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Academic Assembly 2020

Engineering for Humanity: Mary C. Boyce, Dean of Columbia Engineering at The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, faculty and a fellow student will discuss the opportunities and challenges that you, as members of the Columbia Engineering Class of 2024, will have to make your own mark at Columbia and beyond. This event is required for all Columbia Engineering first-year students.

Engineering for Humanity: Mary C. Boyce, Dean of Columbia Engineering at The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, faculty and a fellow student will discuss the opportunities and challenges that you, as members of the Columbia Engineering Class of 2024, will have to make your own mark at Columbia and beyond. This event is required for all Columbia Engineering first-year students.

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New Student Orientation Program

Columbia Engineering

Impact the World!

Academic Assembly

August 31 st , 2020


Dean Mary Boyce

Dean of The Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science

Morris A. and Alma Schapiro Professor

Mary C. Boyce has served as Dean of Engineering at The Fu

Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science at

Columbia University in the City of New York and also the Morris

A. and Alma Schapiro Professor of Engineering since 2013. Prior

to joining Columbia, Dean Boyce served on the faculty of the

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) for over 25 years,

leading the Mechanical Engineering Department from 2008 to

2013.

Dean Boyce leads the education and research mission of

Columbia Engineering with more than 220 faculty, 1600

undergraduate students, 2700 graduate students, and 100

postdoctoral fellows. She is committed to facilitating and

celebrating the creativity and innovation of students and faculty,

and enabling collaborations across the University. She has


launched a Columbia MakerSpace, created Ignition Grants to

support student physical and digital ventures, expanded

undergraduate research opportunities, initiated Columbia Design

Challenges, and established the Senior Design Expo. She also has

inaugurated the School’s participation in the Columbia Startup

Lab, and expanded entrepreneurship programming and the

Columbia Venture Competition in close partnership with the

University’s Columbia Entrepreneurship Initiative. She is a strong

advocate for enabling interdisciplinary research collaborations

across the School and the University, including extensively

transforming research spaces and expanding the faculty body in

cross-cutting fields as wide ranging as Data Science, Nano

Science, Advanced Materials and Devices, Sensing and Imaging,

Sustainability, and Engineering in Medicine. The education and

research mission of Columbia Engineering are guided by our

collective aspiration to bring engineering impact to human lives:

Columbia Engineering for Humanity.

Her own research focuses on advanced materials and mechanics,

particularly in the areas of multi-scale mechanics of polymers and

soft composites, both those that are man-made and those formed

naturally. She has been widely recognized for her scholarly

contributions to this field, including election as a fellow of the

American Society of Mechanical Engineer (ASME), the American

Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of

Engineering. Most recently, Dean Boyce has been recognized

with the ASME 2020 Timoshenko Medal, considered the highest

scholarly recognition in the field of applied mechanics.

Dean Boyce earned her BS degree in engineering science and

mechanics from Virginia Tech, and her MS and PhD degrees in

mechanical engineering from MIT.


Vice Dean Barclay Morrison

Vice Dean of Undergraduate Programs

Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Barclay Morrison, Ph.D. is a professor of Biomedical

Engineering, director of the Neurotrauma and Repair

Laboratory, and serves as Vice Dean of Undergraduate

Programs for the Engineering School at Columbia University.

As vice dean, he is responsible for school-wide undergraduate

academic policy, co-chairing the Committee on Instruction

and serves as a primary liaison between the student body and

administration. He teaches Quantitative Physiology II, which

is a required course of the Biomedical Engineering major. His

research focus is on the biomechanics of traumatic brain injury

(TBI) at the tissue level to better prevent brain injuries, as well

as on the cellular pathways responsible for post-traumatic cell

dysfunction in the search for novel therapies. He has published

over 80 peer-reviewed scientific manuscripts, serves as a

council member and President of the International Research

Council on Biomechanics of Injury, is a board member of

Football Research Inc., and is associate editor for the Journal


of Neurotrauma. He received his B.S. in biomedical

engineering from Johns Hopkins University, his Ph.D. in

bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania, and

continued his academic training as a post-doctoral fellow in the

Clinical Neurosciences department at Southampton

University, UK before joining the faculty of Columbia

University in 2003. Dr. Morrison is a past recipient of the

Rickard Skalak Best Paper Award given by the American

Society for Mechanical Engineers for a publication in the

Journal of Biomechanical Engineering and the John Paul Stapp

Award for the best paper in the Stapp Car Crash Journal.


Professor Matei Ciocarlie

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Matei Ciocarlie is an Associate Professor of Mechanical

Engineering at Columbia University. His main interest is in

robotics, looking to discover how artificial mechanisms can

interact with the world as skillfully as biological organisms.

Matei’s current work focuses on robot motor control,

mechanism and sensor design, planning and learning, all

aiming to demonstrate complex motor skills such as dexterous

manipulation. Matei completed his Ph.D. at Columbia

University in New York; his doctoral dissertation was the

winner of the 2010 Robotdalen Scientific Award. Before

joining the faculty at Columbia, he was a Research Scientist and

then Group Manager at Willow Garage, Inc., a privately funded

Silicon Valley robotics research lab, and then a Senior Research

Scientist at Google, Inc. In recognition of his work, Matei has

been awarded the Early Career Award by the IEEE Robotics

and Automation Society, a Young Investigator Award by the

Office of Naval Research, a CAREER Award by the National

Science Foundation, and a Sloan Research Fellowship by the

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.


Ketsia Zinga

Biomedical Engineering ‘21

Ketsia is a senior majoring in Biomedical Engineering. She

spent the last three years tutoring local students with the

Tutoring & Learning Center and now works as an

undergraduate researcher in the Gang Labs where her current

project uses DNA origami nano-lattices to study ways of

mitigating X-ray damage to DNA. Ketsia is also involved in

Columbia's chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers,

the Questbridge-First Gen Low-Income Partnership, RUF

Christian ministry, as a Peer Connector with the Center for

Global Engagement, and as an undergrad rep on the BME

Committee for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. She has also

had gigs in the Glee Club, arranging music for the 24th Annual

Varsity Show, and as a producer for The Black Motherhood

Project film. Ketsia plans to pursue a PhD and career as a

university educator.


James Wang

Computer Science ‘22

James Wang is a junior at Columbia Engineering studying

computer science and serves as the 2019-2020 Columbia

Engineering Student Council Academic Affairs

Representative. On campus, James is also involved with

machine learning research, Columbia Organization of Rising

Entrepreneurs (CORE) and Global China Connection. In his

free time, he enjoys trying hiking, photography, and crafting

robots. Welcome to Columbia!


Code of Conduct

Engineering Student Council Academic Affairs

Representative, James Wang, will introduce the undergraduate

Honor Code and will lead the student body in reciting this

pledge.

Code of Honor

I affirm that I will not plagiarize, use unauthorized materials,

or give or receive illegitimate help on assignments, papers, or

examinations. I will also uphold equity and honesty in the

evaluation of my work and the work of others. I do so to

sustain a community built around this Code of Honor.

Pledge

We, the undergraduate students of Columbia University,

hereby pledge to value the integrity of our ideas and the ideas

of others by honestly presenting our work, respecting

authorship, and striving not simply for answers but for

understanding in the pursuit of our common scholastic goals.

In this way, we seek to build an academic community governed

by our collective efforts, diligence, and Code of Honor.

If you have not completed the Academic Integrity tutorial and signed the

pledge online, we encourage you to please do so before the start of classes.

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