SLO LIFE Magazine AprMay 2021

slolife

LIFE

SLOmagazine

REAL ESTATE

BY THE NUMB

STUDENT

SPOTLIGHT

TAKING IN

THE VIEW

TASTE

PIZZA

SEASONAL

FAVORITES

HEALTH

TRENDS

APR/MAY 2021

SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM

SAN LUIS OBISPO

HOT & HAPPENING

EXPLORING

THE COAST

NEWS BRIEFS

LOCAL

EVENTS

NOW

HEAR

THIS

MID-CENTURY

MODERN

DATE

NIGHT

MEET

JENNIFER PORCHER

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 1


MORE THAN JUST

INK ON PAPER

Design | Print | Mail | Appare|

Web | Promo

2226 Beebee St, San Luis Obispo, CA | 805.543.6844 | prpco.com

2 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


M O D E R N • C L A S S I C • J E W E L R Y

1 1 2 8 G A R D E N S T R E E T S A N L U I S O B I S P O W W W . B A X T E R M O E R M A N . C O M

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 3


THANK

YOU.

Thank you for wearing face coverings, maintaining physical

distancing, washing hands thoroughly, staying home when

feeling ill and using SLO Transit for essential travel only.

Thank you SLO for preserving the health and wellness of our

community. We appreciate you.

4 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 5


Emergency

care is just

a call away.

Tele-ER Visits with Local Doctors

Our emergency services team sees more than 57,000 patients a year. That

experience allows us to quickly evaluate patients and determine the best

treatment options. We’re here 24 hours a day to answer your call.

1. Call 805-546-7990. Talk

with a nurse or emergency

team member about your

health concern.

2. Book your Tele-ER

appointment with a

local ER doctor. It’s

helpful if you have a

thermometer nearby.

3. Get your smartphone,

tablet or computer

ready. That’s it! Don’t

delay your care.

For a Tele-ER visit, just

call 805-546-7990

For life-threatening emergencies, go to the nearest hospital or call 911.

TenetHealthCentralCoast.com/Telehealth

6 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


“They’re Amazing to Work With”

“American Riviera Bank gave us one of our first loans, and they’ve just been

amazing. They give me the best rates, and they’re amazing to work with. I feel

like I’m partnered almost with a family here to help me grow my business.”

— Tomas Medeiros, Jr., California Mobile Kitchens

What does True Community Banking mean? It means working together

to find solutions under even the most trying of circumstances.

EQUIPMENT LOANS | BUSINESS RESERVE LINES OF CREDIT | SBA504 AND 7A LOANS

Preferred SBA Lender

AmericanRivieraBank.com • 805.965.5942

Paso Robles • San Luis Obispo • Goleta • Santa Barbara • Montecito

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 7


CONTENTS

Volume

22

24

26

12

Number 2

Apr/May 2021

30

Briefs

View

Q&A

MEET YOUR

NEIGHBOR

12

PUBLISHER’S

MESSAGE

14

16

18

20

Info

Sneak Peek

Inbox

Timeline

8 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021

28

NOW HEAR THIS

38 Author


APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 9


| CONTENTS

56

60

Real Estate

Health

68

TASTE

74

WINE NOTES

40

ARTIST

42

Explore

44

On the Rise

78

Brew

46

Dwelling

82 Happenings

10 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Make the New Normal

Better.

Custom Landscape Design

& Construction

805.574.0777

sagelandscapes.net

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 11


| PUBLISHER’S MESSAGE

Early in the afternoon of December 7th, 1941, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was finishing

up lunch on the second floor of the White House when the telephone rang. Immediately

after hanging up, he began crafting a speech. And, as anyone in the business of writing

knows, the real work is not in the drafting, but in the revising.

That speech, which FDR delivered to a joint session of Congress the next day, was only

a few minutes long—about the length of this letter—but it was remembered for just

one word.

Now considered by many the greatest revision of a first draft in American history, FDR crossed out “world history” and replaced

it with “infamy.”

Yesterday, December 7, 1941, a date which will live in infamy . . .

Since then, there have not been many infamous days. Most days do not live beyond the twenty-four hours they existed in the

first place. But I keep going back to one: March 13th, 2020.

I remember it because it was a Friday, and my son’s flag football team I was coaching at the time was gearing up for a big game

that night. Then, my email inbox started overflowing. “The game’s canceled,” it said. Then, another. “School’s canceled,” it said.

Again, and again, the messages cascaded, toppling over one another, piling on frantically like a fumbled pigskin.

There were no dramatic photographs of bombed-out ships and mountain-sized flames burning in the South Pacific. It took

a long while—a year, almost to the day—to finally step back onto that field again with the kids. And when we did, I was

flattened by a wave of emotion as if a defensive end was crushing my blind side.

I stood back for a few minutes to take in the scene. That’s when I realized the feelings I was experiencing weren’t for me. They

were for the kids. I was mourning for them and the time they lost. When we were last together, they were eleven years old. Now

they’re twelve.

Someday they’ll add that word, “infamy.”

For now, all they can do is the one thing, the only thing any of us has ever been able to do: move forward.

These days, we no longer gather around radios hanging on every word uttered by presidents. Today, the dial moves in all

directions—millions of channels. Billions of voices. Large and small. It’s the small ones I find most compelling. And hearing

their laughter on the football field again is at last pushing infamy further away, into the rearview mirror.

Thank you to everyone who has had a hand in producing this issue of SLO LIFE Magazine and, most of all, to our advertisers

and subscribers—we couldn’t do it without you.

Live the SLO Life!

Infamy

Tom Franciskovich

tom@slolifemagazine.com

p.s. If you’d like to read more visit me at tomfranciskovich.com

12 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


© CAMBRIA 2020 || 404585_AD

PORTRUSH

PERFECT FOR THE KITCHEN BLUES

BRIDPORT


With our vast palette, including 20 new designs that celebrate our 20th

anniversary, the sky’s the limit to what you can do when you’ve got the blues.

Be bold. Be inspired. Be revolutionary with Cambria natural quartz surfaces.

Find your new kitchen or bath at San Luis Marble.

805-544-9133

SLMarble.com

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 13


SLO LIFE

magazine

4251 S. HIGUERA STREET, SUITE 800, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA

SLOLIFEMAGAZINE.COM

info@slolifemagazine.com

(805) 543-8600 • (805) 456-1677 fax

PUBLISHER

Tom Franciskovich

Elder Placements realizes the

IMPORTANCE of listening to the

client, in order to find the appropriate:

Independent Living

Assisted Living

Alzheimer’s & Dementia Care Homes

Let their experienced Certified Senior

Advisors take you on a tour to find the

Retirement Home or Community that

fits your loved ones Medical, Financial

and Social needs, at NO Cost to you.

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Sheryl Franciskovich

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Charlotte Alexander

Jeff Al-Mashat

Brant Myers

Lauren Harvey

Paden Hughes

Zara Khan

Jaime Lewis

Andria McGhee

Joe Payne

Brian Schwartz

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Arpad Czapp

David Lalush

Mark Nakamura

Anh Nguyen

Jennifer Olson

Vanessa Plakias

CONTRIBUTIONS

Have some comments or feedback about something you’ve read here?

Or, do you have something on your mind that you think everyone should

know about? Submit your story ideas, events, recipes, and announcements

by visiting us online at slolifemagazine.com and clicking “Share Your Story” or

emailing us at info@slolifemagazine.com. Be sure to include your full name

and city for verification purposes. Contributions chosen for publication may

be edited for clarity and space limitations.

ADVERTISING

If you would like to advertise, please contact Tom Franciskovich by phone

at (805) 543-8600 or by email at tom@slolifemagazine.com or visit us

online at slolifemagazine.com/advertise and we will send you a complete

media kit along with testimonials from happy advertisers.

Nicole Pazdan, CSA,

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Ready to live the SLO Life all year long? It’s quick and easy! Just log on to

slolifemagazine.com/subscribe. It’s just $24.95 for the year. And don’t

forget to set your friends and family up with a subscription, too. It’s the

gift that keeps on giving!

NOTE

The opinions expressed within these pages do not necessarily reflect those of

SLO LIFE Magazine. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole

or in part without the express written permission of the publisher.

Contact us today for FREE placement assistance.

(805) 546-8777

elderplacementprofessionals.com

14 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021

CIRCULATION, COVERAGE, AND ADVERTISING RATES

Complete details regarding circulation, coverage, and advertising

rates, space, sizes and similar information are available to prospective

advertisers. Please call or email for a media kit. Closing date is 30 days

before date of issue.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

info@slolifemagazine.com

4251 S. Higuera Street, Suite 800

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Letters chosen for publication may be edited for clarity and space limitations.


APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 15


| SNEAK PEEK

ON THE COVER

behind the scenes

JENNIFER PORCHER

BY VANESSA PLAKIAS

I met Jennifer at her charming home near the Village

in Arroyo Grande. Her son, Jack, was there and her

granddaughter, Elaina, answered the door. What an adorable

living doll. She’s only three, but was an outgoing, polite, and

welcoming host. The light was so beautiful shining through

the front view window, we decided to start the shoot there.

Plus, I love a good teal couch!

As we walked through Jennifer’s home towards her backyard, I

noticed a lot of heart art. I commented that one of my favorite

heart pieces was one I bought twenty years ago through the

Sundance Catalogue. It’s the seven points of love recipe. Jennifer

also had a seven points of love work of art on her wall. Then she

explained the seven points are all our heart chakras.

We talked about

working out and

gardening as a great

reset during stressful

times. We admired

her agaves and fruit

trees. Her lemons

decided to grow ten

times their size this

year. She’s says all

the neighbors stop

and comment on

them lately. I thought

they were grapefruit!

There was such good sunshine energy in Jennifer’s backyard.

Easy to bring on the smiles and good mood. One shot of

Jennifer turning quickly reminded me of a hair ad from the

80’s. She said, “Yes! Timotei,” and we both started to laugh.

SLO LIFE

16 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 17


| INBOX

TAKE US WITH YOU!

Send your photos and comments to info@slolifemagazine.com or visit us online at slolifemagazine.com

VICHUQUEN LAKE, CHILE

CASTRO VALLEY, CALIFORNIA

PACHY, SOPHIA, SABRINA,

and ROSS DOVER

ARCHES NATIONAL PARK, UTAH

ORION

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

LINDSEY, ANDERS, and TOREN

TRAGO WALLACE

OREGON COAST

ORCAS ISLAND, WASHINGTON

HAILEY and LAURA HEIDEN

RID and PACE

18 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


41 21 ST ST, CAYUCOS

offered at: $1,525,000

935 CRESTON RD. PASO ROBLES

offered at: $445,000

333 TWIN RIDGE DR, SLO

offered at: $1,850,000

THE AVENUE CENTRAL COAST REALTY

REAL ESTATE | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | IN-HOUSE MARKETING

1333 JOHNSON AVE, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA 93401 | (805) 548 2670 | THEAVENUESLO.COM

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 19


| TIMELINE

LOCAL

february 4

San Luis Obispo County Administrative Officer Wade Horton issues a Proclamation of Local

Emergency as a result of damages caused by late-January winter storms to public agencies,

citizens, and businesses. The local proclamation follows a similar one Governor Gavin Newsom

issued the prior week for SLO County, and together they streamline the approval process

for funding through the California Disaster Assistance Act. The storms included damaging

winds, substantial precipitation, flooding, and erosion resulting in damage to infrastructure and

property within the County.

february 5

Cuesta College announces that its

accreditation has been reaffirmed for

the next seven years by the Accrediting

Commission of Community and

Junior Colleges of the Western

Association of Schools and Colleges.

A ten-person review team of faculty

and administrators from peer colleges

visited the community college

virtually last fall to evaluate Cuesta’s

effectiveness, quality of education, and

continuous quality improvement. The

college’s next comprehensive review

will not occur until 2027.

february 6

Anti-Semitic graffiti is discovered in front of

Alpha Epsilon Pi, a Jewish-student-affiliated

fraternity house at Cal Poly. It’s unclear who is

responsible for the vandalism, including swastikas

and other anti-Semitic images, but the incident

was reported to San Luis Obispo Police and an

investigation is underway. The offence occurred

on the Shabbat, a day of religious observance

in the Jewish community that takes place from

sundown on Friday until sundown on Saturday.

february 11

Paul Flores, the only “person of interest” ever

identified in the disappearance of Cal Poly

student Kristin Smart, is arrested by Los

Angeles Police on suspicion of being a felon in

possession of a firearm. He posted bond and was

released from custody the same day. The SLO

County Sheriff ’s Office confirms that the arrest

is the result of information obtained during

search warrants executed in 2020 at the home

of Flores, who now lives in San Pedro. He was

the last person seen with Smart in 1996 as she

returned to her Cal Poly dorm room after an

off-campus party.

february 18

Representative Salud Carbajal reintroduces a

bill in Congress to safeguard local public lands

and wild rivers. The Central Coast Heritage

Protection Act proposes to ban oil development,

logging, and other industrial activities in the

Los Padres National Forest and the Carrizo

Plain National Monument. The bill, originally

co-authored by Representative Lois Capps as

part of a larger package of conservation measures,

did not pass the Senate last year. It would protect

250,000 acres of federal public land across Santa

Barbara, Ventura, and San Luis Obispo counties,

and establish a 400-mile trail from Big Sur to the

Los Angeles County Line.

20 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


REVIEW

march 11

Following a nationwide search, the City of San Luis Obispo

announces the appointment of Rick Scott, “a law enforcement

leader focused on community engagement, transparency, and

trust,” to serve as the city’s next police chief. Scheduled to

report to work on May 13, he currently serves as assistant

police chief in North Richland Hills, Texas, a city of 70,000

in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Scott succeeds Deanna

Cantrell, who left last August to become police chief in

the City of Fairfield. Captain Jeff Smith, who has served as

interim police chief since then, has announced he will leave in

April to become police chief for the City of Pismo Beach.

March 2

The SLO City Council approves a General Plan amendment to

rezone a parcel of land to accommodate a neighborhood park,

fulfilling a need for open space, playground equipment, and

walking paths between Foothill Boulevard and Highway 101,

according to the City’s Parks and Recreation master plan. Almost

an acre in size, and currently home to a community garden,

the parcel is located at 533 Broad Street. Funding for the park

will come from developer fees, and the council will review final

project plans before construction begins.

march 10

The San Luis Obispo Planning Commission hosts a discussion of the

proposed Central Coast Layover Facility project to gather public input about

its potential environmental impact on the eight-acre site located behind

Miner’s Ace Hardware on Santa Barbara Street. SLO’s historic Railroad

District could undergo a major infrastructure change, adding a new rail yard,

storage, train tracks, buildings, and more. The project envisions a relocation of

the existing layover facility adjacent to the SLO Train Station to an expanded

march 16

The SLO County Sheriff ’s Office wrap up a search of the

Arroyo Grande home of Ruben Flores, father of Paul Flores,

who, according to Sheriff ’s officials, remains the “prime

suspect” in the disappearance of Kristin Smart from Cal Poly

in 1996. Officers used cadaver dogs and ground penetrating

radar during the two-day search, and hauled away a vehicle,

but released no new information on whether any evidence

was found in the “active and ongoing investigation.” Last

month, Paul Flores was arrested in Los Angeles County on

suspicion of being a felon in possession of a firearm.

march 18

The California Coastal Commission votes unanimously

to phase out off-highway vehicle (OHV) use at Oceano

Dunes State Vehicular Recreation Area in three years,

shortening a Commission staff recommendation that the

transition take place over five years. The historic decision,

the most sweeping change to the use of the Dunes in a

century, reflects staff concerns that OHV use is unlawful in

environmentally sensitive habitat areas under the California

Coastal Act. California State Parks, which operates the

Area, could phase out OHV use over three years, or

prohibit it all at once. An outpouring of public comments

came in prior to the decision and ranged from support for

recreational opportunities to concerns about environmental

justice from members of the public, government officials,

space at the mostly vacant Union Pacific property at 1320 Roundhouse Street. tribal officials, and public agency leaders. SLO LIFE

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 21


| BRIEFS

$841,000

The amount of funding the City of

San Luis Obispo and SLO Chamber

of Commerce provided directly to 181

businesses affected by the COVID-19

pandemic during a round of Small Business

Relief Fund grantmaking this year. Most

of the funds come from Local Revenue

Measure G-20.

MRWG

The Mesa Refinery Watch Group is a

community-based group of volunteers

who fought to stop Phillips 66 from

bringing crude oil trains to a proposed

rail terminal at its Nipomo Mesa refinery.

The group didn’t die with the failure of

that project, however. It continues to

monitor and report on the company’s

announced closure of the plant in 2023 at

mesarefinerywatch.com.

“Our thirty-five

volunteers have

a passion for

business.”

San Luis Obispo SCORE Chapter

chair Horace Morana responding to the

news that the national SCORE office

has honored the local chapter with its

third annual Diamond Star level award

for outstanding performance. The

achievement recognizes the excellence of

volunteers who provided free face-to-face

mentoring and workshops last year for

2,015 aspiring entrepreneurs and small

business owners throughout SLO County

and the Santa Maria Valley.

52 feet

The length of a new Cal Fire SLO trailer

designed to support the kitchen unit

where inmate firefighters cook meals. The

“mobile kitchen support vehicle” replaces a

smaller trailer that was built in 1964, and

is one of eight delivered recently to crews

in California just in time for fire season.

805-541-2544

The number to call for roundtrip, no-cost

transportation offered by the Regional

Transit Authority to and from the County’s

COVID-19 vaccination clinics for elderly

citizens who otherwise would have no way

of getting to their appointments.

7,504

The number of meals the SLO Food Bank

will be able to serve thanks to a group

of six girls who raised more than $1,000

selling plants in pots that they collected

from family members and neighbors. They

grew succulents in the containers, selling

them through Facebook in February, then

donating the funds raised to the Food Bank.

“I’m really looking

forward to the rest

of the community

being able to get

vaccinated.”

$18.25

million

The amount of State funding the Bob

Jones Trail is in line to receive that would

complete a section of the popular pathway

connecting Avila Beach to southern San

Luis Obispo. If a California Transportation

Commission staff recommendation is

approved this spring, the money will

connect the Ontario Road park’n’ride lot

and the Octagon Barn trailhead.

Vandenberg

Space Force

Base

The new moniker for Vandenberg Air

Force Base reflects its transition from

air to space, and the change is coming

soon. The base has served as part of the

Air Force since the 1950s even though it

has operated for years without any fixed

wing or rotary aircraft assigned to it. “Air

Force” base personnel also will transition

eventually to “Space Force” personnel.

SLO Fire Department paramedic and fire

engineer Alec Flatos following his second

COVID-19 shot. He was the first person in

SLO County to receive the vaccine.

“Edgar”

The newest staffer in the SLO District

Attorney’s office is a highly-trained

facility dog, a three-year-old lab/golden

retriever mix donated in March by Canine

Companions for Independence, who has

one job, and one job only: to help witnesses,

victims of crime, and those with special

needs make it through difficult preparations

for court, simply by being a good boy and letting

himself get scratched behind the ears. SLO LIFE

22 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


OUR 2020

AWARD

WINNERS

CELEBRATING WITH OUR 2020 SALES AWARD WINNERS!

EMERALD ELITE

Wendy Teixeira

Kurtis Wurster

Kim Wurster

Steven Ferrario

April Dean

Monica King

Colleen Clarke

Rob Rose

Lisa Mia

PLATINUM

Kate Hendrickson

Robin Mitchell Hee

Amy Kastning

Monique Carlton

GOLD

Denise Silva Topham

Shea Hutchinson

Diane Moroski

Sandra Lee

Stanley Craig

SILVER

George Sabo

Jenny Shaheen

Sal Ruiz

Judy Fitzgerald

Mary L. Moloney

Barbara Brooks

Holly Rodgers

Abbie Woodward

Rob Feder

Bernie Davidson

Jill Turnbow

Connor Storlie

Sean Hanlon

BHGREHAVEN.COM • 805.592.2050

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 23


| VIEW

COASTAL

MARVEL

BY MARK NAKAMURA

24 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


One of the most photographed bridges in the state is the iconic

Bixby Bridge on the northern end of Big Sur on Highway 1.

This project started in August 1931 and completed in November

1932 with a length of 714 feet, a height of 279 feet at a cost

of $200,000. About 45,000 sacks of cement were used for the

framework using a system of platforms and slings to transport

the sacks.

Five years before the highway linked Carmel and San Luis Obispo,

this masterpiece was finished.

My camping friends and I traveled up Highway 1 from our campsite

in Big Sur to see this bridge last year. Highway 1 was under

construction so we were led across this bridge with a lead car. We

turned off the caravan to the parking area on the north side of this

span. Normally overcrowded with tourists taking selfies with the

bridge and the Big Sur coastline in the background, on this day we

had very little traffic and few tourists in the late fall.

The fog was just lifting, partially

shrouding this engineering feat.

If you’re interested in capturing this

landscape, be sure to take advantage of,

not only shooting on the ocean side of the

highway looking south, but on the Old

Coast Road on the east side of the highway

looking toward the bridge and the ocean.

As a side note, I recommend taking the

Old Coast Road from Andrew Molera

State Park to the south and ending at the

Bixby Bridge. It takes you off the beaten

path through the Redwood groves. On

the way home, be sure to stop by the Shell

Station (the only one in Big Sur), home of

the Big Sur Bakery and treat yourself to a

delicious pastry or meal. SLO LIFE

MARK NAKAMURA, pursues

his passion in landscape

photography as well as

capturing the joys of

weddings, families, events,

and sports around the

Central Coast. Find him on

Instagram @nakamuraphoto

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 25


| Q&A

Just the Numbers

A couple of years ago, Cal Poly professor PRATISH PATEL drove

out to Oceano for the first time. That’s when he asked the question:

“How come this area’s not faring as well as the rest of the county?”

We had an opportunity to talk with him in depth about the eyeglazing

subjects of research methodology and empirical evidence

the other day. Here’s some of what he had to say…

So, Pratish, before we get started can you

please tell us where you’re from? Really?

You want to know about that? Okay. I was

born in a very small town in India, and

we immigrated to the US in ‘96. We came

here for a better life. So, the funny story

there is, when I was born in ‘81 my parents

applied for a visa, a green card. Our visa

was approved in ‘95. It took fourteen years.

That was the waitlist. When we came

here, we went to Georgia. It was my mom,

my dad, and my sister, and me. I went to

Georgia Tech where I got my chemical

engineering degree. And then to Cal to get

my PhD in finance. My first job was with

the Real Estate program at Cal Poly.

Real estate, huh? That’s right. I’m very

interested in urban economics, which looks

into how cities form, and the economics

of regulation and the dynamics between

cities. I think that’s the coolest part of real

estate. Most people, when they think of

real estate, they think about housing and

flipping houses or whatever. But I think

that the guts of it is that a house resides

within a city and, of course, different

cities are different. Every city has its own

character, and I love that. That’s why I love

San Luis Obispo. I truly consider it my

home. And I want to see it improve.

What would you do to solve the housing

problem here? In San Luis Obispo, we

have this idea that we want to only create

single family homes, and I think that idea

is probably not quite right for everyone.

I think we need to start thinking about

building a bit taller, because if we do that,

we can retain a lot of our open space. And

it’s actually a more sustainable thing to

do. I know people don’t like to hear that

because it doesn’t go with the architectural

vision here. But if there is the demand

to grow, and if you really want to solve

housing affordability issues, then we just

need to go taller. So, to preserve the hiking

trails and open space, you go up rather

than out.

Let’s talk about your work in Oceano.

Okay, so a couple of years ago, one of my

students who was participating in a lowincome

housing project said, “Professor

Patel, why don’t you come with us to

Oceano? I just want you to see what is

happening out there.” I went along and

was surprised to learn that it was not

faring as well as the rest of the county.

I wanted to find out why that was, so I

started looking into the demographics

and the history and the economy. It didn’t

make sense to me that it was lagging so far

behind its much wealthier neighbors. Then,

I came across the study done by SMG

that claimed that vehicular access [to the

dunes] adds $240 million in economic

impact annually. That’s when I said to

myself, “These number just don’t add up.

Something’s wrong here.”

What was wrong? They made some

Herculean assumptions, which were

compounded by significant math

mistakes. And, State Parks, which had

commissioned the study, claimed to

not have the raw data. That seemed

funny to me. I mean, how could you

pay someone to do a study and not have

access to the data? It actually took the

Sierra Club doing a bunch of Freedom

of Information Act requests to finally

obtain the data. After that, I wrote up

a counterargument to the study before

doing some research of my own, which

concluded that there was very little,

if any, economic impact coming from

vehicular access. And to be frank with

you, I was surprised by that finding,

because I did expect to find some. But

I didn’t find any. And that seemed to

really upset a lot of people. I found that

quite odd because it’s not my opinion.

It’s just the numbers. SLO LIFE

26 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Listen Up America

Haven’t you heard

what they say?

I’m Scared!

Stop it!

It won’t

hurt a bit.

Helping You Hear the Things You Love

Call us today

for your consultation

805541-1790

www.KarenScottAudiology.com

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 27


| NOW HEAR THIS

28 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Flow

BY JOE PAYNE

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KEVIN GRAYBILL

The tide goes in, the tide goes out; it’s the way of things. It’s a phenomenon that Kevin Graybill observes at home in Shell

Beach, but he’s known it since childhood. “I moved to the Central Coast a few years ago. I moved down from Seattle,

but I was born in San Diego,” Graybill explained. “Just culturally, familywise, we’re just beach people and sun people.”

The longtime self-taught guitarist and singer/songwriter lived in Seattle for years after college, he said, engaged in the “rat race”

of “start-up culture.” All the while Graybill continued to cultivate his music, writing songs and developing a style steeped in the

beach culture of his youth, while the cold and cloudy influence of the Pacific Northwest worked its way in, as well.

When Graybill moved to San Luis Obispo County, it was the right time both for him to leave Seattle and arrive on the Central

Coast and fully dedicate himself to his art. “The music that I’ve been playing and writing for the most part, kind of had a

beach/folk sound to it,” he said. “It was interesting that coming to SLO and putting myself out there with music, it kind of just

worked. It was like I was supposed to land in SLO.”

The SLO Coast audience, whether at wineries, bars, coffee shops, outdoor festivals, or right on the beach, embraced Graybill’s

sound. His beachy vibe is immediately reminiscent of Jack Johnson and other vibed-out acoustic guitar playing, smooth voiced

artists. But there’s another side to his sound as well, with shades of Nick Drake, inspired by his time up north.

This contrast is encapsulated in Graybill’s first studio project, two six-track EPs, titled “High Tide” and “Low Tide.” With a full

embrace from the SLO music community he joined and the audience he’s built over the years, Graybill received crowdfunding

support in January to finance the projects. The duel release comes out on April 16, but the first two singles from “High Tide”

and “Low Tide” are out already, “It’s Been A Long Day” and “How Much I Need You,” respectively, on all streaming platforms

and through his website, Graybillmusic.com.

The two EPs could be viewed as one album, Graybill explained, but he’s also attempting to embrace the way music is listened to

these days, in playlists mostly. “High Tide” is the sunny and optimistic acoustic beach/folk sound complete with crisp drum kits,

ripping guitar riffs, and Graybill’s familiar Martin acoustic guitar. “Low Tide,” however, is a more plaintive and introspective

exploration bathed in moonlight, soft bass, and hand percussion, and a more ethereal fingerstyle picking from the songwriter.

“I was equally passionate about both those styles of playing, but it just never felt like they fit together, but they’re both part of

me,” he explained. “There’s different parts of us dynamically as humans experiencing the human condition. There’s elation and

happiness and joy and then there’s depression and we kind of have these rising tides in our life and

our low tides so to speak.”

The duality in Graybill’s musical personality was made possible through a period of intense

collaboration with a roster of SLO music scene all-stars. Damon Castillo produced and recorded

both projects at his Laurel Lane Studios and Castillo can be heard taking guitar solos and playing

several other instruments throughout. Drummer Paul Griffith, a session player transplant known in

Nashville and New Orleans, is featured on “High Tide.” Beloved fixtures like Bob Liepman of Bob

and Wendy and guitar master Dorian Michael make appearances, as well as Central Coast vocalists

Jineanne Coderre and Katie Boeck. Dominic Castillo also plays Hammond B3 on a track.

The addition from SLO music royalty to Graybill’s vision provides a set of EP’s that sound both

fresh yet familiar, like we’ve heard these songs on the scene for years. And with Graybill’s already

dedicated audience on the Central Coast, we’re sure to hear these tunes for years to come. “This

would never have happened if it weren’t for SLO County and the community that I found here,” he

said. “It’s what the area wanted from me, because every time I put myself out there with music in

SLO, I’d get the answer, ‘Yes.’” SLO LIFE

JOE PAYNE is a

journalist, as well as a

lifelong musician and

music teacher, who

writes about the arts on

the Central Coast.

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 29


| MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR

30 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


PRO

FILE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY VANESSA PLAKIAS

Maybe it’s her entrepreneurial instincts, or perhaps it’s

just how she sees the world, but for JENNIFER PORCHER,

life is an adventure. Always unfolding, always revealing—

always teaching. Whether launching a business of her own

or helping someone on the Central Coast with theirs, she

has been known to innovate through the good times and

the bad. Most recently, she launched a podcast, Aba & Lolli.

Here is her story…

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 31


32 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


kay, Jennifer, let’s start from the

beginning. Where are you from?

I’m from here, this area. I was born in

Fresno, but we moved to Arroyo Grande

when I was two-and-a-half, so this is

my world. I went to elementary, junior

high, and high school right here. I have

two older sisters, and my parents, we’re

all still in the area. My father was in the Omilitary, and my mother was a banker. She worked for Mid-State Bank for

twenty-plus years. My father was very entrepreneurial. He had a little lawn

maintenance side business, and he also had Johnny’s Little Tailor Shop.

So, he’d sew the military uniforms for all the guys. He was a perfectionist.

I remember him prepping all their uniforms with all the perfect pleats

down the front of the legs. And he’d sew on all the different patches, you

know, the emblem things they’d get. He taught me to sew. And when

I became a mom, I would sew my children’s Halloween costumes. He

always sewed my cheerleading costumes and my Halloween costumes. So,

we’ve always had a little bond there from that entrepreneurial side.

So, what were you like as a kid? Gosh, these are big open-ended

questions! [laughter] I don’t know. I guess would say that I was a pretty

quiet kid, which is probably why I’m a little reluctant with my answers

now. But I was social. I mean, I definitely had friends in all different kinds

of crowds. I was active in the sense of dance and cheerleading, but, yeah,

I was quiet. I didn’t really express myself, and I wouldn’t say I was the

most confident kid. I had high expectations for my education. I definitely

prioritized school. So, I don’t know. I wasn’t anything special. I didn’t

stand out as anything amazing. Definitely the most impressionable time

of my life was after I graduated. I lived a year in Venezuela. Got to travel

South America. I’ve always been interested in travel and seeing how other

people live. I think that, at a young age, I knew I wanted to speak different

languages, and I wanted to see the world.

Why South America? I was enrolled at USF [University of San

Francisco] and they had a study abroad program at a university in

Venezuela, sort of like an exchange, through La Universidad del Simón

Bolívar in Caracas. But it was a satellite campus in a tiny, very rural town.

It was in the jungle on the Orinoco River amongst the Warao Indians.

There was no running water, no electricity. This was a bit of an experiment,

and the first time they had ever sent a foreign student to this far-off,

remote location. There was a stretch of eight months without any contact

with my family. I lived with an English professor and his family. It was

interesting culturally because I woke up every day to go to school, but

Venezuela was not as structured as it is in the US. So, I’d show up, but

sometimes the teachers didn’t show up. So then, you just didn’t have school

that day. It was just random. It was always mind-blowing to me. I mean,

the same thing would happen at the bank. You’d go to the bank, and they’d

just decide they didn’t want to be open one day. That’s just how it was.

Culture clash, huh? Yeah, just a totally different culture. But I got credits

studying tourism and economics and, of course, language. In my mind, this

is when my life started. Up until then, I feel like I was just an observer,

pretty much all through my younger years. And then, when I got to go

to Venezuela, it was like everything came into a perspective where I had

independence. I had to make choices about what I wanted to do, and who

I wanted to be. I’ve always been interested in food and you would literally

go to markets to get whatever you were going to eat that day. You’d go

every single morning. And so, when you think about living healthy and

eating healthy, nothing was processed. It was fresh every day, and the

footprint was basically whatever families could grow

to sell for their own income. That’s how people in the

village lived. We would trade clothing with the Warao

Indians, and they would spear us some piranha or

baby alligators or tortoises. That’s pretty much what

you ate.

Now, how long were you there? It was a year total,

and I returned with a completely new perspective.

But a few months later, my life changed again after

reconnecting with my high school boyfriend at my

sister’s wedding. By that Christmas, I found out that I

was pregnant . . . I can’t believe I’m talking about this

. . . So, anyway, I was a baby, just twenty years old at

the time with my first child. I have three now, they’re

twenty-five, twenty-two, and thirteen. But, at that

time, everything changed. I dropped out of school

and moved back to AG. I never went back, which, to

this day, has been my psychological Achilles’ heel. It’s

probably one of the hardest things I have to overcome

in my career. Not having a degree. It’s just a mental

self-worth thing, I think, being really committed,

driven, having high expectations of myself. I used to

really beat myself up about it—but I don’t anymore.

What changed? Well, one of my daughters, who

is the mother to my granddaughter, used to really

struggle with anxiety and depression. We had to get

her a lot of help for about a six to eight year span of

her life. I’ll never forget something she said to me

when she was in recovery—I think about it all the

time—she said, “Mom, if you’re always questioning if

you’re good enough, then how could I ever consider

myself to be good enough?” Those words changed me

forever. Immediately, I stopped being that do-it-all

mother who was self-critical and wanting everything

to be perfect and having these expectations of having

to meet everybody else’s image of what they saw me

to be. I totally changed after going through that with

my daughter, to a point where I care so much more

about what we do have now, than what we don’t have.

I celebrate holidays differently. I spend my weekends

differently. I engage with my children differently. I

believe that with all the pain we go through in life,

if we are serious enough to really grow through it, it

really can make us better.

Let’s go back to those early days when you returned

to the Central Coast. Sure, so, I got a job at Café

Andreini in Arroyo Grande, the Village. I did mostly

managerial stuff and was involved in hiring and

training new employees, which I found so interesting.

A couple of years later, I went on to work for Social

Services in a program called CalWORK. At the

time, anyone who was on cash aid, welfare, would

have to prove that they were out looking for a job,

that they were interviewing, and they were actively

seeking work. My role was to help them in that

process. I would do trainings to get them ready for

an interview, and I’d work with them to get their >>

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 33


esumes perfected. I’d talk with them about how to call and speak with

different companies and employers. I really enjoyed that, working with

people to help them better themselves. So, by then, I had remarried, and

I moved with my ex-husband up to the Bay Area, before he ended up

getting transferred to Fresno. I’d say that my real career ambition and

everything that led me to where I am today started then. I worked for a

national staffing agency that staffed for high-level, C-level positions, so

CEOs, CMOs, COOs, CFOs.

How was that? It was amazing to see how companies operated from

a leadership level, what the responsibilities and expectations and

requirements were of all these higher-level positions. And so, when you’re

interviewing your clients about who they’re looking for, you’re learning

a lot about how companies operate and who they need to fill those roles.

It was awesome. I was in my twenties and I was just really interested

in seeing how businesses operated, and I got that inside scoop. But the

thing I realized pretty quickly was seeing companies that would hire for

the same position again and again and not having it work out. I mean,

the new recruit would be perfectly qualified and would have a great

personality and attitude and an amazing track record, but it wouldn’t click.

We’d see clients coming back to us repeatedly and I’d start to wonder,

“How come a CFO—or whatever the position happened to be—can’t stay

on with the company?”

What was the issue? It was a leadership problem. That’s when I started

to really tune into the intangibles: human behavior, culture, and, most

importantly, relationships. I began to understand that those things, at the

end of the day, are every bit as important as the more tangible things like

a technical skillset and knowledge and experience. That insight was critical

for me going forward and it shapes everything I have done since. So,

after my divorce, we came back to Arroyo Grande and I started my own

business. I’ve always had that entrepreneurial spirit, and I wanted to help, I

wanted to make a difference. I started doing customer service trainings for

local companies. I said, “Gosh, there are so many small businesses around

here that could improve in this area.” But, I learned very quickly that the

companies that already had great customer service were the only ones willing

to invest in the training. The ones that didn’t, the ones that were struggling in

that area, the ones I really wanted to help, just weren’t interested. >>

34 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Fresh from our Farm,

Direct to your Home

SIGN UP TODAY FOR $10 OFF YOUR FIRST BOX

*New customers use code SLOLIFE21

JOIN THE TALLEY COMMUNITY TODAY

TalleyFarmsBox.com | (805) 489-5401

freshpaintslo.com

@freshpaintslo

805-787-0451

LIC. # 1036406

Local, honest expertise for home buyers and sellers

150+ transactions closed within the last seven years


Throughout the purchase of our first home, Graham answered every question

we had. He was always prompt and professional with communication but also

extremely personable and friendly. We felt like he was truly in the hunt with us

as we searched for a home. We are thankful to have worked with him.

– Bobby & Kelly Boss, San Luis Obispo


graham @ ccreslo.com

805.459.1865 | Lic. #01873454

www.ccreslo.com

3196 South Higuera Suite D, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 35


What came next? Over the years, I’ve really evolved as a business consultant

and have done a wide variety of work with local companies. I mean, it’s

ranged from tech start-ups to medical marketing to software to jewelry

manufacturing, you name it. But, I still had this vision in mind, something

that I had always thought about, which is leadership training for women. I

wanted to approach it from a happiness perspective and ask the question:

“How do we get women to really connect with all the skills that are most

needed in the workplace that no one trains on, like communication and

the social intelligence stuff, self-awareness, and recognizing your impact on

others from a social level and interpersonal level?”

Let’s talk about that. I was really connecting with a lot of amazing, strong

women, and it made sense to do it in a group setting. I decided to take

on a partner and together she and I started doing our women’s leadership

program, Unlock Potential, which was just starting to take off when,

well, the pandemic hit, and we’ve had to put a pause on it. But, still, I feel

blessed for everything I’ve been able to do with it so far. Helping women

locally with the interpersonal soft skills: leadership, self-awareness, finding

your voice, getting clear on your values, and operating from a standpoint

where you really understand your strengths and the strengths of people

around you. I really do hope to restart it at some point, but I still do carry

on with those principles in the work I do now—my business consulting—

and I’m also doing some executive coaching. Unlock Potential has been

amazing in the sense that we’ve brought women together that had a lot of

similar ambitions that were just really wanting that community support

and encouragement.

Have you found a common thread in all the work you’ve done?

Yes. I’d say that I’ve come to understand that we all have a story to

tell. And if we can hear that story, those stories, we can learn how to

appreciate people’s differences and we can value them for what’s different

and what it is that they bring to the table. We can appreciate their

differences, and those differences can totally change a relationship for

the better. Being curious about how other people do things, and learning

from them, rather than trying to do it all on your own, and having these

unattainably high expectations, I think that’s a big part of it. I think

that approach, that openness, can really create important opportunities

in our relationships and in our businesses and in our families. If there’s

something core to the work I do—a core principle—it is not about

making people better in their business, it’s truly about helping to give

them skills to make them better in their lives. And at the center of that,

for me, is developing better relationships with their children or their

spouse or the people that really matter to them in their lives. Because,

ultimately, that’s what it’s all about. SLO LIFE

36 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Since 1974, California Cooperage

has been your go-to Jacuzzi supplier

on the Central Coast!

CALIFORNIA

COOPERAGE

SPAS / SAUNAS / WELLNESS

Introducing our new line

of Clearlight Indoor and

Outdoor Infrared Saunas

Visit us today to create your

at home health sanctuary!

3035 Broad Street . San Luis Obispo

ai161437639511_SLO Life Mag March 2021.pdf 1 2/26/2021 1:53:16 PM

(805) 544-3565 . calcooperage.com

EST. 1999

Drought-Tolerant, Lifestyle Landscapes

Design . Build . Maintain

805.927.0374 . ecotoneslandscapes.com . LIC # 767033

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 37


| AUTHOR

LOCAL READ

Succulents Love the

Central Coast

BY BRIAN SCHWARTZ

I’ve often felt succulents are the ideal role models. Stress makes them more

resilient, but too much water can kill them. These remarkable plants take

just enough to thrive. I had a conversation with local author Gabriel Frank

to learn more about how his new book came about and what he hopes

readers will gain from it.

For those curious, once receiving the contract from Ten Speed Press, it

took Frank three more years to finish “Striking Succulent Gardens,” a project he

initially expected to complete in a year. A talent scout at Ten Speed Press sought

out Frank because of his vast depth of knowledge on a topic they knew had a

market. He was ready to quit halfway through but persisted by scheduling three

hours twice a week to finish it.

Frank wanted to publish a book to address common misperceptions about succulents

and give readers a reliable resource to turn to for answers. He shares that

“succulents are an easy plant to work with, but largely misunderstood.”

One common misperception is that you can’t kill a succulent. But “people often

kill succulents with kindness,” which Frank explained, translates to giving them

too much water. Before you give them water, take a close look at their stems

(leaves). They should be plump (since this is where they store most of their water).

A succulent is parched for water when it looks dehydrated … when you see

crinkles and creases, it’s time to give ‘em a little love. The change in color you’ll

sometimes see is a good thing as the stress they endure is, as Frank puts it, “a

beautiful part of their life cycle.”

Succulents are the ideal species for climate change. Highly adaptable plants, learning

to live on less water, and sustain more heat. Frank shares, “Having a succulent

garden is like having your own on-site nursery.” At clubs like The Central Coast Cactus

and Succulent Society, members bring succulent clippings to share with each other.

The Central Coast is home to an abundance of succulents at every turn, many of

which are showcased in Frank’s book. You can also take a road trip to Lotusland in

Montecito to see some amazing varieties of rare succulents you won’t find elsewhere.

So, if you want to write a book, block out time on your

calendar to get it done. Expect it’ll take far longer than

you think. If you want to bring more nature into your

environment, the ease of succulents is hard to beat.

Because they require less water and can handle hotter

temperatures, succulents are climate change friendly.

For those too busy to maintain a garden, succulents are

mostly self-sufficient and extremely low maintenance.

In addition to being an author, Frank is also the owner

of Gardens by Gabriel. He’s a spirited advocate for

all things green and growing. When not landscaping

for others, he can be found cultivating his own home

demonstration garden. “Striking Succulent Gardens”

can be found at local bookstores, as well as many

nurseries and garden centers. SLO LIFE

BRIAN SCHWARTZ is a

publishing consultant and

advocate for local authors.

He can be reached at

brian@selfpublish.org.

38 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST,

SAN LUIS OBISPO

WARMLY INVITES YOU TO

䰀 漀 挀 愀 氀 䔀 琀 栀 椀 挀 愀 氀 䨀 攀 眀 攀 氀 爀 礀 匀 椀 渀 挀 攀 㤀 㜀 㐀

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

A CLEARER VIEW OF YOU

Who are we, really?

You and I, and all humanity?

The health, harmony, and joy we experience in

life depends on our answer to this question.

SUNDAY, MAY 16

2PM PDT

AVAILABLE ON ZOOM

HTTP://BIT.LY/SLOCSTALK

匀 瀀 攀 挀 椀 愀 氀 椀 稀 椀 渀 最 䤀 渀

䌀 甀 猀 琀 漀 洀 䌀 爀 攀 愀 琀 椀 漀 渀 ☀ 䄀 渀 琀 椀 焀 甀 攀 刀 攀 猀 琀 漀 爀 愀 琀 椀 漀 渀

㐀 ☀ 㠀 䜀 愀 爀 搀 攀 渀 匀 琀 ⸀ 䐀 漀 眀 渀 琀 漀 眀 渀 匀 䰀 伀

㠀 㔀 ⸀ 㔀 㐀 アパート⸀ 㠀 㠀 㘀 ⴀ 眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 䜀 愀 爀 搀 攀 渀 匀 琀 爀 攀 攀 琀 䜀 漀 氀 搀 猀 洀 椀 琀 栀 猀 ⸀ 挀 漀 洀

Free Talk given by

Lyle Young, CSB

Christian Science Practitioner & Teacher

A member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship

45

Now Offering

• 24/7 Quick Drop Off

• Concierge Vehicle Pick Up

& Delivery Service

Service for ALL Makes and Models!

Personal Service & Exceptional Car Care

San Luis Obispo 805.242.8336

RIZZOLISAUTOMOTIVE.COM

Santa Maria 805.316.0154

2020 WINNER - Best Oil Change and Favorite Auto Mechanic

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 39


| ARTIST

N

PROFILE

Jason

Towne

BY JEFF AL-MASHAT

ew York Times theater critic Brooks Atkinson, who is probably

more well known today for the Manhattan theater that bears his

name than for his writings, wrote, “Real art is illumination, it adds

stature to life.”

There are many grand things that can be said about San Luis

Obispo’s Jason Towne’s artwork, but associating it with a theatrical

quote seems most appropriate. The work is visual, but it straddles

both performance art and installation.

Towne makes drawings and paintings. Some are geometrical shapes;

others are simple squares of florescent paint on florescent paper.

His magic is in his presentation, where he posts them together on

walls in an almost 19th-century, salon-style arrangement. He then

projects light, along with filters of additional shapes, on to them.

The result is a shimmering, immersive experience that fills the entire

room. Simply having the light spill upon the viewers draws them

into the story in the same way that one gets pulled into a play or

concert, or even a great film. Towne layers different music into the

experience to add another dimension.

“I am looking to create a glowing ambient journey,” says Towne.

“I want people to take away an uplifting feeling that stays with

them.” The execution of his presentation is important, but

illuminating the viewer’s mind is really what it is about for Towne.

“I want people to look to the future when we can gather again and

experience things together.”

Simply visiting his webpage at artbyjasontowne.com will give you a

taste of the excitement associated with his work. The still image on

his homepage alone will light up a phone or computer screen, but

it seems like it has the power to light up whatever space it is being

viewed in.

He is a self-taught painter, but trained as a graphic designer, which

Towne credits for his ability to know the mechanics of putting his

grand presentations together. Figurative

painter Francis Bacon is among his

influences, but there are also nods to

conceptual artists like Jenny Holzer’s

thought-provoking projections on

public spaces, as well as pioneering

multi-media artist Nam June Paik’s

massive video projects.

His post-pandemic plans are to take

the experience to large spaces that will

include multiple musicians and possibly

opportunities for audience members

to get involved and make their own

drawings that become part of the

exhibition. SLO LIFE

JEFF AL-MASHAT is a

writer and visual artist with

an MFA in painting from

Georgia State University. He

lives in Grover Beach.

40 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


ADVENTURE, PASSION

JUN/JUL 2014 & POLITICAL ACTION

Dr. Arnie Horwitz

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Are you feeling overwhelmed

and confused? I can help.

Specializing in

- Relationship Conflicts - Parenting & Self-Esteem

- Separation and Divorce - Personal Life Planning

- Grief and Loss - Career Uncertainty

Therapy/Counseling/Coaching

Dr. Arnie Horwitz • 30 yrs. Experience

805-541-2752

www.doctorarnie.com

live the SLO LIFE!

SLO LIFE

SWINGING

FOR THE

FENCES

ON THE

RISE

HEALTH

WORDS TO

LIVE BY

BEHIND THE

SCENES

m a g a z i n e

HEATING UP

SUMMER

OUTDOOR

LIVING

AFTER

HOURS

NOW HEAR

THIS

MEET

BILL

OSTRANDER

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

slolifemagazine.com

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 41


| EXPLORE

Techno

Golf

BY PADEN HUGHES

Achallenge for the romantics: How many date night ideas

can you come up with?

I don’t know how your date nights go, but ours had started to feel a little

routine. That all changed when my husband, Michael, surprised me with a

fun, new adventure. I had no clue where we were going when he told me to

wear something casual, warm, and something I could move in unrestricted.

“Do you want to know what it is?” he asked.

Nope. I love surprises.

Even as a child, if someone told me they had a surprise and then shortly

thereafter would ask, “Do you want to know what it is?” I’d say, “No thanks!

I want to be surprised.”

I love the anticipation of it and guessing what it might be before I get

there. But I couldn’t guess this one.

Evan after we turned into Dairy Creek Golf Course, I still didn’t know

exactly what we were doing.

In a past life, pre-kids, I played a lot of golf. But it was a weeknight at 8

o’clock. What could possibly be going on out here at this hour?

We parked. Got out our clubs. And I still was confused, “Night golf?”

technology first came on the scene as a way to track a golf

ball on TV and is now used exclusively for NBC Sports’

PGA Tour telecasts. The program follows the flight of the

golf balls with a camera-based system that displays the

virtual simulation on a screen and also provides statistics

allowing you to monitor every shot you hit. Michael

explained it as “virtual golf meets glowing driving range—

making you feel like you’re playing a video game—all

while enjoying food and drinks.”

It was awesome.

We had a private booth, a TV display of our video game, and

it felt like we were both the entertainer and the entertained.

We selected the virtual gold course and style of game we

wanted to play. After the set up,

we aimed at the targets, which

glow at night. Shot after shot,

the technology tracked our

drives and charted our progress.

We ordered food and played

for over an hour—laughing

every time my drive was too

low for the software to chart it

and I had to keep swinging.

With a wide-smile, Michael explained that Dairy Creek now offers an

augmented reality golf experience in a designated area called Swing Time.

Their website describes it as “a mix of driving range, sports bar, bowling

alley, and pinball machine all in one.”

The golf experience has been ramped up using Toptracer technology.

What’s called the gamification of the driving range experience, the

TIP!

Open from 10 am to 10 pm,

you won’t want to risk trying

to walk in, it’s booming in

popularity and reservations

are encouraged. SLO LIFE

PADEN HUGHES is

co-owner of Gymnazo

and enjoys exploring

the Central Coast.

42 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 43


| ON THE RISE

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

Mulenga Malama

This senior is wrapping up his four years at

San Luis Obispo High School as a scholar athlete and

academic honor roll recipient, a College Board

National Scholar, and an All-League soccer player.

What extra-curricular activities are you involved in? I’m involved in track and field and the

Associated Student Body at San Luis Obispo High School.

What do you like to do for fun? I enjoy the life that is being a track athlete. It ranges widely

from stretching and mobility, to strength work and mental resilience/awareness giving me

plenty of areas of myself to explore and spend time developing. Outside of track, I enjoy

listening to podcasts about the mind, body, and lifestyle habits.

What is important to you outside of high school? Striving to organize myself on a day-today

basis and develop a champion mindset through experimenting with habits and food to

feel and be the best me.

Where do you see yourself in ten years? I see myself as an accomplished athlete with

multiple NCAA championship appearances and an Olympic trials on my resume. I’ll have

my engineering degree and possibly be in graduate school working towards a position at a top

university as professor or track coach.

What has influenced you the most? The motivational speeches of Les Brown, Eric Thomas,

David Goggins, Inky Johnson, and Tony Robbins.

If you won $1 million, what would you do with it? I would initially give $250,000 to my

family in Zambia as they could utilize it to help with transportation and it could provide

more financial flexibility. Then I’d give some to my parents, brother, and sister. Finally, I would

reinvest it in myself by spending a portion on a nutrition specialist and personal trainers in

order to get the most out of my body while not damaging it for the long term.

Do you have a career path in mind? I’m looking to eventually become a college professor or

track coach as each profession is in an environment that I enjoy and appreciate; which is a

position to teach others and pass on the information in my head, from my experiences, and

my acquired knowledge.

If you could meet anyone, who would it be? I would like to meet Jesse Owens or Carl Lewis

as they are both people who I would really enjoy listening and learning from as they both

demonstrated in their lives what focus, dedication, and striving for perfection can achieve.

What is something that not many people know about you? I believe that many of the

thoughts and emotions we have are like balls of energy in our mind that can be harnessed by

taking action with our bodies. The action can range from athletic endeavors to everyday tasks.

What are your plans for college? I’ll be attending Lehigh University where I’ve been

admitted into their college of engineering and will be part of the track and field team. I’m

looking forward to my freshman year track season in college as it is a new setting where I am

starting fresh and have the opportunity to show who I am and what I can do. SLO LIFE

Know a student On the Rise?

Email us at info@slolifemagazine.com

44 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Sleep Under the Stars, Connect with Nature, Be Creative

swimming . hiking . arts & crafts . outdoor cooking . tomahawks . backpacking . nature exploration

drama . archery . skits . songs . games . nightly campfire . team building . leadership development

Since 1941,Camp Natoma

has been hosting

ENTIRELY OUTDOORS and

SCREEN-FREE programs,

providing an excellent setting for

personal growth and rejuvenation.

As we approach summer and

Camp Natoma’s 80th year, we

know that now, more than ever,

kids must camp.

We’re looking forward to summer 2021.

We need dirt. And air that smells like air.

We need to gather wood and our friends,

to make s’mores and sing silly songs.

To feel the tiredness that only

hiking and playing outside all day

in the summer heat brings. To rest our

bodies in our cozy sleeping bags.

Unplugged . Engaged . Outdoors

7 Weeklong Overnight Sessions

Boys & Girls 1st - 11th grades

360 acres near Paso Robles

www.campnatoma.org | 805-709-2569 | info@campnatoma.org

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 45


| DWELLING

TIMELESS

46 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


DESIGN

BY ZARA KHAN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID LALUSH

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 47


W

hat is “timeless design” and is it really even achievable? I

have to admit, I always thought it was a compelling marketing

phrase for the building industry, but I wasn’t completely

sold on the idea. After all, it is just a matter of time until

the construction period looks dated with the arrival of new

techniques and the innovation of materials. Touring the home

of the late Ken Schwartz changed my mind.

Schwartz was raised in South

Central LA and was first exposed

to architecture in high school

where he had taken architectural

drafting classes. He was eager

to become an aeronautical

engineer and while pursing that

career, he took up a drafting

job at Douglas Aircraft in El

Segundo. Schwartz realized that

aeronautical engineering wasn’t

all that he thought it would be

and decided to pivot and instead

began studying architecture at >>

In addition to being an

interior designer, ZARA KHAN

is also a shoe aficionado and

horror movie enthusiast.

48 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 49


the University of Southern California in 1944. It wasn’t

long after that he received his draft notice. However,

Schwartz contracted bronchiectasis and was sent home on

medical discharge. Upon his return home, he continued his

education and in 1946 married his high school sweetheart,

Martha. In 1952 he found his way to San Luis Obispo

when he received a recommendation from the USC dean of

Architecture to take a teaching position at the brand-new

Department of Architectural Engineering at Cal Poly.

Schwartz was always into the big picture. He contemplated

how a building should fit into the site, and also how

it interacts with the neighborhood—taking all things

into account. He didn’t always agree with how the city

approached their planning and was told by SLO Mayor

Waters: “If you don’t like things the way they are, you have

to put up or shut up.” Their interaction spurred Schwartz’s

service on the Planning Commission.

While Schwartz made several contributions to the layout

of our city—likely enough to fill the pages of a novel—the

one I am most thankful for is Mission Plaza. It was a

two-decade-long proposal where he insisted that the city

close Monterey Street between Broad Street and Chorro

Street and create a plaza for the community to enjoy. A lot

of his opposition came from merchants who didn’t want to

lose the valuable space. Three Cal Poly Students decided

to make Mission Plaza their senior project and received a

partial grant that was contingent on including an option >>

50 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


CUSTOM BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS & DRAPERY

FREE Installation *

on custom blinds, shades, drapery & decorative hardware

Call to Schedule Your FREE In-Home Design Consultation

1-805-793-1383 or visit www.3dayoffer723.com

*Offer valid on residential base installation of 3 Day Blinds brand products only, excluding shutters and special orders. Minimum purchase of $750 required,

excluding sales tax, shipping and handling. Not valid with any other offer or discount. Offer Code CEPC. Expires 06/30/21. 3 Day Blinds LLC has the following

licenses: AZ ROC 321056, CA #1005986, CT HIC.0644950, NJ #13VH09390200, OR #209181, PA #PA107656, WA #3DAYBDB842KS, Nassau County, NY Home

Improvement License H01073101, Rockland County, NY #H-12401-34-00-00, VA#2705172678 (Licensed through Great Windows Services, LLC). © 2021 3 Day Blinds LLC.

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 51


where Monterey Street remained open. When they failed

to present the option, it was demanded they return the

grant money they received (luckily a local attorney, George

Andre, decided to represent them pro bono). That’s when

Schwartz decided maybe it was time to run for mayor if

that is what it would take to see this project through—so he

did. And he won.

Alongside his contributions to the city, Schwartz was

inspiring students and building the foundation for the

Architectural program at Cal Poly. He was instrumental

in the evolution of implementing city planning and

environmental design into the curriculum. In 1971, the

School of Architecture became the School of Architecture

and Environmental Design (SAED). When Schwartz

retired from SAED in 1988, the program had grown from

ninety-five students to 1,700, which was the largest in the

US at the time. Schwartz valued travel and the inspiration

that came with it and introduced an annual field trip to LA

with his students. The field trip remain a favorite part of the

curriculum for many students today.

Schwartz’s eye for color and design didn’t stop with

architecture, he was an all-around artist. He would sketch

portraits, work on ceramics, and even paint with watercolor.

His family enjoyed camping in their free time and wherever

they went, Schwartz made it a point to pause and take in

any new architecture in cities all along the way. He was

always learning and finding inspiration. >>

52 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Custom lighting

fixtures proudly

made by hand

right here on the

Central Coast.

HANS

DUUS

BLACKSMITH INC

2976 INDUSTRIAL PARKWAY . SANTA MARIA . 805-570-0019

HANSDUUS@GMAIL.COM . HANSDUUSBLACKSMITH.COM

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 53


Schwartz somehow still found time to build his own homes

and express his take on design. I had the opportunity to

speak with Ken and Martha’s daughter, Lorraine, and she

shared that her father had a unique blend of vision and the

drive to make the world better. Lorraine was in junior high

when this home was being built and remembers helping

with several aspects of the construction. From wiring the

electrical and stapling insulation to painting and staining,

all of the Schwartzes were involved.

As I looked through the home,

I recognized elements of his

design that are still incorporated

in projects today. Large windows,

stain-grade base boards, flat panel

cabinet doors, paneled accent

walls, integrated built-ins, and

subway tile shower walls—at

least one, if not all, of these

design elements is on the wish

list for modern-day homeowners.

The Schwartz home tour led me

to a new theory: If you design

with a style in mind, and stay

true to that style, timeless design

can be achieved. SLO LIFE

DAVID LALUSH is an

architectural photographer

here in San Luis Obispo.

54 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Audio/Video . Lighting . Shading . Automation . Surveillance

1320 Van Beurden Drive . Suite 102 . Los Osos

(866) 633-7000 . www.coastalhomeworks.com

STALWORK

INC

CONSTRUCTION + DESIGN

WWW.STALWORK.COM

LIC 948012 | PO BOX 391

SAN LUIS OBISPO CA 93406

805.542.0033

COMMERCIAL | RESIDENTIAL | INTERIORS | ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN | LANDSCAPE

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 55


| SLO CITY

REAL ESTATE

BY THE NUMBERS

laguna

lake

tank

farm

cal poly

area

country

club

down

town

foothill

blvd

johnson

ave

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

Total Homes Sold

Average Asking Price

Average Selling Price

Sales Price as a % of Asking Price

Average # of Days on the Market

2020

6

$692,633

$685,750

99.01%

44

2020

3

$770,717

$780,238

101.24%

36

2020

4

$1,199,250

$1,199,500

100.02%

10

2020

3

$1,232,333

$1,187,400

96.35%

67

2020

9

$1,165,111

$1,117,297

95.90%

23

2020

8

$749,500

$768,813

102.58%

37

2020

13

$1,061,069

$1,017,338

95.88%

36

2021

16

$739,834

$742,706

100.39%

24

2021

17

$1,062,961

$1,044,449

98.26%

58

2021

9

$1,055,989

$1,043,994

98.86%

56

2021

2

$1,367,000

$1,307,500

95.65%

26

2021

19

$1,026,942

$1,017,040

99.04%

41

2021

7

$884,200

$874,857

98.94%

24

2021

8

$1,017,338

$1,131,001

111.17%

67

+/-

166.67%

6.81%

8.31%

1.38%

-45.45%

+/-

466.67%

37.92%

33.86%

99.10%

61.11%

+/-

125.00%

-11.95%

-12.96%

-1.16%

460.00%

+/-

-33.33%

10.93%

10.11%

-0.70%

-61.19%

+/-

111.11%

-11.86%

-8.97%

3.14%

78.26%

+/-

-12.50%

17.97%

13.79%

-3.64%

-35.14%

+/-

-38.46%

-4.12%

11.17%

15.29%

86.11%

*Comparing 01/01/20 - 03/17/20 to 01/01/21 - 03/17/21

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS ®

SLO LIFE

56 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Get growing on your home purchase

Let’s keep the conversation going. Contact us today.

Donna Lewis

Branch Manager &

VP of Mortgage Lending

O: (805) 335-8743

C: (805) 235-0463

donna.lewis@rate.com

Ken Neate

VP of Mortgage Lending

O: (805) 706-8074

C: (925) 963-1015

ken.neate@rate.com

Maggie Koepsell

VP of Mortgage Lending

O: (805) 335-8742

C: (805) 674-6653

maggie.koepsell@rate.com

Ermina Karim

Licensed Sales Assistant

Dylan Morrow

VP of Mortgage Lending

Elieen Mackenzie

VP of Mortgage Lending

O: (805) 329-4095

ermina.karim@rate.com

O: (805) 335-8738

C: (805) 550-9742

dylan.morrow@rate.com

O: (805) 212-5204

C: (831) 566-9908

eileen.mackenzie@rate.com

Zoe Thompson

Licensed Sales Assistant

Luana Geradis

VP of Mortgage Lending

Matthew Janetski

VP of Mortgage Lending

O: (805) 335-8737

zoe.thompson@rate.com

O: (805) 329-4087

C: (707) 227-9582

luana.gerardis@rate.com

O: (805) 329-4092

matt.janetski@rate.com

Joe Hutson

VP of Mortgage Lending

O: (831) 205-1582

C: (831) 212-4138

joe.hutson@rate.com

Rate.com/SanLuisObispo

1065 Higuera St., Suite 100, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Applicant subject to credit and underwriting approval. Not all applicants will be approved for financing. Receipt of application does not represent an approval for financing or interest rate guarantee. Restrictions may apply,

contact Guaranteed Rate for current rates and for more information.

Donna Lewis NMLS #245945; CA - CA-DOC245945 | Dylan Morrow NMLS #1461481; CA - CA-DBO1461481 | Eileen Mackenzie NMLS #282909 | Joe Hutson NMLS #447536; CA - CA-

DOC447536| Ken Neate NMLS ID #373607; CA - CA-DBO373607 | Luana Gerardis NMLS #1324563; CA - CA-DBO1324563 | Maggie Koepsell NMLS #704130; CA - CA-DBO704130 | Matthew Kanetski NMLS #1002317; CA

- CA-DBO1002317

Guaranteed Rate, Inc.; NMLS #2611; For licensing information visit nmlsconsumeraccess.org. • CA: Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 57


Now

is a great time

to take advantage

of low rates to

refinance or

purchase the

home of your

dreams.

Contact me today to learn more.

Ben Lerner

(805) 441-9486

| SLO COUNTY

REAL ESTATE

REGION

Arroyo Grande

Atascadero

Avila Beach

Cambria/San Simeon

Cayucos

Creston

BY THE NUMBERS

NUMBER OF

HOMES SOLD

2020

61

49

3

25

22

1

2021

57

65

5

27

13

0

AVERAGE DAYS

ON MARKET

2020

62

70

29

104

199

52

2021

57

20

63

60

52

0

MEDIAN SELLING

PRICE

2020

$802,429

$608,598

$855,967

$853,920

$1,440,818

$956,000

2021

$948,171

$638,524

$2,047,600

$928,071

$1,269,692

N/A

Grover Beach

17

28

52

18

$546,500

$658,496

Los Osos

24

25

39

24

$661,313

$762,158

Morro Bay

21

34

65

38

$655,301

$909,064

Nipomo

39

55

65

41

$681,595

$794,685

**

Oceano

14

10

91

52

$569,232

$628,667

Pismo Beach

20

26

76

60

$832,445

$1,175,435

Senior Loan Advisor

NMLS 395723

ben.lerner@flagstar.com

1212 Marsh St., Suite 1

San Luis Obispo, CA 93401

Paso (Inside City Limits)

Paso (North 46 - East 101)

Paso (North 46 - West 101)

53

10

23

82

8

33

55

93

126

36

36

70

$522,265

$876,800

$644,889

$541,686

$617,306

$916,091

Paso (South 46 - East 101)

12

14

53

36

$567,500

$642,279

San Luis Obispo

65

86

52

37

$982,189

$1,009,449

Equal Housing Lender | Member FDIC

** Top 200 Mortgage Originator | Mortgage Executive Magazine

Santa Margarita

Templeton

3

25

7

27

196

95

69

67

$713,333

$937,072

$941,286

$736,935

Not a commitment to lend. Programs available only

to qualifi ed borrowers. Subject to credit approval and

underwriting terms and conditions. Programs subject

to change 58 | without SLO LIFE notice. MAGAZINE Some restrictions | APR/MAY may 2021 apply.

Countywide

458 585

*Comparing 01/01/20 - 3/17/20 to 01/01/21 - 03/17/21

70 41 $738,564 $841,754

SOURCE: San Luis Obispo Association of REALTORS ®

SLO LIFE


TIMELESS DESIGN

FOR A CHANGING

WORLD

PUGLISIDESIGN.COM | 805.595.1962

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 59


| HEALTH

When a

Migraine

Attacks

A complete look into the mechanics of migraine

and holistic remedies.

BY LAUREN HARVEY

T

he pain starts in the left temple. A dull, constant

pressure soon morphs into a sharp dagger that

spreads behind the left eye. Soon, sunlight is

unbearable. The exhaust fumes of a passing car

are toxic. And every small noise like a hammer,

knocking the migraine deeper. Sounds unbearable,

right?

For 12% of the American population, this scenario

happens regularly. While there are manifold

treatment options for a migraine, including

preventative Botox treatments, there is no cure for

a migraine. It’s accepted as an inevitable part of

your life, if you’ve been diagnosed.

Migraines are known as an

“invisible illness” because there

are no outward signs that

someone may be experiencing

one. Frequently, migraine

sufferers are dismissed or

invalidated because there are no

outward physical signs of pain.

To be sure, migraines are very

real. Here, we’ll explore what a

migraine entails, who is most

likely to suffer from them, and

holistic remedies for treatment

and prevention. >>

LAUREN HARVEY is a

creative writer fueled by a

love of cooking, adventure,

and naps in the sun.

60 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 61


you cough, move, or sneeze,” notes Medline Plus. Therefore, a dark

quiet room is an ideal place to rest.

After enduring prodrome, aura, and the migraine attack, it’s easy

to see why in the fourth phase, postdrome, migraine sufferers

often feel drained, exhausted, and confused for up to a day.

From start to finish, the process of a migraine from prodrome to

postdrome can last from three days up to a week.

PREVENTATIVE MEASURES

The most common migraine triggers, according to the American

Migraine Foundation, include “. . . stress, changes in or an

irregular sleep schedule, hormones, caffeine and alcohol, changes

in the weather, diet, dehydration, light, smell and/or medication

overuse.” Therefore, migraine triggers are a combination of

elements within and out of our control.

Tracking migraine attacks and suspected triggers can help manage

the onset of migraines. Investing in self-care activities aimed to

reduce and manage stress can be useful. Adhering to a regular

sleep schedule, monitoring caffeine and alcohol consumption

and keeping a log of the foods you eat can also be beneficial in

identifying migraine triggers.

WHAT IS A MIGRAINE?

Migraines can affect anyone, but you are at greater risk “. . . if you are a woman,

have a family history of migraines, or have other medical conditions such as

depression, anxiety, bipolar disorders, sleep disorders, and epilepsy,” according

to Medline Plus, a US National Library of Medicine publication. Becoming

familiar with migraines and their symptoms may help differentiate between

simple headaches and this painful “invisible illness.” A migraine entails four

distinct phases, only one of which encompasses the actual migraine pain itself.

The first phase of a migraine, known as prodrome, happens one to two days

before the migraine hits. “You might notice subtle changes that warn of an

upcoming attack, including constipation, mood changes (from depression

to euphoria), food cravings, neck stiffness, increased thirst and frequent

yawning,” notes the Mayo Clinic. If you are attuned to your common

prodrome symptoms, you may be able to effectively prevent the migraine

before it happens.

If the prodrome symptoms aren’t enough to signal an oncoming attack, take

note of the second phase of a migraine, known as aura. “Each [aura] symptom

usually begins gradually, builds up over several minutes and lasts for 20-60

minutes,” the Mayo Clinic explains. “Examples of migraine aura include

visual phenomena, vision loss, pins and needles sensations in an arm or leg,

weakness or numbness in the face or one side of the body, difficulty speaking,

hearing noises or music, and uncontrollable jerking or other movements.” Some

migraine sufferers experience flashing lights or zig-zag lines in the field of

vision, which can be alarming if not associated as an aura symptom.

The third phase of migraine is the most notorious—migraine attack. Migraine

attacks can last anywhere from four to seventy-two hours, if left untreated. They

are often debilitating, leaving the migraine sufferer incapable of performing

day-to-day activities. In addition to the attack itself, “other symptoms include

sensitivity to light, noise and odors, nausea, vomiting, and worsened pain when

Even with rigorous prevention tactics, migraines are often

unavoidable for most who are diagnosed. However, some

prevention tactics have proved to significantly lower the severity

and regularity of migraine attacks—and for sufferers, this small

victory is a big win.

Teshamae Monteith, MD, FAHS, notes three potentially useful

supplements in preventing migraines: vitamin B2; Coenzyme

Q10; and magnesium. Two of these supplements in particular,

vitamin B2 and magnesium, performed well in initial studies,

providing an affordable, accessible prevention plan.

Vitamin B2, also called riboflavin, assists in the metabolization

of fats and proteins. Though unclear of exactly how vitamin B2

works neurologically in migraine relief, “It could be because

some people who are deficient in it are more prone to migraine,”

concludes Dr. Monteith. Certainly, the results of a study in

the European Journal of Neurology, provides hopeful results for

migraine sufferers. “Twenty-three people who took daily doses of

400 mg of riboflavin (vitamin B2) for six months reported half

the number of headaches per month—from four to two—and

reduced their use of medicines from seven pills per month to

four-and-a-half,” reports Dr. Monteith.

Magnesium is an essential mineral in the body, regulating nerve

function, blood sugar levels, and the creation of protein. Similar

to vitamin B2, “People with migraines may have lower levels

of magnesium than those who don’t have migraines,” says Dr.

Monteith, suspecting this may be why magnesium proves so

effective in migraine prevention. A study published in Cephalalgia

revealed migraine attacks reduced in frequency by 41.6% in

participants. “Those taking magnesium had fewer migraine days

and took fewer drugs to treat symptoms,” says Dr. Monteith.

Small changes in daily routine and diet may help to reduce the

duration, frequency, and severity of migraine attacks. Primary care

physicians may be able to recommend medical treatment that

works preventatively for migraines. Consult your doctor before

taking any new supplements. >>

62 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


TEN OVER is on a mission to amplify local voices working to better our community.

To this end, we are donating the following ad space to local nonprofit organizations in need.

Together, we can leave the world better than we found it.

TENOVERSTUDIO.COM

Jack’s Helping Hand

has been providing financial

assistance with transportation,

food, lodging, equipment and

medical bills for local children

with cancer, disabilities and

special needs for 15 years.

The current climate has had

an impact on these families

creating an additional burden

to their challenge of having a

medically fragile child.

“I HONESTLY DON’T

KNOW WHAT WE

WOULD HAVE

DONE WITHOUT

JACK’S HELPING

HAND.”

Now is the perfect time to

make a difference in a child’s

life by reaching out through

Jack’s Helping Hand.

jackshelpinghand.org || 805-547-1914 || 710 Fiero Lane #16 San Luis Obispo, CA

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 63


spin

LOSE WEIGHT . BURN FAT

GET IN SHAPE

BOOST YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM

FOR MORE INFORMATION EMAIL U S

AT INFO@REVSLO.COM

boot camp,

tnt, turn n burn

SLO LIFE SPECIAL

50% OFF MONTHLY

MEMBERSHIP

THRU MAY 2021

3,000 SQ FT OF NEW TURF

OFFERING TRAINING FOR

ALL AGES AND ALL LEVELS

755 Alphonso Street . SLO

[off Broad Street]

8420 El Camino Real . Atascadero

805.439.1881

revslo.com

64 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021

HOLISTIC TREATMENT

Though migraine treatments vary widely, one common thread seems to remain the same—the

assertion that the best treatment for a migraine is prevention. In fact, once a migraine sets

in, there is little one can do to stop it. Our best chance is to have an arsenal of symptomrelieving

options at the ready. In the event of an attack, we can be prepared to fight back.

For holistic remedies, dark room rest, drinking water, and eating well work best. A cold

compress, hot shower, and aromatherapy with peppermint oil may also help. If you can handle

the heat, a spoonful of ginger may provide some relief.

According to a study published in Phytotherapy Research, “One hundred patients who had

acute migraines were randomly assigned to be treated with either ginger powder or a

prescription drug used to treat migraine. Two hours after taking either treatment, headache

severity decreased significantly, but the side effects of ginger were less than those of the

prescription drug.” Dr. Monteith recommends taking a quarter teaspoon of ginger powder

mixed with water.

The American Migraine Foundation provides a multitude of free resources for navigating life

with migraines. There’s even an app, called Migraine Buddy, which allows sufferers to easily

track attacks in all phases, along with what helped to relieve symptoms.

A migraine effects everyone differently. If someone you care about suffers from migraines,

sometimes what they need most is a dark room, quiet time, and your support. Because of its

status as an “invisible illness” migraine sufferers are often invalidated in their pain. Standing

by your loved one, and believing their pain can sometimes be the best thing to do.

FINAL WORD

Migraines affect 12% of Americans, and are often unavoidable. Holistic

remedies provide prevention and treatment options. If someone you care for

suffers from migraines, offer your support and a dark, quiet place to rest their

aching head. SLO LIFE


"The best medical office I have ever walked into...

everyone is so nice and caring!" - a patient

Kenneth P. Tway, MD, FACC

L. Christina Fundingsland, PA-C

1106 Pacific Street, SLO

(805) 546-9500

www.kennethtwaymd.com

Keeping SLO Heart Healthy since 1987

YOGA & FITNESS CLASSES IN STUDIO, LIVESTREAM, OUTDOORS

AND WELLNESS LIFESTYLE BOUTIQUE

DOWNTOWN SLO, 672 HIGUERA ST

WWW.SLOYOGACENTER.COM | (805) 598-7100

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 65


SPONSORED

TOP 5

BEHAVIORS

Are you are living with a loved

one who has a hearing problem?

Peter A. Lucier

Hearing Instrument Specialist

Whose problem is the hearing loss? People with hearing loss sometimes forget that their issues affect everyone

around them. In some cases, many tasks are taken on by the “significant others” who assume the role of

translator when communicating with family members, healthcare providers, accountants, mechanics, and

countless others.

1. Speaking Louder

As practitioners know, louder is not always clearer, nor does it

always solve hearing challenges. The poor choice of not wearing

hearing aids is one that affects family and friends and not just the

hearing-impaired person.

2. Becoming the Messenger

Out of love, compassion, and instinct to help anyone in need, family

members often repeat and interpret what their loved ones miss. In

the early stages of hearing loss, this is common and helpful, but it

can eventually become a daunting task and lead to co- dependence

in family dynamics. This can in-turn lead to ill-gotten emotions,

feelings, and actions by everyone including anger, anxiety,

avoidance, defensiveness, or depression.

3. Preventing Isolation

Data show that the mere process of aging can often result in social

isolation. Add hearing issues to the mix, and those with untreated

loss pose higher risks for finding themselves in a dark corner. They

may feel abandoned by the family, ignored by friends, and excluded

from activities, all because they cannot hear well enough in these

social situations.

4. Overcoming Resistance

There comes a time when untreated hearing loss

usually reaches a tipping point. In a true codependent

relationship where a husband refuses

help and the wife enjoys being his “ears,” we know

she is doing him a disservice. If her behavior

persists, he will progressively lose his independence

and grow to depend on her even more. Change

happens when the wife finally asks: “Whose problem

is this anyway?” She must become confident enough,

and her husband must grow strong enough, to look

each other in the eye and admit it is time for change.

5. Seeking Inspiration or Begging for Treatment

We practitioners know that it often takes years of

coaxing and nagging for one spouse to convince

the other to get help. Once patients and significant

other are in the office for an evaluation, the spouse

may well become a positive force when they see the

benefits of hearing aids, because in a relationship

both people have a hearing problem.

Peter A. Lucier, has been a practicing Hearing Instrument Specialists for 22 years.

If you would like more information, please contact us today for an appointment.

66 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021

HEARING AID SPECIALISTS OF THE CENTRAL COAST, INC.

WWW.SLOCOUNTYHEARINGAIDS.COM


Do you or a loved one have

hearing aids that are not

working to their full potential,

or even worse, you have stopped

using them altogether?

At Hearing Aid Specialists of The Central Coast, we have

developed a solution that brings your old hearing aids back

to life. The practice owner, Peter Lucier, has over 22 years of

experience. He has repaired and restored just about every

brand of hearing aid. Peter has an All Make Repair Lab at

both offices in San Luis Obispo and Atascadero.

&

RESTORE

YOUR

HEARING

$49CLEAN

AID

money back guarantee

Call us today so you can hear better again!

We accept Anthem Blue Cross, PG&E, Cal PERS, AARP, Golden State, United Healthcare and many other insurance plans.

Call us now for a free consultation.

12326 Los Osos Valley Road . San Luis Obispo . (805) 439-3586

7070 Morro Road, Suite D . Atascadero . (805) 460-7385

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 67


| TASTE

Rogue Pizza

BY JAIME LEWIS

Iinvented this term to describe pizza made and shared via non-traditional

channels. While everyone loves a good pizzeria, rogue pizza asks us to search in

unconventional places to pick up our pies—backyards, bakeries, and commercial

kitchens. Often, the people making them are accomplished chefs. But when COVID

forced the shutdown and slowdown of business as usual, they had to get creative.

So why pizza? When I posed this question to the three pizzaioli I interviewed for this story, each

answered with some version of the same thing: because pizza is sturdy, portable, delicious, and

economical for both the cook and the customer.

Come along with me on a journey through SLO County’s secret pickup pizzaland, where the

cheese is hot, the toppings are fresh, and you never ever have to wait in line. >>

JAIME LEWIS writes about

food, drink, and the good

life from her home in San

Luis Obispo. Find her on

Instagram/Twitter @jaimeclewis.

68 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


DI Y Woodfire

Kean McCabe was working on the line at Ember in Arroyo

Grande and at the Morro Bay Oyster Company right before

COVID hit. When both businesses went into a holding

pattern, he took the opportunity to launch Earth & Oven, his

private pizza catering business in Los Osos.

McCabe and his father built his oven together based on

Native American construction, with mud and hay, which

cures rock-hard on the inside from the heat of wood burning.

Earth & Oven began as a pizza pickup cottage industry, but

due to regulations, McCabe now bills himself as a caterer

with a particular knack for woodfired pizza parties. Because I

have the best job in the world, I get to nab one of McCabe’s

pizzas he made for one of those parties: BBQ chicken with

homemade hoisin BBQ sauce, red onion, cilantro aioli, and

avocado—a daring selection of toppings. The crust is thin

and a little crispy around the edge, but the center is soft and

pliable, which McCabe calls “flatbread style.”

“The oven sets me apart,” he says. “Engineering a vessel that

you can serve food from really connects you with your craft,

with what you produce.” >>

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 69


The Pickup Powerhouse

“Making pizza is not new to me,” says Tim Veatch, the highenergy

chef behind Wayward Baking Co., also in Los Osos.

“I’ve been working with pizza, woodfired or otherwise, for the

duration of my career.”

Veatch’s career is storied, that’s for sure, with stints in fine

dining in the Bay Area as well as executive chef gigs across SLO

County. But even before COVID hit, Veatch left the line for

baking bread and pastries. Eventually, he offered these to the

public through pickup locations around the county and, later,

from his own bakery storefront in Los Osos. The irony, of course,

is that he never really opened the bakery to the public; it’s just a

commercial kitchen and pickup spot.

And now, Veatch is coming around full circle to pizza again. I

visit on his first pizza pickup night, and he’s already nearly sold

out. My pie of choice is the asparagus and pistachio pizza, made

with a mixture of high-gluten flour dough and garlicky white

sauce—but the types of pies change every week. He calls his

style “Neo-Neapolitan,” with a crust that’s soft in the middle but

sturdier around the edges than a true Neapolitan pizza, in part

due to the fact that he’s baking in a gas oven instead of a woodburning

one. The crust has a pleasing chew, and the flavors of the

cheese and toppings are subtle and refined. >>

70 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


Selling Paso

- by Miranda Battenburg

Selling Paso - by Miranda Battenburg

Over 20 years local experience

Miranda brings strong branding &

marketing to your listing

Berkshire Hathaway HomeSerivces knows great homes

Full service local brokerage

Complementary market analysis

Represents buyers and sellers

Quality properties

Miranda Battenburg

Realtor DRE#02131203

800 11th St.

Paso Robles CA 93446

805-712-1362

805-237-4700

miranda@sellingpaso.com

www.sellingpaso.com

©2021 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire

Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. ® Equal Housing Opportunity.

If your property is currently listed with a real estate broker, please disregard this offer. It is not my intention to solicit your listing.

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 71


Professor of Pizza

Ben Arrona has never been to Detroit, but you’d never know that

from eating the Detroit-style pizza he sells most Tuesdays from

his commercial kitchen in SLO. With a two-inch crust that’s piled

high with toppings, each Benny’s Kitchen pizza weighs nearly

seven pounds. Just don’t expect anything exotic.

“I do red sauce and standard toppings,” he says. “No white sauce,

no pesto, no artichoke hearts.” I ask him to make mine however he

wants and he gives me the works: pepperoni, sausage, onion, olives,

and a healthy dose of jalapenos. It is delicious.

But making pizzas is a detour for Arrona; while finishing his PhD

in Global and Imperial History at Oxford University in England,

COVID sent him back to SLO, his hometown.

“I started running Benny’s out of necessity after COVID hit,”

he says, describing how he leased his kitchen last fall after

making Detroit-style pizza for friends for years. All orders and

communication happen via a private Facebook group (which just

passed 4,000 members) wherein customers choose a pickup time.

On Tuesday evenings, the Benny’s Kitchen sees one hundred

people come in for their pies. And on Thursdays, Arrona can

be found selling his vacuum-sealed, par-baked pizzas at Liquid

Gravity in Paso Robles.

In the meantime, he sublets the kitchen to local caterers. “I work

two thirteen-hour days a week on pizza. Otherwise, I’m writing my

dissertation and teaching and trying to live my life.” SLO LIFE

72 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


I N D E P E N D E N T L I V I N g

A S S I S T E D L I V I N G

IT'S A NEW DAY & IT'S YOURS!

Avila Senior Living is a hidden gem with its home-like atmosphere

conveniently located in Downtown. Residents enjoy maintenance-free

TODAY & SPIN THE WHEEL

TOUR

MOVE-IN SPECIALS

FOR

805-242-4777

living, restaurant style dining and specialized activities and excursions.

Lic#405850034

TOURS PROVIDED 7 DAYS A WEEK

475 Marsh Street | San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 | AvilaSeniorLivingSLO.com

Smiling makes the world a better place and

Dr. Daniel is here to help bring out your best.

Give us a call to schedule your appointment today!

Specializing in Smiles

Dr. Daniel Family Orthodontics

1356 Marsh Street . San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-3105 . drdanielortho.com

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 73


| WINE NOTES

new to town

BY ANDRIA MCGHEE

R

people.

74 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021

eaching out to others has

become vital these days.

Since spring of last year,

neighbors have been getting

to know each other as

our lives have shifted to

being more at home. It’s a

primal need to connect to

other humans. It keeps us

balanced. Even the introverts

are screaming hellos across

the road to one another.

When you’re new to a

neighborhood during a

pandemic, it’s hard to meet

These wineries are the

hip new kids in town waiting

to meet everyone. They’ve

already spent years growing

grapes and making wine and

now they are ready to debut

them. This was not the year

they expected and they have

found themselves hunkered

down like the rest of the

world with a bunch of wine in

their lap. So read up on them,

check out their website, and

give them a call to set up a

wine tasting. They can’t wait

to meet you. >>

ANDRIA MCGHEE received

her advanced degree in

wines and spirits from

WSET in London and enjoys

travel, food, wine, and

exercise as a means to enjoy

those around her.


PEACE. COMFORT. HEALING.

Join our online Christian Science Church Services

on Zoom at

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/6596623579

Email us below if you would like the link.

Sunday Services

Join us on Sundays at 10 am.

Wednesday Testimony Meeting

Hear others share insights,

experiences, and healings they’ve had through

their prayer and practice of Christian Science.

Join us on Wednesdays at 7 pm.

First Church of Christ, Scientist

1326 Garden Street, San Luis Obispo

805-543-5853

christiansciencechurchslo@gmail.com

3076 Duncane Lane . San Luis Obispo

805 549 0100

Re-Imagine Retreat

www.GardensbyGabriel.com 805-215-0511 lic.# 887028

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 75


Timshel Vineyards // Vinho Verde // $20

Greg and Becca Thompson had always loved wine and

learned more as they traveled. Two of their children studied

viticulture and so they decided to combine their love of wine

with their children’s talent and start a winery. Their son, Nate

Thompson happily took the job as winemaker.

The quality of the wine shows his attentiveness. Nate worked

with many winemakers as well as growers. He has learned

that a combined close eye on the grapes in the field, as well

as a true winemaking approach in the cellar, works well. He

uses organic farming practices that are shown to produce high

quality wines. In the cellar of local favorite Filipponi Ranch

he tries to intervene as little as possible using low sulfur and

low pH for people sensitive to sulfites. With Taco Temple

nearby, a little taco and wine tasting is an easy pairing.

Though I loved his Syrah and Rose, the Vinho Verde

intrigued me. I enjoy trying different white wine varieties.

It’s noncommittal, you haven’t spent an arm and a leg on

the bottle, and you’re left with bright, great flavors and

fresh tastes. New flavors open up a world before your eyes.

My favorite are the flavors of green. This Portugese grape

says green right in its name. It’s the freshest version of

hiking in a forest, or maybe on the coast with a little unripe

peach, and perhaps pineapple. Very well balanced. As all

the wines are, it was a treat. Find their offerings at many

restaurants and from their winery. Reach out for a taste. I

think you’ll like your new neighbors.

RagTag Winery // Pinot Noir // $56

When you walk in the charming square in downtown Paso Robles you can try

many of the local wines and grab a bite to eat without having to spend time

driving around all day. Brother and sister team Jeff Huskey and Sarah Brewer

want to bring the same feel to downtown San Luis Obispo, hopefully opening

this spring.

Huskey has been working in wineries since he was a student at Cal Poly. His

sister, Brewer, a business brain, thought he was talented and put the idea out

there to start a winery together someday. Huskey wanted to be sure of his

abilities before embarking on his own, so he spent time working with Patrick

Muran at Niner Wine Estates and Chuck Mulligan at Harmony Cellars, before

finally deciding to go for it in 2017.

This is a rag tag bunch. They have collected a group of people with diverse

talents, ideas, and backgrounds to make this winery. Their goal is to produce the

best wine experience they can. It shows. If the same quality that goes into their

website and wine goes into their tasting room downtown, it should be fantastic.

I gravitated toward the Pinot Noir because the grapes from Greengate vineyard

they use consistently make great pinot noir. Rag Tag just hit it out of the park.

It may be a little steep in price but save your pennies, and you’ll be surprised

with tastes of raspberry and cherry with a finish as long as the waves out in

Pismo. Keep an eye out for the winery to open soon downtown across the street

from The Creeky Tiki. Check their website, or give them a call.

Our local community has a great way of connecting with each other. Extend

yourself to some new wineries and let’s bring these makers into our warm

sunny embrace. You’ll be happy you did. SLO LIFE

76 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


WIRELESS INTERNET FOR THE CENTRAL COAST

NO CONTRACTS . NO DATA LIMITS

INSTALLATION ONLY $99

805.556.4065 | peakwifi.com

Visit our kitchen and bath showroom for the remodel of your dreams—with the environment in mind.

Visit our kitchen

and bath showroom

In-House Designers

Custom Cabinets

Countertops

Wine Cellars

Flooring

Contractor’s License 940512

111 South Street

San Luis Obispo

(805) 543-9900

slogreengoods.com

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 77


| BREW

Sip

& Mix

BY BRANT MYERS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER OLSON

recently had a virtual sit down with Abe Stevens,

the founder, owner, chief mop operator, and more

importantly, the distiller at the Humboldt Distillery in

Fortuna. We chatted about the health of California’s

waterways, the versatility of sugar cane, carrot juice

bloody mary recipes, and why I like traditional rum

and colas so much. Stevens’ team sent me four bottles

of their flagship spirits, so I sat down with my flock

of Glencairn glasses as we walked through the history Iof distilleries in America and how his philosophy has shaped his

business model and is reflected in every bottle. Readers, please note

that I will do most anything for free alcohol, including waking up at

six in the morning to write an article after drinking straight hooch

for nearly two hours the day before.

As you’ve likely gleaned, Humboldt Distillery is located in Humboldt

County, a place notorious for one thing: Humboldt fog, an amazingly

creamy blue cheese. But we’re not here to talk about cheese. Maybe

go back a few pages and ask Jamie Lewis. Anyway, where were we?

Yes, Humboldt County where Stevens has a family history going

back five generations. He left there for college in Chicago where

he received degrees in chemistry and biochemistry before pursuing

a career in the pharmaceutical industry. So, if there’s anyone well

qualified to make a mean Painkiller it would be Stevens. He bounced

around various professions and eventually landed back on the lost

coast. Like most hobbyists in the alcohol game, he dreamed of doing

it professionally and that’s how Humboldt Distillery was born.

After chatting for some time, I was really impressed with Stevens’ philosophy

on sustainability, especially when it comes to preserving fresh and salt

water health. Being located between both, and utilizing their water from

old growth redwood forest watersheds, the distillery is eco-conscious in

their footprint while serving the community through the sourcing of local

ingredients and setting aside proceeds from each bottle sold to the California

Coastkeeper Alliance. I like that, it’s the same coastline we have here in SLO

County. I also like their bottle art, a lot. At first glance, I assumed it was just

a nod to their coastal location but the vibrant crab and pelican labels take on

a new meaning when you attach it to their conservation efforts. They want

to be clear, there is no crab in their vodka. I had a lobster saison once and

suggested he add crab sometime. I think there was an issue with our phone

connection, as it went silent for a bit afterwards.

I went through tasting two base spirits with

a variant of each. The first was their flagship

vodka made from organic certified sugar cane,

this neutral spirit has taken home many medals

including the Bartender Spirits Award Double

Gold and Vodka of the Year. I’ve gone through

a few vodka tastings in my career and this was

about as clean and neutral as they come. A great

compliment to any cocktail, or sipped casually

while wearing a fur coat in an ice bar, it was

smooth and didn’t have a lingering aftertaste I’m

accustomed to, a character that Stevens notes

comes from using sugar cane as opposed to >>

BRANT MYERS is a beer

industry veteran and

founder of SLO BIIIG, a

hospitality consulting firm.

78 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


CONSUMED

A PODCAST

Join SLO Life food columnist

Jaime Lewis for candid

conversations about life

and flavor with area eaters,

drinkers, thinkers & makers.

SPOTIFY

APPLE PODCASTS

LETSGETCONSUMED.COM

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 79


Next up, we tackle the rums, with the Original being

a small-batch 80 proof Gold Rum and the Spiced

Rum being an adjunct-based variation of the Original.

Humboldt is known for growing lots of things and,

unfortunately, sugar cane is not one, but they do source

it domestically from farms and mills in Florida and the

southern US. I was curious what form it arrives in and

was informed they get it as raw evaporated cane juice, a

product reminiscent of a popular brown sugar packet you

might find in a coffee shop, and the black plasma that is

pure molasses. Aged in American White Oak formerly

one-use bourbon barrels from Kentucky, the char inside

the barrel is what gives this rum its golden coloration.

I tried using the spiced rum in my afternoon rum and

cola but didn’t like it one bit. Funny though, because

sipping it neat I rather enjoyed the flavors. Finally able

to ask a professional the reason for this, Stevens ably

explained that the more common pirate-themed rums

rely heavily on artificial sweeteners and the cost effective

use of imitation vanilla. Well, thanks for ruining it for

me, but I guess ignorance is bliss. Since then, I’ve been

experimenting with the two rums into both traditional

and more innovative cocktails. If you’re feeling thirsty,

try my recipe for a Bee’s Knees:

BEE’S

KNEES

3 parts Original Gold Rum

1 part orange juice

1 part lime juice

1 jigger triple sec

Shake and strain into a fancy glass

the common grains used in most vodkas. I next tasted Humboldt’s Finest, a hemp

infused botanical spirit, that we most definitely can not legally call a gin as it relies

less on juniper berries and more on the aromatic terpenes of hemp. Hey, a beer term!

Terpenes are volatile oils found naturally in many foods and plants. This particular

one is myrcene, which is found in hops and is responsible for the peppery, spicy,

balsam fragrance in beer. I’m picking up a distinct raw carrot aroma and Stevens

confirms this then immediately tells me about making a carrot juice bloody mary. I’m

intrigued. If you are too, try this:

CARROT JUICE

BLOODY MARY

2 ounces Humboldt’s Finest

4 ounces carrot juice

2 tsp horseradish

2 dashes hot sauce

2 dashes Worcestershire sauce

1 pinch each celery salt and black pepper

Squeeze of lemon

I ended my conversation with Stevens asking about

future plans for the distillery and what trends he sees

in the future of distilled spirits. Humboldt Distillery is

hoping to double production in 2021 with over twelve

thousand cases projected. He will continue to protect

the water, which is so vital to his operations through

continued sourcing of local ingredients, adherence to his

organic distilling process, and use of organic certified

sugar cane and spices. He really threw me a curveball

when I asked where spirits were

headed and he waxed on about

brandy, specifically apple brandy,

making a resurgence like its

1821. He gets to experiment in

his facility and some of these get

to be enjoyed by locals, so maybe

we’ll be seeing his apple brandy

on shelves soon. But in the

meantime, be on the lookout for

bold woodcut designs of crabs

and pelicans next time you’re in

the liquor aisle. So, let’s raise a

glass to the towering redwoods

and toast to the health of our

coastlines, and to ourselves.

Cheers!

SLO LIFE

JENNIFER OLSON is a

food, portrait, and lifestyle

photographer based in San

Luis Obispo County with her

husband and two sons.

80 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021


smart, eclectic, art to live on

3850 RAMADA DRIVE

SUITE B2

PASO ROBLES . CA

(805) 434-3438

TEMPLETONGLASS.COM

1599 Monterey Street | 805.544.5900 | sloconsignment.com

(at the corner of Grove Street, across from Pepe Delgados)

Open Tuesday - Saturday 10-5pm

Attention,

Small Business Owners...

Looking for a professional, convenient, affordable, and fully furnished

individual office with conference room access?

Individual Offices & Suite Rentals

• Affordable month-to-month rent

• Conference Rooms, Break Room, Copy Center

• Ideal location with easy freeway access

• On-site parking

• High Speed Internet and Utilities included

Let us manage the details,

so you can manage your business.

SAN LUIS

BUSINESS CENTER

WE HELP SMALL BUSINESSES GROW!

Call to schedule your tour

of available spaces!

(805) 540-5100

4251 S. Higuera Street | Suite 800 | San Luis Obispo

APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 81


| HAPPENINGS

Culture & Events

CaliforniaAesthetic3D

A celebration of the California spirit through

sculpture, CA3D features work created with

elements of wood, stone, metal, and glass—

earthly materials that yield to an unearthly

aesthetic captured through frozen emotion.

Curated by wood sculptor Ken Wilbanks and

glass artist Stephanie Wilbanks, the exhibit

features California sculptors Carl Berney,

Peter Charles, Mecki Heussen, George

Jercich, Ron Roundy, and Ken Wilbanks.

Through May 3 // studiosonthepark.org

Broken Nature

The Morro Bay Art Association hosts a

mixed-media exhibit celebrating Earth Day

April 22 and encouraging artistic expression

in textile, encaustic, oil, watercolor, acrylic,

photography, and other media. The free event

asks “Can we mend the divides in our broken

society or find strategies to unbreak the cycle

to heal ourselves and the planet?” and seeks to

illustrate living sustainably within the earth’s

finite resources.

April 8 - May 24 // artcentermorrobay.org

Mid-State Fair Market

The Paso Robles Event Center is

hosting a new monthly outdoor

shopping experience. Located in the

Oak Tree Lot on Riverside Avenue at

the Event Center, each day represents

an opportunity to find antiques, new

and used treasures, and handmade crafts

from local artisans. Find apparel, beauty

products, and more for home, garden, or

kitchen. Best of all, it’s free.

April 16 & May 14 // midstatefair.com

Design Village 2021

Cal Poly’s College of Architecture and

Environmental Design hosts its annual daylong

competition encouraging students to

“learn by doing.” This year titled “Perspective,”

the virtual event is free for all to go online

and enjoy digitally-designed structures

created by students to be built in Poly

Canyon. You can vote on the People’s Choice

award, follow the judging, and at the end of

the day watch the final awards ceremony.

April 17 // events.calpoly.edu

Brew at the Zoo

This annual event has transformed

into “Brew at the Zoo At-Home

Fest.” Purchase tickets online and

receive a fourteen-pack of craft beer

from California and Oregon brewers

delivered to your front door no later

than two days before the event. Then

you’ll receive a link so you can tunein

to experience live behind-thescenes

animal tours with experienced

zookeepers, enjoy fun facts from your

brewmasters, and listen to tunes from

some of your favorite local bands.

April 24 // charlespaddockzoo.org

The May Flower Initiative 2021

Downtown SLO presents the second

round of its successful public art project,

The May Flower Initiative, launched last

year during the COVID shutdown. It’s

back this year to brighten downtown San

Luis Obispo with colorful floral designs

painted on vacant storefront windows.

New for 2021: creative place-making and

expanded décor.

April 29-May 31 // downtownSLO.com

Wine 4 Paws

For the thirteenth year in a row, more than

fifty SLO County businesses will donate a

percentage of their sales to Woods Humane

Society the second weekend in April. Pick your

option: ordering from home or venturing out

safely with a reservation and mask in hand.

No tickets needed—just support one of the

participating wineries or retailers, and you’ll be

helping homeless pets, “One glass at a time.”

82 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021

Modeling Central Coast Railroads

Fiesta in a Bottle

Kick off your summer in Avila Beach

on Memorial Day weekend at the ninth

annual Tequila Festival at Avila Beach

Golf Resort. Featuring live music,

tequila tastings, food for purchase, and

free parking, a portion of ticket sales

benefits The Rossi Foundation. Check

out the optional VIP seminar hosted by

Cantera Negra.

April 10-11 // woodshumanesociety.org

Michael Burrell explores the hobby and

craft of modeling Central Coast railroads

using photos, video, and audio commentary

in this hour-long virtual event sponsored by

the San Luis Obispo Railroad Museum.

April 24 // slorrm.com

May 29 // eventbrite.com SLO LIFE


APR/MAY 2021 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | 83


LUXURY

with

STYLE

Lorem ipsum

Lorem ipsum

HAVEN PROPERTIES Distinctive Collection by Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate ®

offers the service and market experience you'd expect from a brand whose legacy was

built upon a passion for the home. Bringing together LOCAL knowledge and experience

with the global marketing and media network of the most trusted brand in real estate, it's

easy to see how HAVEN PROPERTIES is the clear choice for your distinctive listing.

84 | SLO LIFE MAGAZINE | APR/MAY 2021

Lorem ipsum

BHGREHAVEN.COM

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines