70s Catalogue

tidesinstitute

The ’70s:

Art & Place at

Passamaquoddy Bay,

Maine


“Spinnaker for Keith” by Mani Feniger in Eastport, Maine.


The ’70s:

Art & Place at

Passamaquoddy Bay,

Maine

A Catalogue to

Accompany an Exhibition

Held at the

Tides Institute & Museum of Art

Eastport, Maine

July 23 - August 18, 2010

Curated by William Humphreys

with Essays by William Humphreys

and Leatrice Linden

Cover Photograph by Jane Ehrlich.

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T H E H I S T O R Y

ESSAY BY LEATRICE LINDEN

Some artist colonies are launched by fiat as Mable Dodge did in Taos or Henry Flagler in St.

Augustine. Wealthy people wanting to surround themselves with and to support artists from

elsewhere. In the case of Eastport and surrounding towns the initial impetus was real estate.

Cheap homes far from the madding crowds.

John Wise, an artist from Provincetown, bought an inexpensive house in Cherryfield. Bill

Barrell, a painter from England, came to visit with his artist wife, Irene, and found that he

could buy a house in Eastport for $850, the cost of renting for one summer in Provincetown.

Incredible!

John Wise put ads in the Village Voice, New York’s underground paper, read by artists, poets

and musicians, the perfect audience for his new business—renting and selling real estate. In

the summer artists came to visit friends and one of the fun recreations was driving around

looking at houses and land. Michael Zimmer, an architect, bought a place in Pembroke, then

artists Alan and Barbara Kirschenstein, film maker Ron Shade, and film animators Don and

Irene Duga followed.

In 1969 Brendt Berger, painter, sculptor, and printmaker saw an ad in the Village Voice and

gave up his New York loft (to John and Yoko, no less) and bought a house in Eastport with his

wife, fiber artist Mani Feniger. Brendt’s visitors included poet C. Richardson Dilworth, and

artists Richard Van Buren and Mac Wells, who bought homes in the Passamaquoddy Bay area.

Artist word-of-mouth spread through the New York Soho art community that the area was

worth checking out, at least, at first, for the summer.

Of course all this was taking place within the societal context of a strong “back to the land”

environmental movement still resonating from the sixties. In addition, the turmoil engendered

by the Vietnam war was being felt

strongly by those artists still in the cities

where violent protests were a common

occurrence in the early ‘70s. Cities were

becoming more expensive to live in and

more dangerous.

C. Dilworth.

The rugged coast of Maine has always

attracted artists but in the case of Eastport,

the very distance from the big cities held

a special appeal. Eastporters say, “It’s not

the end of the world, but you can see it

from here.” Traveling 16 hours north from

New York City was both a decompression

and a kind of pilgrimage. Artists found

nourishment in the local environment, a

safe place to commune with one’s muse.

Some artists made a conscious decision

to opt out of the competitive New York

art scene and moved into becoming full

time residents.

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Sunspot in Eastport. Photograph by Bill Barrell.

SUNSPOT

Artists like having other artists around, not many visit in the winter, so during the long winter

of 1970-71, seven people, (three artists, two writers and two musicians, Brendt and Terry

Berger, Leatrice Linden, Peter Milford, Dilworth, and Tom and Sally McDugald) gathered

around wood stoves talking about idealistic possibilities. The Lyons factory, a derelict sardine

cannery on Prince’s Cove, was for sale for $2000. It consisted of several wooden buildings

on piers, three acres of shore frontage, a small brick building and a wooden garage. What a

deal!

One spends a lot of time in winter talking with friends, by the time spring came Brendt and

Peter were considering putting a thousand dollars each into the purchase of the dream. The

artists saw huge loft studios, musicians a place to practice and give concerts. The writers talked

of a print shop, and the guys had a place to work on their old cars. Peter the ecologist, wanted

a garden and chickens. Everyone was a budding architect, and there was an evangelical need

to spread the news about the Eastport area as the place for artists and the Sunspot Factory as

the center of activity.

Artists Denis Oppenheim and Joe Stranad bought a three story house overlooking the

breakwater, transforming it into an art installation, and renting rooms in the summer to visiting

artists. The Sunspot Factory housed Joseph White for a summer where he and ceramists Hideao

Okeno set up a wood-fired kiln.

New York in the summer is a great place to get away from and having artist friends to visit

brought Vito Acconci, Red Grooms, Richard Serra, Joan Jonas, Al Loving and Alan Shields up

north for a visit. Leslie Bowman became a summer resident at her parents’ home in Eastport

before heading off to the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. Susan Rothenberg and

George Trakas spent a month housesitting for Richard van Buren and Batya Zamir in Perry;

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Water Street, Eastport, Maine in 1974. Photograph by Hugh French.

when their plumbing failed George built a fantastic outhouse in the style of his sculptures.

The physical bounderies of the new community went beyond Eastport proper. Jane Ehrlich

bought a derelict garage in Quoddy Village. Peter Milford built a log cabin and homesteaded

with Leatrice Linden in Perry. Pembroke, along with its summer residents, had a candle factory

and a leather shop. In Robbinston, Lee Suta and his wife, Elizabeth Ostrander, planned to turn

their barn into studios. Michael Good set up his jewelry workshop in Edmunds. Photographer

Christian Sunde moved into Trescott and filmmaker, Wing Lum, into Lubec.

The factory continued to be a center for happenings but the dream of artist studios and galleries

went crashing into the bay one June day in 1972. Extremely high tides loosened the attached

piers from land and the buildings were seen floating through the fog into Passamaquoddy

Bay. Heroic efforts by artists and friends prevented the factory from becoming a hazard

to navigation and many homes were built with the salvage from those buildings, but the

collective dream was shattered.

Artists are ever resourceful; without the factory to show art work they turned to the local

libraries, and any empty building that needed a tenant to brighten up Water Street became

an art venue. The Bank Square Gallery was in the building that is now The Commons. When

the University of Maine at Augusta offered the artists of Sunspot a show, Eastporter, Nancy

Raye, who was living downstate shared her house with the artists while they installed their

exhibit.

There was a state-wide network developing, places to stay and galleries to exhibit in, but

the distance from major cities, while appealing in the beginning, now began to feel like an

obstacle. People went back to the cities for many reasons; money was a big part of that. Being

out of the art loop it was hard to sell artwork. Winter took its toll as well.

Mainers knew you had to leave the state to find work, and so artists left to teach, or work in

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films or museums or practice carpentry.

Some return in the summer; others

replanted themselves elsewhere. As

artists flow like the tides, “newcomers”

from away replaced “old-timers,” seeking

and seeing in the Passamaquoddy Bay

area a place to live a dream amidst

the awesome beauty that inspires the

most profound meditations that are the

inspiration for art.

The visual arts were not the only ones

to thrive in Eastport and environs during

the ‘70s. Musicians and poets were also

attracted by the natural beauty of the

setting as well as the modest cost of

living.

THE MUSIC SCENE

In the early ‘70s, The North Coast School of Music was started in Eastport by Philip Batstone.

Greg Biss was on the faculty. They received grants from the Maine State Arts and Humanities

Council and produced The Three Penny Opera by Kurt Weill, in addition they gave free

concerts of early choral and chamber music. Each year more musicians were attracted to the

area and much as the visual artists who came to the area had to develop their own exhibition

spaces, so the musicians developed institutions like Summer Keys in Lubec and The Eastport

Art Center.

POETRY

Dilworth came up from Greenwich

Village in New York City with the first

wave of artists and was a bohemian

father-like figure to many of them. He was

instrumental in the founding of Sunspot

and started Friends of the Atlantic to fight

an oil refinery that threatened destruction

of the bay. In yet another hybrid mode

indicative of the times, he printed his

own broadsides integrated with what we

would now call “clip art.”

Heather McHugh arrived with composer

Greg Biss in the early ‘70s. She was

recently the recipient of the prestigious

MacArthur Grant and is represented

here by some early poems of the period

distilling what it was like to be in Eastport

then—a fitting end to our remembrance

of things past.

Philip Batstone playng harpsicord in Eastport, 1974.

Photograph by Hugh French/The Quoddy Tides.

Three Penny Opera performance in Eastport, 1975

with local musician, Terry Flaherty, on drums.

Photograph by Hugh French/The Quoddy Tides.

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T H R E E P O E M S

B Y H E A T H E R M C H U G H

SYMPATHY ON WATER STREET

The dead end of the Eastport street I live on

is a haunt of young and undomesticated

couples who want all night

to throw themselves

for a loop, gear themselves

for the cul-de-sac, pay lip service

to the lovers’ leap. Ardently their autos

elbow-bump and fender-bend; horns blurt out;

interiors spill, as if to publicize the feeling

up, the going down. I watch from my window in the dark

and I can be, for all my distance, no more knowing. It’s enough

to know our place, where the lay of the land

is the law. To the falling off of solid ground,

to the inform sea (that gutter of comings

and goings) we who love inside

are just as perilously close.

NORTH ISLAND SONGS

The water that made the island

murdered the men. You can’t expect

these moons to last, these fallen

roses, rising golds. You can’t believe

in pure decor or easy virtue.

People are dying for good.

*

He wants other women,

those who never leave

well enough alone.

He’s well enough.

At a distance I gather

what is going on. The dark

that fills the deep is

the song they hear in hulls.

*

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If I pine and croon I am no woman

in my hooked heart, if I stand for lying,

maybe I can take a shine and still

keep cool. In its own element that tough

old bird, the gull,

hauls across the last-chance bars

and flashy waterfront its evening

seine of wail.

*

The dance turns out to be

a woodfire, fellows from the factory and mill,

a cop in the doorway looking nowhere,

and a kid to stamp our hands. The band

is bored by the third song and the man I’d like

to like is drunk in a swarming corner, so

I plunge out the storm-door towards the cars and there

are stars, all out.

Orion perfectly

speared by a pine.

the moon exactly

sharpened to a shade

of meaning. I can think now

cold and clear, imagine why the inland people call

some kinds of water kill.

SYLLABLES

The island doesn’t sink.

It’s not a ship, or spirits.

Doesn’t try to keep up.

Doesn’t care.

This comforts the lonely man.

He thinks like them

he’s given up the ghost of likeness,

line and clause. But all along the shoals

of mated shapes

the boats will prowl and grind

and run aground. It’s even farther out

that his survival finds its form: where

small and fat and striped

and never to be touched, they sing

their whole notes (heard or not) —

their boy low lub bob bell.

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T H E A R T I S T S

ESSAY BY WILLIAM HUMPHREYS

The ‘70s, in the larger art world as well as in the Passamaquoddy Bay area, was a time of

synthesis and permission, of opening up and process, of words and ideas and intellectual

approaches along with funky materiality and craft. These new ways and means of doing art

were like strands that had all been laid down in the previous “free-for-all” decade which

formed this group of disparate artists. It was now their turn to weave these threads together in

a new, visually exhilarating and simpler environment. Though cut off to some extent from the

pressures and stimulations of life in New York City, they were nourished by the art community

in the Eastport area that was reaching critical mass by the early ‘70s.

One of the new threads they brought

to this area was the blurring of the

boundaries between craft and art. In

the realm of fiber, both the abstract

fabric hangings of Lenore Tawney and

the gigantic three-dimensional fiber

works called Abakans by the Polish

artist Magdalena Abakanowicz form

some of the background of this rather

radical opening to traditionally “female”

techniques by serious artists. In our

exhibition , this is exemplified in the work

of Leatrice Linden, who used traditional

and innovative fiber techniques and

materials to create soft sculpture and

three dimensional tapestries combining

color and form in ways being done by

abstract painters at the time.

Leatrice Linden in her weaving studio in Eastport,

c.1975.

Alan Shields was another artist exploring craft-derived approaches. His radiantly colored,

sewing machine stitched or woven artworks included paintings, utilitarian conceits and

installations. The piece in this exhibition combines traditional basketry technique with nontraditional

materials creating a nominally household waste basket with surreal overtones.

Mani Feniger applied tie-dying and staining on silk surfaces to create elegant abstract colored

hangings influenced to some extent by the paintings of Helen Frankenthaler and Morris Louis

as well as the hung canvases of D.C. artist Sam Gilliam. All these were artists who eschewed

the standard brushes and palette knives for poured and stained washes of color.

The use of clay by artists is too old a tradition to be included in this context of blurred

boundaries but its use as a vehicle of expressive form and the distortion of the figure starts

with Matisse and runs in our time through Manuel Neri, Stephen DeStabler and Robert

Arneson; this group brought a violent yet playful take on figuration by tearing through the

clay and painting roughly and expressively over the surface. This was one of the approaches

taken up by Elizabeth Ostrander who utilized the ceramic medium to create both fragmented

and, later, highly stylized figural forms.

The jeweler’s art is a uniquely intimate one and has been adopted in our time by artists

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Mani Feniger in her studio in Eastport, Maine in 1974 working on dyed silk piece, “Wave.”

like Alexander Calder, Salvador Dali, and Louise Nevelson. In the ‘70s there was a strong

influence in art jewelry from Europe, Germany in particular. In our area, Michael Good,

trained in jewelry techniques and later learning casting then working with Heiki Seppi at

Haystack School in Deer Isle, won international acclaim by producing sculptural art to wear

that used his unique, personal methods to make sinuous forms playing with negative spaces

and positive line.

Among the sculptors represented here, Melanie Zibit, from Lexington, Massachusetts, carved

directly in marble with sensitivity and technique learned in Carrara, Italy early in her career.

She took up the approach worked in our time by Brancusi and Arp; softly sensual, biomorphic

forms in hard, durable materials at once abstract yet mysteriously familiar. Richard Klyver,

trained in casting techniques centuries old, produced realistic images in pewter and bronze,

some derived from his work and travels in Africa. He brought his skills in these mediums to

work he did for the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. His sculpture of an owl is a totemic

sentinel of the night. These were artists honoring the traditions of stone and bronze just as

there were those adhering to the realist path in painting, even though the critics and art

magazines of the time were touting abstraction, irony, and the blurring of the distinction

between high and popular cultures.

In contrast to these artists, some sculptors such as Ronald Bladen, David Weinrib and Bruce

Beasley in this period were exploring the use of non-art, industrial materials. Rough edged

surfaces at play with transparency, a frozen viscosity, and magical color and light effects were

some of the ingredients in the aesthetic and process of Richard Van Buren. Fiberglass resins,

powdered pigments, viscous chemicals, charcoal, and glues to be dripped on to armatures

or poured into mylar molds were all part of Van Buren’s exploration of the new, hybrid

possibilities of our material culture. He was like some kind of industrial alchemist constantly

experimenting with new combinations and methods.

Brendt Berger, in his early work, also explored the use of fiberglass and polyester in a similar

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mode. Instead of pure resins poured into

molds these were painted on, colored

resins over glass cloth in multiple stages

on top of plaster and clay shapes. Like

the paintings and prints he did in this

period, these were tondos, circular threedimensional

works in saturated colors.

The pieces in this exhibition, influenced

by the early protractor paintings of Frank

Stella and also the crisp circular motifs

of Robert Indiana, evince a concern for

pattern, surface, and precision—cool,

abstract, and objective.

Berger serves as a bridge to the painters

to be considered in this exhibition as

the distinction between painting and

sculpture was being blurred in the 70’s.

There were many stylistic possibilities

Melanie Zebit in her studio in Eastport, 1974.

Photograph by Hugh French/The Quoddy Tides.

in painting one could take as a starting point. Jane Erlich was doing her own versions of

geometric abstractions using quirky optically colored bands sporting, in this example, chain

saw like teeth on a canvas tilted radically off square. Both the striping and the shaping of

paintings were consistent warp threads running through this period in the work of influential

artists like Ellsworth Kelly and Frank Stella.

Bill Barrell, who was the first of the ‘70s artists to arrive in the Eastport area, painted in a

very personal, painterly style using compositional elements from Matisse and figuration from

Picasso in a decidedly funky, expressionistic, and anti-academic manner.

Lee Suta, who trained as a scenic artist for opera, stage and film, though a realistic painter,

has produced a body of work that surpasses the utilitarian in his surreal, highly imaginative

art. Suta is an accomplished draftsman and we have in this exhibition the illustrations he did

for books produced in conjunction with the Wabanaki Bilingual Education Program as well

as an oil painting depicting the Maine Coast. He captures the lyrical harmony of sea, fields,

silence, and the scents of the earth.

Another signature image of Eastport, the working water front, is depicted by Judy Colemann

in a style somewhere between Van Gogh

and Marsden Hartley, an earlier visitor to

the Maine coast. Like Hartley, she also

did loose but incisive portraits of many

of the cast of characters in the area.

Her work prefigures some of the neoexpresionistic

art of the ‘80s.

There was, in fact, a very strong

predilection towards landscape imagery

among many of these painters, not

surprising in a liminal environment

dominated by Passamaquoddy Bay’s

insistent horizon line. This was a time

Brendt Berger and Sarah Berger in Eastport, c.1975.

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when hard ass abstract artists, such as

deKooning and Frankenthaler, tried to

free themselves from representation, the

real world imagery is, suggestively, still

there. Even a Minimalist abstract painter

like Mac Wells, a summer resident of

Robbinston, retained that reference,

reducing that horizon line to a blur of

color or a single bold slice of white

across an atmospheric field.

Leslie Bowman, a summer resident in the

Bill Barrell in Eastport, Maine, c.1975.

70s, who taught at the Maine College

of Art, refers to the surrounding coastal

landscapes in her very seductive, painterly expressions of distilled sea and sky. For many

years she was also the photographer for The Quoddy Tides capturing the spirit of the people

and places of Washington County.

Joe White, whose previous paintings were in the abstract manner, produced numerous

renditions of the coastal land/seascape in refined and magical watercolors he did while a

summer resident in “the way-house,” part of the Sunspot factory complex used by various

visiting artists. As a year round resident, Alan Horseradish (Kirshenstein), in his beautiful and

delightfully obsessive watercolors, repeats six times an almost identical land-water-sky-cloud

image in a composition suggestive of decorative tiles.

Arnold Wechsler, in his Double Puffin, chose to abstract one of the coast’s feathered fauna

from his many more direct and painterly puffin images of the time. It is an almost psychedelic,

mandala-like image that balances organic and geometric forms with Native American

pictographs. His patterned subject matter draws on decorative aspects ranging from Oriental

calligraphy to the visual characteristics of DNA molecules. These eclectic references, along

with the “trippy” qualities, were a continuing thread used by many artists from the previous

decade.

Another artist in this group who utilized several of the signature trends of this period was

Barbara Toothpick (Kirschenstein). Her work incorporated textual elements (a la Jenny Holzer

and Barbara Kruger), swirling Fillmore poster-like psychedelic compositions, and decidedly

frank feminist depictions of the female body. She, with her husband Alan, also used poetic

autobiography and song in their many performances in the area—fusing a kind of ad hoc

musicality with personal history Performance Art. It must be noted, at this point, that a good

proportion of the artists in this exhibition are women, all working in their own personal ways,

which mirrored what was starting to happen in the larger art world as well.

One more thread woven into the fabric of this area was Conceptual Art. Avant garde artists of

the period, such as Sol LeWitt and Yoko Ono, were using ideas as their whole dematerialized

products. It was brought to this area by Dennis Oppenheim, who had a house in Eastport

with fellow artist Joe Stranad. Earlier in his career he had combined Earth Work scale with

conceptual underpinnings, using entire fields of grain as his “canvas,” creating patterns in

the service of concepts, and photographing them for sale. Here he compresses the scale

down to the size of a standard postcard while keeping his Body Art concept fresh, droll, and

personal.

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Elliot Fishbein in his woodworking studio in Eastport, 1974. Photograph by Hugh French/The

Quoddy Tides.

Photography is represented here by the work of Christian Sunde who lives in Trescott. The

great curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in the 70’s, John

Szarkowski, divided art photographers into two camps. They were either “mirrors” looking

inward and expressing what they saw there, or they were “windows” capturing the truth of

the world outside as did Gary Winogrand, Diane Arbus, and Bruce Davidson, three of the

best practitioners of the period. Chris Sunde falls in the latter group. His work shows us an

alert and perceptive observer of that time and place.

And then there were the woodworkers, Jerry Young, Jim Blankman, and Allen Harris, who

made musical instruments. Also in this group of true craftspeople was Elliot Fishbein. Using

only hand tools (his incredible tool cabinet is illustrated here) he was commissioned by

photographer Sid Bahrt of Pembroke and created this refined and stately box that houses

a classic Bible which now resides in Husson University in Bangor. He made furniture and

hand carved signs for the many businesses in the area. His sign for the Quoddy Tides hangs

on Water Street.

Though all the above artists and craftspeople are a disparate group in terms of styles, media,

aesthetics, and backgrounds, in fact, they are a microcosm of the arts in that era making

manifest in the Passamaqoddy Bay area almost every major trend in modern art. Lest we

think that this was only in the past and that they are all gone let us remember that Blankman,

Bowman, Colemann, Good, the Kirschensteins, Klyver, Linden, Ostrander, Sunde, Suta, and

Van Buren are all still either full or part time residents. These are the warp threads of the recent

past interweaving now with the fibers of our current art scene creating a vibrant tapestry.

William Humphreys is an artist and was the Curator at Florida International University’s Art

Museum and Gallery Manager at the Lowe Art Museum, University of Miami. His summer

home is in Perry, Maine.

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“THE DRAWING,” acrylic on canvas, 1977, 37” x 50.”

B I L L B A R R E L L

Born: 1932 London, England

Education: 1956 Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Pennsylvania

One Man Exhibitions:

2008, 2006, 2000 Peter Findlay Gallery, New York City

1998 “Mad Cows,” Halle St. Pierre, Paris, France

1993 Rachel Freedman Contemporary Fine Art, New York City

1991 “Ten Year Retrospective,” Museum Art for Arts Sake, New York

1987 David Brown Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts

1981 Blue Mountain Gallery, New York City

1979 “Art In Public Places,” World Trade Center, New York City

1971 Bank Square Gallery, Eastport, Maine

1964, 1963, 1962,

1961, 1960 East End Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts

Selected Group Shows:

1999 NJ State Arts Annual, New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, New Jersey

1999 “Art + Suitcase Will Travel,” DNA Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts

Alley Culture, Detroit, Michigan; Conductors Hallway Gallery, London, England

1996 “Artist As Curator, Curator As Artist, Bergen Museum, Paramus, New Jersey

1986 “Five Expressionist Painters from N.Y.” Newton Arts Center, Massachusetts

1981 ”The Figure, A Celebration,” Galleries, University of North Dakota

1977 “Art In Public Spaces,” World Trade Center, New York City

1972 “The New York Group,” Bank Square Gallery, Eastport, Maine

Selected Catalogues:

1978 Potholes, Essay by Peter Schjeldalh

Selected Publications:

Art In America, Art News, The New York Times, The New Criterion, London Evening

Standard

Awards:

2007, 1995, Pollock-Krasner Fellowship

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“UNTITLED,” watercolor on paper, 1971, 12” x 12.”

B R E N D T B E R G E R

Born: Oakland, California

Education:

1964 BFA, University of Hawaii, Hawaii

Selected Exhibitions:

2009 Parkside Gallery, La Veta, Colorado

2008 Kentler International Drawing Space, New York City

1995, 1963 Artists of Hawaii, Honolulu Academy of Art, Hawaii

1980 Allen Stone Gallery, New York City

1979 “Art In Public Spaces,” World Trade Center, New York City

1973 “The New York Group” Bank Square Gallery, Eastport, Maine

1972 The Sunspot Show, University of Maine, Augusta, Maine

1971 Peavey Memorial Library, Eastport, Maine

1968, 1970 17th Brooklyn Museum Biennial, Brooklyn, New York

1969 O.K. Harris Gallery, New York City

Teaching:

1995-2004 Instructor Honolulu Academy of Art, Hawaii

1967-1968 Instructor, School of Visual Arts, New York

Grants:

1998 Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts

1981 Committee for Visual Arts Grant, New York City

Mural:

1979 World Trade Center New York City

Selected Bibliography:

1982 Brendt Berger at 55 Mercer Street, Art in America

1967 Origins and Cycles, Art News

Brendt Berger is the founder and director of the Museum of Friends in Walsenburg,

Colorado.

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“UNTITLED,” oil/canvas, 1976, 34” x 32.”

L E S L I E D A L E B O W M A N

Education:

BA, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

MFA, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri

Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, Maine

Work Experience:

2004 to 2010 Photographer and Photography Editor

Bangor Metro Magazine, Bangor, Maine

1997-2004 Assistant Professor of Art , University of Maine, Machias, Maine

1983-1997 Photographer Quoddy Tides newspaper, Eastport, Maine

1986-2007 Founding Member, Eastport Gallery, Eastport, Maine

Selected Exhibitions:

2008-2009 Petroglyph Equinox Exhibition, University of Maine;

Abbe Museum, Bar Harbor, Maine; Maine State Museum,

Augusta, Maine

2004 Sunrise on Washington County, State House, Augusta, Maine

1993 Reflections from Way Downeast, Danforth Gallery, Portland,

Maine

1993 Return of the Cadavre Exquis, The Drawing Center, New York

City

1977 Evansville Museum of Arts & Science, Evansville, Indiana

1974 Nova Scotia X Ten, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia,

Canada

Selected Publications:

Maine Art Now, 1990, by Edgar Allen Beem

Maine Sunday Telegram, Maine Times, Portland Press, Washington Post

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“FISH FACTORY,” oil on canvas board, 1973, 17 7/8” x 24.”

J U D I T H C O L E M A N N

Education:

1965 BA, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan

1986 MA, University of Maine, Orono, Maine

Selected Exhibitions:

2001 Cafe Expresso, Flagstaff, Arizona

1985 Maine Painting Biennial, Portland Museum of Art, Portland,

Maine

1984, 1983 Peavey Memorial Library, Eastport, Maine

1977 Colemann Munjoy Gallery, Portland, Maine

1975 Emerson Gallery, Tarzana, California

Reviews:

1979 June issue, “DownEast” cover, “Estes Head”

1979 October issue, “Maine Life” cover, “View from Munjoy Hill”

17


“UNTITLED,” oil on canvas, 1978, 18” x 48.”

J A N E E H R L I C H

Education:

1962-1964 Pratt Institute

1966-1968 School of Visual Arts

Selected Exhibitions:

1979 One Woman Exhibit, University of Maine, Machias, Maine

1977 Art In Public Spaces, World Trade Center, New York City

1977 Weber Gallery, Portland, Maine

1975 “3 Moose Island Artists,” Strong Gallery, Bar Harbor, Maine

1974 Hansen Gallery, New York City

1973 “The New York Group,” Bank Square Gallery, Eastport, Maine

1972 “The Sunspot Show,” University of Maine, Augusta, Maine

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“WAVE,” dyed silk, 1973, 70” x 36.”

M A N I F E N I G E R

(T E R R Y B E R G E R)

Born: New York City

Education: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Selected Exhibitions:

1975 Strong Gallery, “3 Moose Island Artists,” Bar Harbor, Maine

1974 College of the Atlantic, “Maine Coast Artists,” Bar Harbor, Maine

1974 University of Maine, “Women In Art,” Orono, Maine

1973 Bank Square Gallery, “New York Group,” Eastport, Maine

1972 University of Maine, “Sunspot Show,” Augusta, Maine

1968 Emily Lowe Gallery, One Woman Show, New York City

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“HELICOIDAL,” earrings, 18 carat gold, late 1970s, 2 3/4 x 3/4.”

M I C H A E L G O O D

Born: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Education:

Apprenticeship with Robert Peerless, Sculptor, New York City

1978 Haystack School, Metalsmithing, Deer Isle, Maine

1979 Haystack School, Metalsmithing with Haiku Seppa, Deer Isle, Maine

Awards: In the 1980’s and 1990’s, Diamonds Today, Diamonds International and many other

international competitions.

Michael Good whose name is synonymous with anticlastic raising has developed and

expanded the definition of jewelry and metalsmithing to sculptural forms that are a natural

extension of the human form. He has his own gallery in Rockport, ME and his work is shown

throughout the world.

20


“SEASCAPE BLUE,” watercolor on paper, 1980, 14” x 20.”

A L A N K I R S C H E N S T E I N

(A L A N H O R S E R A D I S H)

Education:

1961-1963 Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1960-1962 Barnes Foundation, Merion, Pennsylvania

Selected Exhibitions:

2002 Book House Gallery, Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania

2001 Faculty Club Gallery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia,

Pennsylvania

2001 Bushnell Gallery, Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania

1973 “The New York Group,” Bank Square Gallery, Eastport, Maine

1972 “The Sunspot Show,” University of Maine, Augusta, Maine

Performances:

1965-2002

Gallery Shows, The Black-Kay Foundation, Philomathean Society,

Shows and readings at Pembroke Historical Society, Eastport Gallery, Shubin

theater, Group Motion, North Star Bar, Nexus, Fleischer, Limerance Gallery,

Highwire, Rubba Clue CEC, Kill Time, Revival, Robbin’s Bookstore, Cooper Hill

Music Festival, West Spot, Anarchist Coffee House, Common Ground Fair.

21


“RING ROSIE UP,” watercolor on paper, 1972, 20” x 26.”

B A R B A R A K I R S C H E N S T E I N

(B A R B A R A T O O T H P I C K)

Education:

Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio

Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana

Selected Exhibitions:

2009 “Found and Bound,” Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia,

Pennsylvania

2007 “Paper & Scissors,” Philadelphia Library, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

1997-2002 Painting and Installations, Bushnell Gallery, Jim Thorpe. Pennsylvania

2000 “A Gathering of Women,” Penn State Gallery, Pennsylvania

1999 Philomathean Society

1977 Group Show, Colemann Gallery, Portland, Maine

1974 “Woman in Art,” College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, Maine

1973 “The New York Group,” Bank Square Gallery, Eastport, Maine

1972 “The Sunspot Show,” University of Maine, Augusta, Maine

1965-2007 Performances with Alan Horshradish:

Eastport Art Gallery, The Harvard Divinity School, Ocracoke, Pembroke Historical

Society, Cooper Hill Music Festival, The Common Ground Fair

2001-2007 Produced and Performed CDs:

“Maine Songs From a Different Head,” ”More Maine Songs”

22


“OWL,” pewter, 13” x 6.”

R I C H A R D

B. K L Y V E R

Education:

1958-1962 School of Visual Arts, New York City

Work Experience:

1975-1994 Sculptor/Designer Peregrine Associates, Eastport, Maine

1999-2003 Artist in Residence Telegraph Road Learning Center

Wilmington, Delaware

2000-2001 Smithsonian Dinosaur Project, Smithsonian Museum,

Washington, D.C.

2005 -2010 Art Bronze Foundry, Eastport, Maine

Museum Collections:

Peabody Museum, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Smithsonian Museum, Washington, D.C.

23


“LA MER,” Fiber, 1976, 96” x 52.”

L E A T R I C E L I N D E N

Born: Brooklyn, New York

Solo Exhibitions:

2003 Stonehaus Gallery, Miami, Florida

1999 “Landscape and Memory,” University of Maine, Machias, Maine

1980 Michael Aaron Gallery, Los Angeles, California

1979 Cape Split Place Gallery, Addison, Maine

1975 Gloria Luria Gallery, Miami, Florida

1970 Emily Lowe Gallery, New York City

Selected Group Exhibitions:

2009 “Black and White,” Eastport Art Gallery, Eastport, Maine

2008 Group Show, Campobello Gallery, Maple City, Michigan

1997 “Walkaround,” Lowe Art Museum, Miami, Florida

1989 “Collaborations,” Center of Contemporary Art, Miami, Florida

1985 “Tropical Visions,” Art & Culture Center, Hollywood, Florida

1985 “Lots of Knots,” Tampa Museum, Tampa, Florida

1977 “Some of Our Friends,” Webber Gallery, Portland, Maine

1977 “Art In Public Spaces,” World Trade Center, New York City

1974 “Women In Art,” University of Maine, Orono, Maine

1974 “Maine Coast Artists,” College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, Maine

1974 “3 From Moose Island,” Strong Gallery, Bar Harbor, Maine

1973 “The New York Group” Bank Square Gallery, Eastport, Maine

1972 “The Sunspot Show,” University of Maine, Augusta, Maine

1970 “Fiber International Invitational,” Skidmore College, Saratoga, New York

Publications:

1985 Miami Herald, “Tropical Visions”, by Helen Kohen

1979 “Craft Horizons”

24


“MATERIAL INTERCHANGE FOR JOE STRANAD,” paper postcard, 1971, 4 1/2” x 6 1/2” (reverse side below).

D E N N I S O P P E N H E I M

Born: 1938 Electric City, Washington

Education: BFA, School of Arts & Crafts, Oakland, California

MFA, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California

Selected Exhibitions:

Tate Gallery, London, England

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Whitney Museum, New York City

Musee d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, France

Galerie Pro Arte, Germany

Joseph Helman Gallery, New York City

Awards: Guggenheim Foundation

National Endowment for the Arts

25


“EARTH DANCER,” unglazed ceramic, 1977, 7 1/2” x 3” x 2”

E L I Z A B E T H O S T R A N D E R

Born: 1943 Mt. Kisco, New York

Education: Arts Students’ League, Cooper Union, New York City

B.F.A., University of Maine, Portland/Gorham, Maine

Selected Exhibitions:

2010 Group Show, Cocco & Salem Imagine Art, Key West, Florida

2009 “Among Friends,” New Brunswick Museum, Saint John, New Brunswick,

Canada

2007 “Maine Sculptors,” University of Southern Maine, Lewiston, Maine

2007 “Summer Sculpture,” Barn Gallery, Ogunquit, Maine

2006 ‘Sweet Rememberances,” University College, Ellsworth, Maine

2005 “Maine Sculptors,” Lewis Gallery, Portland, Maine

2004 “One Person Show,” The Eastport Gallery, Eastport, Maine

2002 “Calling All Angels,” Harbor Square Gallery, Rockland, Maine

2001 “Women in the Arts,” Colby College, Waterville, Maine

2000 “On the Horizon,” University of New England, Portland, Maine;

College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, Maine

1999 “Sky,” Davidson & Daughters, Portland, Maine

1998 “Maine Woman Artist,” A Framework Company, W. Palm Beach, Florida

1995 “Vision, Myth and Magic,” Kristen Gallery, Seattle, Washington

1994 “Brenau”s National Invitational Art Exhibition,” Atlanta, Georgia

1991 “Artists of the Fundy Area,” St. Stephen Library, St. Stephen, New

Brunswick, Canada

1990 ”New Forms,” Danforth Gallery, Portland, Maine

1972 “The Sunspot Show,” University of Maine, Augusta, Maine

Grant:

The Maine Arts, Inc.

26


“UNTITLED,” basket of wire mesh/handmade paper/acrylic, 10” x 9.”

A L A N S H I E L D S

Born: 1944 Herington, Kansas

Education: 1964 Kansas State University Kansas

Selected Exhibitions:

2007 Parish Art Museum, Southhampton, New York

1984 National Gallery of Australia, Sydney, Australia

1981 Orlando Museum of Art, Orlando, Florida

1969-1980 One Man Shows, Paula Cooper Gallery, New York City

1974 Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, San Francisco, California

1972 Hirschhorn Museum, Washington, D.C.

Selected Publications:

Art In America, Art News, ArtForum

27


“BOY HUNTER,” photographic print, 12 1/2” x 18 1/2”

C H R I S T I A N G. S U N D E

Born: 1939

Selected Exhibitions:

2002-2008 “Faculty Show,” University of Maine, Machias, Maine

1982-1990 Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York

1971, 1984 Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York

1970 Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York

1969 San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, California

Published Work:

“Documentary Photography,” Time, Inc., Library of Congress

1998 “Contact Sheet 97,” Light Work Visual Studies, Inc.

Grants:

1990 LIght Work Grant

1985 Artist Grant, New York State

Teaching:

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York

San Francisco Institute of Art, San Francisco, California

Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York

University of Maine, Machias, Machias, Maine

28


“THE VIEW FROM MERT’S,” oil on panel, 1972, 22” x 27 1/2.”

L E E S U T A

Born: 1943 Scotch Plains, New Jersey

Education:

Studied painting and drawing with Frank Reilly,

Scenic Design with Lester Polakov

1961-1963 Scenic design assistant to Albert A. Ostrander

1966-1999 Scenic Artist, United Scenic Artists New York, working at the

Metropolitan Opera, Broadway Theaters, Films and Television

Selected Exhibitions:

2009 Calais Free Library, Calais, Maine

2009 Knotts Gallery, Eastport, Maine

2006-1992 Eastport Art Gallery, Eastport, Maine

1984-1990 Swains Gallery, Plainfield, New Jersey

1984 Frost Gully Gallery, Portland, Maine

1982 “For Real With Beal,” Katona Gallery, Katona, New York

1973 “The New York Group,” Bank Square Gallery, Eastport, Maine

1972 “The Sunspot Show,” University of Maine, Augusta, Maine

Grant:

1990 Maine Arts Commission, Perry School, Perry, Maine

Publications:

Illustrations for a series of books published for Wabnaki Bilingual Education

Program, 1976

29


“RED BADGE,” fiberglass resin, 33” x 14” x 7.”

R I C H A R D V A N B U R E N

Education:

San Francisco State College, California; University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico

Selected One Man Exhibitions:

2003 Center for Maine Contemporary Art, Rockport, Maine

1999 Christiane Nienaber Contemporary Art , New York City

1984 Maryland Institute, Baltimore, Maryland

1978 Sculpture Center, Sydney, Australia

1977 Paul Cooper Gallery, New York City

1970 Bennington College, Bennington, Vermont

1962 San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco, California

Selected Group Exhibitions:

2007-2008 Neue Galerie, Karlsruhe, Germany

2006 Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, North Carolina

2002 Center for Maine Contempoary Art, Rockport, Maine

(Awarded Best in Show)

1999 Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California

30


“DOUBLE PUFFIN,” acrylic on paper, 18” x 24.”

A R N O L D W E C H S L E R

Born: 1930, Jersey City, New Jersey

Education: BA, University of Florida, Florida; MFA, Columbia University, New York City

Selected Solo Exhibits:

2001 Gallery X Harlem,, New York City

1999 Westbeth Gallery, New York City

Selected Group Exhibits:

2003 Andre Zarre Gallery, New York City

2000 Chase Manhattan Bank, New York City

1993 Independent Curators, World Trade Center, New York City

1986 Oaxaca Museum, Oaxaca, Mexico

1980 Metropolitan Museum, New York City

1978 International Fair of Contemporary Art, Bologna, Italy

1975 Hansen Gallery, New York City

31


”UNTITLED,“ watercolor on paper, 1976, 9 1/4” x 7 3/4.”

M A C W E L L S

Born: 1925 Cleveland, Ohio

Education: 1948 B.A., Philosophy, Oberlin College, Ohio

1948-49 Cooper Union, New York

Selected Solo Exhibitions:

1993 Rothko Foundation Award Show, Artists Space, New York City

1979 St. Stephen Art Center, St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada

1972 Max Hutchinson Gallery, New York City

Selected Group Shows:

1992 “Persistence of Abstraction,” Ulrich Museum of Art, Wichita, Kansas

1989 55 Mercer Gallery, New York City

1987 Condeso-Lawler Gallery, New York City

1979 Betty Parsons Gallery, New York City

1972 Eight from New York, Festival of Perth, Perth, Australia

1970 Small Works, Bard College, New York City

1968 Park Place Gallery, New York City

Selected Publications:

Art News, Arts Magazine, Art in America, Art International

32


“VIEW NORTH FROM WADSWORTH’S,” watercolor on paper, 1971, 7 1/2” x 9 3/4.”

J O S E P H W H I T E

Born: 1938

Education: B.A., San Francisco State University, California

Selected Solo Exhibitions:

2004 Washington Arts Museum, Washington, D.C.

1973 The San Francisco Museum, San Francisco, California

1972 The Corcoran Gallery of At, Washington, D.C.

1971 Paula Cooper Gallery, New York City

1967 San Francisco Art Institute, San Francisco, California

Selected Group Exhibitions:

1992 Baumgartner Galleries, Inc., Washington, D.C.

1985 The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

1985 Oakland Museum, Oakland, California

1973 Phyllis Kind Gallery, Chicago, Illinois

1973 Storm King Art Center, Mountainville, New York

1970 Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York

1970 Wheatherspoon Art Gallery, University of North Carolina,

Greensboro, North Carolina

1964, 1967 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum, New York City

33


”LIKE SKIN,” Vermont Marble, 1970, 27” x 10” x 8.”

M E L A N I E Z I B I T

Education:

1970 B.A., Brandeis University, Massachusetts

University of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana, Illinois

M.B.A., Harvard Business School, Massachusetts

Selected Exhibitions:

2008 Cape Cod Cultural Center, Yarmouth, Massachusetts

2006 University of Massachusetts, Boston, Massachusetts

2006 Vermont Sculpture and Carving Studio, W. Rutland, Vermont

2002 New Bedford Museum, New Bedford, Massachusetts

2000 Cambridge Art Association, Cambridge, Massachusetts

1985,1986 Boston Fine Arts Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts

1973,1974 Sculpture Center, New York City

1972 “The Sunspot Show,” University of Maine, Augusta, Maine

1972 The Strong Gallery, Bar Harbor, Maine

1971 Rose Art Gallery, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts

34


T H E W O O D W O R K E R S:

J I M B L A N K M A N, E L L I O T F I S H B E I N,

A L A N H A R R I S, J E R R Y Y O U N G

Jerry Young learned to make dulcimers in California from Sam Herman. He came to Eastport

with his wife Debbie in the early ‘70s. They bought a house on Spear Avenue, Elliot Fishbein

lived nearby. Jim Blankman, a friend from California came to visit in 1972. Subsequently,

Jerry and Jim worked together making dulcimers until Jim went back to California.

In 1970 Alan Harris was a summer visitor from New York City. He fell in love with Washington

County and moved to Eastport, buying a house on Clark Street. Alan loved music and which

led him to build his own harpsichord. He worked with Jerry making dulcimers after Jim

Blankman left. When Jerry Young moved back to California, Alan worked with Richard Klyver

doing pewter animal sculptures, which were sold at Smithsonian Gift Shops in Washington,

D.C.

Presently, Jerry Young is making surfboards in Calfornia. Jim Blankman returned to Eastport

in 1976 and has created many wonderful creations in wood in his workshop on Water Street

and an incredible tree house environment at his home. Alan Harris still resides in Eastport

doing carpentry.

Elliot Fishbein moved to Eastport in 1973 from the Pacific coast. He came originally from

New York where he used to work in his uncle’s wood working shop. He moved to the San

Francisco area in 1968 where he decided to take up wood working as a serious vocation,

finding an apprenticeship with a violin repairman.

Six years later he moved to Eastport, Maine. One of his first assignments was carving the

wooden sign which now identifies the Quoddy Tides office. He purchased a home and

workshop on Spear Avenue with a view of the bay. His workshop was a former boat shop.

He used antique tools and the best hand tools available and a cross cut saw which he made

himself. He made Shaker furniture as the Shakers did, simple functional designs made with

sophisticated joining work. Among his commissions was a Bible Box, now in the collection

of the Bangor Theological Seminary at Husson University in Bangor, Maine.

Elliot died tragically in a car accident on Route 9 in 2002.

35


36

Above: Bible Box by Elliot Fishbein,

1977, 21 7/8” x 17” x 8.”

Left: Label on underside of Bible

Box.

Below: Elliot Fishbein’s tool cabinet.


Pair of dulcimers from the ‘70s. Left: Dulcimer c. 1975 by Alan Harris and Jerry Young, 38 1/2” x 5”

9/16” x 2 3/8.” Right: Dulcimer, c.1980 by Jim Blankman, 37 1/8” x 12 3/8” x 3 5/8.”

37


A R C H I T E C T U R A L W O R K S

George Trakas’ work creates a functional response to a specific site. In this period he usually

incorporated ramps in wood or steel which lead the walker through the environment in a

novel way to transform the mundane experience, as here, of going to the outhouse.

Robert Szatkowski moved with his family from Chicago in the late 1960s and lived in Robbinston,

Maine for many years. He built several experimental structures on his land there as

well as Leatrice Linden’s studio in Perry, Maine and one for Elizabeth Ostrander when she

lived on the Ridge Road in Robbinston, Maine.

Above: Walkway and outhouse designed by George Trakas in Perry, Maine.

38


Interior (below) and exterior (above) views of Leatrice Linden’s studio in Perry, Maine designed by

Robert Szatkowski.

39


W O R K S I N E X H I B I T I O N

1. BILL BARREL.

“THE DRAWING.” Acrylic on canvas. 1977. 37” x 50.” Collection of the artist.

2. BRENDT BERGER.

“UNTITLED.” Watercolor on paper. 1971. 12” x 12.” Collection of Gwen Jones.

“UNTITLED.” Oil on canvas. 36” diameter. Collection of the artist.

3. LESLIE DALE BOWMAN.

“UNTITLED.” Oil on canvas. 1976. 34” x 32.” Collection of the artist.

4. JUDITH COLEMANN.

“FISH FACTORY.” Oil on canvas board. 1973. 17 7/8” x 24.” Collection of Tides Institute &

Museum of Art.

“DIANE RUSSO.” Oil pastel on paper. 1972. 15” x 15 1/2.” Collection of the artist.

5. JANE EHRICH.

“UNTITLED.” Oil on canvas. 1978. 18” x 48.” Collection of the artist.

6. MANI FENIGER (TERRY BERGER).

“WAVE.” Dyed silk. 1973. 70” x 36.” Collection of the artist.

8. MICHAEL GOOD.

“Helicoidal.” Earrings, 18 carat gold. 2 3/4” x 3/4.” Loan from Michael Good Gallery, Rockport,

Maine.

“Hammered Flat Gold Mobile.” Earrings, 14 carat gold. 1 5/8” x 7/8.” Loan from Michael Good

Gallery, Rockport, Maine.

9. ALAN KIRSCHENSTEIN (ALAN HORSERADISH).

“SEASCAPE BLUE.” Watercolor on paper. 1980. 14” x 20.” Collection of the artist.

10. BARBARA KIRSCHENSTEIN (BARBARA TOOTHPICK).

“RING ROSIE UP” Watercolor on paper. 1972. 20” x 26.” Collection of the artist.

“FROM AWAY.” Hand-made book. 2010. Collection of the artist.

11. RICHARD KLYVER.

“OWL.” Pewter. 13” x 6.” Collection of the Tides Institue & Museum of Art.

12. LEATRICE LINDEN.

“PASSAMAQUODDY TOTEM.” Wool/fur/wire. 1971. 96” x 36.” On extended loan to Tides

Institute & Museum of Art.

“LA MER.” Fiber. 1976. 96” x 52.” Collection of the artist.

13. DENNIS OPPENHEIM.

“MATERIAL INTERCHANGE FOR JOE STRANAD.” Paper postcard. 1971. 4 1/2” x 6 1/2.”

Collection of the Museum of Friends, Walsenburg, Colorado.

14. ELIZABETH OSTRANDER.

“EARTH DANCER.” Unglazed ceramic. 1977. 7 1/2” x 3” x 2.” Collection of the artist.

“GENTLE DANCER.” Unglazed ceramic. 1977. 7 1/2” x 3” x 2.” Private collection.

15. ALAN SHIELDS.

“UNTITLED.” Basket of wire mesh, handmade paper, acrylic. 10” x 9.” Collection of Richard Van

Buren.

40


16 CHRISTIAN SUNDE.

“BOY HUNTER.” Photographic print. 12 1/2” x 18 1/2.” Collection of the artist.

“BOY & GIRL WASHING.” Photographic print. 11 7/8” x 7 7/8.” Collection of the artist.

17. LEE SUTA.

“THE VIEW FROM MERT’S.” Oil on panel. 1972. 22” x 27 1/2.” Collection of the artist.

Illustrations for Booklets for Wabnaki Bilingual Education Program, Maine. 1970s. Collection of the

Tides Institute & Museum of Art.

18. RICHARD VAN BUREN.

“RED BADGE.” Fiberglass resin. 33” x 14” x 7.” Collection of the artist.

19. MAC WELLS.

“UNTITLED.” Watercolor on paper. 1976. 9 1/4” x 7 3/4.” Collection of Eileen Wells.

“UNTITLED.” Silkscreen print. 1970. 15 7/8” x 12 7/8.” Collection of the Tides Institute & Museum

of Art.

20. ARNOLD WESCHLER.

“DOUBLE PUFFIN.” Acrylic on paper. 18” x 24.” Collection of Lou Weschler, West Palm Beach,

Florida.

21. JOSEPH WHITE.

“VIEW NORTH FROM WADSWORTH’S.” Watercolor on paper. 1971. 7 1/2”x9 3/4.” Private

collection.

22. MELANIE ZIBIT

“LIKE SKIN.” Vermont Marble. 1970. 27” x 10” x 8.” Collection of the artist.

THE WOODWORKERS

23. JIM BLANKMAN. Dulcimer. c. 1980. 37 1/8” x 12 3/8” x 3 5/8.” Collection of the Tides Institute &

Museum of Art.

24. ELLIOT FISHBEIN. BIBLE BOX. 1977. 21 7/8” x 17” x 8.” Collection of Bangor Theological

Seminary, Husson University, Bangor, Maine.

25 & 26. ALLEN HARRIS & JERRY YOUNG. Dulcimer. c. 1975. 38 1/2” x 5 9/16” x 2 3/8.” Collection

of the Tides Institute & Museum of Art.

41


A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S

The Tides Institute & Museum of Art is deeply grateful to William Humphreys and Leatrice

Linden for their heroic efforts to pull this catalogue and exhibition together and for writing

short essays for the catalogue. Without these efforts, neither the catalogue or exhibition would

have happened. The Tides Institute also wishes to thank the many artists and other people who

contributed their knowledge and memories and who loaned works for this exhibition.

The Tides Institute & Museum of Art wishes to acknowledge with deep thanks the funding

provided by the Maine Community Foundation and the William and Joan Alfond Foundation

in support of this exhibition catalogue and the exhibition. Additional funding has come from

other private contributions.

The TIdes Institute & Museum of Art is grateful to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for granting

permission to reprint Heather McHugh’s poems, ”North Island Songs” and ”Syllables,” from

the book, A World of Difference, and to Heather McHugh for granting permission to reprint

her poem, ”Sympathy on Water Street,” from the book, Dangers. Additional thanks to Husson

University and Bangor Theological Seminary for loaning its “Bible Box” made by Elliot

Fishbein for this exhibition and for inclusion in this catalogue.

This exhibition catalogue has been printed in an edition of 1,000 copies by Penmor Lithographers

of Lewiston, Maine.

Exhibition Catalogue Copyright © 2010 Tides Institute & Museum of Art.

“North Island Songs” and “Syllables” from A World of Difference by Heather McHugh.

Copyright © 1981 by Heather McHugh. Used by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

“Sympathy on Water Street” from Dangers by Heather McHugh. Copyright © 1977 by

Heather McHugh. Used by permission of Heather McHugh. All rights reserved.

42


William Humphreys (left) with Bill Barrell (center) in Barrell’s

studio in Easton, Pennsylvania, 2010.

43

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