The Official Stay Japan Traveler

stayjapan

A multi-media magazine made to guide anyone traveling to Japan. We fashion valuable content creation while promoting places to visit and unique accommodations in Japan.

The Official

Traveler

S P R I N G 2 0 2 0


I

Credits

Head Director

Shantell Mitchell

Assistant Director

Caroll Hirose

Cory Rotolo

Marketing

Giovanni Perez

Editorial

Teresa Fong

Kenneth Valencich

Social Media PR

Alex Loke

Lillian Seiler

Art, Photo, & Content

Teresa Fong

Ayumi Kondo

Giovanni Perez

Daiki Shimizu

Natasha Taliferro

ADDITONAL

SUPPORT

Takeshi Amitani, Celine Bennett,

Louise Carroll, Emi Chubachi,

Scarlett Halford, Dalton Iwasaki,

Joanne Jamieson, Charleen Lay,

Miguel Magtiibay, Michael Sanchez,

Erin Shoaf, Kai Simms,

Tayla-paige Van Sittert


II

Table of Contents

III

ON COVID 19

V-VI

EDITOR'S LETTER

1-10 Feature

HISTORICAL ADVENTURES

AND NAKED FIRE FESTIVAL

13-18 Feature

GET HAUNTED TO RICHES

21-29 Feature

RELAX AND BECOME ONE

WITH YOURSELF IN OBAMA

33

ASK THE EXPERT

34-37

FOLKS FOOD

39-40

INTERVIEW: FUYUMEDO CAFE

AND ART GALLERY

44-50

FASHION IN JAPAN


We at SJ Media strive to showcase the beauty and unique

charms of Japan with first-hand accounts from our experts.

While our mission involves advocating for travel and one-of-akind

experiences in Japan, we take the current COVID-19

pandemic seriously and do not recommend travel at this time.

Instead, we hope that by following proper protocol advised by

local governments and authorities (washing hands, avoiding

crowded areas, social distancing measures, etc.), we will safely

be able to return to our normal lives in the near future. In the

meantime, please feel free to utilize the Official STAY JAPAN

Traveler as inspiration for future travel plans. Stay safe now so

that you and your loved ones can travel later! Japan will be

waiting for you.

III

O N C O V I D - 1 9


TAKE ONLY

MEMORIES,

LEAVE ONLY

FOOTPRINTS

F R O M C H I E F S E A T T L E


EDITOR'S

LETTER

pring has come. The room feels warm, birds are

chirping, and flowers are blooming. Nature calls

you to be amazed by its beauty, but what to do

when "gathering" is a prohibited word? Well, make

your brief outside time more exciting by wearing

that spring outfit that makes you feel good. Don't

forget about your mask! Remember, nature is Swaiting for you with open arms, but, before you feel the wind on

your cheeks, let me enlighten you on Japan’s most popular spring

culture: Hanami! Hanami is the act of enjoying the outstanding

view of cherry blossoms, called sakura in Japanese. The question

is: "How does one enjoy a 1,000+ year-old cultural event that

takes place all over Japan for a month." The easiest way is to

simply go to a park, pond, university, or school (this one might be

a little weird if you don't know anyone from a school). Wherever

you see a cherry blossom tree, stop, gaze at the beauty, and

voila! Hanami. This lovely tradition is a bit deeper than a simple

description makes it sound.

V

Hanami

Where you live

and who you

spend your time

with play a deep

role in what kind

of hanami you

have.

In my case, I've

had hanami with

co-workers,

friends, and family.

Each time is

slightly different.

That's why I

present you with...

"How to do Hanami"

With Co-workers:

1. One person needs to go early, find

the right spot, and stand guard.

2. Another person is in charge of

delivering food and drinks.

3. Little by little, everybody joins and

the party starts.

It's an obviously good excuse to escape

the office, enjoy beautiful sights, and

have a drinking party.

With friends:

1. Depending on the number of friends,

there's no need to reserve a spot. Food

and drinks are readily available at

convenience stores.

2. Don't forget to bring a blue sheet or

a small folding chair.

3. You can also opt to have a potluck

style hanami and enjoy an

internationally flavored hanami with

different types of tasty dishes.

With a Japanese family:

Regardless whether you live in a city or

the more rural parts of Japan, hanami is

an event you can’t turn down. Why?

The answer is very simple: because

you'll be overwhelmed by the amount

of delicious home-cooked bento and

snacks that people bring.

Caroll Hirose

Few things to always keep

in mind when you do

Hanami

1. Always take the garbage home

with you. Japan is a clean

country. Let’s keep it that way.

2. Depending on where you live,

especially if you're planning to

enjoy the night illumination, wear

warm clothes.

3. Don't forget your equipment.

There'll be many beautiful

landscapes and cherry blossoms

for you to take a quick snap of or

make a quick sketch.

Hanami is a Japanese cultural

activity that is easy to enjoy. For

those who want to keep the

excitement alive for more than

one event, search for Hanami

trips and festivals all over Japan.

Keep in mind that there are over

200 types of Cherry blossom

trees in Japan.

Next time you go, how many

cherry blossoms will you see?



Historical Adventures

and

NAKED

FIRE

FESTIVAL

By Giovanni Perez

Ninohe City in Iwate Prefecture is just a little over two hours

away from Tokyo station. It's best known for its food, culture,

and history. In the following article, you can read about Iwate’s

Naked Fire Festival, delicious hitsumi soup, and Jomon cooking.

Kunohe Village

Furusato Sozo-Kan Food Tasting

Experience

1

We started our trip going

straight towards Furusato

Sozo-Kan for a tour of a 100+

year old historical community

hall located in Kunohe village,

Iwate City. We saw many tools

that were used in the Japanese

stone age, which only ended

within the last 3000 years!

Parts of Iwate have heavy

snow and rain, so people

would cover themselves with a

straw blanket to keep warm.


After taking a tour of the building, we

feasted on a Japanese traditional dish

with a side of juicy steak and pork. The

chef was talkative and had the nicest

smile that made the food even more

enjoyable. We also ate a traditional

vegetable soup called hitsumi that was

boiled on a hearth. We ripped dough

into tiny balls and threw it into the pot

to add some texture to the soup. When

you came close to the hearth, you only

had a few seconds to throw in as many

balls as possible before your body

would start burning from the blazing

heat coming from the pot.

"The chef was talkative and had

the nicest smile that made the

food even more enjoyable."

After stuffing ourselves, we got ready for the

Chef’s special dessert that he invented

himself: matcha ice cream in an edible apple

skin with whipped cream and a cherry on top.

He showed us how to do it, then we

proceeded to make our own. A perfect

dessert to end lunch.

2


3

After lunch, we gathered around the

hearth that had lost most of its heat

and talked about the impact of

inbound tourism on Ninohe City. It’s

important for cities like Ninohe to be

able to open their doors to tourists

from all countries so that the history

can live on.

Ninohe City

Furusato Sozo-Kan Naked Fire Festival

(Saitogi)

Saitogi festival, or “Naked Fire Festival ” in

English, has been going on for over 400

years. It’s used to figure out the quality of

harvest for the current year. The Naked

Fire Festival is open to anyone brave

enough to wear a thin loin cloth, throw

cold water on themselves, and use a log to

bash four meters of blazing hot fire.

The festival is broken down into four small

rituals: okomori, mizugori, hadaka-mairi,

and himatsuri.


4

Sword-shaped Grain Tower

Five okomori, or small swordshaped

towers of grain in

English, are made and left

outside one day before the

main festival. Their condition

is checked upon the next day

as a way to determine the

city’s harvest for that year.

Cold Water Cleansing

On the night of the festival,

you strip down and wear only a

thin loin cloth called fundoshi,

which looks like an adult

diaper. You pair up with

another member and stand on

stage in front of a large crowd,

throwing freezing cold water

on yourself.

Hadaka-mairi

You take off your fundoshi and

exchange it for a sarashi, a

five-meter strip of wide cloth.

It starts below your stomach

and ends just above your

thighs. To prevent any funny

accidents from occurring, I had

to tighten it as much as

possible. We wore a headband,

festival socks called tabi, a

straw skirt called mino, and a

pair of straw shoes.


5

We prepared five ten-yen

coins by wrapping them up

with small pieces of paper and

put them inside our sarashi.

We quickly formed into

groups again. From here, the

whole group walked in pairs.

We ate a pinch of salt, drank a

shot of sacred sake, and

clamped a white paper in our

mouths. We couldn’t speak

until the paper left our mouth.

The festival truly begins here.

Himatsuri

Fire Festival

The person in the front leads

the way, swaying a bell from

left to right. We are led down

the side of a hill with just an

arm’s length of visibility. Once

all the members gathered

together, we walked up the

stone stairs, lit only by small

lanterns, to pay respects to

three individual shrines. We

made sure to drop five-yen

coins for every visit. Lastly, we

walked near the edge of the

burning pile of stacked logs

that had been lit two hours

prior to the festival. We payed

our respects to about fifteen

smaller gods.


6

After giving our respects,

we positioned ourselves

around the crackling

inferno. While the ritual

horn and drums sounded,

we bashed the top of the

fire tower with four-meterlong

wooden rods. As we

were hitting, we prayed to

our own God to not burn

to death. A rain of ash fell

on our bodies, singeing, if

not incinerating, our hair.

All participants used the

nearby snow to cool off

during rest periods.

The direction of the flames

also indicates the quality of

the upcoming harvest.

Flames point towards the

shrine for a poor harvest

and away from it to predict

a bountiful harvest.

Himatsuri finishes after

four rounds of fire tower

bashing.

We took off our straw

shoes and tied them to the

shrine.

Nothing ends a festival

quite like the brave

participants partaking in

beer and a special soup

with vegetables and tofu

called kenchi-jiru. Legend

has it that joining the

festival three years straight

will bring you happiness.


Ichinohe Town

Jomon Site

Have you heard of the Jomon

period? No, not the board

game Jumanji. The Jomon

period is part of Japan’s

prehistory and dates back to

about 16,000 to 3,000 years

ago. The name Jomon comes

from the straw rope pattern

found from this time. Even

now, There are constant new

discoveries of Jomon artifacts.

In Ninohe City, Iwate, there's

an abundance of Jomon

artifacts, so much so that

there's a whole building

dedicated to them. This

museum is packed with many

exciting activities, from

cooking to making necklaces

the Jomon way.

7

There were no knives or even chopsticks during the

Jomon period. People cut their own food with a sharpedged

rock and started fires without matches. You, too,

can do exactly that in Ichinohe’s Jomon Museum. Along

with some friends and a Jomon expert, we learned how

to make our own fire and experienced first-hand the

Jomon way of cooking. We used the sharp rocks to cut

mushrooms, potatoes, herbs, and lamb, which we

cooked in a tall, black pot.

| Jomon-style Cooking


8

We also used replica Jomon tools to make

our own fire. The ingenuity of the Jomon

era was astoundingly advanced. A pulleylike

system was used to bring the wooden

handles of the fire-making contraption up

and down. With the right amount of speed

and a steady rhythmic hand motion, small

particles of burning wood are made by the

friction from the tools.

The fire would then be transported to a

small bowl with bigger wood chips that

were incorporated into a fire pit. Overall

preparation took about an hour and a half,

with another hour for the soup to fully cook.

Hot soups during cold winters in northern

Japan were an essential survival tactic.

Another essential item was clothes. It would

be hard to imagine living in Tohoku without

clothes or a house. Walking around the

museum, we saw different types of clothes

that were used for various activities.


9

Jomon Accessories

Each pair of clothes had a pendant on

them. We had the opportunity to create

our own out of a special, thinly cut

piece of bark. The native Jomon

community would place thinly cut bark

in water for a few days. These wet

pieces of bark became soft enough to

shape into whatever item needed.


Jomon Museum

The museum wouldn’t be complete

without attractions of pottery,

weaponry, and image mapping.

There’s a ten-minute image mapping

video that portrays how the Jomon

people possibly lived. This interactive

museum has plenty of activities for all

ages to enjoy without having to travel

to multiple sites.

Want to learn about

more amazing places

like this one? Check

out our website at:

Stayjapan.com/media

GIOVANNI PEREZ

When he's not busy planning events

for inbound tourism to explore the

rural parts of Japan, you can find

Giovanni taking pictures of landscape

or whipping up delicious tacos with

oba-chans.

10



IT IS BETTER TO

SEE SOMETHING

ONCE

THAN TO HEAR ABOUT IT A

THOUSAND TIMES


Written by,

T E R E S A F O N G

G E T H A U N T E D T O

R I C H E S

Ever wanted to be instantly rich? I’m sure you had that wish at least once in your life. Of

course, you can play the waiting game and buy lottery tickets, or you can try an even less

conventional method, which follows a famous Japanese legend. Traditional ryokan are

elegant Japanese inns that have many elements: indoor and outdoor onsen (hot springs),

aromatic tatami floors, comfortable yukata, and succulent Japanese-style set meals.

They're essentially 5 star hotels that feel like home. That is, if your home comes with

attentive staff and a fire pit to warm your cold feet. With Ryokufuso Ryokan, however,

there’s one unique element that no other ryokan can offer. Can you guess what it is?

13


| Ryokufuso

It’s a ghost! That’s right. Ryokufuso is

a haunted ryokan. Luckily, it’s not the

typical Hollywood image of a

Japanese haunting. We don’t have a

woman with long, wet, shiny black

hair. We don’t have a well in the back

that has a sad, horrific history. Rather,

we have a little boy with a heart of

gold.

| The History

About 670 years ago, at the age of six, he was

fleeing the Nambokucho war with his father when

he unfortunately collapsed and died. In his final

moments, he swore to protect his family for eternity.

He must’ve been a very loyal child to make such a

promise at such a young age! Kamemaro-chan’s

passing is where Ryokufuso comes in. Even though

his exact place of death is unknown, it is said that his

first ghostly sighting was in the ryokan of Ryokufuso.

Locals say that he supposedly haunts other ryokan in

the area too, but he has a particular fondness for

Ryokufuso.

The little boy that currently haunts

Ryokufuso is affectionately known as

Kamemaro-chan.

14


Legend goes on to say that if the person who

sees him is female, she’ll be blessed with a

successful marriage within the year. If the person

who sees him is male, he’ll be blessed with riches

and success. Personally, I’d prefer the latter.

Staff told me that if you seek Kamemaro-chan,

he will show up as balls of light. Since he seems

so willing to do that, I’m sure he’d also be willing

to switch up the blessings, too.

| The History

15

| Fun fact:

In the West, the witching hour is at 3:00 A.M. It’s the time of

night when the supernatural has the most power in the

mortal dimension. I was shocked to learn that the witching

hour in Japan is at 2:00 A.M. In Ryokufuso, you’ll often see

guests stay up until 2:00 A.M. in an attempt to meet

Kamemaro-chan. Guests usually walk around in pairs, but I

needed at least three partners because I was too terrified.

The staff does their part in ensuring the ryokan is as creepy

as possible, with dark hallways and dimly lit corners. In my

opinion, the staff does their job a bit too well, because I was

shaking like a leaf!


16 3

| Japanese-style Set Meal

If you also, unfortunately, don't get to see Kamemaro chan (which

might be a good thing if you're a scaredy cat like me), you can at least

feel like a rich celebrity with their extravagant Japanese-style set

meals. It’s not often that you get to enjoy a traditional Japanese

multi-course dinner, especially at this level. The skills and techniques

required to prepare such a haute cuisine is certainly something to

marvel at.

Not only was I impressed by the overall presentation, I was also

enthralled by the tiny details of the over 15 bowls and plates in my

dinner setting! Just at a glance, I instantly knew that the artisans and

craftsmen must have put a great deal of effort in each and every

single detail. My personal favorite was the bowl shaped as a

chrysanthemum with alternating patterns of blue flowers and shapes.

Japanese-style set meals in Tokyo start as low as

10,000 yen, about $100, so it’s not a meal you can

enjoy every day. That’s why, when you actually have

the chance to sit down to enjoy each little part of

the cuisine, it will always feel special. The enjoyment

is enhanced when eating in your yukata after a soak

in the hot spring. Nothing beats that combination!


17

3

In your Japanese-style set meals, not only do you get shabushabu,

you also get sashimi, oyster, and a delicious array of tiny

appetizers. I have to admit: I’ve never had such tender pork in

shabu-shabu before. At one point I forgot I left a slice boiling in

the soup, but it didn’t end up dry and swiveled like usual! It

was glorious.

| Plant-based Diet

Ryokufuso also offers plant-based Japanese-style set meals.

They serve fresh and crispy vegetables and apple tempura with

a side of fruit. They also have something called, “fu,” which is

dried wheat gluten. “Fu” has an amazing ability to soak any

sauce you add, so they’re extremely juicy and delectable.

Definitely look for it even if you don’t have a plant-based diet!

You don’t want to miss this treat.

Did I mention that you get dessert? Even if it was

just one strawberry, strawberries in Japan are known

to always be sweet. They've developed a way of

growing and harvesting strawberries to ensure peak

freshness and high quality. That’s probably why

strawberries, or, rather, fruits in Japan are so

expensive!


18 3

| Breakfast

We had a variety of pickled vegetables, a

bowl of perfectly steamed rice, and a slice

of the richest pink salmon. Of course,

paired with all of those is a bowl of miso

soup for the soul. Going to the hot springs

is great, especially when you’re blessed

with hot miso soup right after. It really

does the trick!

So, what are you waiting for? Go get

haunted to riches or simply go enjoy

Japanese-style set meals like the wealthy!

Follow us on

instagram

@Stayjapan



IT'S BETTER TO

TRAVEL WELL

THAN TO ARRIVE


Photos by, Natasha Taliferro Awayfromorigin.com

RELAX AND BECOME

ONE WITH

YOURSELF

IN OBAMA, FUKUI

Fukui Prefecture has a little town known for its

fresh fish and crystal-clear water. It’s also known

for its name and connection to a beloved public

figure. Obama City in Fukui Prefecture is a mix of

Kansai and Wakasa charm that distinguishes it

from the rest of the Hokuriku Region.

The small-town charm and love for

quiet comforts will make anyone

feel right at home.

Obama City, not named after the

former U.S. President Barack

Obama (the town came first), is a

small town located in the

southernmost region of Fukui

Prefecture, known as the Wakasa

region.

21



The ryokan is a beautifully built

structure that mixes wood and

bamboo with natural stone

elements. Transport into relaxation

as soon as you walk into Fujiya and

slide into a pair of soft slippers.

Natural wood tones, earthy colors,

and deep reds greet you at the door

along with an iron fireplace roaring

quietly in the corner.

| The Inside

There are five spacious guest

rooms, a small dining room, and two

gender-separated hot springs.

Both make for a very intimate

experience. They designed each

room with traditional tatami or

bamboo flooring, shoji or paper

sliding doors, and futon.

The Yamayuri room has a private

bathroom, two sitting areas, large

windows that let in a stream of

sunlight, and a colorful haori, or

kimono coat, hanging in the corner.

Mountains and a dense forest

surround the ryokan with no

neighbors on either side.

23

Photo by, Natasha Taliferro Awayfromorigin.com


Photos by, Natasha Taliferro Awayfromorigin.com

At night, the area is quiet, as there

is little to no nearby traffic. It's a

relaxing experience. The next best

part of Matsunaga Rokkan is the 8-

course vegetarian dinner.

Before heading off to dinner, make

sure to check out the mini library

and the Japanese irori fire pit. You

can also indulge in complimentary

tea, coffee, and cookies in front of

the iron kettle-warmer while

reading.

Take a tour of the ryokan’s

greenhouse and garden across the

street to have your senses

awakened.

| Seasonal Vegetable

Dinner

I’m not exaggerating when I say that I

was stuffed. They served each course

one-at-a-time so you can use all six

senses. Each menu item is chosen and

arranged based on the theme of the

season and the seasonal vegetables

available.

24


The chef was nice enough to make

me something special with carrots

because I mentioned my deep love

for carrots during the greenhouse

tour earlier in the day. Each dish is

distinctively Japanese with elegant

interpretations of dishes that

normally would contain meat.

Colorful seasonal vegetables filled

the menu, such as black Japanese

radish (daikon), truffle mushrooms,

fresh herbs, udon, flavored wheatrice

cakes (nama-fu), and seasonal

Japanese sweets (wagashi).

Once you’ve filled your belly with

the delicious 8-course vegetarian

meal, you can slide into the

steaming hot bath.

| Find Zen at a Myotsuji

Temple

Myotsuji is a Buddhist Shingon sect

temple which includes a three

story-pagoda, three Buddha statues

designated as national important

cultural properties, with 12 smaller

Buddha statues to protect them.

25

Photo by, Natasha Taliferro Awayfromorigin.com



27

| Rice Vinegar Tour

Photo by, Natasha Taliferro Awayfromorigin.com

Photo by, Natasha Taliferro Awayfromorigin.com

| Woodworking

Photo by, Natasha Taliferro Awayfromorigin.com


| Bicycle Tour

Take a bike tour through town

using one of the electric bikes

provided by the ryokan. There is an

expansive natural environment to

explore around the area, as well as

various small local temples and cute

cafes.

| Local Shrines

Obama City is filled with small

neighborhood shrines with unique

charm and history. The community

has maintained these shrines for

generations.

Obama City has a rich religious

history connected to the major

Shinto shrines of Nara and Kyoto.

Every year on March 2nd, the Jingu

Shrine performs a water-sending

ceremony . The Shrine sends

blessed water from Obama City

down to the famous Todai-Ji

Temple in Nara. Because of this rich

cultural tradition, smaller local

shrines and temples are popular

power spots.

During my trip to Obama City, I

visited Wakasahiko

Shrine and Wakasa Hime Shrine.

28

Photo by, Natasha Taliferro Awayfromorigin.com


Photos by, Natasha Taliferro Awayfromorigin.com

These sister shrines and temples

are connected through a ranking

system, making them strong power

spots for the Wakasa area. The

Wakasahiko Shrine, the only “upper

shrine” (ichinomiya) in Wakasa, has

been worshiped as the guardian of

fishermen since the 7th Century.

The eclectic cafe takes advantage

of its traditional woodwork and

design by using every space. They

showcase a collection of guitars,

ukuleles, jewelry, books, and family

pictures. They make everything

fresh and also change their menu

monthly. It’s full of ofukuro-aji (a

mother’s cooking).

| Cafe Watoto

Watoto is a small cafe in a

traditional Japanese house run by a

friendly Japanese couple.

29

If you have a little extra time, you

can go to the sea and ride on a

cruise to the fishing port, the fish

market, and “Sotomon” in Wakasa

Bay, which is also designated as a

national scenic spot.




IT IS NOT THE

DESTINATION

WHERE YOU END UP

B U T T H E M I S H A P S A N D

M E M O R I E S Y O U C R E A T E A L O N G

T H E W A Y .

P E N E L O P E R I L E Y


SPRING 2020

Ask the Expert

Your

questions

about living

in Japan as

an expat

answered

by me or

our team of

experts!

THIS SEASON'S

EXPERT

TERESA FONG

I'M VEGAN. WHAT ARE MY OPTIONS?

Don’t fret! You have many options, from vegan ramen to sushi (yes!), but even if

they’re just a Google search away, it’s not so easy to find them organically in the city. I

suggest you make a Google map list before you arrive. Also, as most Japanese people

don’t know the difference between vegan, vegetarian, and pescatarian, etc., it might be

better to list out exactly what you can't eat.

WHAT ESTABLISHMENTS

CAN I VISIT THAT ACCEPT

OTHER FORMS OF

PAYMENTS BESIDES CASH?

More stores in Japan now accept credit

cards. An easy find is the top floors of

any mall. Malls generally accept credit

cards and ban indoor smoking. It’s a

double win!

I actually rarely use cash nowadays

when I go out. Keep in mind that I live

in Tokyo! It's very different in the

countryside.

WHAT ARE SOME OTHER

RELIABLE WAYS TO GET CASH

BESIDES FROM AN ATM AT A

CONVENIENCE STORE?

The best way to get yen is from a 7-11 ATM,

but if that’s not an option, here are some

fairly unknown ways you can get cash

(besides going to banks and currency

exchange counters):

・If you have foreign currency, you can head

to Don Quijote and buy something using

that. Your change will be in yen.

・If you have foreign currency, you can head

to Daikokuya, a store that sells discounted

name-brand products, and exchange your

currency there.

P.S. If you have a friend in Japan, you can

offer to Venmo home currency for JPY.

WHY ARE THE LIVING SPACES

SO SMALL?

There's quite a lot of reasons, but simply put:

every year, more people are moving into the

cities, making land prices skyrocket, amongst

other issues. On the other hand, renovation

is relatively cheap and easy to get approval

for. Construction companies work quickly,

too. I've seen an entire apartment complex

finish in 1 month.

All combined, a person could buy whatever

land they can and hire a company to fashion

a home within that space, which is usually

small.

Of course, it would be silly of me to ignore

Japanese principles of minimalism. The

KonMari Method should tell you everything

you need.

33

Teresa has been living in Japan since August 2015.

She loves design, dogs & cats, and food.


art by: @vege.pop

Food

Popular western cuisine that has been made,

Folks

長 ネギと 鶏 もも 肉 パイ

5~6 人 分

step 1) 鍋 に450mlの 水 とコンソメを 入 れ 沸 騰

(ふっとう)させます。その 中 に 鶏 もも 肉 を 加 え、

蓋 をしたまま 弱 火 で10 分 煮 ます。 鳥 もも 肉 を 鍋 から

皿 に 移 し、 残 った 水 分 は 水 差 しに 注 ぎます。

step 2)フライパンを 弱 火 にかけ 無 塩 バター

25gを 入 れ、ネギを2 分 間 柔 らかくなるまで 軽 く 炒 め

ます。さらにニンニクを 入 れ1 分 間 炒 め 続 けます。

残 りの 無 塩 バターを 加 え、 溶 けてから 薄 力 粉 を 入 れ

満 遍 なく1 分 間 続 けて 混 ぜます。

step 3)フライパンに 牛 乳 を 少 しずつ 混 ぜな

がら 加 えます。それから 水 差 しにとっておいたスト

ック250mlも 同 じように 少 しずつ 加 えながら 混 ぜま

す。お 好 みで 白 ワインを 入 れ(2−3 大 さじ)、 満 遍

なく 滑 らかになるまで 混 ぜ 続 けます。それから3 分

間 弱 火 で 煮 ます。

塩 こしょうで 味 を 整 え、フライパンから 大 きなボー

ルに 移 します。 表 面 が 乾 かないようにラップをかけ

て 冷 まします。 オーブンを200 度 にし、トレイを 入

れたまま 加 熱 します。パイシートを 袋 から 出 し5mm

の 厚 さに 伸 ばし、パイ 皿 より4cm 余 るほどの 大 きさ

にしパイ 皿 に 敷 き 込 みます。 鳥 もも 肉 と 厚 切 りのハ

ムを3cmずつの 大 きさにカットし、 冷 ましたソース

と 混 ぜ、パイシートの 上 に 入 れます。 残 ったパイシ

ートを 上 に 置 き、 手 で 周 りをしっかり 閉 めます。パ

イシートの 周 囲 を 切 り 落 とし、ナイフで 真 ん 中 に 小

さな 穴 を 開 け、 全 体 に 溶 き 卵 を 薄 くかけます。

step 4)オーブンで 温 めたトレイの 中 央 に

置 き、35〜40 分 間 焼 きます。 目 印 はパイの 全 体

が 黄 金 色 になることです。

Photo by: @sl__mitchell 34

R E C I P E

tested, and tasted by expats all over Japan.

These commonly found western recipes have

been translated for you to try at home! Have

fun and stay cookin'!

無 塩 バター 75g

鶏 もも 肉 2

長 ネギ 2 本

にんにく 15g

コンソメ 1 個

薄 力 粉 55g

牛 乳 200ml

生 クリーム 150ml

厚 切 りのハム 150g

塩 コショウ 少 々

溶 き 卵 1 個

冷 凍 食 品 のパイシート 4 枚

好 みで 白 ワイン 2−3 大 さじ


leek pie

and

5 to 6

serves

Unsalted butter

75g

Chicken breast

3

Leeks trimmed

2

Crushed garlic

15g

Chicken stk.

450ml

Plain flour

55g

Double cream

150ml

Thickly carved ham

150g

and pepper to taste.

Salt

Beaten egg

1

Frozen pie sheets

4

Tbsp white wine (opt.)

2/3

art by: @vege.pop

Popular western cuisine that has been

Food

Folks

made, tested, and tasted by expats all

over Japan. These commonly found

western recipes have been translated

for you to try at home! Have fun and

stay cookin'!

creamy chicken, ham

R E C I P E

35

Photo by: @sl__mitchell

200ml Milk Flour

1. Heat the chicken stock in a lidded saucepan. Add the chicken

breast and bring to a low simmer. Cover with a lid and cook for

10 minutes. Remove the chicken breasts from the water with

tongs and place on a plate. Pour the cooking liquor into a large

jug.

2. Melt 25g/1oz of butter in a large, heavy-based saucepan over

low heat. Stir in the leeks and fry gently for 2 minutes, stirring

occasionally until just softened. Add the garlic and cook for a

further minute. Add the remaining butter and stir in the flour as

soon as the butter has melted. Cook for 30 seconds, stirring

constantly.

3. Slowly pour the milk into the pan, just a little at a time, stirring

well between each adding. Gradually add 250ml/10fl oz of the

reserved stock and the wine, if using, and stirring until the sauce

is smooth and thickened slightly. Bring to a gentle simmer and

cook for 3 minutes.

4. Season with salt and pepper. Remove from the heat and stir in

the cream. Pour into a large bowl and cover the surface of the

sauce with cling film to prevent a skin forming. Set aside to cool.

5. Preheat the oven to 200C/180C Fan/Gas.

6. Put the flour and butter, for the pastry, in a food processor and

blend on the pulse setting until the mixture resembles fine

breadcrumbs. With the motor running, add the beaten egg and

water and blend until the mixture forms a ball. Portion off

250g/9oz pastry for the lid.

7. Roll the remaining pastry out on a lightly floured surface, turning

the pastry frequently until around 5mm/¼in thick and 4cm/1½in

larger than the pie dish. Lift the pastry over the rolling pin and

place it gently into the pie dish. Press the pastry firmly up the

sides, making sure there are no air bubbles. Leave the excess

pastry overhanging the sides.

8. Cut the chicken breasts into 3cm/1¼in pieces. Stir the chicken

and ham into the cooled sauce. Pour the chicken filling into the

pie dish. Brush the rim of the dish with beaten egg. Roll out the

reserved pastry for the lid.

9. Cover the pie with the pastry lid and press the edges together

firmly to seal. Trim any excess pastry.

10. Make a small hole in the centre of the pie with the tip of a knife.

Glaze the top of the pie with beaten egg. Bake on the preheated

tray in the centre of the oven for 35–40 minutes, or until the pie

is golden brown all over and the filling is piping hot.


ベーキングタイム

ベリーベリーパイ

とっても 楽 2~4 人 分

冷 凍 食 品 のパイシート

砂 糖 120g

レモンジュース

4 枚

大 さじ1

冷 凍 食 品 のベリー 1パック500g

step 1) 鍋 にミックスベリー、 砂 糖 とレモンジュース

を 入 れ、 中 火 で5−10 分 間 煮 ます。 砂 糖 の 量 を 確 認 しなが

ら、 足 りない 場 合 は 追 加 してね。そして 一 度 火 を 止 めます。

step 2) 鍋 から100ccの 液 体 を 分 けて 小 さなボールに

移 します。その 中 に 片 栗 粉 を 入 れ、きれいに 溶 けるまで 混 ぜ

ます。

step 3) 鍋 をまた 中 火 にし、 片 栗 粉 のソースを 少 しず

つ 入 れながら2−5 分 間 とろっとなるまで 混 ぜます。ベリー

を 崩 さないように 気 をつけてね。 鍋 を 火 からとり、バターを

入 れて 混 ぜます。それから15 分 間 冷 まします。

step 4)パイシートを 袋 から 出 し3mmの 厚 さに 伸 ば

します。パイ 皿 に 敷 き 込 み、4cm 余 るほどの 大 きさにしま

す。その 上 に 冷 ましたベリーソースを 入 れます。パイ 皿 にパ

イシートを 置 き、 残 りの 生 地 でラティストップ( 上 のアミア

ミ)を 準 備 します。フォークで 空 気 穴 をあけ、パイの 上 にラ

ティストップを 載 せます。 溶 き 卵 を 塗 り、グラニュー 糖 をま

ぶし、220 度 で 予 熱 を 済 ませたオーブンで30 分 間 焼 きま

す。(オーブンによって 時 間 の 差 があります) 途 中 、 満 遍 な

く 焼 き 目 がついたら 出 来 上 がり。 足 りない 場 合 は 時 間 を 追 加

してね。

R E C I P E

Shantell’s

片 栗 粉 大 さじ4

無 塩 バター 大 さじ2

砂 糖 15g

溶 き 卵 1 個

Kitchen

Shantell’s

Kitchen

タピオカ ミルクティー

タピオカ

Photo by: @sl__mitchell

お 湯 適 量

ブラックタピオカ

( 乾 燥 ) 500g

黒 砂 糖 大 さじ3

蜂 蜜 大 さじ3

ミルクティー

お 湯 適 量

紅 茶 ( 濃 い) 適 量

牛 乳 適 量

step 1) 鍋 にお 湯 を 沸 かし、 沸 騰 したらタ

ピオカを 入 れます。キッチンタイマーを35 分 にセ

ットし、 中 火 で 煮 て 時 々かき 混 ぜます。( 途 中 で

食 べてみて 芯 がなければOKです)。

step 2) 沸 かしながら、 黒 砂 糖 と 蜂 蜜 を 加

え、 混 ぜます。

step 3)キッチンタイマーがなったら、 火

を 止 めます。 蓋 をし、シロップに10〜15 分 間 ひ

たします。

step 4)タピオカをザルに 入 れ、 流 水 で 冷

やします。

step 5) 濃 い 紅 茶 を 作 り、 冷 蔵 庫 で 冷 まし

ます。

step 6)グラスにお 好 みでタピオカを 入

れ、 紅 茶 と 牛 乳 、シロップを 注 ぎます。

R E C I P E

art by: @vege.pop

36


of assorted berries

500g

Tbsp. of Corn starch

4

Tbsp. of unsalted butter

2

g Sugar to spread on top

15

Water

Hot

black Tapioca

500g

(dried)

Brown sugar

3Tbsp.

water

Hot

tea (dark)

Black

Baking Time

Triple Berry Pie

Serves 4 to 6

120 g Sugar

1 Tbsp. lemon juice

1Large egg

1.Cook Berries: Add berries, sugar and lemon juice to a

large saucepan over medium heat. Simmer, until warm and

juicy, about 5-10 minutes, gently stirring occasionally.

2.Thicken filling: Spoon out about 1/2 cup of the juice from

the pan into a bowl. Stir cornstarch into the juice until

smooth. Bring pot of berries back to a simmer and slowly

pour in the cornstarch. Gently stir mixture (being careful not

to mash the berries), until thickened, about 2-5 minutes.

3. Cool and add to pie shell. Remove from heat and stir in

the butter. Allow to cool for 15 minutes.

4. Pour mixture into unbaked pie shell and add lattice top or

a whole top with holes for steam to escape. (See directions

for lattice crust below).

5.Pinch the edges of the top and bottom pie crusts together

and crimp the edge. Brush a thin layer of beaten egg white

over the top of the pie and sprinkle lightly with sugar.

6.Bake at 400 degrees F (200 C) for 40-45 minutes. Check

it after about 25 minutes and place a piece of tinfoil over it

if the top crust is getting too brown.

7. Cook the pie for 1 hour and enjoy !

Photo by: @sl__mitchell

Shantell’s

Kitchen

Tapioca | Milk Tea

R E C I P E

4 Pie Sheets

Milk

R E C I P E

3 Tbsp. Honey

1.Boil water. Add the tapioca pearls. Once the water boils

again, start the timer for 35 minutes. Lower heat to medium

and stir occasionally.

2.While boiling, add the brown sugar and honey. Mix the

syrup well.

3.Once the timer goes off, turn the fire off. Keep the lid on

and let the pearls sit in the syrup for 10-15 mins.

4.After 10 mins, rinse the tapioca in cold water until no

longer hot.

5.Make strong black tea. Cool in the fridge.

6.Add the tapioca, black tea, milk, and syrup to your

preference.

Shantell’s

Kitchen

37

art by: @vege.pop


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J E T

S e t t e r s


h


FAS

T H E

District



FAS

T H E

District


Reviewed by,

D A I K I S H I M I Z U

F A S H I O N I N

J A P A N

HION

SHIMIZU」

「DAIKI

Daiki Shimizu studied business as

a university undergraduate. Upon

graduation, he went to fashion

school, where he learned how to

make his own clothes. After

fashion school, he worked at

various department stores,

apparel shops, and street shops,

where he helped thousands of

customers with their fashion

decisions. Now, he is a consultant

for farm stay guesthouses by day

and a fashion adviser by night,

where he provides advice to his

colleagues and close friends on

the current trends, one sock at a

time.

46



Covid-19 has been hurting

plenty of industries, both

domestically and

internationally. The fashion

industry in Japan has also taken

a big hit. However, putting

some of our focus on what we

could wear when it finally

becomes okay to venture

outside again can give us some

hope while living in our

compact housing units.

I remember as if it was just

yesterday, when I heard a

female classmate say that

fashion is fun. "The feeling of

coordinating the right clothes

to meet someone or to go out

and shop while being

surrounded by similarly

fashionable people makes it all

the better." What she said

opened my eyes and created a

deeper meaning to what the

word fashion is to me. Now, I

often think of it in terms of

“activity” and “experience.”

Daiki’s Recommendations:

“Stella McCartney”

When I think of the word

“Sustainability,” the fashion

designer Stella McCartney

immediately comes to mind.

Reason: The designer is known

for pioneering more

environmentally friendly

clothes in the fashion world.

This is represented by her

latest fashion line with clothes

made from plants. She has also

avoided use of any animal

products. For the 2020SS

Men’s Fashion Collection, she

used a picture of the world that

was taken from an orbiting

satellite and put it on a jacket.

How can you enjoy fashion

during Covid-19? The trend in

the fashion world is

“Sustainability.” Fashion has

moved in the direction of

decreased pollution and

diminished use of animal

products.

W R I T T E N B Y ,

DAIKI

SHIMIZU

48



Sustainability with Corona:

How to be fashionable while

still being at home for long

hours.

What would you say if a friend

asked, "What are you doing for

fun while staying at home?"

Just imagine their face when

you excitedly tell them, "I’m

having fun with fashion!"

“Sustainability” in fashion

comes in many forms, such as

“color,” “pattern,” “material,”

and “type.” An example of this

is the use of botanical patterns,

also known as “Natural Mood,”

formal short suits, and classic

denim clothing used during the

2020SS fashion collection

show.

Summer must be coming soon,

since I’m sweating more than

usual. “Sustainability with

Corona” will be the new fashion

to look forward to wearing in

the summer, so why not start

getting prepared for it now?

2. Recommended items: Onepiece

jumpsuit | Long T-shirt

that can be turned into a

dress.

Covid-19 fashion theme:

Many of us have been spending

more time in our private

bastions than we’re accustomed

to this year. Around summer,

there might be more chances to

get out of the house for a quick

walk around the park or to a

local coffee shop. That’s why I

recommend either a one-piece

jumpsuit or a Long T-shirt that

can be turned into a dress.

Nothing beats relaxing clothing

that you can wear at home and

go out for a quick walk without

having to change at all and still

look your best! A simple jacket

over your clothes will quickly

turn that casual one-piece into

business casual, making it even

easier for people who need to

go to work at short notice. This

trend is also called Nature

Mood.

3.The Secret to Coordinating.

W R I T T E N B Y ,

DAIKI

SHIMIZU

The secret to being able to go

from casual wear to business

wear quickly is in the feet, or

rather, in the shoes. There’s no

need to change clothes!

Instead, wear sneakers for a

casual look and put on heels for

a more business casual attire.

50


4.Summary

In summary, the whole world is experiencing some dark times. That

means we need to adapt to our surroundings and try to enjoy what we

can. For me, fashion is something that you can enjoy while feeling

good inside and outside. It’s also nice when someone stops you on the

street to ask, “Where did you get those great clothes?”

The important thing is not the actual brand, or even following the

latest fashion trend. It’s wearing what you like! Japan is famous for its

seasonality, which means we have four different types of fashionable

wear to enjoy. Once the wave of Covid-19 has passed, I hope that you

can wear your favorite clothing while traveling Japan!

W R I T T E N B Y ,

DAIKI

SHIMIZU

50


In difficult times,

fashion is always outrageous.


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