject them to an unreasonable risk of physical

or psychological harm.

If, due to a written request by the expelled pupil, the hearing is held at a public meeting, and the

charge is committing or attempting to commit a sexual assault or committing a sexual battery as

defined in Education Code Section 48900, a complaining witness shall have the right to have his

or her testimony heard in a session closed to the public.

The decision of the Administrative Panel shall be in the form of written findings of fact and a

written recommendation to the Board of Directors, which will make a final determination

regarding the expulsion. The final decision by the Board shall be made within ten (10) school

days following the conclusion of the hearing. The Decision of the Board is final.

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If the Administrative Panel decides not to recommend expulsion, the pupil shall immediately be

returned to his/her educational program.

I. Written Notice to Expel

The Head of School or designee, following a decision of the Board to expel, shall send written

notice of the decision to expel, including the Board’s adopted findings of fact, to the student or

parent/guardian. This notice shall also include the following: (a) Notice of the specific offense

committed by the student; and (b) Notice of the student’s or parent/guardian’s obligation to

inform any new district in which the student seeks to enroll of the student’s status with the

Charter School.

The Head of School or designee shall send a copy of the written notice of the decision to expel to

the authorizer. This notice shall include the following: (a) The student’s name; and (b) The

specific expellable offense committed by the student.

J. Disciplinary Records

The Charter School shall maintain records of all student suspensions and expulsions at the

Charter School. Such records shall be made available to the authorizer upon request.

K. No Right to Appeal

The pupil shall have no right of appeal from expulsion from the Charter School as the Charter

School Board’s decision to expel shall be final.

L. Expelled Pupils/Alternative Education

Parents/guardians of pupils who are expelled shall be responsible for seeking alternative

education programs including, but not limited to, programs within the County or their school

district of residence. The Charter School shall work cooperatively with parents/guardians as

requested by parents/guardians or by the school district of residence to assist with locating

alternative placements during expulsion.

M. Rehabilitation Plans

Students who are expelled from the Charter School shall be given a rehabilitation plan upon

expulsion as developed by the Board at the time of the expulsion order, which may include, but

is not limited to, periodic review as well as assessment at the time of review for readmission. The

rehabilitation plan should include a date not later than one year from the date of expulsion when

the pupil may reapply to the Charter School for readmission.

N. Readmission

The decision to readmit a pupil or to admit a previously expelled pupil from another school

district or charter school shall be in the sole discretion of the Board following a meeting with the

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Head of School or designee and the pupil and guardian or representative to determine whether

the pupil has successfully completed the rehabilitation plan and to determine whether the pupil

poses a threat to others or will be disruptive to the school environment. The Head of School or

designee shall make a recommendation to the Board following the meeting regarding his or her

determination. The Board shall then make a final decision regarding readmission during the

closed session of a public meeting, reporting out any action taken during closed session

consistent with the requirements of the Brown Act. The pupil’s readmission is also contingent

upon the Charter School’s capacity at the time the student seeks readmission.

O. Notice to Teachers

The Charter School shall notify teachers of each pupil who has engaged in or is reasonably

suspected to have engaged in any of the acts listed in Education Code Section 49079 and the

corresponding enumerated offenses set forth above.

P. Special Procedures for the Consideration of Suspension and

Expulsion of Students with Disabilities

1. Notification of District

The Charter School shall immediately notify the District and coordinate the procedures in

this policy with the District of the discipline of any student with a disability or student

who the Charter School or District would be deemed to have knowledge that the student

had a disability.

22. Services During Suspension

Students suspended for more than ten (10) school days in a school year shall continue to

receive services so as to enable the student to continue to participate in the general

education curriculum, although in another setting (which could constitute a change of

placement and the student’s IEP would reflect this change), and to progress toward

meeting the goals set out in the child’s IEP/504 Plan; and receive, as appropriate, a

functional behavioral assessment and behavioral intervention services and modifications,

that are designed to address the behavior violation so that it does not recur. These

services may be provided in an interim alterative educational setting.

23. Procedural Safeguards/Manifestation Determination

Within ten (10) school days of a recommendation for expulsion or any decision to change

the placement of a child with a disability because of a violation of a code of student

conduct, the Charter School, the parent, and relevant members of the IEP/504 Team shall

review all relevant information in the student’s file, including the child’s IEP/504 Plan,

any teacher observations, and any relevant information provided by the parents to

determine:

a. If the conduct in question was caused by, or had a direct and substantial relationship

to, the child’s disability; or

b. If the conduct in question was the direct result of the local educational agency’s

failure to implement the IEP/504 Plan.

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If the Charter School, the parent, and relevant members of the IEP/504 Team determine

that either of the above is applicable for the child, the conduct shall be determined to be a

manifestation of the child’s disability.

If the Charter School, the parent, and relevant members of the IEP/504 Team make the

determination that the conduct was a manifestation of the child’s disability, the IEP/504

Team shall:

a. Conduct a functional behavioral assessment and implement a behavioral intervention

plan for such child, provided that the Charter School had not conducted such

assessment prior to such determination before the behavior that resulted in a change

in placement;

b. If a behavioral intervention plan has been developed, review the behavioral

intervention plan if the child already has such a behavioral intervention plan, and

modify it, as necessary, to address the behavior; and

c. Return the child to the placement from which the child was removed, unless the

parent and the Charter School agree to a change of placement as part of the

modification of the behavioral intervention plan.

If the Charter School, the parent, and relevant members of the IEP/504 Team determine

that the behavior was not a manifestation of the student’s disability and that the conduct

in question was not a direct result of the failure to implement the IEP/504 Plan, then the

Charter School may apply the relevant disciplinary procedures to children with

disabilities in the same manner and for the same duration as the procedures would be

applied to students without disabilities.

24. Due Process Appeals

The parent of a child with a disability who disagrees with any decision regarding

placement, or the manifestation determination, or the Charter School believes that

maintaining the current placement of the child is substantially likely to result in injury to

the child or to others, may request an expedited administrative hearing through the

Special Education Unit of the Office of Administrative Hearings or by utilizing the

dispute provisions of the 504 Policy and Procedures.

When an appeal relating to the placement of the student or the manifestation

determination has been requested by either the parent or the Charter School, the student

shall remain in the interim alternative educational setting pending the decision of the

hearing officer, in accordance with state and federal law, including 20 U.S.C. Section

1415(k), until the expiration of the forty-five (45) day time period provided for in an

interim alternative educational setting, unless the parent and the Charter School agree

otherwise.

In accordance with 20 U.S.C. Section 1415(k)(3), if a parent/guardian disagrees with any

decision regarding placement, or the manifestation determination, or if the Charter

School believes that maintaining the current placement of the child is substantially likely

to result in injury to the child or to others, the parent/guardian or Charter School may

request a hearing.

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In such an appeal, a hearing officer may: (1) return a child with a disability to the

placement from which the child was removed; or (2) order a change in placement of a

child with a disability to an appropriate interim alternative educational setting for not

more than 45 school days if the hearing officer determines that maintaining the current

placement of such child is substantially likely to result in injury to the child or to others.

25. Special Circumstances

Charter School personnel may consider any unique circumstances on a case-by-case basis

when determining whether to order a change in placement for a child with a disability

who violates a code of student conduct.

The Head of School or designee may remove a student to an interim alternative

educational setting for not more than forty-five (45) school days without regard to

whether the behavior is determined to be a manifestation of the student’s disability in

cases where a student:

a. Carries or possesses a weapon, as defined in 18 U.S.C. Section 930, to or at school,

on school premises, or to or at a school function;

b. Knowingly possesses or uses illegal drugs, or sells or solicits the sale of a controlled

substance, while at school, on school premises, or at a school function; or

c. Has inflicted serious bodily injury, as defined by 20 U.S.C. Section 1415(k)(7)(D),

upon a person while at school, on school premises, or at a school function.

26. Interim Alternative Educational Setting

The student’s interim alternative educational setting shall be determined by the student’s

IEP/504 Team.

27. Procedures for Students Not Yet Eligible for Special Education Services

A student who has not been identified as an individual with disabilities pursuant to IDEA

and who has violated the Charter School’s disciplinary procedures may assert the

procedural safeguards granted under this administrative regulation only if the Charter

School had knowledge that the student was disabled before the behavior occurred.

The Charter School shall be deemed to have knowledge that the student had a disability if

one of the following conditions exists:

a. The parent/guardian has expressed concern in writing, or orally if the

parent/guardian does not know how to write or has a disability that prevents a

written statement, to Charter School supervisory or administrative personnel, or

to one of the child’s teachers, that the student is in need of special education or

related services.

b. The parent has requested an evaluation of the child.

c. The child’s teacher, or other Charter School personnel, has expressed specific

concerns about a pattern of behavior demonstrated by the child, directly to the

director of special education or to other Charter School supervisory personnel.

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If the Charter School knew or should have known the student had a disability under any

of the three (3) circumstances described above, the student may assert any of the

protections available to IDEA-eligible children with disabilities, including the right to

stay-put.

If the Charter School had no basis for knowledge of the student’s disability, it shall

proceed with the proposed discipline. The Charter School shall conduct an expedited

evaluation if requested by the parents; however the student shall remain in the education

placement determined by the Charter School pending the results of the evaluation.

The Charter School shall not be deemed to have knowledge that the student had a

disability if the parent has not allowed an evaluation, refused services, or if the student

has been evaluated and determined to not be eligible.

28. TGS shall comply with the MOU governing special education between TGS and the

District, and provide any necessary notification to the District.

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Element 11: Employee Retirement

Systems

Governing Law: The manner by which staff members of the charter schools will be covered by

the State Teachers’ Retirement System, the Public Employees’ Retirement System, or federal

social security. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(K).

All certificated and qualified employees of The Grove School will participate in the State

Teachers’ Retirement System (“STRS”). All noncertificated employees averaging 20 hours per

week or more as required by the Public Employees’ Retirement System (“PERS”) will

participate in PERS and in federal social security. All employees not eligible to participate in

STRS or PERS shall participate in federal social security. The Charter School retains the option

to offer access to other tax-sheltered annuity retirement programs. The Head of School shall be

responsible for ensuring that appropriate arrangements for retirement coverage have been made.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 118 of 127


Element 12: Public School

Attendance Alternatives

Governing Law: The public school attendance alternatives for pupils residing within the school

district who choose not to attend charter schools. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(L).

No student may be required to attend TGS. Students who reside within the District who choose

not to attend TGS may attend school within the District according to District policy or at another

school district or school within the District through the District’s intra and inter-district policies.

Parents and guardians of each student enrolled in TGS will be informed on admissions forms that

the students have no right to admission in a particular school of a local education agency as a

consequence of enrollment in TGS, except to the extent that such a right is extended by the local

education agency.

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Element 13: Employee Return Rights

Governing Law: The rights of an employee of the school district upon leaving the employment of

the school district to work in a charter school, and of any rights of return to the school district

after employment at a charter school. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(M).

District Employees

No public school district employee shall be required to work at the Charter School. Employees of

the District who choose to leave the employment of the District to work at the Charter School

will have no automatic rights of return to the District after employment by the Charter School

unless specifically granted by the District through a leave of absence or other agreement. Charter

School employees shall have any right upon leaving the District to work in the Charter School

that the District may specify, any rights of return to employment in a school district after

employment in the Charter School that the District may specify, and any other rights upon

leaving employment to work in the Charter School that the District determines to be reasonable

and not in conflict with any law.

Sick or vacation leave or years of service credit at the District or any other school district will not

be transferred to the Charter School. Employment by the Charter School provides no rights of

employment at any other entity, including any rights in the case of closure of the Charter School.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 120 of 127


Element 14: Dispute Resolution

Procedures

Governing Law: The procedures to be followed by the charter school and the entity granting the

charter to resolve disputes relating to the provisions of the charter. Education Code Section

47605(b)(5)(N).

Disputes Between the Charter School and the District

The Grove School and the District will be encouraged to attempt to resolve any disputes with the

District amicably and reasonably, without resorting to formal procedures.

In the event of a dispute between The Grove School and the District, Charter School staff,

employees, and Board members of The Grove School and the District agree to first frame the

issue in written format (“dispute statement”) and to refer the issue to the District Superintendent

and Head of School of The Grove School, or their respective designees. In the event that the

District Board of Education believes that the dispute relates to an issue that could lead to

revocation of the charter in accordance with Education Code Section 47607, The Grove School

requests that this shall be noted in the written dispute statement, although it recognizes it cannot

legally bind the District to do so. However, participation in the dispute resolution procedures

outlined in this section shall not be interpreted to impede or act as a pre-requisite to the District’s

ability to proceed with revocation in accordance with Education Code Section 47607 and its

implementing regulations.

The Head of School and Superintendent, or their respective designees, shall informally meet and

confer in a timely fashion to attempt to resolve the dispute, not later than five (5) business days

from receipt of the dispute statement. In the event that this informal meeting fails to resolve the

dispute, both parties shall identify two Board members from their respective boards who shall

jointly meet with the Superintendent and the Head of School of The Grove School, or their

respective designees, and attempt to resolve the dispute within fifteen (15) business days from

receipt of the dispute statement.

If this joint meeting fails to resolve the dispute, the Superintendent and the Head of School, or

their respective designees, shall meet to jointly identify a neutral third-party mediator to engage

the parties in a mediation session designed to facilitate resolution of the dispute. The format of

the mediation session shall be developed jointly by the Superintendent and the Head of School,

or their respective designees. Mediation shall be held within sixty (60) business days of receipt

of the dispute statement. The costs of the mediator shall be split equally between the District and

The Grove School. If mediation does not resolve the dispute, either party may pursue any other

remedy available under the law. All timelines and procedures in this section may be revised upon

mutual written agreement of the District and The Grove School.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 121 of 127


Internal Disputes

Attached, as Appendix Q, please find The Grove School’s Uniform Complaint Policies and

Procedures, for resolving internal complaints and disputes. Parents, students, Board members,

volunteers, and staff at The Grove School shall be provided with a copy of the Charter School’s

policies and internal dispute resolution process. The District shall promptly refer all disputes not

related to a possible violation of the charter or law to the Charter School. The Grove School

recognizes that these policies shall not interfere with the District’s oversight duties, and the right

of the District to make random, periodic inspections under Education Code Section 47607.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 122 of 127


Element 15: Closure Procedures

Governing Law: The procedures to be used if the charter school closes. The procedures shall

ensure a final audit of the charter school to determine the disposition of all assets and liabilities

of the charter school, including plans for disposing of any net assets and for the maintenance

and transfer of pupil records. Education Code Section 47605(b)(5)(O).

Closure of the Charter School will be documented by official action of the Board of Directors.

The action will identify the reason for closure. The official action will also identify the Head of

School as the person responsible for closure-related activities.

The Charter School will promptly notify parents and students of the Charter School, the District,

the San Bernardino County Office of Education, the Charter School’s SELPA, the retirement

systems in which the Charter School’s employees participate (e.g., Public Employees’

Retirement System, State Teachers’ Retirement System, and federal social security), and the

California Department of Education of the closure as well as the effective date of the closure.

This notice will also include the name(s) of and contact information for the person(s) to whom

reasonable inquiries may be made regarding the closure; the pupils’ school districts of residence;

and the manner in which parents/guardians may obtain copies of pupil records, including specific

information on completed courses and credits that meet graduation requirements.

The Charter School will ensure that the notification to the parents and students of the Charter

School of the closure provides information to assist parents and students in locating suitable

alternative programs. This notice will be provided promptly following the Board's decision to

close the Charter School.

The Charter School will also develop a list of pupils in each grade level and the classes they have

completed, together with information on the pupils’ districts of residence, which they will

provide to the entity responsible for closure-related activities.

As applicable, the Charter School will provide parents, students, and the District with copies of

all appropriate student records and will otherwise assist students in transferring to their next

school. All transfers of student records will be made in compliance with the Family Educational

Rights and Privacy Act (“FERPA”) 20 U.S.C. § 1232g. The Charter School will ask the District

to store original records of Charter School students. All records of the Charter School shall be

transferred to the District upon Charter School closure. If the District will not or cannot store the

records, the Charter School shall work with the County Office of Education to determine a

suitable alternative location for storage.

All state assessment results, special education records, and personnel records will be transferred

to and maintained by the entity responsible for closure-related activities in accordance with

applicable law.

As soon as reasonably practical, the Charter School will prepare final financial records. The

Charter School will also have an independent audit completed within six months after closure.

The Charter School will pay for the final audit. The audit will be prepared by a qualified

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 123 of 127


Certified Public Accountant selected by the Charter School and will be provided to the District

promptly upon its completion. The final audit will include an accounting of all financial assets,

including cash and accounts receivable and an inventory of property, equipment, and other items

of material value, an accounting of the liabilities, including accounts payable and any reduction

in apportionments as a result of audit findings or other investigations, loans, and unpaid staff

compensation, and an assessment of the disposition of any restricted funds received by or due to

the Charter School.

The Charter School will complete and file any annual reports required pursuant to Education

Code section 47604.33.

On closure of the Charter School, all assets of the Charter School, including but not limited to all

leaseholds, personal property, intellectual property and all ADA apportionments and other

revenues generated by students attending the Charter School, remain the sole property of the

nonprofit public benefit corporation. Upon the dissolution of the non-profit public benefit

corporation, all net assets shall be distributed to another public school that satisfies the

requirements of paragraphs (a) through (e) of section III.A of Notice 2015-07 issued by the

Internal Revenue Service and the Treasury Department entitled “Relief for Certain Participants

in § 414(d) Plans” or any final regulations implementing 26 U.S.C.§ 414(d) or to a State,

political subdivision of a State, or agency or instrumentality thereof. Any assets acquired from

the District or District property will be promptly returned upon Charter School closure to the

District. The distribution shall include return of any grant funds and restricted categorical funds

to their source in accordance with the terms of the grant or state and federal law, as appropriate,

which may include submission of final expenditure reports for entitlement grants and the filing

of any required Final Expenditure Reports and Final Performance Reports, as well as the return

of any donated materials and property in accordance with any conditions established when the

donation of such materials or property was accepted.

On closure, the Charter School shall remain solely responsible for all liabilities arising from the

operation of the Charter School.

As the Charter School is operated by a non-profit public benefit corporation, should the

corporation dissolve with the closure of the Charter School, the Board will follow the procedures

set forth in the California Corporations Code for the dissolution of a non-profit public benefit

corporation and file all necessary filings with the appropriate state and federal agencies.

The Charter School will utilize the reserve fund to undertake any expenses associated with the

closure procedures identified above.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 124 of 127


Miscellaneous Charter Provisions

A. Budgets and Financial Reporting

Governing Law: The petitioner or petitioners also shall be required to provide financial statements that

include a proposed first-year operational budget, including startup costs, and cashflow and financial

projections for the first three years of operation. Education Code Section 47605(g).

Attached, as Appendix R, please find the following documents:



A projected budget

Financial projections and cash flow

These documents are based upon the best data available to the petitioners at this time.

The Charter School shall provide reports to the District and County Superintendent of Schools as

follows in accordance with Education Code Section 47604.33, and shall provide additional fiscal reports

as requested by the District:

1. By July 1, a preliminary budget for the current fiscal year.

2. By July 1, a local control and accountability plan and an annual update to the local control and

accountability plan required pursuant to Education Code Section 47606.5.

3. By December 15, an interim financial report for the current fiscal year reflecting changes

through October 31. Additionally, on December 15, a copy of the Charter School’s annual,

independent financial audit report for the preceding fiscal year shall be delivered to the District,

State Controller, California Department of Education and County Superintendent of Schools.

4. By March 15, a second interim financial report for the current fiscal year reflecting changes

through January 31.

5. By September 15, a final unaudited report for the full prior year. The report submitted to the

District shall include an annual statement of all the Charter School’s receipts and expenditures

for the preceding fiscal year.

The Charter School shall provide reporting to the District as required by law and as requested by the

District including, but not limited to, the following: California Basic Educational Data System

(CBEDS), actual Average Daily Attendance reports, all financial reports required by Education Code

Sections 47604.33 and 47605(m), the SARC, and the LCAP.

The Charter School agrees to and submits to the right of the District to make random visits and

inspections in order to carry out its statutorily required oversight in accordance with Education Code

Sections 47604.32 and 47607.

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Pursuant to Education Code Section 47604.3, the Charter School shall promptly respond to all

reasonable inquiries including, but not limited to, inquiries regarding its financial records from the

District.

B. Administrative Services

Governing Law: The manner in which administrative services of the charter school are to be provided.

Education Code Section 47605(g).

The Charter School will provide or procure its own administrative services including, but not limited to,

financial management, accounts payable/receivable, payroll, human resources, and instructional

program development either through its own staff or through an appropriately qualified third-party

contractor.

At any time the Charter School may discuss the possibility of purchasing administrative services from

the District. If the District is interested, the specific terms and cost for these services will be the subject

of a memorandum of understanding between the Charter School and the District and subject to District

availability and willingness to provide such services.

C. Facilities

Governing Law: The facilities to be utilized by the charter school. The description of the facilities to be

used by the charter school shall specify where the charter school intends to locate. Education Code

Section 47605(g).

The Grove School is located at: 200 Nevada Street, Redlands, CA 92372.

Attached, as Appendix S, please find a copy of TGS’s lease agreements.

D. Potential Civil Liability Effects

Potential civil liability effects, if any, upon the charter school and upon the school district. Education

Code Section 47605(g).

The Charter School shall be operated by a California non-profit public benefit corporation. This

corporation is organized and operated exclusively for charitable purposes within the meaning of Section

501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code and California Revenue and Taxation Code Section 23701(d).

Pursuant to Education Code Section 47604(c), an authority that grants a charter to a charter school

operated by or as a non-profit public benefit corporation shall not be liable for the debts or obligations of

the charter school or for claims arising from the performance of acts, errors or omissions by the charter

school if the authority has complied with all oversight responsibilities required by law. The Charter

School shall work diligently to assist the District in meeting any and all oversight obligations under the

law, including monthly meetings, reporting, or other District-requested protocol to ensure the District

shall not be liable for the operation of the Charter School.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 126 of 127


Further, the Charter School intends to enter into a memorandum of understanding with the District,

wherein the Charter School shall indemnify the District for the actions of the Charter School under this

charter.

The corporate bylaws of the Charter School shall provide for indemnification of the Charter School’s

Board, officers, agents, and employees, and the Charter School will purchase general liability insurance,

Board Members and Officers insurance, and fidelity bonding to secure against financial risks.

As stated below, insurance amounts shall be determined by recommendation of the District and the

Charter School’s insurance company for schools of similar size, location, and student population. The

District shall be named an additional insured on the general liability insurance of the Charter School.

The Charter School Board shall institute appropriate risk management practices as discussed herein,

including screening of employees, establishing codes of conduct for students, and dispute resolution.

E. Insurance

The Charter School shall acquire and finance general liability, workers’ compensation, and other

necessary insurance of the types and in the amounts required for an enterprise of similar purpose and

circumstance. Coverage amounts will be based on recommendations provided by the District and the

Charter School’s insurer. The District Board of Education shall be named as an additional insured on all

policies of the Charter School. Prior to opening, the Charter School will provide evidence of the above

insurance coverage to the District. A copy of TGS’s Certificate of Liability Insurance is attached as

Appendix T.

F. Oversight

Pursuant to California law, the District will be required to provide oversight and performance

monitoring services, including monitoring school and student performance data, reviewing the Charter

School’s audit reports, performing annual site visits, engaging in any necessary dispute resolution

processes, and considering charter amendment and renewal requests. In accordance with Education

Code Section 47613(a), the District may charge for the actual costs of supervisorial oversight of the

Charter School not to exceed one (1) percent of the revenue of the Charter School. The District may

charge up to three (3) percent of the revenue of the Charter School if the Charter School is able to obtain

substantially rent free facilities from the District. Pursuant to Education Code Section 47613(f),

“revenue of the charter school” is defined as the amount received in the current fiscal year from the local

control funding formula calculated pursuant to Education Code Section 42238.02, as implemented by

Education Code Section 42238.03.

TGS Charter Renewal PAGE 127 of 127

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